Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Coshocton News Newspaper Archive: March 17, 1946 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Coshocton News

Location: Coshocton, Ohio

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Coshocton News, The (Newspaper) - March 17, 1946, Coshocton, Ohio                               EATHER Temperatures Satur- 69 at 2 p.m.; low 45 at 4 a. m. THE COSHOCTOIV NEWS Devoted to the of Cothocton and Vicinity w v Vol. I, No. 55 Established 1946 Coshoc-tup. Olno. Sundav. March 17. 1946 Eight Cents tfoftei Prett Newt and Central Prtu Phone 1900 Vet Imagines He Committed f Murder On Bus CHICAGO (UP) A dis- charged war veteran tried for the second time Saturday to confess a slaying which ap- parently never happened. George Fairbanks, 23. Row- ley, Mass.. walked into a po- lice station and announced: "I want to confess a sex kill- ling." said he had killed a four- vear-old boy on a bus near Green River, Wyo.. but Wyo- rnmg authorities said no slay- ing had been reported. Last Tuesday Fairbanks walked into the North Platte. Neb., police station and said hr> was wanted for murder. Ho was released when investigation failed to reveal a slavinc. "I've had dreams before, but never anything like this." Fan- bank? told police. "There's something in my mind If something happened, I did it." Capt. Jerry I.ooney of the Chicago police department said he thought the youth might be a victim of war nerves. Fairbanks said he boarded a bus in San Franciscn last weekend enroute homo to He said he drank heavily the first day. During the nicht. he said, he walked down the aisle of the darkened bus to where the four-year-old boy was seated with his mother and sister. Ho took the child back tn his seat, he said, abused him and then strangled him. Fairbanks said he put the child's bodv on the floor, cnv- ered it with an overcoat and went to sleep. The next morning, he he told the bus driver the child was asleep on the floor. The child's body was taken off the bus at Green River, he said. Fairbanks told police he con- tinued the journev to North Platte. Neb where he was taken off the bus and ques- tioned by authorities. He said he was released after two days. Fairbanks said he was dis- charged from the Army last October after five years with the llth armored division in Germanv and France. yrnes Rejects Churchill Anglo-American Alliance V V V Oil Internationalization Seen Solution of Iran Case British Believed Ready to Initiate Plan To Relieve Pressure on Tiny Nation Vi'i tn he ccin- of Iran's oil Britain i. ni sidering a proposal for internationali-rd cr resources as a possible move toward solution of the crisis with Russia. v. charger, hy ;i. that Iran had Seek Brutal Murderer Young Kentucky Wile Is Beaten To Death Hoover Asks Aid of All 'Invisible Guest' Invited to Dinner NEW Former President Herbert Hoover has called upon the government to take stronger action in reducing livestock consumption of bread grains so that larger food supplies may be sent to 500.000.000 famine threatened people in other coun- tries. "I fear it is too late to save all the starving people." Hoover said in a nation-wide broadcast. "Our purpose is to save the last one possible." He praised housewives and res- taurants for following his recom- mendations last week to use less wheat and fats. But he said his recommendation as honorary ad- viser to the emergency famine committee that a transfer of pow- ers be granted to secretary of agriculture Clinton Anderson as head of the committee had not been followed. Anderson, he said, needed great- er powers "which would make him a real food administrator capable of stopping the human food now consumed by livestock." In Atlantic Citv. the food board reporting to UNRRA urged that livestock be slaughtered on a scale in North America to con- serve bread grains, and called up- on Argentina to entend her ex- to .our piW i r'S." 2 sr-sr1 "rtke aulomotiv' Thp suggested British move coin the Soviet government newspaper, repeatedly violated the 1921 Russn-Iran agreement cover- ing oil and other concessions in northern Iran in an effort to embroil Russia and the great powers in disputes. The British proposal which was being discussed in high quarters was first hint of a move to break thp deadlock which has arisen over failure of the Soviet to withdraw her troop? from I.OUISY1M.K. KV (UP) northern Iran by March 2 as she Pnhre Saturday maht were with- pronvspd in the Anglo-Iranian- out ,-.ny tansib'e clues in the mys- Russian treaty. tery o'.avinc; of attractive 19-ycar- At present the only oil prodtic- old Mrs. Frances Allison, riime tion "is under control of the- Anglo- store employe and bride of a year. Iraninn Oil Co., in which the British government is a large shsre-holder. The Russians, eager to acquire the might nave beaten his bride to UAW VOTING TO RATIFY SETTLEMENT fiur.-tinr.cci her husband, 21-yf ar-cild Dewey Allison, a fur- niture rivnii.iny employe, but later released him when he was unable tn shed ar.v liL'ht. on the identity more oil for their expanding m- n who dustrial plant, have been pressing Iran for months for similar con- cessions in nnrthern Iran. Desire to exploit northern Iran nil re- 'ourcos is believed to be a factor in th" stubborn Soviet refusal tn null her troops out. It was understood the British plan for internationalization of Iran's oil would place responsi- bility for administration of the There oil reserves in an international Praj hodv. presumably under Allison told police he had ar- rived fit dnwntown apart- niTt about 3 m. Saturday after havinc been "away from home" j all I Alison told police the only; thing missing from the apartment wns Sin which his wife- possessed. no pyid'-nce of a gen- of house such Warns U.S. Ready for Force If Needed to Keep Peace Stirring Speech ChitUs Russia for Threats To Get What Soviet Nation Wants NF.W of State .lamps F Byrnes Saturday mghl roir-rted military allumro with Great Britain and declared the United instead would use its military power to support (lie principles of the United Nations charter. In c'H'ert ho rejected Winston Churchill's proposal for an Anplri-Ameru an "1'rnU-mal reiterated Friday and at the same time eluded Soviet Russia for ap- parent willingness tn use force to pet wtvit she wants. In to tin Socialv of the Friendly of Si P.itnck. B% cxpn-'H'd al.irm al the rapid ion of America's A-bomb Test Run Success Dress Rehearsals Reveal All Ready A WIDE SEARCH is being conducted for Suzanne Froedtere. ahove, 16-year-old daughter of a millionaire Milwaukee malt manufacturer, who disappeared from the Milwaukee campus of Edpewood, a fashionable Cath- olic school. Her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Kurlis R. Froedlere, ,are reported hurrving to Milwaukee from Florida, where they have been wintering. ,'irmed forces at a time when U S commitments abroad call for mil- itary might j Urging extension of thp draft and prompt adoption of a uni-; FOSWFLL. N M versal military training program, hjnd a wartime veil of secrecy, Byrnes said i the U. S Army and Navy haf "Whilr- other nations remain staged off the coast, of southern i armed, thr United St.-ifPS. in the i California full-dress rehearsal i interest of world peace, cannot Of the atomic homb-versus-war- i disarm i ship test. Conceding that the people have Twelve B-29 superforts based in a right to knnw tn what purposes New Mexico roared out over the this country's reserve military Pacific Ocean off San Diego to power might one day be put, drop on a small naval vessel an Byrnes said "the answer is simple, i exact but far less powerful replica "The Untied he said, [of the atomic bombs which forced "is committed to the of j Japan to surrender. the charter of the United Na- Should the occasion arise, our military strenqlh will be used to support the purposes and of the charter." Declaring that this country "lonks to the United Nations as The bomb used in the test was described as a "dummy bomb" and "not atomic." It wns the final test before their transfer to mid-pacific for the men and equipment, of "operations joint Army-Navy cx- !the path to enduring peace." he exploding of _an at- l- omic bomb over Bikjm in the done by .._... as would have ,TT_. T, United Nations, would insure that thieves but there was evidence of locals gets.a better share of a terrif1c strugfile by Mrs. Allison DETROIT table an invisible GLENNON LAID TO REST IN OWN CRYPT In "what was apparently the ploitation of these resources, first test of the referendum, workers at the Cadillac plant in Detroit late Saturday voted 1.200 to two in favor of the national agreement. The vote was an- nounced by Dave Miller, presi- dent of Cadillac local 22 of the UAW. Mass meetings at all but a few Heller Workers to Return To Jobs Monday Morning Marshall islands: i announcement of the INDIANS RIOT DESPITE BID FOR FREEDOM Coshoclon Employes of Timken Plants In Zanesville Go Back to Their Jobs ST. LOUIS. Mo. remains of John Cardinal Glen- non rests today in the chapel of widp be approved BOMBAY   rose from an humble Irish be- remain on strike until their plan'- Tnf, i. All Timken plants in the s'ste said th" night clothing have been idle since Jan. 2! anri Feh It Iso urged no workers return to party 1 heir jobs until a maiority ff the weirorned British Prime Minis break of rioting came as India ar.d disheveled. leaders generally i r- i n anri confidence the rank-and-file frePdom -.ana ratifv overwhelmingly. Moslem leaders, however, met ginning to the rank of a prince level problems were resolved. of the Roman Catholic church, al preceded the interment Satur- their ,___ day corporation's employes ter clement R Attlee's offer of The mass, although celebrated has approved the national con- Indian mdependence as a sten in by the apostolic delegate to the t t. the right direction. They called United States Archbishop Aleto Delegates to the conference, in- on thrjr flowers to avoid acts Cicignani. was the same as that eluding top negotiators for the nf mp-n that their for a priest. international union, expressed is on "the threshold of Some 20.000 of the clergy ana [fv overwheimlngl faithful, including the cardinals of New York, Chicago and De- troit, crowded into the huge cathedral to pay their last re- spects to the archbishop who had his archdiocese for 42 m _ said the Moslem noting Thursday in Hy- derabad, capital of the largest Indian principality, began as a protest agajnst demolition bv state authorities of a mosque built without official permission of the new out- the voung woman wore was torn the Heller Brothers plant closed down eight weeks ago Marshall Warns World Peace Hinges on Manchurian Status "most recorded event in history" announced by Brig. Gen. Roger M Rnmey, commanding Plant in New-i their jobs Monday at the same th'al they want general of the air force section wages thc-y received when the he taken hy force 'instead explosion to he toucnea strike was called, pending a com- nuking claiirs the basis nff m MaV over a 8uinca fleet for social nego't tat ir-iv.''1 j of 07 worships. Perhaps thinking of the Soviet "This is our fin.il American re-   send three-man "teams churia to put. into Killed on Crossing VAN A man identified a? George F Cornelius ONE KILLED, 122 HURT IN BLAST One person was killed and 122 injured today when an unidentified "rookie pnliceman accidentally drew the pin from a hand grenade and then tossed it into .111 ammunition stockpile. Twenty-nine were injured ge- riouslv German c i v headquarters where the accident occurred was 2 That picked units from the of Chicago was killed when his of people? of manv coun'- n e s e was hit bv a Pennsylvania fought in rir.w" licit tnuglicnod s prcsum- Am.enrnn en over rnilrond train Saturday night at O1-fu] a crossing four miles v. e.s; Wert. -.f Van Education Goes Blind NEW YORK (UP) Dr To Seek New Schools MARTINS FERRY (UP) The school hoard today had voted to put a bond issue on the the Chinese These off are not expect mg- that the Soviet union will make som0 move soon to oase the tension. Any breik in Soviet union s'lenre would hr'ip The return of Soviet ambafsador Andre; A Groir.--'ko to Washmg- ten IF- evpeetor! to Ir-ad tc. an ITI- mfrii.Ttr series of conferences with Secretary of State James F. Byrnes Cnmcidcnlally wit'1 by k of a res- TORNADOES KILL SEVEN, INJURE 30 Bv United Prtss At least seven dead, over 30 in- jured, more than 175 homes des- troyed or damaged and uncounted thousands of dollars damage "'ere Nicholas Murray Butler. 83-year- May 7 primary ballot to provide olution calling on Russia to get left Saturday in the wake of a president emeritus of Colum- money for two new grade schols. tornado that cut a straight path nja university, revealed Saturday a high school and other building across south central Alabama Fri- ne ;s totally blind. improvements. __________ day night and early Saturday.------.....-----.....----------------------------- The high winds, accompanied by a deluge of ram, appeared to gather dangerous force around Hflttieshurg, Miss., and played out along the south Georgia coast Saturday night. The bureau said that local women was injured. The motorist stopped his car "tornadic conditions" appear ta not seriously, when struck hy an after striking the woman and re- hive passed I automobile at Seventh and p0rteH. the accident to police. He ably thp greatest mdivimni killer Heaviest damage and casual- Chestnut streets At p. rn Sat- w not in the history of the world ties were centered in six Alabama urdsy. _ Hoess was the miss'ng man at counties. Mrs. E. H. Sproull. 707 Lo- Afrs Sproull was removen to nf At the same time a flash flood rust Street, was in Citv hnsntal. the- in People's ambu- Kramer, "the b.-.-i--! of Re-Uon v en f-om small streams' in the suffering from injuries about the lancp. was treated by Dr Kramer rcpea'-Hlv accused him cent Meridian area sent water rolling legs and bodv. Pmer of the T. F McAllister, who is to take of gassing millions of Germans Woman Injured When Struck By An Automobile Saturday Night Horror Camp Executor Caught By British 'seri'r'c'of Man- ffect agrr-f- ments on ir.r.. Jap'in- rse rlir.armament. restoration of communications and reorganisa- tion of the Chinese army teams v. ill ir.r ludr- an a Chinese nationali.-t. ar.d a Cni- nese communist represent.itr -e 4 Tha' Air.c r i c a n political leaders possibly do no' urner stand vital establishment of May Continue flying COLUMBUS _ fUP> Ohm State Untversitv will he offered six ne-'.- courses in pri- mary and flight train- ing during the spring quarter cinr.mc March 2fi. airport super- retary of interior at visor E H Briscoc said today. day. spirit of will i "We musl have patience, nt well firmness." he said, to- ferring to big Jhree troubles in j Iran and Manchuria. "We miift krep our feet on the ground." "We cannot afford to our tempers Rvnes a.-kri tha' the the not an hv but American victo.-v hut ,h- moM managed to escape before the. grenade explo- sion igiiitfd the author- ities s.nd The headquarters build- ing 15 in the Russian sector. Most of the victims were paS- sershv, arcnid.ng tn police. All were Germans shaken and windows shat'crod in a wide area Sonv- Russian soldiers were stationed nearby, but none was in- jured. tries welded ogother in a pow- Ameri.vinf But .-idde.i th.-i are proirl fiat I'my cn "migii'l.v" to victorv in and "plavr-d the defeat of Ku: Krug Ready WASHINGTON .Tului? A Krug will b" !r poc 11 a m Mon- '.______ New High School Band Uniforms will Have Naiiy Appearance Seeking Two Veis Who Disappeared With Preiiy Girl By DOTTIE HAMMOND black tiou Coshocton high school band members members will out. in fancy they rcallv .ir shorter band KANSAS Mo. Kansas City police Saturday night are a' night They new military Style uniforms next prefer peace Success of Chinas pres- ent efforts depends on actions BRITISH ARMY HEAD QUAR- Of other nTions. hut the Unit-H TKRS. a unified ar.d stable Chinese gov- ernment is to the fu'ure of world 'all It wax decided tn buy single breasted military stvle suits ar an uniforms. assembly of students, faculty and Several broadcast a nationwide, pickup order for two servicemen, a sail- The Vradditirvnal school colors or and a soldier, believed to have of black and red remain m the kidnapped a 17-year-old Blonde todiv after a round Ol ever GF.RMANV British agents captured Rudolph material assistance Hoess, former ron-.mar.dart of the concentration camp, nine for the man they prob- Sta'es "is best able to render China others interested in suits Frf- dav afternoon at the school Th" present and were to the audience. Thev r. Patterson. San ford giri early nf the co-n- Jackson night funds for the The girl. Charlotte is last seen shortly before dawn Campbell, Bivd, Mr? year-old wide, black leather Tr cfT braid on the shoulder The Stipes iwav the nr-xt few months are of 't remendons importance to the future of China and "to the future peace of the wnrld Marshall made no mention of suits will cost approximately the Soviet union's in the Far each Fa" but his guarded remarks A the assembly Supt A r'a'" K Pence said "We have had our u-ere ?nown to the stud en's and Kansas Cit> approxi- Saturday in an automobile rented of last night. 19- new suits have grev trousers -.nth 'ntrndue-e a black stripe down the side. were A -ingle breasted red Jackets with Mrs Lester and sil- Ralph Everly and Mrs. Bernard The soldier and sailor arovt Herman Breitenbach. ier and sailor dr Charlotte Bm- C. combmations nf and s'vles the at two clubs directed at over anrarent re- t Lafayette route 1. McAllister, who is to take of passing as Heinncl trttion camp administrator. efforts to raryp out a Russi fold Li ison. chief of the youth bur Kg" low" .Teas auT, was Paul E West _ X-ray today the Heinrich of mf hience Vn northeast band tt." i extent of the injuries. 4 ity that the present modeled the new f r NEWSPAPER!   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication