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Circleville Herald Newspaper Archive: March 23, 1931 - Page 1

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Publication: Circleville Herald

Location: Circleville, Ohio

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   Circleville Herald (Newspaper) - March 23, 1931, Circleville, Ohio                                782 Office THE ORCLEVILLE HERALD WEATHtt Number 69. CIRCLEVILLE, OHIO, MONDAY, MARCH WELLKNOWNCOUTY MAN TRIES T O TAKE OWN LIFE WITH GUN John Barthelmas, 70, Re- ported in Serious Condi- tion in Berger Hospital SHOT UNDER HEART Act Is Witnessed by Wife and Son's Family John Barthelmas, aged 70, well Ttnown Pickaway-co farmer, is in a serious condition at Berger hos- pital suffering from a aelf-inflict- ed wound from a .22 caliber rifle. Mr. Barthelmas shot himself on the porch at his home in Washing- ton-twp, three miles from this city. on the old Tarlton road, at p. m. Sunday in what is thought a fit of despondency. He underwent an operation Mon- morning at the hospital for removal of the ImTlett which fentered his body just below the Although he remains cH- 'ttcal, Berger hospital attaches re- port that he has a good chance to survive his wound. Mr. Barthelmas had been in the city and went home Sunday after- noon. Ha went into the bedroom at his home and apparently went to bed. His son, Arthur Barthelmas and family, of E. Franklin-st, were spending the afternoon at the home Mrs. Barthelmas. At p.m. Arthur and his family started to leave the house to go home and had entered their automobile. The elder Mr. Barthelmas came to the kitchen door of the house and said everybody." All looked around him goodby when Mrs. Arthur Barthelmas ob- served that he had a gun in his hand. He pointed the rifle to bis chest fired before anyone could reach his side. He fell back into the kitchen badly injured. Dr. D. V. Courtright was sum- moned and the Mader Ebert atur- -caUed_and.Mx. BEGIN PROBE IN PRISON BLAZE COLUMBUS, O. Mar. Franklin-co grand jury today be- gan an investigation to determine whether it has enough evidence to indict any "of several convict sus- pects for starting the Easter Mon- day fire at the Ohio Pententiary in which 322 prisoners were burn- ed to death. Joseph D. Clear, of the state fire marshal's office, who was assigned to investigate the cause of the fire almost immediately, was one of the principal witnesses. SPRING VACATION AT O. S. U. ENDED COLUMBUS, Spring vacation which started Sat- urday, Mar. 14, ended today tor Ohio State university stu- dents. The final lap of the 1930- 31 school year was scheduled to be- gin Tuesday morning with the op- ening of spring quarter classes. The quarter will end with the beginning of the commencement season Sat- urday, June 6, when hundreds of graduates return for annual alumni day ceremonies. Fight In State Assembly Seen Writers Battle at Banquet COLUMBUS, O., Mar. WiL.h hut three short weeks to get desir- able legislation enacted and unde- sirable legislation diplomatically erased from the thoughts of ils supporters, the general assembly returned to the state capital today resolved to work cooperatively but well aware of impending fights on two important topics steel and highways. One battlecry was sounded by Rep. Charles H. Jones (R) of Jack- son, when he announced that he will lead a determined opposition to the Whittemore bill through which he thinks the Youngstown Sheet Tube-Bethlehem steel mer- ger controversy has been brought to the state legislature for a ver- dict. TANGLE THREATENED The threatening house and se- nate tangle over a highway pro- gram seemed, to be ready to break out of the state highway into, the tiieimas was rushed to the tal where he was given Immediate attention. J The son Monday blamed intoxl- liquor for his father's act. said he had been in town Sat- urday evening and had been feel- ing well. Later in the evening, he said, he obtained some whiskey and was placed in the city jail. He was released Sunday afternoon and went to hia home where he at- tempted to take his life. AGEDASHVILLE RESIDENT WES Mother of Atty. George W. Morrison Taken by Apo- plexy Monday A. M. __ of-''defender! Both problems and a score of others must be solved withia three weeks because, on April 10, as, has been decreed by both houses, th'e lagislature will adjourn for 17 days after vhich it will retum_aere to take up two problems only taxation and the budget. The bill which Representative Jones is opposing with so much sincerity would alter an existing law which prohibits minority stockholders from voting or shar- ing in dividends during- litigation over a proposed merger. If amendments suggested in the bill bjr Senator Frank E. Whitte- more of Akron were passed the minority stockholders in Lhe Youngstown Sheet and Tube Cor- poration would be able to regam voting- power and draw dividends from worth of stocks at once, Jones said. HIGHWAY QUESTION Senate leaders advocating a se- of the senate's secondary hignway proposition. WULUMSPORT NAN IS TAKEN r' Mra- Miranda Morrison, aged 88, mother of Attorney G. W. Morrison, died at her home in Ashville Monday at 7 a. m. Apo- was the immediate cause of I death. Mrs, Morrison was the widow of James Morrison who passed away 30 years ago. She was a native of Ross-co and was the daughter of Wffliam and Elizabeth Jones Dresbach. Besides the son, G. W. Morrison, she is survived by a daughter, Mrs. Rolland McCrillis of Nor- walk and one half-brother, Alfred Dresbach of Kingston. Funeral arrangements in charge of R F. Schlegel of Ashville, have not been completed. --------------o--------------. Harold E. Tootle, 26, Father of Three Children, Dies Sunday Morning. Harold E. Tootle, aged 26, well known resident of Williamsport, passed away at his home Sunday at 2 a. m. after a lingering illness. He was the son of James M. and Sarah Slager Tootle and was born July He was united in mar- riage to Ellen Arledge and to this union were born three children, Robert, Milton and Mary. Besides his wife and children, he is sur- vived by_ two brothers, Earl of Tellowbiid and Neal of Whisler. Funeral services will be held at Brown's Chapel Tuesday at 2 p. m. with Rev. Swearingen of Williaras- port officiating. Burial will be in the adjoining cemetery by C. K. Hill, Williamsport. DEERCREEK TWPL'AD WINS HIGHEST MARK IN TEST FOR SENIORS TERWILLIGER AT KIWANIS MEETING Meeker Terwilliger, district-gov- ernor of Ohio Rotasgr "clubs, will I be the speaker at the Kiwanis j club meeting at the Boggs Hotel Monday at p. turnout is expected. m. A good __________ Theodore DreiderTief noted "American author, loomed up as the heavyweight champion of American letters as result ofa bare-fist the exclusive Metropolitan Club of New York, with Sinclair the Nobel prize winner, whose remarks on plagiarism to have roused the author of "American Tragedy" to action. DROVE WHILE DKUNOELD Three Local Men Arrested By City Police; Other News of Courts Given. Three persons, allegedly intoxi- cated automobile drivers, were ap- prehended by the city police de- partment and the sheriff's office over the week-end with the result that two of the men were lined by Mayor B. T. Hedges and the third was to be given a hearing Monday SIX CHILDREN DIE IN BLAZE Ashes Left of Farm House In 'Which Children Die; Nine Children Remain. Federal Farm Board Now Makes Announcements to End Stabilization MUCH MONEY IS LOST Board Turns About-face Under New Leader OLD COINS ARE MISSING, CARD TELLSPOUCE Valuable Coins Taken as Furniture is Being Mov-. ed; Police Investigate HOLDERNESS, N. H.. Mar. Oflt of the ashes of a little frame farm house, evidence of the Sun- day tragedy which took the lives of seven of the sixteen children of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Avery, today rose the sympathy of neighbors tofthe- aid of _thjr stricken family. y the entire state were expected ttFSei joiore confident about defying wish- es expressed by the house in its passage of the Secrest-Bostwick bill after a declaration by highway department leaders house bill would deprive the state of federal road aid. The house last week by a big vote passed the Secrest-Bostwick funds used for road purposes Heedless of house action and in- dicating that it was unafraid, tne senate highways committee appro- ved a. counter-proposal by Senator Walter G. Nickels (R) of Naw Philadelphia by which a Secondary highway system would be develo- ped from gasoline funds and in- creased auto license receipts. The house bill will go to the se- nate committee for consideration this week, a committee headed by Senator Nickels. SUNDAY SHOWS A vote on the Marshall bill to legalize Sunday movies and repeal an anticipated blue-law already disregarded in a majority of Ohio counties will be taken in the sen- ate Tuesday if the calender is fol- lowed. Definite fixing of a date fofr the first hearing on the Norton redts- Earl Moore was fined and coats Monday morning on a charge of operating a motor vehicle while intoxicated Saturday night when the Ford car he was driving colli- dede with the Ford belonging to Fred Fissell, Jr. Both cars were damaged considerably. The Ford Moore was driving was not his thus his drivers 'license could not be revoked but Mayor Hedges took his privilege to drive a car away for six months. March Barnes, E. Main-st exten- sion, furnished bond for pay- ment of a fine of and costs to- talling assessed when ne pleaded guilty to driving while n- toxicated It is necessary for T.fr. Barnes to drive his car in ierUess' school, was utilized ES temporary shelter for tne remain- ing nine children and their parents. Friends donated clothing, bedding and furnishings. The victims of the fire were, Sterle, 20, George, 14, Fred, 11, Harry, 10, Milton, 5, Daisy, 4, and Joseph, 5 months. It was believed the first staried from a spark from the kitchen stove. DETROIT, Mar. nine-year old girl was burned to death, three other persons were seriously inju- red and 40 people, including 25 children, were forced to flee to the streets in night clothing todav his 1 when a two-alarm fire swept an work so his license was not revok- Alger-ave apartment house WASHINGTON, Mar. nouncement by the federal farm board that government funds are not going ue tnrown into the Chicago wheat pit to stabilize pri- ces on the 1931 crop was interpre- ted here today as marking the end of the great governmental experi- ment in the wheat-buying business. Already gorged with wheat which it is unable to digest or dn- pose of, except at enormous mone- tary loss, the board, under its nsw chairman, James C. Stone, has de- cided upon a radical about-face m the policy it pursued under the di- rection of Alexander H. Legge. CARRIED WARNING Boiled down to essentials, board's announcement carried to tne growers the Wunt warning that they can no longer look to the government to take the surplus off the market m order to peg pri- flies wit! in reducing thei? ccresge so Gat 1931 will not produce a further un- manageable surplus. The effect of this warning asd the new policy remains to be seen. But on all sides today it was ac- cepted that the board's action would serve to accelerate a de- mand in the new 72nd Congress for trial of the debenture or equal- ization fee schemes of dealing with the wheat situation. It is a pros- pect and a situation that bodes little peace for the Hoover admin- istration, which came into power two years ago on the promise of solving the farm riddle which has plagued every administration ainca the war. Stabilization operations John D. Corcoran Ekvoi Points Higher Than Opponent, Saltcreek tad 31 IN EXAMINATIONS Valuable coins were stolen from Harry Gard, E. Main-st confec- tioner, Saturday night, according to a report made to the city police department. Gard was moving rom Main-st to E. Franklin-st and had the coins in a cabinet which was left outside the build- ing while other furniture was be- ing arranged. He says that when he went to look for the coins they were gone. The denominations of the coins were one gold piece; two J5 gold pieces; two 1893 Columbia 50 cent pieces; two 1878 Columbia >0 cent pieces; nine quarters, one 1899, two 1S93, one 1860 and one 1850. Police began an Investigation of the theft but aa yet no arrests have been made. --------------0-------------- ed. John Sabine was to be given a hearing this afternoon on a simi- lar charge It is charged that Sa- bin struck a parked car Court-st Saturday nighL RELIEF PLANE THOT WRECKED Frauds Aloyi Lynch? M OST every body round about Knows Mister Francis Lynch He's hitting' close to fifty-two, Not more though, that's a ctnch. Was born right here in CirdeviOe And unless in hia car It's safe to say if you waat Frank He won't be very far. t; bottles Coco-Cola And also on UK aide cre's numerous other soft drinks Disposes of beside. Been in this game a long, long lime, Two decades at the worst. So Frank Aloysious Lynch you'll say By this time knows bis thirst. He's married, in the Country dab The Elks and C. of C. Athletic Club and maybe more, Oh yes, the Rotary. Last year was county chairman (Perhaps you know) Red Cross. When be quit pliyla' baseball Toe fane aore a loal tricting plan probably wfll be set by Senator Joseph N- Ackerman (R) of Cleveland, chairman of Ui2 committee on elections and federal relations, on his return tonigat. The hearing is expected to be set for Tuesday or Wednesday. HOOVER REACHES PORTO RICO TODAY ABOARD U. S. S- ARIZONA, March his first real vaca- tion since taking office, President Hoover, arrived at Peace. Porto Fuco aboard the U. S. S- Arizona, at a. m. Eastern Standard Time today. A short while after the Arizona 1 dropped anchor. Governor Theodore w   men took part in the killing, according to police Besides the four men in a stna.1 roadster who nddled Ger.aro with InvesU- 20 out bond. ges of first degree murder today! cuiture given duricg were lodged against Louis Johns, j -nnnter quarter at Ohio Stale .jr. 25. an3 William Gibbons. 22. versity. The enrollment of i m connection with the slaying cf -seas more three ticc Henry Gay. 90 year Civil War a Vear ago Those awarded certlt- leraa ai Car.nelville last March 7. cates for completing Arraigned on the charges tins eluded the foUowing from Cireto- morning the pair pleaded not guil- J vUte: ly. They were held without bond clarence R. Bamhart, Ralpb K. for a preliminary hearing Himrod. Howard A. Orr. Harry day msming Jewell J. J. Smith, E- Totbcrt The murder charges were plac- _caaners' Short ed against ihe two men followiac; c Fruit Gibbons implicating Johns, accord- Growers. ing to information given by author- ities. o MARRIAGE LICENSE Grant DickSK.n, 22. Lancaster mechanic, and Evelyn Hayden. 2 Williamsport. Dr G .T Tr man. rnmjsler. ro.ir- EXPECT JURY IN DAYTON POLICE THOUGHT THUGS DAYTON. O. Mar a'l OGAX FREED Harry Ognn was m the county jail Monday evening i ter serving a fine of S25 for mlovi- cation. Funeral services day at 1 30 p m at burg M. E church M Mumford. wife of ford, who dif-d at :.ara The of Prof of is reported as 'nut M pletion Leo V Si L- -s maa. for the ganged IT .rder or Alfred J. Uagle TrV-jn.- reporter, was expected toda) mai Ciarks- reconvened. All but a final panel of four jurors have been ?'Aom T. and it is considered likely iha'. last Mum- Cross officer today were to be tiosed in connection with an SS.'.1 "0 payroll robbery here last August The pair arrested day after Albert lachmeyer, who w-as returned from West Bend. where he was an-ested as of the bandits, accused .'w-rf Roberts of having planned and CLUE FOUND IN YOUTH'S DEATH PORTSMOUTH 0-, Jtar. csw was followed todftjr police sought to UM no- tary surrounding Lb William S Wrigbt, Wheelersbury H.fh dest. on Aptsl 30 From of Va ped to obtaiii uroulil to youth's nurferw. tpkea mto i ing an Brown Chape! bem Miutiveiy acwpted. ues stated.   

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