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Athens Daily Messenger Newspaper Archive: January 19, 1912 - Page 1

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Publication: Athens Daily Messenger

Location: Athens, Ohio

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   Athens Daily Messenger, The (Newspaper) - January 19, 1912, Athens, Ohio                                Not many good servants will be found, or will them- seh'es find good places in this city this week except through want advertising. THE HOME PAPER OF ATHENS AND ATHENS COUNTY. OHIO. WEATHER Fair and colder tonight ex- cept snow near lakes. Friday fair. VOL, 45 ATHENS, OHIO. FRIDAY EVENING, JANUARY 19, 1912 PRICE TWO CENTS SHIP WRECKED; Jv 53 LIVES LOST Wlitov Hal! Goes Ashore on Coast ot Scotland. FIERCE GALE SWEEPS ATUHTiC Thanks God For Pardon. Atlanta, Jan God" said Morse, when told tl.at ho had been par.ioned by PIV-M Taft Morse is veiy weak and the eja( ulation with which he re- ceived the news wa-s hardly moie tiian a Moise's pai don removes from him the watchful eye of the government, it is hardly thar he ill leave thr foi t foon. The pjesent indications are that it will be some time before he is able to stand the short tup to the city. BRIGHT YEAR AHEAD OF A1KNSK. OF FS Will Prepare for Big State Club Meet Here This Fall Murderer Is Convicted. Akron. O., Jan. 19., After being Driven Out of Course and Goes to Fifteen Minutes Af- ter Striking on and Three of Crew Swim Ashore, but Are Terribly Beaten by Toll Will! Reach 100 Mark. Glasgow, Jan. 13. The Hall line steamship Wistow Hall was wrecked ctt a grouo of dangerous rocks off Nortbaven, Aberdeenshire, 53 metn- Lers of the crew being drowned. j Captain Stoddart and three mem- of the crew were rescued. Most cf those drowned were lasears. xvas a. terrific gale at tbe time and the Wistow Hall was driv- her course. The seas were so fclgh when she struck that it was Impossible to launch a lifeboat. The cwist guard men from the village of Bullers attempted to reach the ship, Lut were hurled back each time they got their boat in the water. The lifesaving crews of the Peter- i'ead and Peterroll stations also did their utmost to save soqpe of tbe of the doomed vessel, which xvas being driven rapidly on the rocks. Tbe vessel remained on the locks only a. short time, when she lifted up and driven towards the shore. Then she was dashed broad- sMe on against Tempion rock, where found lodgment for 15 minutes. ".At this end of that time she began to break up, and in a few minutes was a mass of Bodies Washed bodies were athore in a terribly battered eo lion. mission house on shore was improvised as a mortuary chapel is full of ghastly corpses. Captain Stoddart and the three lasears who were saved owe their lives to luck and the fact that they were strong swimmers. Captain was unconscious when he 'was picked up on the beach, but was One of his arms the other badly bruised, while he also suffered inter- nal injuries. Two of the three las- rare were badly battered up. It is sTHd now that the vessel which foundered off Peterhead is not an American ship, but the steamship Frederick Snowden, owned by the Aberdeen Coal company. The vessel loaded with coal and was a small one of 431 tons net. Her own- out for six hours a jury a verdict finding William guil- ty of seconj. degree muidei. Muriay. whose home was Xew York, was charged with the murder of Frank Price of Cuyalioga Falls, at Hudson. July 5 last toon resuscitated. broken .and ELSON THINKS THAT HE WASJLIGHTED s Ixpected to be Placed at Head of Short Ballot Committee Coltunbus, Ohio, Jan. pointed delegates expressed them- elves freely tonight over the commit- ee appointments of the Constituticn- 1 Convention, announced today. ?he three college professors, Fess, of Vntioch; Knight, of Ohio State uni and Elsou, of Ohio university at Athens, all complained that they 'had been slighted in tbe 'Choice ap pointments" and indicated that the It session would see a storm ot protest on the floor of the convention Prof. Fess stated that there was s feeling among some of, the delegates that in making his committee appoint ments, had been actuated by a desire to punish his opponents 01 further the chance of some policies of his own. "I would certainly not like to think that this sort of sentiment was has ed on said Fess, "bnt I air afraid that Mr. Bigelow has mad some :nJstakes in his appointments.' Prof. Elson declared ho had had ev ery reason, to expect that he would b made chairma.i of the Short Ballo committee. He was the author o the only short ballot proposal so fa: introduced, and has long been one o the foremost advocates of. the shor ballot in Ohio. >ra have not heard of her loss as yet Hundred Lives Lost. London, Jan. sale which continues in some parts of the Unit- ed Kingdom has -been the most vere in a long period. About 300 lives have been sacrificed by ship wrecks and ac.cidents, and it is fear- ed the tale is incomplete. PARDONS MORSE ON ADVIGE OF SURGEON EPIDEMIC OF COLDS Strikes White House Force After Taf Sets the Fashion. Washington, Jan m; colds have developed among Whit House officials recently that the Goi eminent machinery moved slowly to day. Old Winter Likes Us! Old U'mter hasn't not u all out ot his >ot, aud fol- a respite of hi> dphcondotl uuoa the Oliio from me-1 Xortbwest early this morning a fieh'n cold and this uiorn- ing another blanket of snow replaced the one which bo near- h Tim Atiantic coast is al--o getting its share of cold Yes- terdav not a spot in the Onited MITCHELL HOLDS HIS POPULARITY Miners Agree to Heat Former Leader's Accusations. SOCIALISTS GIVEN SETBACK The annual inspection and nibtalla- 10.1 of officers of Athens Company. s'o. 51, Uniterm Rank, Knights ol states showed below zero, hias v, ere held at the K. of P. jast night all of the Northwest jry last evening, the ceremonies being'.j. Was below this mark. High utended by a large per cent of the 4, winds tin; wave beforu members. tiiem. Col V A Snyder. of Uincabter Clear, cold was fore- he iiihpecting oHicer. acting in cabled lor today, 'while the Col Graham, who was unable weather man bays'that Satur- )c and he expiessed himself day will be fair witii northwiet as highly pleased with the condition winds.. of the local company. The following omceis mstall- ed tor the ensuing year ;aptaiu............J-- 1> Mercer Lieutenant.....J. F. Robbins Second Lieutenant Bert Hooper Treasurer..... llarvoy Ramsey Recorder....... Gail G. Neff Guard Ilany Wilson Sentinel Forest McReynolda Following the installation, the com- pany adjourned to the banquet hall, wiiere aj. oyster supper was enjoyed, alter which a toast program was car- led out. Captain F. 15. Gcldsberry acting as toastmaster. Those respond- ns were Col. V. A. Snyder, Captain Mercer, Lieutenant Eobbins, and Capt. F. Beverage. The gist of the remarks were along ihe line of the work for the coming year, the outlook for which is verj bright indeed. Captain Mercer is up tc the minute on military tactics, "be- ing one of the best drilled men in Company L. O. N. G., and has quali- fications as a commanding officer that are exceptional. With Captain MerJ car at the head of Athens company, and with. Ms two able Lieutenants Robbins and Hooper, both men of ex- perie-ice in things military, it was ob- vicus-that the success of the com- pany depended almost entirely upon the attitude of the men in line, and as all expressed a willingness to do their best to this end, Athens com- pany has a bright year ahead of it. The retiring Captain Goldsberry spoke at some length of his apprecia- tion of the support the members had given him in the past aud assured them of his- continued interest. He has served as captain for a number of years and was the first command- ing officer ot the company when it was organized 12 years ago. and was largely responsible for its success throughout its existence. Captain Goldsberry was recently re-elected for another year, but resigned cu account of his inability to An encampment of the First Ohio Regiment is being talked of for the coming summer, probably at Buckeye and Col. Graham, by a vote of Uhens company, "ftas given to under- IE OF 1787 18 STIIUN EFFECT Supreme Court Repeated" De- %ision, Some Lawyers Think Heads Off I. and R. p President Taft recovering from alstand l-nat Athens company was en? slight cold, remained in bis study to j in accord with this plan. Company members present from out of the city were Cap-t. S. F. Beverage and Sir Knight T. R. Hamilton, of Xew Marshfieid, Sir Knight Evan Dent of Millfieid, and Sir Knight Allen B. Bean of Torch. work. Secretary Hillis was at home in bed convalescent, and the newest addition to the office force, Assistant Secretary Allen, at home battling with what threatened to develop into an attack of la1 grippe. Only Assist- ant Secretary Fcrster was on hand to sit with decorum on the White House lid. Nobody knows just why the epi- demic of colds started, but the Presi- dent had the first one. Mr, Forster was the second victim and the others succumbed. President's Clemency Will Not Save Banker's Lite, n. .Tan. 19. President Taf I commuted the sentence of Charles W. Moise to expire at once. This action was decided upon, follow- irg the receipt of a report from Sur- General Terney of the army. "''W Attorney General Wicker- tMhn that Morsf could not I've more tran one month longer if ,kept in SEARCH BEGUN For Henry Martin Gage. Who Was Kidnapped by Gypsies in '1871 Dalhart, Texas, Jan. of attempts to find Martin Gage, who was kidnapped by gypsies from his home in Holland, Mich., in 1S71 .were begun here today. Ten years ago a. gypsy or. herj COUNTY DRY BY REDUCED El Majority of 1688 Three Years Ago, Cut to 1263 at Close of Active Campaign Proposition For Indorsement Turned Down at Indianapolis Convention by Vote of 515 to Offi- cially Declared Elected President Over Tom Lewis Organization Wilt Not Withdraw From Ameri- can Federation of Labor. Indianapolis. Ind.. .Tan. taough attacked in ajesolution be- tore the rr-m ention of the L'nitec loiae Workers ot" America as a labor leader in the grasp of the John .Mitchell, former president of the more votes than any other candidate for delegate to the American Ferter ation of Labor. Mr. Mitchell will appear to defend his of the National Civic Federation, from which he resigne( last year in compliance with a reso mtion adopted by me miners' vention at Columbus, and the a bly voted to pay the expenses of his trip. He has declared that the Co lumbus convention was packet .igMinst him. Socialists Turned Down. The attempt of Socialists to cap tnre the "''nvAtion was frustratec when a resolution to indorse the So cialist party as the party of th miners' organization was down. Tho movement for the secession of the organization from the American Fedenfcon of Labor >vas also voted down, but the con- vention adopted a resolution declar- ing in favor of the industrial form of organization lo take the. place of or- ganization by rraftc. The vote on the question of indors- ing the Socialist pany was a clefpat for the Socialist movement in trie convention. It stood 515 to 135 in favor of adopting the resolutions committee's substitute for the lulion of indoisemer.t. The report of the tellers was sub- mitted and John P. White was shown to have been elec tod Tom Lewi.} by a majority of -So.121 I ewis received 5S and White voto Frank .1. Hayes was lire pipsidenfc and Ferry o With the constitutional comenuou n session in the Capitol, the supreme ourt, sitting in the annex, this et'used to recede from a dccisian. vliich many lawyers have declared nay be made the basis for attacking opular government in Ohio, as ex- ressed in the inltiatni1, leferoudurn ind recall, even it tho measures are ait into the new organic lasv. The .eclsion was in ihe cape of Boone >f llardin County and knocked out he vital statistics lau. In the new decision, written by Fudge Davis, all concur except Judge Spear, who dissents on the ground hat Judgu Davis has made his decis- 011 too broad. Judge Davis explains hat a rehearing was granted because doubt had arisen as to the of he syllabus. "There is no ambiguity n the ho says. !t was the opinion in which Judsje Davis said that I he ordinance of 17S7 is "still under, above and before 11 laws and constitutions that may be adoptPd" that led many students oC court decisions to declare that the ,rcuml was laid for daclaring all de- lartures1 in Ohio from the original re- mblicau form of government to be in- valid. Tho court holds the essential provl sions of the statute are unconstitu- tional because provisions of Section 14, the one requiring tho furnishing of detailed information without com- >eusation, are other sections. interwoven in the The court points out tlwt the. general assembly may be ab'e to correct ihc situation by suit- nble legislation. It does not outline any law, but H is understood that Attorney Genera) Hogan has pointed out under the de- cision the law might be made effec tive and detailed reports of births and deaths compulsory by merely provid ins for the payment cf a small fee to physicians and niidwjvcs, the cour holding tho state may not exact this service without payment for it. Judge Spear points out that th court might have held only unconsti tutional the section which requires reporting of all information prescrib- ed by the bureau of vital statistics and saved tho remainder of the act Parents of a Fine Son. Dr. and Mrs. Victor Halbert (Maud Hutchinson) cf Sylvania, are the par ents of a fine 10-pound son born to them yesterday. The baby has been named Robert Ilutchinson Halbert. A tolegram to Mrs. mother Mrs. Alice Hutchinson, of this city last, evening, said that mother an child were doing nicely. The home o Dr. and Mrs. Halbert was saddene orary chairman and named a notnl atiug committee consisting ot Mes- dajnes Charles Cameron, W. E. Meier Jlla T. Merwln. and L. V irown, who placed in nomination the ollowlng all ot t' .ubsequently elected: President-v. Mrs. Frederick Treudlej Vice- Prisldeut Mrs. A. K. Pric Recording Secretary Mrs. D. It. Richards Corresponding Secretary Mrs. C. U Martzolff SUFFRAGETTES ON THE GROUND Two Register as Constitutional Convention Lobbyists, BOTH HAIL FROM CLEVELAND Judge Lindsey of Denver Enthusiasm Among by Declaration That Power of Should B; Restricted In Matttr of Declaring Unconstitutional. Temperance Planks Centinut to Be Popu'ar. Columbus. O., Jan. Blii- nbeth 3. Ha user and Mrs. Myron B. Vorce, both of Cleveland, first persons to register u lobbyists ith Secretary GalbreatU of the con- stitutional convention. They r.ent the Woman Suffrage party ot Ohio wtl! appear before commit- tees of fhe convention .urginj submission of a woman suffrage proposition which is to, be next week by Delegate B. Kilpat- r'ck, chairman of the woman frage -cotniRittee. _- Thrco nonoffielal suffrage prqpoma.lt have already been Introduced.J Suggestion by LitUh sey of Denver'that the right ot courts to declare laws uncoiwtitu-- tional be restricted UMntmoiw-- decision, if not taken altoeeth- er, was greeted with a round "of ap- plause the members" Of "the stitutlonal convention. of a brief- addresr LO whom Us was wiik Treasurer Mrs. W. E. Peters These officers will constitute the executive committee of the Federation a.nd will select chairmen of other com- nittees to perfect plans for the State Moderation convention, which is to meet here in October. 'A constitution was adopted and otU- sr busiaews of permanent organization was transacted. Tbe next meeting will be held at the call of the presi- dent. The spirit with which the ladies ha.ve entered into this undertaking In- sures a successful and capable man- agement of the state meeting liere this fall. said: "You, needn't, few, "jitistteg; K done country a law houldn't be permitted to do, M as the unconafltutloMJIty ond a doabt, Brown Bests Attell Boxing Bout. JOINT CONFERENCE TO BE HELD JAN. 25 Coal Miners and Operators to Meet at In- dianapolis T'iHhbu.15, Penn, .Ian a joint meeting of the coal operators In Very Tama of Pennsylvania, Ohio and FIRST RECITAL Of Class of 1912, O. U. of M tic, on Jaiijary 24. Invitauons have been, issued by the College of Music for the recitals and commencement exercises of the Class of 1912. Mr. Harry Lee Ridencur, assisted by Mr. Mac Slator Bethel will bo the first of the class to appear in recit- al, Wednesday evening, JanuaryaT. "The dates of the other recitals are as follows: Mr. Cnarles Don McVay, April 25. Miss Helen Worth Falloon, April 30. Miss Hannah Louise Higgins, Maj 7. Agnes Dyson Beck Millikan May 14. Mr. Mac Slator Bethel, -May 21. Mrs. Elizabeth Spaulding Logan .May 28. Vera Starr, June 4. Indiana, held today ai Pittsburgh it Yoik. Jan. IS. ,1S decided to go i.ito iho joint wage Knockout Brown outfought and tor at Indianapolis January that reason had the better of Abft In a reply to a letter received At tell, tbe feather A eight champion. I p. Yx'bitc, of the in n 10-roiind at the Xa- iional Sportinti CHID, he did not Next Meeting February 10th. The next meeting of the Athens Oounfy Fruit Growers' association v.ill be held at the Normal Collegi building on Saturday, February 10th The topics taken up at that time wil be C. K. Cooper rider; O. K. Dnalap; "Why. H. O. Tidd. Prof. W. A. Matheny wil with glory Attel! did notj show his clexerncss and se.-m- Unittcl Mine Workers ot America, the notified him that they would (jle imfierstandinjr tliat to .a _ ._ 1 I ill, "V- J- of iKnt rushes, but T. strange to could not hit -wit'i enough pov.'er to j srore a knockuon n. and also rt e many chances to "in more f rep- Ai'er th Secretary Taj lor ed that the- by the j'liVrrnee are Indiana. Ohio, Virginia and He Born With a the operators of Virginia 'arr net as much in the matter as aro thoho of four other ivp a talk on "Bud Moth" Athens Grange to Meet. .Vtbei.s Grange will hold a meeting tomorrow afternooo. in thi city. The installation of the new o ficers has> been made a special orde for this meeting. The installation wa to have bef-n held two weeks ago, mi v-as postponed on account of the- col weather. "Rev. Fr. Kircher and sister. Mrs. Agnes Foley are in Columbus. Declared a Boycott. Chicago Jan. healthy matter a.s aro thoho of four other McConnelsville, Ohio, Jan. babv weighing 11 pounds state- follow Ins resolution was passed by th and 2 ounces and having four It, is belif-'.ed that this action jW. C. T. U. at its last meeting: "E fully developed teeth, was born the oporarors do much it is the decision of th here (apt sight to Martin a satisfactory setrlomeat ofjW. C. T. U. of Morgan county, tha husbar.d is a wa.se scale nnd working condi- only such business firms of neighbo The operators are will-ng cities as have shown theniselve 'do all they can to bring about a. set- _ favorable to tbe temperance caus k in a peaceful manner, -1' police- arc worthy our Marshall that. ABd doubt It one judw tliert ;o law should not declared to e unconitltut.lonal the court _ y- _, Indmtriauf. That the eonatitutiop to cave pltnty of material which varioiit troblcms before them was, made ont when 41 propoealu were Beat iy delegatee. Tbe good _ roads, Jrablie obt and Hf'.uor qaestime were- eadlng attacked Dy cgates. Four delegates suint in propeaals relating to the question.- on of Guernsey" county seat, in "a- proposition that no license should hereafter be granted for sale; of ntcxicatinjr liquors; Tallman of Bet mont sent 'u one similar to, the- It censo proposition introduced br Judge King for the liquor organlza- (Continued on Page Two.) CHINESE REPUBLIC IS NOW ASSURED Mancliii Rulers line to IMI- cate fur Princely PmsiM London, .Ian. from king, the correspondent of the aays that an understanding baa reached between the republican lead- ers and the imperial clan and that two edicts will be issued at to carry this out Tbe first edict will empower Premier Yuan Shili Kal to establisn a republican form of gov- ernment. Yuan will accept, where- upon the delegates at the Nanking conference will elect him president of the republic, Sun Yat Sea retiring ;a his favor. Yuan will accept' presidency. Then a second edict -rill issued announcing the abdication of throne. After the abdication SUB Yat Sen will coma to Peking to con- fer with Yuan in regard to the for- mation ot the new government. The republican leaders will allow Emperor Pu Yi to retain the "Manchu emperor" but not China." Yuan to grant tre court pensions amounting? to .-..000.000 (about O.QOO.OOO) annum. Tbe three would-be aaaaMiac the premier were to Mr. and Mrs. W. E." Mblen are itinp friends in   

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