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Athens Daily Messenger Newspaper Archive: January 18, 1912 - Page 1

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   Athens Daily Messenger, The (Newspaper) - January 18, 1912, Athens, Ohio                                Not many good servants twill be found, or will them- selves find sood places in this city this week except through want advertising. THE HOME PAPER OF ATHENS AND ATHENS COUNTY, OHIO. Rain tonight, turning1 to snow, Colder tonight. Friday snow. rou> WAVE COMING. 44444 4444 VOL 44 ATHENS, OHIO, THURSDAY EVENING, JANUARY 18, 1912 PRICE TWO CENTS CHAIRMANSHIPS ARE ANNOUNCED Constitutional Convention Now Ready tor Real Work, FESS MADE VICE PRESIDENT Fifteen Proposed Amendments and One Complete Constitution Are In- King of San- dusky Presents License Proposition as Favored by Wets Thomas. Cleveland Socialist, Has New Bill of Rights. Jan. follow- ehairmanships were Ohio's constitutional Columbus, O ing committee announced at convention: Agriculture. Miller of Crawford: arrangement and phraseology, Col- ton; banks and banking, Beatty of Wood; claims against the conven- tion, Cassidy: corporations other than municipal. Hoskins; county and township organization. Okey; educa- tional, Fess; employes, Roehm; equal suffrage and elective franchise. JCilpatrick: good roads. Lampson- initiative and referendum, Crosser; iudieiaiy and bill of rights, Peck; labor. Stillweil; legislature and ex- ecutive departments, Harris of Ash- labula; liquor traffic, Bowdle: meth- od of amending the constitution, Smith of Hamilton; miscellaneous subjects, Barter of Stark; municipal government, Ilarris of Hamilton; printing and -publication of proceed- ings, Watson: public works, Norris; mles, Bigelow; schedule. Dwyer: short ballot. Fackler; submission and address people. Bigelow: tax- ation, Doty. Wins on Second Ballot. ,On the second ballot, Gl to 52, Professor S. D. Fess of Antioch coi- Greene county delegate, was elected vice president of the consti- tutional convention over "E. "W. Doty at Cleveland. The first ballot result- ed" Doty, 47: Anderson, 26, and Fess, 31. After the result, had been can not be amended except nv suli- mission of an amendment In legislature This is to bai use of the 1 and R in securing the single tax. Lampson's proposal also yio- vides that there shall never bo ;uiv classification of pmpeity for tion. Has License Provision. Delegate King of Erie comity troduced the license plank upon by the "wet" organization ft provides for compulsory he prise wherever saloons exist, but leaves the present option laws as tney are and does not impair the power of the legislature to pass fuither pio- hibitory laws. An alternative plank in the form of the present provision for no license is submitted. The 1: cense plank does not proiide foi rhe details of license, but makes ir man datory for the legislature to pass a license law under its prousions Separate submission is specified. Brown of -would make EXPRESS PACKAGES Taken From the Coclvitic Station by Burglars Sunday Night. Ohillicoibe, Ohio, Jan. 17. The ease of the Bf-.t O at Coolviilo. which uah robbed on Sunday uieht, is boms: investigated by the C O police J5ntrans.f> jx.ido inc- btnldinjr through a window Three e.MUvss packages were taken, the value and c-onrouts of one 01 which ;s u.iknown An Inwrsoll witch ai.d a fountain pen were tak- en in the oilier two. S: me oystei s. snakA root and Cuucura soap were taken trom the buildm claims for have not been P tered as vet. FIELD IS GETTING (Continued On Pace Three.) Fared Well at State Poultry Show at Columbns this Week Athens county bird fanciers who had birds in the Columbus show this week are highly pleased over awards they received in the the big state show. Their winnings indicate that this county has to be reckoned with in the award of trophies at the state meet. Attorney S. M. Johnson, the White VTyandotte fancier, had three entries and won -first cockerel in a big field, his strongest competitor being the Hartman Stock Farm company of Co- lumbus, who made Mr. Johnson a fine and most liberal offer for his prize winning bird, which was promptly re- fused. E. E. JEddy. of Trimble, who HARRY D THOMAS. Socialist Delegate to the Constitutional Convention. {Announced Anderson, who Voungstown. withdrew, and Fess was elected on the second ballot. The committee on employe? sub- mitted its recommendations for the 50 jobs. Franklin county got 10 of the plums. The clerks to the secre- tary arc: Will T. Blake. Columbiana T. It. Brown, Franklin; H. L. Rebrassier, E. Hamilton: Ira I. Morrison, Summit: Mrs. Ella Scriven. Franklin; James B. Lewis, Curahoga; H. S. Brown, V.'ood: S. E. Neff, Crawford: Clement Kelly. Marion. Clerks will get So a day. The salary of Secretary Galbreath. was fixed at Sixteen proposals to amend the constitution, _ranging from an entire new constitution -.down to the mere changing 'of a 'word, were submitted by members. Evans of Scioto introduced an en- tire model constitution amid the FOinewhat sarcastic applause of the convention. Two I. and R. planks were submitted, one by Crosser of Cleveland, who is slated to head the committee on that subject, and an- other by Timer of Lucas. Ulmer introduced a proposal for the recall, including judges, aud one for municipal home rule. Lampson of Ashtabula proposed to make the single tax impossible. A everywhere with his White Iveghorns had four entries and won first cock- erel, first hen. first pullet and fourth cock. Due of his birds sold last year was in the shew and won first cock. C. M. Darst. of .lacksonville, won first cock, first cockerel, second hen, fourth pullet and fourth pen with his Buff Orpingtons. E. TL Lantz, oi Trimble, drew fourth cockerel, second and fourth pullet and second pen in the Buff Rock class. A. M. Rainey. of Trimble, was awarded second cock in thp White Orpington field. Mrs. Albert Hilt, of Jacksonville-. had fourth pen in the Buff Orpington class. Dr. V. G-. Danford. of Tinmblf. had two entries of Black Orpingtons ar.d drew third hen and fifth cockerel. Russeil Herrr.ld, of Athens, had two entries in the Barred Rock class but as the judging of that class was not completed yesterday, the result is not known. Dunne Ouv t-or ts Chicago, Jan. IS. Edward F. Dunne, jurist and ex-mayor of Chi- cago, announced himself as n candi- date for the Democratic nomination tor governor INTERVENTION WILL NOT BE NECESSARY Coal Orders are Very Nu- merous During the Past Ten Days Columbus coal operators hold- ings in the Hocking field and local operators say that they are away be- hind on orders and that each day sees them setting more hack with ship- ments, but that they expect to get our from ubder with ibe moderating cf the weather. It is probable tliat more orders have been booked by Co- lumbus coal operators in the last 10 days than in any similar period for the last live years. The cold weather has materially re- duced the output of the mines, and in addition there has been much trouble in transportation. The railroads have 1 unasked plenty of cars and there has been no complaint of any car shortage, but the severe weather has handicapped the railroads in getting the Trains through. Chicago has been facing a coal famine for several and all efforts have been made to get a sufficient supply of coal to that city. The Chesapeake and Ohio this week put Chicago coal trains on the passen- ger schedule, and orders were issued by President Stevens himself to see that the coal trains wore given right of way. It is nor. probaole thai there will be much dullness again this winter in the local coal business. With, the end of the big demand for domestic use caused by the cold weather, there will come a rush of orders from the rail- roads and big industrial consumers for coal to stock in anticipation of a uspension during the adjustment, of the wage scale after April 1, and indi- cations are that all of the mines of he Hocking and eastern Ohio dis- tricts will bp kept practically to ca- pacity caring for these stocking or- ders. Showing the amount of coal be- ng handled from the ITocking field, the Hocking- Valley last Sunday bad jS loaded coal trains pass through Co- umbus northbound. K1LLEI EXPLi Cincinnati Tenement House is Complete Wreck. ELEVEN RECEIVE INJURIES PARKERSBURGERS Wedded by 'Squire B. L. Horn at Probate Office Last Evening. Mr lOamobt II. Adams and MIRK lUnh Ola Ferguson, it tiiu- looking onus couple, I'roiu Parkt-rsburs, W. Va., were unitoii 111 marruiKe .HI the oilitf- of Probate .ludne A. Lynch, eailv Ins-r evening by 'Stjuire Horn The couple, accompanied by friend s> :ii rived in Athens ou the afternoon train, and after some dilliculty in lo- cating .Indge secured n license t and iii'rer the foienumy, left on the evening tram, lor Uioir now home in 1'nrkiTsburg. The bride's i-esi.lence was ns Canaunvllle, and 10- 11 rs. Airs. THE COLD People Rush 10 Street Fearing City In Gracp of Several Blocks Away Hurled From Bed by Street Car Has Windows Shattered and Passengers Are Injured by Flying Woman Missing. Cincinnati, 0. Jan. v an ip dead, another missing and 11 persons are serious! v injured as the result of a gafi explosion wliii-li complete! j wrecked a brick tenement house. Members of iamiHes were buried beneath luins. The dead- Miss Ida Marcus. Missing: Mrs. Mary Frock. Tne injured: George Unpff Mrs. Dorothy lloeir, months-old child of Mr, and 'Llocff; Gamfer and ij-UUUei 'William Swiekman: G. A. Sehaefer; Clarence Hillian; Edward Brown. Five families, including IS per- sons, were buried in the ruins and were extricated with great difficulty. The flames were extinguished in less limn an hour. The explosion was felt two rniies distant. One woman living several blocks away was knocked from the'Port having found thousands of car- bed in which she v.'as sleeping, an- causes of poor Bob White strewn over ether was knocked from her chair, snow covered ground in almost every People became panlc-strieen and j locality in the county. This is evt- tushad into the streets, thinking the dence sutlicient to show that, it is not c.'ty had been visited by an partn- j the hunter so much as it is old King POLITICS TURNS OP AT MEETING Little Protection for Birds During the Past Two Weeks H is estimated that tliotAnds of (iiir.il have died nightly during Uie severe weather of the past two weeks. The quail early ia the fall were driv- en from the hillside cover which was then very scant in most localities, to the woods, where they sought shelter in hollow trees and caves. The woather hnving: remained sevoro since the early days of the hunting season, the quail have, it has been found, re- mained in t IIP woods, that is, the of them who have survived the blasts. Ther? is very little for any bird to eat. in the woods and for that reason the quail that have not frozen, to death have starved to death. Farmers re- Ihf other funds could br> liic-rwised to whal tbey wore last year. This was not deemed advisable, although, the light and water plants retttrnod about to the binUiiK fund last. year. Councilman Cotton, who has been a member of the board of public affairs thousht thai the two plants should not be disturbed ns far as receiving (he- was loneerned, EJH all of their earnings are bein.s: mil into the sinking fund. Next year about OOtt worth of light and water bonds will corao due and the slnkimr fund trustees hone to have enotiRli mouey on h.uul to meet ihem If not, they will be renewed in all probability. Mr. Cotton said that while he was on the board, it was the board's desire to pay -off (his indebtedness. Solicitor Price slated that now the local light plant was solvent and that was more than could b0 said of many other city plants. The he said was vital to its existence. Fur- (Conliuued On Pace Three.) Miners Are Asked to indorse Socialist Parly, RESOLUTION WARMLY DEBATED quake. Passengers on a passin streetcar sustained miuor injuries. Every window in the car was shat- tered and ilia, passengers wore cut by (lying; glass. Every County Office to be! Filled This 21st the Day WHOLESALE ARRESTS FORMAL THEFTS Twenty-Two Men Rounded Up at Circle Hill This Week Warring Cubans Deckle Quit Wrangling, to Havana. Jan. Gomez find representatives of the various factions ended a conference at the palace early this All warring elements reached an agreement, to put aside their several interests and ambitions and unite for the welfare of Cuba and to ?ive' no cause whatsoever for the inter- vention of tiie United States. Thp general sentiment at the con- ference was one of the deepest grat- itude to the t'nitcd States, which was recognized as never before as being Cuba's best and most sincere friend. Mr. Frank Gross was a business vis- in his proposal says that it jtor to Columbus yesterday. Xelsonvillc. Ohio, -Ian if Police Edington. Officer Skeyion, of he Hocking Valley railroad, arrested wenty-two men this week at Circle Till for talcing- coal from the Ilock- ng Valley railroad and the 'oal company. They were brought to his city and arraigned before Mayor fill on a petit larceny change. They ntered picas of guilty and were fined 15 and costs and given "0 days in The Columbus workhouse, each. The im- prisonment portion of the- sent F nee was suspended. C. 'I Newton ib a business in Charleston, Va., this week. Fain-P died at her home on Jeffe'rron street Tuesday after a prolonged illness. Miss Matheny returned from Columbus Tuesday afier a few daya" visit iricnds Joshua Spacer is ill at his horn" on. Fayette street. Louis Rice is visiting in the of his parents. Mrs. C. V. Bartels. of Torchlight. Ky., is visiting her motnor. MIS. Het- ty William Lama, of Dexter is visiting relatives here tin's week. W. O. Tnompson returned hone af- ter a pleasant vjsif with his daugh- ter in Columbus. The E. K. E. B. club will entertain their friends with a dance Monday ev- ening January 22, at the K, of P. hall. The primaries for the purpose of nominating candidates for the various county offices will be held on the third Tuesday in May, which this jear falls on the 21st of the mouth. Sn far there are a great number of candidates for county commissioner in prospect, although only three or four have made, public announcement of their candidacy. On the other hand it. is expected that there wij] be at least, candidates on the Repub- lican ticket for this office. So far ihere are three avowed .candidates for the office of probate Attorney Sam M. Johns-en, of this city, Attor- ney C. AV. Juniper, of Xelsonville, aud Attorney George Rose, of Glouster. All are out on the R-epubiican ticket for norninaiion for tnis office. The next few weeks will see many candi- dates announce them.-'elves for the various offices. So far I he Democrats, have not pro- duced any candidates, but that party will have a ticket in tho field Uner. Already they nave a county commis- sioner who is Servian his second term aud a, sheriff, the first Democratic Winter who reaps the grim harvest on the quail tribe. The country people are protectors that the quail have in this Joeality. In many barn- yards Hie- quail aro fed every morn- ing with the chickens. Men of this sciction .who eiijoy their html every fall have never taken any action to- ward furnishing protection for the nuail. In some other of the state sportsmen's clubs "wive provid- ed a. with which to shelter and foctl the quail during the winter. Such a plan has lieen hinted at. here several times, but no action has ever been taken. Is it any wonder thai, the farmer who feeds a ccvey of. quail all winter long does not want them slain the following fall by the hunter who contributed nothing toward their care during the winter? SPRING WHEAT STATES SURE OUOOD CROP Abundant Moisture Now in Ground According to Railroad Expert New York, Jan. Erb, president of the Minneapolis aud St. Louis railroad, returned to this city today after a trip to Chicago and Minneapolis, where he took part in the reorganization of- railroad company. "The changes -said Mr. Erb, the view of securing great- "were er efficiency and greater economies. During my trip I met several execu- tive heads of the Chicago North- western, the Northern Pacific, Uie Great Northern and the Soo lines, and all were agreed that, the open winter we have had up to the last week in September has hrought about a full saturation of the ground in the sheriff in the historj of the county. Candidates are to be nominated for .'he following- offices. Representative, three commissioners, clerk of courts. treasurer, auditor, recorder, probate judge, surveyor, p-osecurincr attorney and sheriff. The of infirmary director was abolished by the last legislature, but the present board serve until tiie time for which thrv were elected pires. which will he en December of this yeur. After that thime the board ot infirmary director will a thing of tho past, and the count commissioners will manage in- firmary. vv'hile some of present count} officers arp only seining on their first term. it is cot.ridently that they will have a; The polls and the primary election will be one of the warmest elections pulled off in the county Bishop O'Connell Sails. Naples, .Tan. O'Con- rell sailed for Boston steamer Canopic. aboard the CAPITAL OF CITY WK REDUCED Salaries of Many New Offi- cials Cut Down General Funds Vote In Gallia Today. Gallipoiis. O. .Ian. coun- ty, which throe yea's -voted dry by a majority of is today hold Council last evening met and pass- ed the semi-annual appropriation or- dinance for the fiscal half year end- June SO. 1012. Councilman Dan was the only The appropriations had ligur- i t ut in advance by Directors Wil- liams and Wood worth, with the aid of State Inspector Jackson and Solici- tor Price. Consequently not much time was taken with the discussion of the various itern" as most of the (TMincilmen had been studying the ex- penditures of the city and little plauaticn was necessary. The. o nance was unanimously adopted. There were few changes in the var- ious departments, as the amount of money rhp city has to spend this yr-ar is the same as last year. A number of funds were cut several hundred dollars to make up for the extra sala- i i.'s of the officials under the city administration. It was stated that tin's year the palarios of the various officers would exceed the same cxpen- djiures of iast year bv nt least stales of two Dakotas Montana and lovra." "This saturation is greater than wo have bad in thp, last 15 years, it was first produced by tho rain and mois- ture, and then, came the frost and the snows, i was told hy the man.ige- ment of the Northern Pacific and the Soo roacls thai the ground itself was not frozen more than 12 inches be- fore the snowfall. The ground is now believed to be in better shape than ia many years, and it is a hope- ful foundation for a good spring wheat crop." Three-Cent Fare Refused. Cincinnati, O., Jan. Cin- cinunti Traction company announced that it will refuse the demand of the woman taxpayers' league for 3-cent fare when no scats are available In the streetcars. .Mrs. llae Von Wai- den, president of the league, boarded a crowded car and, when the con- ductor came around, handed him cents on the theory that if a seat in a car is worth cents standing room is worth about half. The conductor to take the money, but al- iowed .Mrs. Von Walden to ride for i.othing. MANIAC BATTLES WITH HIS RESCUER Illinois Delegate Arraigns Capitalittlc Class and Declares They Will sort to Murder te Enforce Injunc- tions Resolutions Favoring Gov- ernment Ownership of and Rapping at National Fed- eration and Officers Go Indianapolis, Ind., Jan. on the resolution Indorsing the So- cialists as "the political party of the j working was resumed at the national conveinioE of X'nited Mine Workers-'of America. The resolution was introduced the convention bad gone on record ns favoring government ownership _ot. industries. Because the constitution of >ho United Mine Workers.stipulateg that it shall he nonpolitical. the resoltj- rions committee reported it noneoo- ourred in the resolution the orgaclzatioh to the Socialist ty and offered a substitute" only "it would be would unite in the" political as the industrial John Walker, president of 'Illfe nois miners, speaking for ists, intimated that it" effort would be made to constitution so- that union could indorse the SocUIUt rarty. In a Mid: you will you willpay the The "capitalistic jrossess the kill If urged "that the worldnjr' political power, ao'that "if there. Ir need to use the Injunction And bayonet they will be used of your firesides-" Samuel Gompers wna as a reactionary by Thomua Lew-- is, former national president of Diners, "As long as Gompers'ls at the ol the federation'it will oppose general industrial organization contrasted with the peparate union he said. the will come when the leaders In federation -will be compelled to step down or come .over Uie principle of a close working for benefit of the whole .laboring Action was -deferred' 05 a re'aolu- tion providing that the United- Mine Workers should withdraw front the American Federation of Labor, con- demning ,the National Civic tion as an agent of capitalists and sharply criticising Samuel Campers. John JKtohell and other leaders of the Federation of Labor for jco-opet- ation with the Civic Federation. Dunning Hospital at Giiicago Burns to Ground, Consequently the v.orklng capital of' much smaller this OHIOANS REMEMBERED Relatives of Three Dead Get Carnegie Pittsburg; Jan. hero medals and money -were awarded to persons in all parts of the country. Three Ohioans participated in the distribution. They are Clark H. Pressley, deceased, silver medal to son. Pressly lost his life at Notting- ham, Aug. 33, 1911, la a vain attempt to save a 3-year-old "boy from death beneath the wheels of a streetcar. Elma II. Martins, deceased, bronzs medals to father and T.Iartins. 16, died in saving the life i rf AloysiiiB II. Ruppert, 11, from frowning, at Cleveland June 6, 1911. Franit R. Benton, deceased, bronze ffledal to father and to liqui- nate indebtedness. Benton, 16, his life attempting to save David Exownell, IS. from drowuingr, at Huron. Robes Are Returned. The three vestments of a Catholic which were presented to the'. thn cit3- is that fiscal year. The service department i v.-jih the streets, ar.d two tookj half of the appropriations, orj about hut of this amount is refunded, for the two plants to pay for the lighting of the- city's streets. Tliei f was some discussion as to! Chicago. Jan. emergency hospital at Dunning was burned to tho ground, police, firemen am! s.ftenrtams battled with in-1 university museum, as a part of thw mates. Supposed to have ignited Brown Memorial Collection, -were re- From a defective fiue on the top floor, 'turned to the church last evening the flames gradually ate their way-through Rev. Fr. Banahan, and will rlo-wnw.'Tfl. and four hours after the'bo sent back to the Philippines ia all fire was discovered virtually all of a probability. trig its second Roto Lw lo'-ai option j whether or not it. would bo advisable] election. 'to withdraw this assistance so that Uiree-wing building, four and five stories high, was in So far as is knov n no lives were lost. Dunns- the progress of tho fire Former Justice of the Poace Thom- as Kdaar now steward of tho insti- tution, had a battle for life on a bridge two of the lour Mories in s-ane patients. t'ue air. vsith two in-i quantities of chlorine purification process. Try Water on Columbus, O.. Jan. Onto state hoard of health has decided buy several monkeys to be -used in making tests of Cleveland's water supply, which is said to danger- ous to health by reason, of Uw used fa   

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