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Athens Daily Messenger Newspaper Archive: January 15, 1912 - Page 1

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Publication: Athens Daily Messenger

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   Athens Daily Messenger, The (Newspaper) - January 15, 1912, Athens, Ohio                                Not many people whose thrift-sense is educated will MISS any great number of this week's waur ads- How about YOU 0 WEATHER INDICATIONS. FAIR AND COL0SR TOXIOHT. TUESDAY PA1H. THE HOME PAPER OF ATHENS AND ATHENS COUNTY, OHIO. VOL 41 ATHENS, OHIO, MONDAY EVENING, JANUARY IS, 1912 PRICE TWO CENTS HIT AS TRAIN PITCHES Big Four Has Disastrous Wreck Near Carey, Otiio, FIVE IN SERIOUS CONDITION Split Rail Hurls Diner From Track and Two Coaches Follow It Into Deep Trample Wom- en and Children In Mad Fight to Escape From Burning neer Admits Speed of Mile a to Make Up Time. Carey. O., Jan. Big pour train No. 1 was wrecked four miles north of here, 34 persons were injured., five probably fatally. Eleven of the injured were taken on a spe- cial train to a hospital in Kenton. The more seriously injured are: ,lohn McKinley, Middletown. inter- nally; W. H. llaskin, Detroit, skull x fra-ctured; C. H. Lockwood. Cincin- nati, internally; Pearl Raymond, Bar Bay r cut; J. .T. City, .Mich., batTly brui "Raymond, bruised; Mrs. G. Cornell, Mich., internal injuries: Joseph Ornie. London. Ont.. cut and bruised; C. E. Kelly, Ann Arbor, Mich., internally; G. A. Levar, Kalainazoo, Mich., crushed: F. C. Ray. Detroit, badly cut: R. W. Raj-, Detroit, badly cut; Mrs. Charles Evans. Toledo, left hip dislocated; Mrs. Pearl Stone, Albany, Inrt., inter- nally; Mrs. Hetter, .internally; Les- ter ftothenberg, Dayton, le? hurt: Hull. Dimondale. Mich., G. L-ozendurfer. Toledo, leg leg E. M. Brenner, TJrbana, leg J. W Scharold, Dayton, Ky., X. P. hurt; hurt: hurt: arm hurt. Making Up Time. According to Engineer Thomas, the train was several hours late and was making close to a. mile a. minute in its rush toward Cincinnati to make up lost time, when the acci- dent happened. The combination diner left the rails first, dragging two other coaches after it. The train bumped over the ties for 500 feet mid then two of the three coaches rolled and tumbled down a steep em- bankment to the ravine below. Screaming and frightened men trampled crazily on women and chil- dren if, their battle to escape as the overturned stove set fire to tue debris. Tt was not until aid arriuaki from nearjjjy farms that the trainmen suc- ceeded in extinguishing the fire and pulled the victims from the window-a and doors of the shattered carp. Al- though the train was unusually crowded, most ot" the sufferers were ,'n the-diner at the time of the aecs- ent. Won Ribbons at Bellaire. J. F. Guliey, of Fosu-r Plato, v. ho made such a large winning tlu- !o- tal poultry show his S. 0. Bun Leghorns, shipped a pen ol his biids to the show at Bellaire last ueek and made the largest in his class He took first and fourth pullet, first cockeiel and iirtt pen. In addition he was awarded a siher cup shipment of birds Horn the distance. There about birds in this class at the Bellaire Resignation Accepted. Washington. Jan. Piesident Taft accepted the resignation of Robert Bacon as ambassador to France, to take effect upon the ap- pointment of a successor. TWO WIVES T FOR DIVORCE Drink Broke Up One Home and Cruelty the Other Two suitfc for dnorce were filed in common, picas, court Saturday, one by Olive Wilson, against Edward Wil- son on the ground of habitual drunk- enness and the ether by Ethel Mc- Cauley againfct Walter McCauley on Casley Made Fire Health Board Was Also Selected Mavo'- Slaughter this inornins an- nounced that he- had appointee! liain A Cusle.v ab chief of the lire [laitnient of the cit: ot Athens .tnd that the appointment yo into effect at once. Mr. C'aMey has been Jne chief of Atiie is tor jeart and has brought the department into ct state of efficiency. At present tht- department luib about in its and is contemplating the purchase ot another team by the aid ot citj. The additional team will be t'bed for street work, so that theie be a team In ihe barn at all times. Under the present arrange- ment the fire team may be oa the streets when an alarm is turned in and jiiany valuable minutes would iluts bo lest before it could lie got- un into service. Another fireman to be stationed ;.t the city building ib to Jje appointed, but this man has Lot et been picked Today the new board of health was also appointed and is made up as follows- Prof. E. Mills, F. S Roach, Frank Cross, Ed C. and W. S. Southerton. When this board oryanizts. it will name a health of- ticer. sauirary policeman and clerk The Wilsons were married at Or- AJr_ Roacll is Ule only meniber of the the ground of cruelty. clevHIc in 1W01 and have two children. The wife claims that her husband has neglected her during the period covered by the last three years. In old hoard to be reappointed. This evening council will meet to pass the semi-annual appropriation ordinance, which lias been in the that time she alleges that he failed course of preparation for several days to provide her with the necessities of the various departments of the life. "Wilson now lives in administration. The meeting 01 villo. She seeks the custody of the Uiis evening has been called for 7 children, also. o'clock. Mr. and Mrs. McCauley were mar- ried in Athens in 1907 and have two children and the mother asks their custody. Mrs. McCauley claims thad during- their married life her husband has been guilty of extreme cruel ty toward her at various times. She avers that while they were living ati iiarr last March, he struck her and kicked her and called her vile names.' McCauley now lives in Hocking: 116 Was Discovered m BaS6- Mrs. McCauley claims that she i has been a dutiful wife ai.d that herj lusband had no reason to treat her as he did. She asks for aii.nouy suf- ficient for the needs of herself and i :heir children. i; Logan Has Fire Loss. Many Athens people who have hold- ings in and about l3ogan, W. Va.. have'just learned that the very heart of the little city was burned out on ed was the court house, a business b'ock and' the fire department house. Mrs. J. E. Rowland (Mary Baker) livesj-'in Logan. M F r WAS THREATENED ment or Building Early Saturday ECLIPSES OF THE WILL BE VISIBLE HERE The fortunate presence of tile jan itor in the building Saturday even- ing, prevented a "serious tire at the new First M. E. church and becaus Of the quick discovery of tbo flames the fire was soon extinguished. During the late afternoon a blow- torch had been used to thaw out a frozen water pipe and the heat gene- rated by this torch was so intense Old Sol Will Hide His the lath inside of the plastering J" Ames Has Record. .j. Alin-.-uIl.'. O, .f.in 1 i-ovi'rinncut ilu nnoniCH-r this morning at the local w-Mtiier bureau hhowtd a luiuperaune J1 of di'inxvs below yero, or v thf coldest her ihat has -t fr prevailed in this pall of tile i' country in a number of yetirs. r At ibis mornine th tlur- mometi'r still reconifti I'l iln. -J. if woes below. Amos township f ai'd Ame.svillo were nhsayt. nou-d as the coldest bpots in I' Southeastern Ohio duiiniy tile winter and the real garden tpot of the world in the hot, -fc bummer Last s record anything noted at the f- sroM'rnment bureau Jn jeais, t, 3- At Carpenter Tco. -5- t> Carpenter, O., .Tan. J- eminent sLation at this 5- place this morning: punuujieed if that during ilie night a tem- f- perature of 2o degrees below I' ailed here. Mrs. John Beggs, 25. of Al- bany, Victim of Fright- ful Accident Albany, Ohio, Jan. 15. Mrs. John Beggs, aged 25, died at her home here Sunday evening as a result of burns Satur- day- While sitting in front of the fire nursing her IB-months old baby Saturday evening, she fell asleep and sparks from the fire set her clothing afire. She was awakened by the flames and suc- ceeded in getting to a bed, where she placed tift babe, and then ran out into the snow. Her body was horribly burned before tbs flames were extinguished. Mrs. Beggs leaves a husband and her small child. The funeral will be held Tuesday afternoon at 1 o'clock at the Baptist church, conducted by Rev. W. AV. Crabrrec. Interment will be made in Twice During the Year 1912 jot a basement wall were set to smol- dering-. About f> o'clock in the even- jing the januoi- discovered i-moke in the During the present yeir ii is intcr- e engine room, where had been fanned and he scni in an alarm. The fire depart aient responded, as did a the Alexander cemetery. Baptist church Born to Two Arrivals. .Mr. and Arthur li M STRIKE SYSTEM ADOPTEHY MINERS Walkout in One to Result in Walkout in All Com- pany's Mines What is said to have been one of A.he most radical acts of the mmers of the state, who closed their annual convention in Cfclumbus Saturday, was the adoption of an amendment :o (heir constitution providing that in the event of a grievance at. any mine results in a strike, all miners employed at other mines of the cxmpaiiy owning and oper- ating the mine whore the first trouble occurred must go on a strike. The amendment further provides that if it develops that the company is filling its orders at other mines, the employes of those mines are to refuse to work. The amendment was submitted at the morning session Saturday and was accepted without opposi- tion. esting to note thai there will he two large number of people from that eclipses of the moon and two of tho'part ofstbe ciiy. H. D. Henry dis- snn. Those of the moon will uoi the fire iu a wall near the visible in Athens, but both of the Sunday school room in the baseme.n eclipses of the sun will be plainly Knocked off some plastering. The ible here during the rime the eclipse'fire thpi; burst cut and was soon ex- lasts, junguished with a chemical can. The The fifsr of these eclipses will be (loss was verv slight, but if there had that cf the moon, which will no one in Uie a piace on April invisible in this usirou.-- fire wuiild doubtless ha-, e re- country, but general 13" visible in Eu-i suited, since there is so much wood rope. Africa and Ac-ia. TMs will be j work in that par' of the church but a partial eclipse. Th.- sei-o id J Driver Meisrhen aid Chief one of the moon will be on September i Mills were both injured by falling on 25, and if will be partly visible in (the icy steps of 'he cburcn at the United States, w-uh the cxcep- fire. tion of the extreme eastern portions. I Bur, as it does not take place until about 1 o'clock in the morninsr there will be few who will it at that hour. There will be a central eclipse of the sun, the first of the year on April 17. that will be visible to the eastern portion of Xorth America. At Wash- TWO YOUNG GIRLS of Richland avenue on Sunday, Bom to Mr and Mis. Harry of Franklin avenue, a tine daugn tor last evening. MARIETTA PLAYED BETTER BALL AND WON Axlopt Resolution Giving Members Until April 1 to Abrogate Contracts The- hvsiiin of sHib-liMtjiiin mines on a eo-opcrahxe plan, so thai members of the union been for less ih.iu ticiile rates, especially in ihp Hocking Valley dis- trict, was foxerely condenuied in a bet ol i (-solutions passed by the statu miiK'is' t at (.'oluiubiiH late labi week, just boiViH" ihe adjoinn- ment lor the The action tlie convention was stimulated by conditions found to ex- ibt in tlie l.ax mine near Carbon ihll in Hocking county, where representa- tives of the union had long' been in substantial posbohsum of facts re- .rdjni? the low-wage working dis- actual conditions, including lay envelops containing considerable than was reported. Many of the debaters on the convention floor ask- ed for protection for tho two men who bad thus proved an index io ac- .ual conditions in the Hocking Val- ey The resolutions, as adopted, by the condemns tbo system of sub-leaping mines in the Hocking ey district or eleswhere where mine workcifi are employed for less than rates. They condemn as no bet- ter the non unionist men who work in such mines after April 1. Overtures for peace and invitations as one delegate said, for "the prod- gal sons to return are seen in further resolutions thai every mine worker PO employed be invited join the union "0 days from Jan- (Continued on Page Two.) DEMAND QE MEANS AUDVANCE District No 6 Would Enforce Pay Scale on Run-of- Mine Basis SALT INJURIOUS or in- Ct- To Cement Ashes Harmllfce. A local nusinosn man, ho UMVbted in tlu- const ruction ot lucnt fc'.dowalks, states that til.' use of halt (o Toinovo ice from sidewalks of that character M voiy injurious, li'sH it JM diluted, as the in id in ihf undiluted salt will car, through tlu- cement, making ii porous and will otliorwise injure U. This m-j formation was Kivou to a city ollicial. li sui h is the case, no doubt some other inati-iial ln> nsod, ashes or sawdust. a.s it is iryniK on pedestri- ans to bo i-ompelled to on the y sidewalks on account of tin; dan- ger injury by falling. IN POSTAGE STUMPS Entire Issues Will be Chang- ed by Government, in Few Months Columbus, Ohio, -Tan. 15 Asking tr-o National Government to take a hand in fixing the wage scale in all mining districts where the existing contracts between miners and opera- tors will expire March 31 of the pres- ent year, tbo Ohio miners to-day framed and adopted resolutions which serve as a guide to the things they will de-maud when the new contracts are to be enforced. Their demands ate: That a nation- ent he made in all distircts Early in the postotlice de- partment will isfciie some new stamps. Among the changes announced istttat tlie head of Benjamin Franklin will be removed from the cue-cent stamp to be replaced with the likeness of George 'Washington. The portrait of President Washington will appear on the one-cent, two-cent, three-cent, four-cent, five-cent, and six-cent stamps. Hereafter the eightcent, ten-cent, fifteen-cent, tifty-cent and one dollar stamps, which now bear the portrait of Washington, will dis- play that of Franklin. The government issues a. two-dol- lar stamp, dark blue in color, with the portrait of James Madison, and a live-dollar stamp, dark green, with ihe portrait of John 'Marshal. These two stamps are to be discontinued and the new issue will contain BO denominaUoa higher than a dollar. A few changes in stamp colors will also be made, although, not in the issues which are widely used. The one-cent will remain green, and tho two-cent stamp will remain crimson. On the new Franklin stamps, the words "V. S. Postage" will be placed on a curved lino above the portrait. In the Washington stamps these words will remain a straight line. The new issues are now on the press- es at the bureau of engraving and printing. Unwelcome Topic Bobs Up in Anthracite Field. OPERATORS RECEIVE DEMANDS VERDICT OF GUILTY wlicfc contracts will expire March 31, 1012, or a general suspension in all districts; a rnn-of-mine system, and all coal to be weighed and paid for on that basis: a general substantial adiance in pick and machine a fiat differential of 7 corns a ton be- tv.een pick and machine mining; a uniform inside day wage scale, with a proper advance with the mining rates: a uniform day waere scale for all of outside labor, with a uroportionate ad', ance with the rntn- inp; rates: a seven-hour work day, with a half hcliday on Saturday, and Ohin T rmt Rpr First Inter- a for a11 unio .Lost ner i irsc micr uai.row work antl collegiate Game of the Season The adoption of the scale i? of spc- Bean and Nicholson Local Boys, Held by U. S. at Parkersburg Parkerfebtirg, AV. Va., Jan. 14. considering the evidence for some time the federal jury in the case of the United States against Jj. G. Bean and .Tolm Nicholson returned a verdict of guilty late yesterday afternoon. The young men. both of whom are residents of Athens, Ohio, were convicted of passing counterfeit coins in this city several inonths ago. Sentence was not imposed yesterday afternoon. It was shown at the trial that the two men came to this city tevera! months ago and that they went to a number of resorts and saloons with ijlillllll'l Ul lAll't OlVtWJUO rial importance to the minins intention of three spur try of Indiana. Illinois and Pennsyl- s- AUhnmrh t.hf iv.inia. as the members of those states From Nslsonville Brought Before thej In one have not adopted ,1 scab- and will use Probate Saturday. I Ketball ever plajed on tbr- I'. flnorj Probation Officer Fisher, of Xelnon-j Marietta v.oi 'om uhio's fi'.cj Ohio scale as ;i IJOFIS of compn'a- I ions gold witnesses for the Hard Coal Miners Said to Be Uualter- ably Opposed to Renewal of Con- ciliation Bozrd Which Has Disputas For Nine John Mitchell's Friends Go to iis to Revive Old Scrap Relative to Civic Federation Membership. AVilkesbarre. Pa., Jan. bility of a Central strike throughout the anthracite field ia staring the op- erators and miners in the face, and although the subject te one that busi- ness men try to avoid as Ionic possible, it is now being discussed by all interested partiee. Last Wed- nesday President William H, dalc ot the Laclcawanna railroad ad- niitted while he was visiting- Scran- ton that the coal operators had re- ceived the-new demands cf Ihe mine their On March 31. the anthracite of. conciliatics, which' came into ex- istence in 1903 after the big strike of 1002, and which had been lettllng: questions of dispute betweaa pper- ator and employe for almont years, will cease to miners and 'in .a- meeting already arranged to tinue it. Wherefore, the' regions are talking over'.tbe probmV- bilitiea of a etriko. March 31. ,Not'only the wealthy'cowl M.cn, but the miners, butcbw- candlestick maker had ot a shock' when it beflame fcnpwn that one of the miners ia that tlie board of tion be abolished. Bvtry operator' who has been seen bellevei in board, which so far hoe factorlly more than 200 While the operators generally'and the individual are io favor of retaining the board, the mine' work- ers' leaders, it is claimed. oppoMthf board, because it takes the matter. of settling -controversies out of'their bands. TAKE UP OLD FIGHT Seek Revocation of Withdrawal Resolution. "Wllkesbarre, Pa., Jan. to take up the fight which John Mitchell, former president of, the union, is expected to make at. coming international- cers and delegates of the mbie work- ers' union left here for to attend tho convention tomorrow. A year ago at this convention res- olution was passed compelling John Mitchell to either resigir the National Civic Federation or from the mine workers' union. Mitchell left the federation, giving'up the sal- ary of a year which he paid. Since then his friends claimed that the convention by the Socialist element of the union, which Mitchell has always (Continued on Page Two.) Although the prosecution RURAL CARRIERS ARE NOW UNDER NEW RULE c, on Saturday brought Anncs ?.in-; Saturday b> (br> of -1 public: Cervine comini.ssion askcdl submitted to a. severe cross-examina- tion by attorneys for thf de- fciipe they were not able to discred- resolution adopted was that the ,t restimonv. ihcny and IVarl old'to IS. Thv srann- v.as giris before Probate Judge I.ynrh on ington and in Athens, it will be seenja charge, as a partial On October ibeni v.hich he pro- rovvd and tiall. an old Ken bijiiHeif after (lives at Parkereiiurs there will be a totai eoiipie of thellearr.ins: froni other sources uuu ihr-y j .ainlv visible hexo! bad r.'xnt ihe street-, in the. The cami- n, by ,ijt, tlK- ofiiciai V-jpharcpd by railroads in Ohio for j man, who trans-portal ion are just and, His fo remedy the condition. June ierrn of federal court f tried but jury failed a verdi'T. A number ol SCK were here from snn that will be pl and in most ether sections of and usint; profane exeinnK. Ohio Lunrig Men Mother, tt'ill and TJeckli-. of I. t'nited States, isith the exception ofj will bp and sroi.-d seven points Man-', hummcnod to 1'oinorov, Sunda the extreme southeastern up. jsfir rr> the Girls' Industrial rett-.-d tiio ba'; Tho half aticml tlie of tl.ojr motlicr ar.'i the rfrlondcd to UK- crnmc rhri.itera Pickle. MI o Will Be Hereafter Picked in Same Manner as City Carriers Nodes of a new method of appoint- ing rural mail carriers was received at. the local poatoffice several days ago, and hereafter the rural postmen Woman is Identified. Columbus, O.. Jan. to a dispatch from Xeisonville today, a woman nad been livin? in liast Liverpool under the name of placed o., is (cam. and 'ben oth-r Saloons Voted Back. oks-.ilK Perry county's largest ohosen ia exactly the town, with, a population of vot-'nianncr tne carriers. i ui'.'ier tlie IP.W to reiil-j Matnony and rho i'.as ahead li. tin- is "Marietta. or two -p form and for man- The civil service commission, after had .'.r sUtfJ n majority of 12 j examinations have been held, shall UK and left thc of .iohn l.apninsr. Vaged to ;ri iiaiiOily Foi :b tv.o c-h'ldrfn bavin? proi a week ago, has hee.i identified, asro. through a photograph as Francis} Holland, foimerly of Xelsonviiie. The dispatch s-aid ihat she was once ar- fiT in vvas shot, arid k'iiieri by Oflkt-r Tom visitors an-1 Tor F'-vrra! prior jaw. opdav Mrs- i Anna Evans and who was found dead Ciino, of Nclboniillp, some months.while Milier and Oiuron n--r death rested on a i-harge of insanity, follow- French Cabinet Is Satisfactory. j Paris. Jan. ry.' was Duirarii, for Ohio Nutnr.K and Voi'iirii for Ohio. "'-iRriei'.i bnti l.vod NslsorvMIe Coup.'c Weds. O'to Kvans, o! At tho rocfnt. election a registered list of dry majority of 10. the postoffice depart- n drv bv the Ueal'lnt-nt which then sends it back to ithe postmaster. a. car- _______________ trier i-, needed ihe postmaster picks one of the highest three in thei as announcpii M. ing- an attempt at suicide. Accord- hailed by Matin I ins to the information from Xeison- villc Mrs. Holland has a sister, Mrs. AV. Patton of West Fourth Pnmfaip. i1? a national and Parker. X.--r ruday t filing v. iil ni" of Kale Escaped injury. hn K.-iio, of this city, was confine- j jjsr. and ceitifies the name back to KaU- .of 'bis ciry, conm.ission for appointment, rowiiship. on a 13. O. S-W freight train] t'nder ihe old systani, the postman ar.'l Mary crashed into another freighter here not have a list of Xels-.ciiViiie. v. r-n- wr-dded at _j rain at Orient, near Columbut-, and iJie appointment -was Avenue, in rolumbus. State Journaa.1 agi-. one. U is well bv paners sern-raliy any 'imp of (lambf-tia fit New oncnrd tp, with Samrdny evening will Kt-nyon College at conies Tanuary 27. offic today Two trainnien weiv killed by the. fourth assistant postmaster >X Horn. Ho'h yonnjf poo- 1 but Conductor was uninjured. upon recommendation of the highest are ivell and favorably in The upper county. Jus orders. on Kal'j train forgot on the list by the civil service mission.   

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