Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Athens Daily Messenger Newspaper Archive: January 13, 1912 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Athens Daily Messenger

Location: Athens, Ohio

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Athens Daily Messenger, The (Newspaper) - January 13, 1912, Athens, Ohio                                Not many people whose Thrifc-sense is educated vill .MISS any great number of tiiis week's want ads- Kow about YOU THE HOME PAPER OF ATHENS AND ATHENS COUNTY, OHIO. WEATHER SNOW FLURRIES TO- NIGHT OR SUNDAY. RISING TEMPERATURE. VOL 40 ATHENS, OHIO. SATURDAY EVENING, JANUARY 13, 1912 PRICE TWO CENTS COPPERS USE CLUKFREELY Gfteck Rioters in Massachu- setts Manufacturing Town, WOMEN ABE TRAMPLED UPON Trouble Follow; Threatened Reduc- tion In Wages of Woolen Opera- tives as Result of Operation of 54- Hour Strike and In- vade Factories, Forcing Shutdown and Throwing Employes Out of Ready For Duty. Lawrence, Mass., Jan. In this city was the direct result of Jhe new 34-hour law enacted by the last legislature at the instance of labor leaders. The law prohibits the employment in mills and factories of of women and chil- dren for more than that length of time each week. A riot call was sounded, women were knocked down and trampled upon, heads were clubbed, much damage of trifling nature done to machinery, five persons arrested lor inciting- riot and operatives left Uieir work, either by inclination 01 compulsion. The operatives want the same pay for 54 hours work that they received for 06 hours labor, and trouble has been smoldering for some daj-s be- cause of the belief that what is in effect a wage reduction was about to be put into effect. The new statute, while applying to females and minors only, made it mandatory on manu- facturers to close their plants when the women and children left. It was found that the male opeiativcs could not bo kept profitably employed with tho diminished supply of raw ma- terial. Accost Other Operatives Italian spinners of the Washington, Wood and Ayres mills of the Atner- freight tru'n and took a of coal out of the tuiiu. U crc-'.v obitCU-J. b-jl r; the engineer i'H'ir.an to cut oaf the car and set it onto a A committee 01 ei'.izt- ns then tioned the to llu leu- helders. Texans Freeze to Death. Fort V.'u.th 1 All Texas bv the weather for tlu lure from JO br-lov, I'.ui- haniile towp-s to JS gulf. Snow fell loi the i. 35 years at Gaivpston, IJp.i San Antcisio liousioj; mometers over the .state Flviwed a Reneril or to 70 ti.i- sudden change catcSunK poor so unprotected that six were frozen to death. Waco, Sanderson Jlallas, Sherrnan and Denidoa tejio.-i these deattis. due dnectly to wave. t' SPEAK AT COLLEi Rev. U. G. Hoover to Speak on the "White Slave" Evil Many people in Athens will be to hear that Rev. Q. G. Hoover return to Athens soon 10 deliver famous lecture on -The Peril of Girl and the Wlme lad ujll bis the He Subscriptions are Sent As- sociation Which is Aiding Cause WOLVES STEAL FOWLS Farmers Join In Wolf Drive for Pro- j tection Against Pests. I'ity. J_, IVoi-.os in !hu omutry snrro undiuy this DIV such a to and poultry that HH-ajrU'.cn have bofu usHi-'i taUen iu "-e'lC-ruI ioifilitios for ihcir noil In tht' hood f-veral iiiinilicd t'armois aio tniAauiHl 'otlay in a vvnl? hunt Thedi> oi last summer 01- iViei! a favorable soiuou for ivaiins their Woolen company announced spoke to a crowded house on this subject at the Free Methodist church here some weeks ago. At that time numbers were turned away, who could not get into the church on ac- count of the crowd. All who heard the lecture realized the av. iulness of this gigantic evil as never before. Numerous requests have "open made for Mr. Hoover's return, in cider thai a larger Athens audience might have the privilege of listening to this lec- ture. return He has llna.Hy to Athens, and i-onseuted will speak Now York. .Jan in payment oL yearU 1110111- ducs, have already been re- cuUfd by ill-; Ameri.au fiame iceuvf and Pionaaation" Association. ac  from it- ollices at ill Al- though little more than two months plupsed since its incorporation, till- association has lent -valuable aid to the cause of gamo prelection, and sportsmen from all over the country, realizing the necessity for prompt and concentrated action if our fish and same are to be saved from extraction, are hastening to enlist under the na- tional standard. Over a dczen litv-. and a number of club memberships have been secured. Tho New Yorh State Pish. Game and Forest which counts among its members most of the local clubs of the state, and which ha? been very influential in securing thp enactment of good legislation, joined the new association by the unani- mous vote of the annual conve.nion held recently in Schenectady. Canada and almost every state in the Union have furnished me-nhers. 3g from to a year. Jicm- 'erships are secured on. the follow- ing basis: Associate, or more an- nually; club, cr more annually: life, at one time: patron, and benefactor. The funds derived in this way, to- gether with au income of sub- scribed by manufacturers, is adniiriib- erod by experts trained in. the pro- fession cf game and fish protection and propagation. T'noy stand ic.irtv gcod these jL-.i.iir woh es Mid it ia nuil.s an.- more many than lor A .'sen 1st Indicted. O, Jan. 1" S. "D, v as bv c'iid jury on an charge, it being that lie s.'t tue 10 the U'titcd Cicak and Puit company store, which Inirned on il'o night of Dec. 16. G'lltin was manager of the local store. the Auditorium Thursday evening, January 25. "The White Slave Evil" is appalling intention to strike, and American people of operatives gathered outside the gates men and women are and announced that they would not lives to stop its course. today and iving their Mr. Hoover go to work. They accosted other op-'as a rnitcd States detective, is enn- eratives and endeavored to persuade'nently fitted to give information as them to strike most of. the to the workings of this gigantic s-vs- thousands brushed past the malcon- J tern, of which ho has, made a special tents and went to work as usual. study for years. He brings before This angered the Italians and they' his audience vhirt and entered the Wood mill, shouting pictures of this anful crime as talc- threats to everyone to quit work at en from his acula] experiences in ivs once. Sticks, bobbins and weights f efforts to expcge some of ,he were used as forcibly aignmr-nts and j workings lhosc ,vho are engaged many were injured, but none serious- j in soul and b0ilv destrovin b ly. Many women fainted. The pow- j er was shut off and soon 6.000 em- ployes were in idleness. A riot call was sounded on the fire alarm and every available man re- sponded. The cops used their clnbs freely anil finally cleaned the strik- ers frr.ra the three mills, A large crowd of them then made thfir way to the Lawrence Buck company plant, where windows were smasaed and a general Sjbt with the police occurred. There many women in the crowd, and they were particu- narly, "bitter against the police, whoj finally advanced with drawn clubs and made arrests, What will happen today, when about due the operatives is paid, can not be predicted, but the city anthorities are confident that they can cope with the situation and are prepared to call out the local Every citizen of Athens should hear the place Years s South- eastern Ohio Last night the tnermorneter record- ed the coldest spell That had visited militia if necessary ta pult down dis- _ this part of the country in many a order. GOLD WAVE LEAVES DEAD IN ITS WAKE West Suffers When Mercury Takes Drop, day and this morning everything V.T I frozen solid and there was much dis- comfort and suffering trough the city and county. Every branch of busi- i.ess was For the past ten days real old-fash- ioned winter has continued through this section of the country and zero weather has prevailed in the West and Northwest for more than two weeks. Athens was snow bound yos- (terday and trains oiitall roads are co give their support to any cause for the furtherance of the things already accom- plished by the association is a com- plete reorganization of the protective Forccs of cur slate, where a special agent spent 30 days, during which rime more convictions were secured against violators than in the preced- ing 10 months. Ths a.-creiii'c: with the local authorities, in most cases turning all evidence over to them, so that they cbtain the cors- id ions. The president of the association, John B. Burnhani, who has for j'ears been identified with protective work. ind is an authority on game 'aws. has been asked by the prate of York to assist in codifying its He is one of a committee of three engaged in this work. Report? of local conditions, which members uave se.U in. arc strikingly similar. Inadequate, or conflicting laws, poor- ly enfrccd, are the rule aliucst every- where. Laxity m ihe enforcement of game laws is of! en due to considerations of local politics from which the associa- tion's special asents are immune, and are therefore able to obtain evidence igainsc and prosecute violators. where the county or state officers would Sot do so. In other cases the local authorities ife simply handi- capped by lack of funds and arc only too glad of the assistance cf the as- sociation's {rained men. Another of the commonest ob- stacles in the way of bringing to jus- tice those who are ruthlessly despoil- ing the rctmtry of the game Tvhu-h rightfully belongs to ail tho peoplo. is 'nertia. on the part of the public as yet unawakened to the disastrous ro- LOCAL IN TRIAL L. G. Bean and J. R. Nick- olson Before Federal Court at Parkersburg Parkersburg, W. Va., Jan. G. Beau and R. Nicholson, both of Athens, who were tried at the last term of court on a charge of passing several suurious coins, purporting to be gold pieces, at several bus- iness places in this city, were called for trial this afternoon, the jury hav- ;g disagreed on the former trial. Their attorneys, Hiicshew Mc- Dougle, cf this city, announced that and the trial was they soon were ready in progress. Both Beaa and known in this c-il Nicholson are wpll been, con- nected with the Besn restaurant aud hotel near the B. dc O. depot. Bean was recently married and now lives in Columbus. Bigelow Will Recognize Both Sides of Proposals Sub- mitted to Convention Columbus, O., Jan. 33. President of the constitutional conven- iion, in making up his list of com- PUCES mm McDevitt Given Ovation By Wilkesbarre Takes Them Into Confidence NVw York, ,1m. York so- ciety WHS honored a on.1.! from John Jay MeUevitt of Pa., who is faiill in our midst. Food and flashlights were indulged in until ij. late hour alter Joan Jay rc-aohed the metropolis ou his spe- cial train. John Jay, as you prob- ably lemember, recently got for withdrawing 1'rom the Demo- cratic fckct after he had been nom- inated for county treasurer of Lu- zcrno county, Pennsylvania, and straightway decided to spend what was left of it on a. special train to New York and the Waldorf and have a regular day. John Jay, accompanied by the rest of Wilkesbarre, went to the Lehigh Valley station, "Wiikesbarre. Did John Jay walk the 100 j arils from Reci- ington hotel to tho station? No, no, no! He look a touring car. And.til the town surged alongside thiough a snowstorm and cheered. There were enousa folks present to apill out on the tracks in front of the rod brick station. train had to a result a be stopped passenger short and mittecs.will endeavor to place on the i n a- more important ones the strongest was compelled to discharge its Wil- kesbarre passengers half a block north of the station or run down John's admirers and kill a lot of them. While the regular passenger train was being delayed John was lifted by two stalwart admirers above the shoulders of tho crowd and placed finally on the high stair of tbe station platform blmtblack. The voung man made a brief speech to the crowd, which was received uproariously. Tells How It Cost. "lly Fellow said John Jay, "this trip- is costing- me a hell of a lot of "money. (Cheers.) My father says I'm no good. (Cheers.) He has always been sore on me since, when I bad walking typhoid, I just stayed in bed and compelled him to do the walking. Somebody 'n the family had to do it. The fact remains, however, that I recovered. fLong applause.) Have some money (throwing pennies into the "This trip, as t have already said, is costing a lot of money. I'd tell you exactly how much this special train cost except that I've told each of thore fly newspaper men a certain price and 1 forgot what I told them. But I gladly spend money to put Wilkcibarre on the map. I think I'll be back about Sunday night. But I won't be back at this platform. Any- body who is interested enough to welcome me back, to the old home will nlease come around to the freight yards just above the Hazard the Northampton St. Louis, Jan. records running from minutes to hcurs This worning scores cf telephone and telegraph-wires had snapped of! from the effects of the extreme cold and communication between Athens for the twelfth day of the cold wavejancj Columbus and way points was in this city show 3C degrees below j crjppletl. In some instances early freight trains. zero as.jChe climax, the wave fromjtijjs morning, slurt the nort.'iihaYms now passed to the j some of thorn consisting of less than southeast. 120 Coal is selling at a ton in Ok- lahoma's panhandle, where tbe cold wave has broken the record. Xorth- j west Missouri reports a new coM j wave record established and a coal famine imminent. Daniel was found frozen to jjcat'n in his room at Springfield. lii., it was 13 below z-rro. Other deaths from cold are: Chicago, Hammond, Tnd.. 2: St. Paul, 1; Far- jto, X. D.. Valley City. N. D., 1; Digger, Sask.. 2. With every pound of coal in the town exhausted and the weather near the zero mark, the people of Fortales, X. M.. held up a Santa Fe cars, passed througn Athens puii- by as mr.ny as four freight en- gines.' It was found al'nost impossi- ble to keep the big engines warm this morning and on all roads into Athens traffic was demoralized. At the B. O. depot "mi: cr.o was working this and at the Western Union office and the Tlock- jng Valley depot, tho situation was bad. All building work has been sus- pended as Veil as all outside wont of every character and as a consequence there is much idleness about the city. The township trustees and Associ- (Continued" On Page Four.) suits v.-hjrn are sum tM: despoliation. If the eonrnupity iinrter his surveillance is not behind him. a warden, can accomplish iitrle. The association's agents active in reaning the gospel of game protec- tion among those v ho do not realize its necessity. The interest t'.ia; has run ii- advooales and opponents of the vari- ous proposals which will be submit- ted to tl-e convention. He FO de- clared after a talk with Superinten- dent Wheeler of the Anti-Saloon league. He also pointed out that under the rules to be recommended by the rules committee a minority report frora a committee would be consid- ered by tbe convention prior to the majority report, so that the ordmary co'iiniittce would be minimized. j In line with this plan President i Bigelow announced four members of! the ininati'-e nnd referendum com-1 of Cleveland, author of the municipal I- and advantage of havine a majority for a proposal "Did you ever hear about the time irsy father and I got into an argu- ment and I held him on the kitchen floor for an hour, pounding the face off him, and how when I let him up at last he staggered into a chair and asked me, 'Have j9u got enough (Cheers.) I went over to him quick and reaching around with a right hook T---- "For the last time, all in- terrupted Conductor Martin L. San- dorlin for the special, conr-isiing ofi a. chair car, a baggage car to hold John Jay's suitcase, and a stingy day coach for ballast (have you ever swung around the sharp curves of the Lehigh was panting acroso the tracks and a regular train Repl'cs In Negat've. XV.iMifunton. .l.in of Suit.' repliod to the fioni F. E. {.'ann. one of UK- .M-bi.-ii jisis ot Shn.stf-r. tilt' de treasurer general oi Persia, who that iie and his 13 asso- ciates be- backed by tlu> btate depart- ment it; their demand to be paid the same as Shuster for full ycais, although they hare worked but a few month's Kiiox replied that tln-lr claim is not valid Wet Rush At Newark. Newark, .Ian. lifluor licenses had been taken out in New- ark up until hibt evening, or half the number of saloons that were in oper- ation when tho county voted dry three years ago. Tho hotels are crowded with representatives wholesale liquor houses, and it is esti- mated that before the week expires sixty saloons will be in operation. "ANNA EVANS" CASE IS STIIU MYSTERY Body of Woman Who Was Once Athens Resident Remains Unclaimed Dallas Smith East Liverpool, has written Postmaster Bryson for in- formation concerning a wojnan by the name of Anna Evans, ww recent- ly died in that city ana whose body is new being neia tor identification. A.S yet no light has been cast which will in any way clear up the mystery concerning her identity. Mr. Smith states in His letter that iho woman who gave her name as Anna Evans, xvorketi at his home in )2ast Liverpool for several Vt'eeka and two days after she had lef.t their liome she was found dead in a room- ing house in that city. The woman told the Smiths that she at one had lived in both Athens and Nelson- ville, but that she had beea working in Columbus for some time prior; ,to coming to Bast Liverpool. No one has appeared at the morgue where the body is now held to identi- fy it and East Liverpool authorities are at a loss to explain the affair. Sorry Ha Slashed Throat. Kentou, O.. Jan. Mej'ers, troubled with insomnia, attempted suicide by slashing his throat with a razor. Ho is in a critical condition, and expresses regret over his rash act. Accidentally Shot by Chum. Toledo, O., Jan. 13 Ernest Ja- cobs, 17, was probably fatally wound- ed when he received the contents of an old shotgun accidentally irred hy his chum, Lee Winkler, 17. T was being held up. law; .Tamos naif mil of Lima.! whom President Digelotr regards as Welcomed on Arrival. And at last the special got Jersey City. While the train from tne giarr, anfl loval support which sportsmen and others! have accorded to the Amerk-ari i at.d Propagation Associa-j tion shows that peopif to i thf same position in trie matter'' of our wild life rhat tbev ha-.o! a progressive or. other linep. bur as opposed to I. and R.: Former Speaker E'bert L. Lamppon of AK'I- j tabula r.nd T. Ccdv of Union both of were said to be awiinBt direct He announced tho selrc'ten of v> Representative W. R. Kilpatriei: of T'-iinil.ull as of thr> mm- m it toe on woman suffrage. Mr. Kil- patrick favors suffrage into was rnming to a stop in came many folks. .iohn Jay at this moment was standing at the rear end of was now a the chair complete -and completing the speeches that he wanted to finish at V.'ilkes- and especially BROWN COLLECTION 10 MUSEUM Phillipino Curios Secured by Late Dr. Brown of Coolville Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Brown, of Cool- ,have tendered to the Museum of Ohio University, the Phillipino curio collection of their son after whom it is named, the Wihnont Elton-Brown Memorial collection. Prof. C. L. Martzolff returned from the Brown home yesterday with the curios which for the present, owing to insufficient space, will net have fair display. This collection comes a.s a. timely addition to that of Captain Frank Lowry.of this city, whoso donation represents the military side of Philip- ino life, while that of the late Dr. Brown is domestic in character. In the group are all manners and shapes of hats from the wide floppy Panama to the rigid, board-like struc- barve. Mauch Chunk, a! Souse Besslehem. In between he was reciting Bryan's cross of cold j ture of the sun stroke hat, mostly of peroration, "Cardinal blank' bfsutiful texture and -wonderful con- towards the fconio of our natur.il Xoihinjr br.t united pfforf the fish and jrr.nif1. ofi the national afsociat'ou irf ?o or as wc-il as tn this effort. vesourcps. pave of to organize Another Lancaster Family Paiscncd. Coluznhus.. O.. Jan. 10. State an to determine whether thtre ur- srnic. 'n a of Hour iisc'i hj Mr. r.fr.s. Clinton of A v.-n? "rr.r to Dairy au-1 Ff-.sd Strodc. The fai.'iiy be- iil otter r-atln" r.iri in- vfsHgaiiOM -aas WJSF- in of lie fatal result in the Hat! case. Blackburn for Commissioner. David K. a road and l.ridee builder, having hud many yonrs' in Ftonr aii'l concret" work, is a canrtidat" for tii" nomination of rounty at the Republican primaries. MIPS Esitcl'a A'binson lias ed from a several weeks" r-lav in Kramer, Ind. She will probably re- sume her place ir. the public schools soon. vorse, and asking the flashiight men not to crowd him. And .lobii Jay went to the Waldorf struct ion. An ivory opium pipe with long and tiny bowl richly carved and with Dr. Kdward Swreney, his phy-j mounted with metals accompanied by Kician, Secretary John Lenahan, and! tisrich purse like bag to carry the I a string of admirers. And he had is uniouo and valuable. come quick scrambk-d eggs and took j Two priests vestments are of the a cab to "Tne Little Millionaire" j richcM brocade, or.c- of gold and black show, was introduced to Georgie (he other of red silk brocade, in- Cohan and family between acts and wita gold and silver thread. MAKES TARIFF LEADING ISSUE i Governor Harmon Speaks at Jackson Day Banquet, WISHES FOR HERO'S RETURN After Sharp Criticism of Taft FOP His Alleged Failure to Keep Party Platform Pledges, Ohio Executive For Economy In Govern- mental Expenses and Refers to Own Record as Buster While Attorney General. East St. Louis, Jan. 13. Fifteen hundred peraons sat shivering tut thoy heard Governor Harmon of Ohio deliver an address before the Democratic club hero on the occa- sion of the celebration of the one hundredth, anniversary of the battle of New Orleans, In which Jncksou immortalized, himself. "Jackson urged a.-jgradual ___ tion of tariff saitj the fovef- nor, "especially on neceHnaries, at time when, they were levied mainly for revenue. When recently swe .saw a president, against his just inclina- tion, sign and praise aT tariff bill which brolte his own. and. his promise ot reform, and then, in the face of his express admissions, bills for reductions by con- gross under direct command ot voters of the entire couatry, everywhere exclaimed, as they did in the days of the vacillating Buchanan, 'Oh, tor one hour of Andrew Jack- son.' Attacks Republican Admlnirtraticha. The governor attacked ,the finan- cial policy of the three Republi- can administrations. aa f; to the every -two" jeart-ito. than attention, aescrlbed worst abuBei known ranging tariff w to favored collect from the public, a much larger mm than ,for benefit. "According: to reliable he said, "for every dollar the govern- ment receives on article imported. the favored manufacturer collects IS above tbe-normal of .like artl-" cles from American Is, in effect, farming out .the taxing power." _ .1 The gorernor pointed with, pride to! his record as a trust huater, cltlnR the cases against- the Missouri Freight association and the- Ad- dyston Pipe company of bis successful activity .attorney jteneral In the Cleveland cafciaet. There were also pending av the ex- piration of his term of- the bee! and othera. Remove Morie to Hoipital. Washington, Jan. 13. Announce- ment was made at tho department ot Justice that Charles W. Morse, the banker-convict, serving at Atlanta, would be removed immediately tp_ths. government hospital at Hot Spriaga, Aik. Trainman Fatally Crushed. Kenton, O., Jan. 13. Caught be- tween two cars In the Ohio Central yards, P. N. Tharpe was fatally in- jured. His skull was crushed, but he lived for 15 minutes afterward. COLLISION RESULTS IN TWO FATALITIES Accident Near Coliinte Out to Forgetfutas. i taken to Rector's and the Friars later. Turk! Loss Seven Gunboats. Fire Destroys Piano Factory. Cincinnati, O.. Jan. four- story brick piano factory of the ir.e, Jan. Turkish Knabft Brothers in Norwood, jnstont- gnnboats were sunk off Konfada in j side Cincinnati, was destroyed by a battle with an Italian bactleihlv! fire. The loss is estimated at and two destroyers. 000, partially covered by insurance. The one of black and gold was worn by a priest at the moment he was shot and the blood stains are still visible on the front. The fabrics are of wonderful text- ure and other specimens of sheer ma- terials are quite as rich. Side by side with these rich mater- (Continued Oil Pago Five.) Orient, O-, Jan. a collision between two freight trains on the Baltimore Ohio Southwestern rail- road here. Engineer J. M. Gregg of Chillicothe. Fireman. E. W. Haessler of Cincinnati were killed, and Brake- man Emmet Mul Unix of Newurk seriously if not fatally scalded. Two locomotives and 15 cars were almost completely demolished and a num- ber of cattle killed. The wreck was due to forgetful- ness on the part of Engineer J. >f. Gregg of Chillicothe, operating east- bound train Xo. 190. who ignored or- ders to pass train Xo. 197, bound, Orient. Engineer J. P. Britton of Newark, of the westbound train, arrived at the and jrum preparing to enter the siding. would have had plenty of the other train   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication