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Athens Daily Messenger: Wednesday, January 10, 1912 - Page 1

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   Athens Daily Messenger, The (Newspaper) - January 10, 1912, Athens, Ohio                               f Not many people whose is educated will MISS any great number or this week't want ads Hov. about VOT A. WEATHER tsxow FIJCPJIIES I.ATE OB THURSDAY. COLDER TONIGHT, THE HOME PAPER OF ATHENS AND ATHENS COUNTY, OHIO. VOL 37 ATHENS, OHIO, WEDNESDAY EVENING. JANUARY 10, 1912 PRICE TWO CENTS Financial District is Threatened, EQUITABLE BUILDING !N RUINS Billion Dollars' Worth of Securities Stored In Steel Vaults Are Sup- posed to Be Loss Will Not Exceed as Structure Was of Antiquated Type and Was Soon to Have Been Razed. Bank President Injured. New York, Jan. com- pletely mined the building of the Equitable Assurance society the first exclusive office building in New York. Six men lost their lues in the wreckage, one being Battalion Chief William Walsh of the fire de- partment, who was carried down by a collapsing floor as he was leading his men upward toward the Lawyers' club rooms. em- ployes of the cafp Savarin. wlio were trapped on the roof, plunged TO death the flames reached them. "Wil- liam Giblin. president of the Mercan- tile Safe Beposit company, was saved in the nick of through a window whose bars had been sawed through by nremen. The actual money loss was com paratirely slight, provided, that is. that the securities were not charred or injured in the steel vaults. Even the Equitable people do not mourn the building. They were going to tear it down soon anyway, snd fig- ured its actual value to the stock and policy holders as precisely noth- ing. It was outworn and anuquated and the cost of demolishing it would have been 1ar more 'than tire loss in furnishings and equipment. Figuring that way, the society places its loss Jt only hut the value of the law library is not included in the estimate. Insurance e'xperts guessed jthat the loss to tenants would amount to perhaps So all told the loss was perhaps invaluable Records Lost. Invaluable records of the Equitable society, of railroad companies and of corporations and law firms, housed in the building, were destroj-ed. Se- curities valued at upwards of 000.000 were endangered, although they are probably safe in die mas- sive steel vaults now sheathed in ice. The law library, containing volumes, worth perhaps 000, is dissipated in ashes. Possibly lifa insurance policies upon which the Equitable had loaned money were burned. If they are gone it will take legislation to re- produce them. All in all, the fire so tangled the affairs of corporations vast interests that it may ypars to straighten them out take Lost His Horse. Ilciiiy Gutherie reports the loss of his horse, through feeding mouldy corn and fodder. This is the new dis- ease that is working havoc with horse flesh all over the country, through poison contained in mouldy corn that is so plentiful this season, due to the unusual I v rainy weather during the fall. Coming to Auditorium Thurs- day Night in Recital Au- spices C. E. Society JUDGE CALEB H. NORRIS Marion Jurist Defeated by Cincinnati Minister. Will Admit Killing Wife. 111. Jan 10. Dr Hany Elgin Webster or Chicago, tacina; trial for the murder of his Bes- plean. gmlty sie Kent Webster, will to the crime ol which in court JT PD WET ON SATURDAY Program of Worth to Farmer and Horticulturist is Provided SIM Aged Woman Sustained Broken Leg Others Injured ThP Athens, t'o'in's Frmi O-'owois Association meer at KUis Hall on Satuidav morning, .lanuaiv lOtb, be- ginning at in o'clock. An intprr-qtingr program has pivpared as toi- lows Reading of minutes 01" last meeting. Slope Led Mr Barker 1 :ght and Siiade. lis Effects on Plants and Tiofs .Mr h'ickox DISCU3S1 OX. "Economic Entomology" Mr Spohn 'Does it Pay the Fai mer to Produce Cream" <5 min.) J Ilahday Clinc Apple Judging Rome Beauty. minutes.) Any farmer or fruit grower, wish- ing to whether or not their cows are paying their keep, or rob- bing them, are invited to bring a sam- ple of. milk and the agricultural de- of he is accused partment will test the same free charge. Also, any pei'son with diseased trees or branches, bring: them in, and the department will be plpased 10 give any information. John Cunningham Dead. New England, O., Jan W Cunningham, single and aged 39, ciied at the home of his mother neai here last night at 9 o'clock. The fun- eral will be held here on Thursday, at 11 a. m and be conducted by (Rev. Davidson. Mrs John Dalton, icy street yesterday 70, fell on the afternoon near her home on fiast State sa'est anu sustained, a vpry had fiacture of the left log near the thigh.. Because of tier age and general health, her con- dition is quite serious, and she has been removed to the home of her daughter, Mrs. Bertha Jordan, on Mor- ris avenue. Several people have sustained minor injuries through faHs on icy sidewalks and streets m the last days and the physicians nrc receiving more re- ports every Those n ho were so thoughtful as tc scatter sawdust on the are being praised to the skies but these people are few and far between. The blacksmiths are doing a flour- ishing business, as all horses have to be rough shod 10 set along the treets at all. This morning many teamsters were ordered by the humane officers to have their hcrses reshod. The plumbers are still working overtime to thaw out hundreds of frozen water pipes and the weather man holds out little hope of moderation OHIO MINERS ELECT President Nu- Mocre Recommends merous Reforms. Columbus. O Tan the opening of the twenty-third annual convention of the Ohio miners John Moore ot Reudville was Declared elected president of District fi. Ohio Mine Workers, Zeleiika of Bridgeport, vice- president, Gcor.se Savage of Columbus, secicfaiy- treastirer; A. R. Ysikville. international hoard member. Conrad Harmon Welcomes Farmers. Columbus O Jan connec- tion with the annual meeting cf t'jc Ohio   has two voices of remarkable quality rich baritone and a clear soprano which he uses interchangeably with wonderful effect. He can't explain his double knows he has it. When one of his voices is hoarse the other retains its ciearness. The admission is only a quarter. Seats reserved at Hart's drug store, j lowing: A mine-run, sjstem; a reform in unfair and unreasonable diff-eren- i Henry. Ual pick and machine mining: an ad- vance in wages consistent the in- creased least in niain- Annual Meetings of Stock- holders Held Yesterday Afternoon The stockholders cf. tho two local national banks met yesterday after- noon in annual session, and elected i'lfir boards of directors for the com- ing jear. No changes were made in thf directorates or officials cf either bank. The stockholders of the First Xa- tional Bank flectod iue following di- O'Bleness, C. L. Pos- (on. D. 11. .Moore. S. M. Mocre and J. P. "Wood. The officers elected b> the directors Henry O'- Cleness: vice president, C. L. Poston: cashier, D.'ll Moore: assistant cash- iers. Frai'k Rolton and R. I.. Wood- worth. The Athen Xational Brink stock holders elected the following board of X Alderman. L. G Worstell. H. Baker, J. Gas ton Coe, J. R. Harvey. George B. Henry tainine. if not improving, the Ameri- can standard of living, ana i univer- sal half holiday on Saturdav. TAFT IS PRAISED Lawrence Langcion Opens Speaking Tour at Akron. Akron. O, Jan for all the important acts of the Taft administiatir r. and a tribute tc the worth "f the president as a man Ti-prc. embodied in the here before the Summit Count} Repub'i- of Lawrence floor K. tho Mr Ohio Lang- oar. club formerly house of representatives, don brought to tiie fore the instances of Taft's activity under the anti- trust law, the president's efforts at world peace and the administration's stand for tariff reduction. .1. Haliday Cline and H. The officers elected wpre as President. W X. Alderman: vice pi evident and cashier. H D. Hen- ry; assistant cashier, Fred Alderman; teller, 12 R The Security Savings Bank pany re-e'ected the following directors Sayro, A. S. Bethel, H. Moore, llw.ry C. G. O'- Blenes-. FOUR ACTIONS BROUGHT In the Common Pleas Court Yester- day After a Rest of More Than Month. Alter an intenm ct noio than :t month m which v as be- gun, foui i-abes were liU-d in tiu> com- mon pleas couri .Moruhu Koda L ipeiitoM, who ;eil .'times Car- pouter at Canaanvillo ill VKlo claiii" that her husband nexer tor r dining rneir marninl liip and that they now children, one but a old She wants a di voice1 U'nu-s 1C Urowu, ot Yoik township, brought suit for divorce agaiiifat Delia Brown, alleging that she has het-n of misconduct with James Lau.l- erbac k They raarriod in l.sfiS ut.d havp one child, whoso custody the father seeks The Athens Lumber lompauy brought suit against John rannon and DPS Antle on a promis- sory ncte for If 108. The fourth ihr- quo war- ranto iirocet'ding against Mr. former councilman from the waitl. WILL RELIEVE NEEDY Delegates From Churches of City Started Active Cam- paign Today Committees from all of the churches of the city met yesterday in the First M. E. church and organized the Board of Associated Charities of the city of Athens. Meetings will be held from time to time as found necessary. The project was formulated at tbti suggestion of Humane Oflicer Al C. Roach, whose investigations have showed him that there are a number of families in Athens ihat win re- quire assistance during ihe winter and spring. They arp in actual need, and tho majority cf them through no faull of their own. Ezra Walker v.-as made chairman of the organization, Charles -E. Cameron secretary, and James A. Palmer, treas- urer. Next Sunday the purpose of the organization will be brought before each of the churches, and an appeal for money, clcthiug that can be used and food, will be made. It was decided that contributions of money should be sent to Treasurer Palmer and that contribulions of clothing-and food should be sent to the fire department house, where Hugh Moighen will take care of it for the organization until it is distribut- ed, it is desired that the clothing contributed shall be in condition that can be made use of. J. A. Palmer, C. B. Henderson, J. C. Rardin, E. F. Black, and Mr. Ezra "Walker were appointed as a committee cf five to solicit funds for immediate use by the Associated Char- ities. CONVICTS HIMSELF OF MANY CRIMES Chicago Suspect Admits Being Murderer Gets Pardon. Col'-.rubus. O., Jan. the recommeft'lrit'on of Chief J. W. Clark of the penitent inij. ernor Ifaimon pardoned Thomas J. "S. received In to servo life from Montgomery county for second degree murder. Youns is an ex-soldier. Dr. Clark said his mind was permanently affected by a sun- stroke in the Phi'ippines. ile was sent tip for shooting to death a man named Mohler in a Dayton restau- rant because he thought Mohler had his wife. Chicago. Jan. Hunt of the detective bureau from Frank Ilolloway, a man of many aliases, a confession that he robbefi the Montreal hank of New Westmin- ster, B. C.. of M3'i 000, looted the Panama bank cf SS-f.OOO ami had committed tvro muidors. As IIP finished his confersii-n. Ilol- loway remarked. "My nind is relieved lit- had pivcncjnan name': ami dates and plares rnS fcai he rfad> to "nans iike ri mar1 Ilolloway was arrested on suspicion of beins; a pickpocket. Taken befoie Inspector Hunt ho began a :ecital ot his alleged "I'm what they ca'I a ba-'i real burglar, bank robber, I'm almost anything you want to call me." IIP said. "I robbed the Montreal bank Jan. 10, 1010, and sot away v.ith all the cash, about 3-Oil 00. Next I r bed the bank at Panama and got away with I pursued by a rrevr on a gunboat, but T sot ashore and escaped in the swamps. HQPMG THE COAL Hocking Shafts Have Re- sumed Otlier Companies Have Orders 11 in PIS and opeiator.s alike are ben> flitting through the bitter colti wpalh- at, orders aro daily increasing' and shafts in ibis part, of HIP county which haie been idle or working only a small part, of the tiino promise to be busy for some ahead. In addi- tion, a shur-down is in prospect in the late through the readjust- ment of the scale. .Many think that this peiiod of idleness will be of some length, while others think it will bo but short. At am rate, the tendency will be to keep work up in the Interim !-o that a supply of mined coal may he on hand in case of a protracted shut- down. New Pittsburg- Mine No. 10, at Hock- ing, which has been shut down since about ten days before Christmas, will reopen tomorrow and thus about men will be iiled with work which promises to be tairly steady. About 100 of these men live in this cny. Mine No. of this company, has been idle for about a week, but has again started and about two-thirds time is expected. Sunday Creek Mine No. on Sug- ar Creek is working about half time. No other mine 011 the Creek, is work- ing Caiiaaiiville mine is working fairly seadily now, although last month work was net extra good there. Rescued From Ice F'oe Poit Clinton, O.. Jan. big section of ice broke away from the shore hove, carrying six men and a who were engaged ia cutting be. with it. A strong wind blew the ice into Lake Erie. The horse jumped into the water and swam ashore. The men were resctio-d with difficulty in small boats. James Succeeds Paynter. "Frankfort, Ky., .Inn. tative Ollic- James was today elected "United States senator to succeed Senator Thomas P. Paynter, whose term expires in March. 1913. JameS received 105 votes to 28 cast for his Republican opponent, Edwin P. Mor- row. PRICE OE SHOES WIILJOOOSTED Manufacturers' Association May Have Government After Them as Result XPW York, .Tan. family shoos will cost more, this year, than they did in 1911. According to the statements made by members of the Xational Boot and Shoe Manufactur- ers' Association, who began their an- nual meeting in this city today, an advance is absolutely necessary be- cause of Ihe increase in the cost of raw material. It is expected that an advance of from five to seven per cent will be -made in the wholesale prices of shoes, after the fall samples been sent out in March. A UNIQUE DEVICE Nat REV. HERBERT BIGELOW Wmf Hard Fight to Head Constitutional BY PASTEUR EXPERT Dr. Japaes M. Phillips, of Columbus Speaks Before Medical Society Quite a number of members of the Athens County Medical Society at their monthly session in this city yes- terday, were addressed by Dr. James M. Phillips, head of the Pasteur Insti- tute, of Columbus. His talk was on "Rabies" and was heard with great interest by the physicians 'of the Boun- ty who were so fortunate as to be in attendance. Dr. Phillips brought with him a rab- bit which'had been Injected with the I'M? anJMil JPdeirtEae to! virus of rabies eight days ago to make plain the operation cf the disease, had reached the stage of ,e where it was paralyzed through the effect of the virus and was killed before the members of the society by Dr. Phillips, who then, pre- pared serum for Injection. The rab- bit would have died at C o'clock last night. It was disssected and the ef- fect of the rabies was shown on the spinal column and brain. Dr. Phillips stated that a person that has been bitten by a mad dog will develop rabies in a period of form ten days to eighteen months. The average time of incubation is three months. Further he declared that if a dog in a certain neighborhood de- veloped rabies, that all dogs In that part of the city should be muzzled for a peiiod of a year. If the dogs are muzled for but a few weeks, rabies may develop at time, as the incu- bation period differs, according to the conditions and the animal bitten. In case a person is bitten, the af- fected part should be cut away and cauterized with nitric acid. Carbolic acid should not be used. Don't kill the dog at once, but shut him up in a box and observe him for a few If be is killed, have the head taken to the state board of health for exam- ination. Do not send it by express. Dr. Phillips stated that in about So per cent of the cases where a person is bitten in the face and no Pasteur treatment is given, rabies will devel- op, In cases where persons are bit- and arp not treated, only about 15 ppr cent de- velop rabies, as tho clothing selves as protection. In cases where the persons bitten arc treated, less than one per cent develop rabies. To Protect Lives and ural Gas A unique and effective device ]ower ,imb protect life and pioperty wherever gas is used for light or boat, has just bee.i put on the market and is known as the Peterson gas alarm. This lit- tle instrument may be quicklv and easily attached to any gaw and it gives instant alam by ringing a bell, loud and clear, like an alarm clock. moment the gas pressure It affords absolute protec- tion danger cf explosion caused by escaping gas. "With this device in your bed room you ca.i sicep at night with the pos- i'i'.e a'-suranco that should the "gas fro off. the alarm will notifj you im- mediately." Dr. C. H. Thompson, who is inior- csied in the manufacture of this de- One of my pals, Eddie Schaefer, an will shortly organize a selling jvrnencan, all the money and latency for this and adjoining I shot him dead. Edward G. A representative will soon and I got in an argument March 2S. jxas users in this city and will give 1010. at Bogota. Colombia, and I demonstration of this wonderful ed him. I committed half a dozen life and home protector, robberies and other crimes in Texas and Oklahoma. I jumjved a bond in Texas and got awaj'. I've got 'planted' iu a certain do-svntoivn hotel in Chicago. Hollo- First Offender Finsd. Orman TitchmiHer was fined and costs Jesierday by Slaughter. after pleading guilty to a plain drunk] Trapped In Burning Building. Portsmouth, O .Ian. Lawson, 74. art1, his wife. 77, wpre family binned ir. n. fire that destroy- ed their home at Ilanther Furnace, Ky. Thomas Holly, a stepson, res- ruori the appd tounle. He was so badly burned that hp may not re- cover. A flue the fire the famiH. including Ij's wife and joung childrpn, wore aslepp. Constitutional Convention Pro- cedure Under Consideration. BIGELQW ELECTED PRESIDENT Cincinnati Minister Wins After Elev- en Spirited Ballots Had Been of Youngstown Passes Judge Norris and Flniches Second In Secretaryship and Sherlock Made Columhus, O., Jan. its officers, the constitutional ronvention met today to arrange the program to be followed in drafting Ohio's new basic law, Tho first and probably the most Imponsnt question to the manner in which, the committees are to be named. President Bigelow has openly declared that ia his opln- ion it is the duty of the presiding; officer to name all committees; but it is known that many delegates, some cf whom supported Bigelow In liw candidacy for the hold to the belief that the should he named by a committee wt-'J committees, members of which, shall be selected by the convention- itself. -T, it is probable that the entire will be taken up with-' the tracwae- j tion of routine anijf that ,it will be several days preliminaries are arranged and the delegates are ready to settle "down, to the work of tution. _' ,1- Many favor holding noon iwslons. In order to leave mornings free fop, meet- A{ not relinking night _ At the opening vention Rev, Herbert- S: Blgelolr -of.' Cincinnati was elected president on 'r the eleventh ballot. warm ,tO'> leadinir" Vfirst lot with r.4 votes, six.rtjort required number- to elecV' On that s- ballot Judge Caleb rloji received 27 voteg, D. B. son of Yemngstown 20, Henry son of Athens -14; D, of 1. On Om thfiri S. B. Pass of Yellow Springs- ed one vote. He remained in race uMl 'the tenth ballot, the high- est number of votefe-lie log on the eighth and ninth when-he received 16. Norris ed bis -M, the second'- ballot, after which' he hit the tobog-., Can, en final rsceivincv only three Final Ballot. The eleventh ballot resulted lows: of Wood, Beyer of" Hancock, Brown of Highland. Brown Pike, Cassidy of Logan, Cordea oC Plamilton, Crites of Piekaway, Gros- ser and Davio of Cuyahoga, of Miami, Donahey of Tuscarawas, I Doty of Cuyahoga. Eamhart of War- ren, Packler of Cuyahoga. Fcrrell of Cuyahcga, Fitzsimmons of Cuyahoga, Fluke of Ashland, Fox; of Mercer, H.ahn of Cuyahoga. Hallenkamp of Franklin.. (Continued .on Two.) WATERLOO EARNERS TO HEETJATURDAY Supt. J. R. Clark Will Speak at New Marshfield School Rally Now Marshfield. Ohio, Jan. 10. A school and farmers' rally will held here Saturday afternoon, ary loth, beginning at i o'clock- "speakers will be Supt. J. R. supervisor of Agricultural Teaching J 3 Invites Friend to Heaven. iuiii. O.. .la.ii. Bcrdjor. out ol v.-ork rornTnitted suiride by blowing out his train with a revolver. Bcforo the act he treated his friend Robert Blum so a can of beer and then in- vited the latter to join him on a ii-ip to heaven. Tho latter declined. way was also known as Robert Hunt- charge. Ornian was the first person! Most of us would rather Bawled ley, Anderson and other aliases. to appear before His Honor this year.'Out than Muttered Out. for the southeastern district of and several local men. Supt. Clarke desires to meet all of the farmers, teachers and school of- ficials of Waterloo township at this meeting. Mr. Clarke will explain ful- ly the manner ia which agriculture is ro. be taught in the rural schools iof the state of Ohio and what it -will I mean to the farmer as well as his He should be greeted by a 1 large number of people His work in directly among- the teachers aad Iscliocl children, and he has visited scores of communities in the past months.   

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