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Bismarck Tribune: Tuesday, January 26, 1943 - Page 1

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   Bismarck Tribune, The (Newspaper) - January 26, 1943, Bismarck, North Dakota                               Thought In u in we more happy from the things we are ignorant ot than from those we art acquainted with. -LA ROCHEFOUCALO. THE BISMARCK TRIBUNE North Dakota's Oldest 1873 The Weather- Not quite so cold to- night and Wednesday morning VOLUME 70-NUMBER 21 BISMARCK. N. D.. JANUARY PRICE FIVE CENTS Russ Army Pushes Battle Lines Ahead in Ukraine and Caucasus French Fight Germans in Marseilles London Press Jumps Gun On Allied 'Announcement1 Battle Bitterly Against Leaving Old Port City authorities have proclaimed a state of siege in the Vichy radio reported Tues- dispatches from Switzerland told of angry Frenchmen fortifying their homes in the old port district of the city and firing on Ger- man soldiers ordered to evac- uate the district. The German News Agency DNB said in dispatches to Madrid and Lisbon that persons had been arrested in the city The Vichy ra- which placed the number of arrested at was making an obvious effort to minimize difficul- ties in the old and historical city of second largest in France. Shortly after reporting the state of siege the radio as- serted that Marseille was calm and the evacuation of the old port dls- trict had taken place without dif- ficulty. Earlier it had anyone disobeying an order or at- tempUng to shoot would be sen- ienced to death. Nads Use Artillery A Reuters dispatch from Zurich said the' Germans had brought up artillery to shel revolting French- men into submission If necessary and that house-to-house fighting was in progress German occupation authorities ordered and razing of the as a de fense against possible Al- lied invasion from North Africa. The Germans have been fortifying the coast in the Marseille area since completing the occupation of France. German dispatches reporting the arrest of persons said the move was necessary be- cause there were among them many criminals whose activities were against the security and Interest of the state Refugees Sent to Frejns Thousands of it was were being sent to a town 75 miles east of Marseille. A broadcast by the German-con- trolled Lyon radio to the French reported to the office of war was quoted as follows- Marseille by their calm and have greatly facilitated the evacuation of the northern area of the old port. The regional perfect of Marseille ex- pressed his warm gratitude and thanked them for the understanding they displayed. May Safeguard Personal Material entrusted with maintain- Bereaved Bridegroom Learns of Murder Governor Moses Signs Bill Of 1943 Session Action on routine bills marked a quiet session Monday in both North Dakota houses on the 21st legislative day as the senate honored the mem- ory of 13 departed members who have died since the close of the 1941 legislature. The senate took final action on only one bill while the house passed three bilk and a concurrent reso- the latter asking congress to call for investigation of the present marketing and transportation sys- tem of farm products from rural areas to the consumer. BUI Would Reduce Vote Age Three new bills were brought into the upper house as well as a reso- introduced by Senator Young of which would reduce the legal voting age from 21 to 18- year-olds. The house received two new proposals and three concurrent resolutions. In addition to the voting age reso- Senator pro- poses to provide dally per diem and travel expense for public wel- fare board members to attend meet- ings and in another bill he would ate the necessity of a wife's Ensign Richard James learns from railway investigator C W ChampUn and an officer of the murder of his prettv bride aboard speeding mainline Southern Pacific train near Klamath Ore Marine private Harold B Wilson who occupied berth above Mrs Richard James when she was slain aboard a southbound limited near Klamath was held as a ma- terial witness in the case. Wilson said he heard a scream and saw the body tumble from lower 13 into the aisle. Nazis Fight Back as Allies Develop Squeeze on Tunisia LONDON Field Marshal American -accepting a dare Erwin Rommel's Libyan army and i broke through to only the Axis Tunisian forces under Col. Gen. Jurgen fought back to back to retain a foothold in Africa Tuesday as the British Eighth army pressed relentlessly after the retreating Rommel in the south and British and French forces held firmly a bristling line on the west. While it was assumed that some of Rommel's forces already had joined Von the vulnerability of the Axis corridor up the east coast of Tunisia was indicated Monday when Yank Bombers Hit Jap Munition Ship By VERN HAUGLAND NEW G'JINEA A small Japanese ship probably munitions exploded with carrying towering ing order showed a great spirit of i flames that lighted the entire Ra- humane and social solidarity. Ar-1 baul Harbor area Monday night as 35 miles from the coastal and seized 80 Axis French holding their positions in the important Ous- seltia sector of central threw back German attacks In the mountains to the east and with the arrival of U. S. ar- mored strengthened their hold north and northeast of the a French communique said. Rommel was believed to have sent he Mareth Irrigated Gardens In Strong Demand BeliePthat the demand for space in Bismarck's irrigated victory gar- dens will be strong this year was voiced Tuesday by Kenneth W. chairman of the Bismarck Association of Commerce irrigation committee following numerous tele- phone calls from prospective gar- deners are being made now by the staff of the State Water Con- servation commission to bring more land under cultivation in the garden signature on bills of sale for threshed grain A new public welfare bill in the introduced by the public wel- fare would provide for other state public health labora- tories to conduct serological tests for venereal diseases before mar- riage contracts are completed upon approval of the North Dakota pub- lic health officer. 3 Bills Go Through House the eighth army pounding westward toward the line. The position there was further threatened by the approach from the south of Fighting French forces under Bilg. Gen Jacques Le Clerc reported to be within 50 miles of the Jebel a long range of hills stretching from Libya into Tunisia south of the Mareth line The greatest problem of the two Axis armies in Tunisia will be in get- The two main ports since additional acreage can ditch system in- fais the demand and the time available be- tween the date the frost goes out of the ground and the date when rangements were made to safeguard Flying Fortresses unloaded more as far as possible me material in-' than 15 tons of bombs on airdromes j ting supplies terests of the evacuated inhabitants and shipping in the harbor. is why everyone is definitely Describing the Major Eugene are in the extreme north and are until further to i Flying Fortress pilot from enter the evacuated and anyone disregarding orders and starting to pillage will be Im- mediately arrested the state of siege declared by the French the death sentence will be pronounced. Those entrusted with maintaining order have been given strict orders to use arms against anyone who does not reply when challenged Mystery Woman In Minot Hotel Fire Identified MINOT N D. Investiga- tion had been completed Tuesday by Police Chief w. E Mi- establishing the identity of Beatrice who is believed to hai'e died in the Waverly hotel fire last night as Mrs. of LaCrossp Wis Trip police chief has informed her pa'pn s Mr and Mrs loseph Bret- de1 route 1 Lafrosse that she i- pbt havp tiprished in t IP u With rf sa o other pprsons also bellei pd 'ra w in the has not said hit a mer- chantman of with two bombs and there was a large explosion that lighted up the entire harbor area Capt Kenneth McCullar of Bates- was pilot of another plane which skip-bombed a me- dium-sized vessel at the scor- a direct hit and leaving a gap- ing hole in the ship's side A third ship at the wharf was but results were not ob- served Other bombers gave New another hammering and si- lenced three machine-gun and anti- aircraft posts Four to six Japanese raided Port Moresby Jan 23 and almost constant aerial attack by Allied planes The harbor instal- lations already are badly smash'ed Heavier Allied bombings of the main Axis supply base for and all over Ger- many and Italy were expected by many observers. It is even they for bombers to leave blast targets in Germany or Italy and land in North Africa. The airdromes on the North African they make ex- cellent bomber bases as they are rarely made unuseable by mist or fog The American thrust at Mak- apparently a small operation designed to test Axis was Wants Six Acres prospective user of ground in the area will be St Vin- cent's Home for the which has asked for six acres of irrigated land to raise the vegetables needed for that institution. In nearly all of the persons who had irrigated gardens last year have asked that space be leserved for them this year and there have been numerous inquiries from persons who wish to obtain irrigated gar- dropoed 30 bombr near the made after German planes dropped but the damage was negligible and there were no casualties the challenge Why don t the Americans come out and Gen. Douglas MacArthur Celebrates 63rd Birthday dens for 1943 Production in the gardens was it was impossible crops on time and satisfactory last year but is expected to be even better in 1943 Last year plant some water was not available until the end of June This year water will be available from the beginning and planting can be- gin at the usual time In the fertility cf the tract has been increased by the application of ma- nure will be made at a later date as to the time when ap- plications for garden sites will be received by the committee Won't Be Rationed the meantime the news fiom the ration board is the best possible propaganda for the idea of rais.ng jour own food this year Home- tor imai passage in the house went through without change as the lower assembly ap- proved for the state game and fish to com- plete the work of the North Da- kota code and another to lestore exemptions on home- steads from estate debts. The single bill passed by the sen- ate would permit the use of game and game bird fur and for arts and crafts where game is raised by propagation. the senate ways and means committee has voted to bring in three committee bUls to adopt some phases of the Governmental Survey Commission which was created by the 1941 legislature. Recommends Consolidation The of which a ma- jority recommends con- solidation of all agricultural including grain and under a department of agriculture Senator committee chair- said a majority of his group also favored bringing in a commit- tee bill to establish a department of audit and another to create a new department of finance. These three which do not include a bill to set up a uniform account- ing system for North Dakota coun- ties are the only phases of the gov- ernmental survey commission which will come to the senate as commit- tee Young said. He other points contained in the report may be introduced as bills by individual senators Moses Signs School BUI For the department of agriculture the department of agriculture and Young explained it would be the purpose of a bill to place the commissioner of agricul- ture as supervising head of all agri- cultural duties including the live- stock sanitary poultry im- provement state seed de- soil conservation ind stal- lion registration board. The first 1943 bill to become law became effective at p m Mon- day when it was signed by Gov. John Moses Stalin Rallies Russians on to By E. C. DANIEL report that Joseph Stalin was fully infqymed on recent Allied implying that he did i I DC not attend appeared today in the London WlCOICI UQIIIJ anticipated an official announcement about the talks within the next 24 hours. has been revealed that an important announcement is expected tonight at 9 p. m. It is to this that the London press apparently refers when it time hVmie p annminnomonf toito OA preme commander of the Red Russia's fighting forces pushed their-battle lines ahead Atnervm- i T- i MOSCOW _ -Lrged Premier Stalm for the announcement about the talks within the next 24 Presumably because of censor- ship restrictions on premature dis closure of the strategy all morning newspapers which men- tioned the subject attributed their reports to United States not British Typical headlines Daily ex- pects 'most dramatic statement of to be made Daily talks of S. ex- pecting big Daily 8. expects news to stir The Man's in The Star understand that Stalin has been American Forces Kill 293 Japs On Guadalcanal kept fully informed of all that has taken place during of supreme importance between the Al- lied nations in the past week. American I are speculating on the formation of an Allied war but I doubt whether the official statemen' about to be issued mil .ontain an an- nouncement on this question Others like the have been given a preview of the official could appreciate the basis for .this The s in the Evening Standard said the question of who will be Gen Sir Bernard L Montgomerj s commander-in-chief in Tunisia soon would be and hinted would not be sur- prising if Alexander Sir Har- old and Montgomery were separated now Gen. Charles De Fighting French and Gen Henri Hon- ore Giraud high mrmssioner in French North were reported in the Ukraine and the Cau- casus Friday and battled against growing German re- sistance in the lower Don ap- proaches to Rostov. The premier's praise was ecl in an order of the day broaden by the Moscow radio and reported here by the Soviet Monitor Praises Red Army In it he cited the Red army for 1 diking 245 miles in two months of i the Russian winter offensive and I capturing more than pris- I oners w hile rolling tue Germans j back from the Volga and down from tne Don Premier Staliii signed tne order I as 'the supreme He I singled out the armies on all tne I fionts in language that began like tnis. congratulate the Red army the commanders and political wotkers on their victory over the I German Fascist leaders and their Allies and WASHINGTON American forces have consolidated positions In Japanese headquarters on and control the village and beach after killing 293 enemy the navy reported Tuesday. In a communique the navy told also of a force of Japanese dive bombers being intercepted and turned back by American fighter planes. _________________ The text oi the navy's communl- No. Pacific rail dates are east On Tuesday toliave reached an agree-I Hunganans. my appreciation to-tne ment as. a result of mediation the United States and Britain. Talks were understood to be parti of far-reaching war-winning plans of the Allied nations Military leaders the United States and it was re- played a part in the talks. Fighting Fiench sources heie had maintained weeks that any dis- agreements could be quickly ironed out if representatives of the two -French factions met-------------------- command and to the gallant troops. the Nazi Invaders' to_lhe routing of the Geiman invaders and their expul- sion ovei the boundaries of our motherland Tins praiseful exhortation came after the ur special and regular told oi re- claiming all of strategic Voronezh from the Germans who had octa- pieci us western section since tne cummer' of wlieli the Axis ot- The principal barrier between the fenslve culminating In tne DeGaulle and Giraud tamps has now-broken siege of Stalingrad been the Fighting French charges i The Russians also reported the that Vichy men had not been ehm-1 capture of Belava in the A large force of Japanese i inated entirely from key positions Northern putting one of grown vegetables are not subject it was senate bill 25 which pro- rationing Home-canned food can be tides for for employes sal- used without reference to rationing aries at the Grafton State school It carfies the emergency clause and is effective immediately upon approval IK l M hnvp preven t i nr ruin' hut citv street sdftv were rlearlne r IP that fell from the bi i Photopnt i of Sanrier sent bv t i nf use shPriff s nfflce ts trip aidPd in clinching thr irientrir-ation of the woman c lavbaueh said Mrs Sander had in Minot for pight or nine months HP was unable to find any reasons any other than some which may have bee i entirely which caused Mrs Sander to have taken the name of Beatrice Meyers here. sT A T VlacA 61 l rt idav T ir mi nn ff m rs f I A hrsu i rrr respprts but obsprvanrp of his orking as 'i radicallv ngn iff m al nf- m fl cted Tuesday to listen to re broacrvt greetings from President n i i o his of- d-u to jav their uas in le annlvprsary A ear ago fren di- i FT Ire 'hp rlp'pnsp of the Philip- pint- iiTfPd 1 ark and forth in a tin n 1 nn rresu or tapping the rpmr Hoot 1th I i 'ane Tnpst av nlv onth rpturned It slso WTS e .pecteu there would br a bir hrio cake Tuesrtiy rnsht wiT-n hp TOI iri bp with Mrs Mac- A iiir ind iFi- son i in arrm tradi'ion that of- ri not givp prp-ents to t eir cm imit rii ig general but close ppr- sonM fnpnds in the pavp him cisars Tvpsdav The genpnl seldom kepps cigar liphted but ohpws vig- as he the floor during his firr ipnt military conferences AT o firp- r oso tn Gpn Mar- Arthu- 'ok Inpsdiv a restrictions Ordinarj diversions and amusements are curtailed bj gas ra tiomng and other considerations It by the governor. all arMs up to the biggest gardening in history for and the ir- rigated gardens will ba readv I It was decided last vear to eive LT. nUDIOU those who had gardens IT 1942 fust choice for 1943 and arrangements In in will be made to carry out this in- struction f dive twin-engine bombers and which was headed for was intercepted and attacked by U S aircraft The enemy planes were driven off- and no bombs were dropped on C. S. positions. Four Japanese 'Zeros' were shot down. No U. S. planes were Two units of U. S. ground forces joined at Kokumbona on Guadalcanal after one unit had en- tered the village from along the' beach to the east and the other had encircled a strong enemy pocket and entered Kokumbona from the south. The maneuver resulted in giving U. S. forces unrestricted use of Ko- kumbona and the beach to the east. Two hundred ninety-three Japanese were killed and five pris- oners were taken during the opera- tion. Several supply three six-inch artillery seven 77mm two 37mm one several three 40mm. anti- aircraft guns and various other field pieces and small arms were cap- tured. operations against en- emy resistance continues in North Africa DeGaulle and Giraud themselves were always understood to have a high regard foi each other. their armies within 40 miles of a rail junction 90 miles south of Rostov. Spearheads Aim At Rostov Other Spearheads aimed at Ros- tov weie said to be 56 miles to the east of the city and 70 miles to the north Forty miles south of Tikhoretsk another army which advanced up the railroad from Baku to capture Aimavir now was reported threat- The body ot Charles L 59.' another railway Northern Pacific conductor was Mandan Conductor Found Dead at Home Plans for Polio Drive Announced Residents of N started the ball rolling m Burleigh county this year in the annual drive to raise funds for the National Foun- dation for Infantile Paralysis A check for all collected in membership was received by Frank president of the Burleigh county Tuesday was a mighty big Milhollan said hope the rest of tne county can do as There are four wajs in which money is being raised Milhollan i said in outlining the program First there is the national of campaign in which money is mailed directly to the White home of the president on found in his home here Monday night and Morton countj Coroner John K. Kennelly said Smith had been dead since sometime Saturday night Kennelly said an inquest was un- necessary The body was found bj T Rot- Smith's who said he had last seen Smith early Saturday nigjlf Rotnem told Kenneily he found the lights burning and the radio plajmg when ne to Smith's home Monday night at the request of railroad officials -SmiLis bodv was laving on the bed Mrs Smith is visiting in Seatt e Funeral services will be held Fri- day afternoon at Mandar I COMMANDOS RAID NORWAY authoritative British source said Tuesday that a small scale commando raid was made last Saturday night on the coast of and was very suc- cessful _________ Enters Service center The advancing columns there were placed bj latest dis- patches at nine miles northwest of Armavir on the railroad Hanking unit of this ho- was reported to have takea Feldmarshalsky and a group of towns about 25 miles noun of Armavir and east of the and thus wao about half-way to Kropotkin. The latter column may be which pushed west from Vorosn.- lovsk Russ Advance in Ukraine In tne the Russians re- poited thev had pushed to wltm-i 10 miles of Voroshilovgrad and pen ted out that their occupation of Siarobelsk and Valuiki at once gave tnem a kev to the approaches to Voroshilovgrad and to ire Ukraine capital and one of the Get- man front strong points. In the middle Don the Russians said that the Germans still were throwing heavy infantry and tank forces into cour- which the Russians re- ported they were turning back OSWALD YORKE DIES NEW actor of the American and British stage who played with John Drew and Maude died Monday in his New York home. His most recent appearance was with Jane Cowl in frnm rtirerftne thp victorious Papua cpneral s nnlv present was p hox campuen and in pxrellfnt health of clears hari been intendPd hp stpppcd from a tng black en- for the U s ambassador to tercd thp headquarters building and Joseph C Grew With .ispan and the States at war diplomatic mail addressed to Ambassador Grew at Tokvo was held up in the Philippines and when ted was found to contain a box walked br'sklj to the elevator to start day of work Awaiting him were messages of congrat u 1 a t i o n from Australia's prime minister John Curtin Presi- dent Manuel Quezon of the Philip pines and others Earlier he .md listened to a B then U S high commis- broadcast of greetings from mem-1 sioner to the Philippines presented bers of his class at West Point them to the general Jackie Coogan Must M i i. Captain Hublou is stationed now Monthly Alimony OS ANGELES Sergeant Jaricie Coogan former luvemle movie actor now stationed at an army air field in Kenturkv Has ordered bv Judee William S Baird to pay his second wife Flower Coo- a month for support of their infant son understand Jackie is broke again Lawyer Charles Katz told the court His present pav amounts to about a rionth but it may be increased f he passes examina- of cigars for the diplomat So on tion for sub-fUgM officer Gen MacArtnur s Francis Coogan remarried in 1841 after his divorce from Betty Irable but the venture ended in a separa- tion last April. whose birthday the drive is made annusll v Sprnnd through direct donations fror tho individual to the local cfn of 'he Foundation for In- fant ii Miralvsis Thir bv membership dues Manv Bismarck dentist for vears rm been promoted to Jlc nrn Mm vear raptam in the United States anm j fourth means of the an_ received here by dances and programs held Sat- urdav in honor of the president's birthdav Although mam of the rural com- munities n i' been able to ar- range a celebration this vear a big- ger and bettor affair is being plan- ned in the Capital Citv A dance his been scheduled for Saturday meht in the World War Memorial Milhollan said Music will be furnished Arnold Christiansen and his -orchestra A program of several vocal selections at Canp Bowie and his wife and three children are there with him They are making their -home at near Camp Bowie Captain Hublou entered the army last May May Buy Fuel Oil Without Coupons Office of Price Administration Tuesaav authorized emergency sale of 50 gal- lons of fuel oil to anyone in the 30- state rationed cou- pons if necessary The onlv string to thp offp- cials was that thp IP us' applied for rnupoi o cnjicon Tt P loral ntmn f Kiard is expected afterwi-r rip urt the 50 gallons Irom fu' i ri ons Thp on prrerepr pui wi'hout rn ions or 'h r u w frnm n heat me period be made onl once in a heating spa son of- OU JEWS ARE WARNED LONDON Japanese mili- tary authorities have addressed a to all Jews living in the Philippine a DNB dispatch from broadcast bv the Berlin said Tuesday. The wariung said that Jews there had been guilty of black market jpecu- lations and DNB re- ported. has also been arranged Tickets are on sale now for tl a couple. THE ROAST STAYED GREAT MONT Wallace Olson opered her oven door to put in a roast Out hopped a sparrow It ruffled its' wings and flew out the back SPEVCER C. BOI-.F Entering sprvice in 'IIP ietp oloey division of i -m iir corps Thui sda 1 S ice- C J- sor of M- M-s S S Boise filS Tna.p- w est Boi e w i '.rct o Ft Snelline He -v u then be sent to a fo- co-- ditiorung arc1 la'e- n o p f the ak corp's schools A 1942 eria r- Bismarck hizh s 100 lias beer iiiern c in college for pas lit er IJe is a former Bisma- k h.nn school football J .asketoall having been to the coaches' All-State foo-oau team in 1940 and 1941. Firs Destroys of trip r mmeti ereri slnre H Prpst co t show I V K IM SF4PFR1   

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