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Rocky Mount Evening Telegram: Thursday, December 18, 1952 - Page 1

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   Rocky Mount Evening Telegram (Newspaper) - December 18, 1952, Rocky Mount, North Carolina                                 y-v-'.v.  TELEGRAM PHONES Dial 5161: ClrcnlaUon-BooKkeepins Dial, 5162: Society and News Dial 5l63i< Mahaglng JEditor-Sports Dial 5164: Dlsplay-ClassHfed Adv.  WEATHEE  Partly cioudv and slSglitly n-armar tonieht: Friday cloudy and mild.  VOL. XLH-NO. 52 THIRTY-TWO  ROCKY MOUNT, N. C. THURSDAY AFTERNOON, DECEMBER 18,1952  ih« AsBnciated Press. Wlrs ,antl Feature Servie»  PRK^E FIVK CKNTS  Cars Are Derailèd In Streamliher Wreck  To Suppo^r^^  Baggage cars (foreground) and passenger coaches sprawl beside tracks near St. Maries, Idaho, when a Milwaukee Railroad's crack streamliner hit a broken rail and bent seven cars off the track. Four passengers suffered serious injuries, 15 other persons required first aid. ■  Views presented By Gen. AAacArt^  President-Elect Reviewing Ideas Outlined By Gdn. Mac Arthur in'Histoiy-Making Con f erence  I By MARVIN L. ABROWSMITH I A . meeting with Scniite, Repub-NEW YORK (^Presi'dent-elect f lican leader.«; probably will be iield Dv/ight D. Eisenhower cloaked In during the week betwcpn Crhist-  J deep secrecy ' today the Korean, I War and worl^ peace views out-1 lihed to him by Gen. Dbuelas I MacArlhur. :  Aides .said Ei.scnhower Was  más and Ne\v Year's day.  After, yesterday's Eisenhower-MacArthur conference at the Man-hatan home of Jplin Fo.strr Dulles, secretary of state-de.siBnaie, ¿he  studying idea.'i. MácArthui\.set forth two iive-.star generals tójd news.  at their history-making conference I yesterday, but tiiey added that no rdietailed public account of what Iwas discufised can be expected. Eisenhower rtiade ready, mean-  men they had discussed the problem of winnins' pcaco in Korea and the ro.st of the world, The lunchcon iret-together at Dul-  Siamese Twins Are Separated  Operation Proyes Very Successful  CSiCAGO W—In . a history-making operation, surnepns yesterday . , , completed, the, separation ' of 15-  les' fpur-M,ory town: house »;cs«|W^ inionlH-pld: Siamese- twin boys who  while, for a meeting, today, with ¡ from" a , MacArthur speech hereg-^.p joinpfj „t 'Ibe heads.  I a group of Republican leaders in I the House of Representatives.  The President-elect said the ses-Ision is one of a series he will 1 hold with J In Congre I program 1 other domestic lems.  Dec. 5. He. said then there is _a| ^^^ twins, several hours after clear and,definite solution to the u^^ hour and 40 minute opera-  Km-ean conflict. . ¡liDn, were reported in critical con-  El.scnhower, who had .lust com-Tl.i^ wns nrrUvl ns nnliir-  ' See EISENHOWER Puro ir>A  Gasoline Price Group Divi^^ (3h Role State S  tinder the North Carolina ÜtiVi-ties commission and that if proper cbntroli.s not forthcomine, then .give : the .attorney ,g-oncrni  By BA1,PH HOWLAND Telegrram RaleiJth Bureau RALEIGHi--^ A North Carolina. iGaSoÚñe -study committee'rcporl.. li^d yesterday there is some dis-l^riminatloh ; in Tar Heel. prices, Itompared With Virginia, butsug-Igtested ; that the legislature not| gallon.s of ga.soline were sold in  [try to-i^'gulate thetii. . ■ .......  r ■ It, ïtiight have been a. coinci-[áence. the committee said, but Ifour months after a study oí' Ipricfis began, gasoline, cost was llowered an average of .17 cents la gallon. That saved North Caro-llihians about $2 milliori: in the liast year,  A dissenting report recommend: led that sale of gasoline be put  Chauffeur Gives More Testimony At Crime Probe  New Jersey Mayor Blasts Witnesses At N. Y. Hearings  By RAY KOIIN  NEW YORK —An ex-chauffeur for Jersey City Mayor JoJin V. Kenny says the mayor inòàhed that "they got me dead to rights" after a grand jury here quizzed him on his secret meeting with à waterfront underworld leader...  Kenny's former police depart-ment driver, Albert D. Jordan, testified yesterday before the New York State Crime Commission probing crime afld corruption along New, York-New Jer.sey docks.  Jordan said he drove Kenny to the grand iury hearing at which Kenny admitted he had met Anthony CTony Bender) Strollo at the Manhattan hotel , suite of sin.ger Phil Regan. Six days earlier, Kenny had told the panel he didn't know Strollo.  "What did he (Kenny) say when he came out (of the jury .session) ?" Jordan was a.sked. Jprdsin replied:  "He told rne—he cried on my •shoulder and tried to explain. l| told him, 'What did you have to go to New York for?' He paid, "They got me dead to right,s. They must have a bug (micrpphone) in i.he room.''  Kenny, who thuis far has ignored a : standing invitation . .frnm the commissipn to testify before it. la.shed ut yesterday a:t a string of probe witne.sses linking him with -stady waterfront characters. Ken-ed their iestii)iony as 1 untrustworthy, has promised "starllirig s''when he appears IDec, befpre the New Jersey Law, F,n-fprccmcnt Council, He was stib-poenaéd before that ini'cstigating body after he had turned down a bid to appear before the New York Crime Commission. By law. Kènny cannot be served with a New York subpoena. . . , :  At ye.stérdíiy'.«; comirHssión. hearing, Kenny wa« quoted in private "unbelievably hoarlv " | te.stimony -as. saying he met with  Boy Gets 300th Transfusion  President Of AMA  Goiiipents  'Compromise'Plan By Health Coininission Calls For Appropriation Of Over Billion Dollars  Tar Heels Quit  RICHMOND, Va. f/f) — Two North Carolina industry mem-  Thirteen-year-old Gary Miller, born with a blood disease called hYpo-plastic aneinia, gets his 300th blood transfusion at Children's Hospital in Los Angeles. Thé transfusions began When he was seven weeks old. Whenever he becomes overly tired and starts to get pale -— his Bymptoins of the disease —r he's given another pint of blood. Checking off the blood score is Laboratory Technician Connie Steetner.  ! history. In two previoii.s attempts ito cut apart babies joined at the j heads, the paticnt.s died. , . ■ Np inember pf the medical, team which participated in the opcra-tion would, predict if the infant twins will be able to ; recover, Earlier doctors ,said the oddii were against the twins -survival, from; Ihc .stiirt but, t,hat thé boys. ■ we.i'.e.  powei" to. prosecute "discrimin- ^^rch ^Pi'^Wling New York waterfrpnt  ation and unlawful ■ monopolies.", EducaS H^sn^^^^^ and qome to an understanding re-  . in 1951.TOPretlian one., billion. Mng a war on; dpck racketeers.  University of Illinpis, . where the ii  Sawyer Blasts IJ. S. Aid Plan In V^estern Europe  Secretary Says U. S^ Has Too Many Agencies Doing Too Many Things; Waste, Confusion Hit  By FRANK E. CAREY I AP, Sciciice Reporter WASHINGTON lyp) --- president Truman's , .Commissipn ; on Uii  Health Needs of the Nation cam'? > .„„^ „f lu r.- ..„n; u t UP today With a middle-ground proposal for. solving one of the' '  country's hottest Issues—how ,lo pay thè doctor's bill. '  The .comini.ssion proposed l'i billioh dollar annual outlay of federal'and state; funds to bolsler voluntary insurance plans covering the costs of hospitiil and mccii-cal care for all the nation's people lacking full ability, to pay.  The program would be admin-i.stered chiefly by the stat.os. which would match federal money dol-lar-for-dollar.  It differs bpth frpm a plan unsuccessfully espnused by Presiden;, TrUman and a rival proposal of the American Medical As.sociatioh.  In Chicago, the president of the Ama termed pne aspect of the report "compulsory health ihsur-arice."  Dr. Louis H. Bauer of Hemp-.stead, N. Y., said a major rèconn-mondatipn in the report provides that "The federal government Ihi-ough payroll deductions, wpulri pay directly fpr the medical care of a large segment of the popur lation. This is compulsory health insurance."  The AMA said it would withhold comment on the fulr report pending "careful study" by a four-man committee.  Presidfcnt Truman, sijice 194.5. has vainly pluiiged for , a fede !'' s.vslem of prepaid .sickness insurance for wuge-earning Americans and their families—to be financed  By^JÉPANR O'BRIEN . . ¿^^^«li^piilON m - Secretary •Pf CpmiBrce Sawyer, says. t,he trnitéd States baji "too many people and too many agencies...doing too many thing.s" in. Western Europe, at the cost of waste and! confusion. . i  This wa.s thé: meat, of a hard-1 swinging attack on U. S. aid ad-  AtNewAftack  this state at a. cost of $300 "million . Net earnings pf: the nine major oil; corhpaiiics operating in thi.s area, were up 21.56 per cent above 1950 earnings, with  The ma,vpr;_in.sisted he made np niini.stration in Europe wliich Saw-i concessions to Strollo.  net profits ranging from l.^Ti^f'- ^ . ; , ;. ,  cent,s a gallon to 2.53 cents. The most expert kind of post-  The ma jority repprt npted that PPerative and; nursing care will be  pperation was performed.  Stanley Olson, dean of the uni-> i  vovcH,,'^ r'^iii.^cr,^ „f ' ij strollo took the stand to confirm  to go" before their survival.is as-  E,ssp is . thé dorninant company in tihe; state, with 29.6 per .cent See GASOLINE Page lSA  ^ore SteéI Assured For Gor Manufacturers During 1953  By WILLIAM O, VARN WASHINGTON —Makérs of au-omobiles a nd other civilian gppds raised their production goals for ! second 'quarter of 19,5.3 today, oh the basis of government assurance they will have more steel at any , time sinca the Koran IWar began.  ■ The : Defense Production Adminr jstration (DPA) authorized them até yesterday to use steel up to 70 per; cént of their pre-Kcrean ate. This - is about 16 per cent áore than for the third quarter of ^952, the previous high since the government bgan rationing scarce ateríais to assure adequate" sup-Iplies for defense. : Aluminum prbdiicers weighed, iieanwhile, a, Conditional govern-aent offer fpr a ceiling price in-brease of pne-half cent a pound on  needed, Olson .said, as the babies had been subjected to intense sl-iock and had lost considerable blood.  Surgeons w'atched Over the twins thrpughout .the night. They were taken frm the pperating ropm at 8:30 p. m. tp the pediatric ward pf. the. Neuro-Psychi-atric institute,, a university. unit, and placed in separate cribs. , "The babies, their head.s swathed  Defense Mobilizer Henry Fowler;in bandages, were placed under tied the proppsed . increa.se to a See tw^NS Page 15A provision that; the: Big Three producers agree to certain changes in their contract.s .with the government. among them the deletion of; the right-of the government or the companies to cancel contracts for aluminum before they iiin their full five, years.  Fowler's . proposal was made in identical; letters to the Aluminum; Company of America, the Kaiser Aluminum and Chemical (;;orp: and the Reynolds Metals Company. He asked immediate replies.  The companie.s got a bigger in-  ny—with Regan as host. Regan was pictured a.s the go-:between in arranging the-riieetinc, but why the singer was interested was not disclosed.  Strollo testified he couldn't re-  yer. just back from a lO-country study In Europe, inseiied , into a report last night to President 'Tni-man. . . , ■  Sawyer .said per-sonnel abroad ..„„^ „ r>„,j  can be cut sharply, and some agen-:planes smashed a big Red troop  cies abolished. .[ massing area néar the North Ko-;  He said he found Eiirope in bet-irean capital, of Pyongyang 'Thürs  Red Troop Area Smashed By UN  By GEORGE MCARTHUR  SEOUL, Friday (/IV-Allied war-  resigned because of the hotly-disputed issue ofPresident , Truman's handling m  er's wa.çe increase.  J. Edgar Kennedy of High Point, and Stark S. DiUard oi Greensboro, two of thé eight industry members on ^ thc 24« ; member board, resigned ycster« day with a joint blast at the Prcsidpurs action in the United Mine Workers (UMW) pay hike, Kennedy and Dillard .in » joint slatement at Greensboro, said the wage increase was "» sham and â fraud against the American public, particularly so agahist unorganized work-ers and members of , wealter independent unions" ■  Soviet Refugee Gives Testimony  Says Intellectuals Spark Revolutions  By RUSSELL BRINES  ; WASHINGTON (il-^Investigatlhg congressmen were tbld' yesterday that Premier Stalin depends upon intellectual.s and not thé workei» to spark Communist revolution in; the Western world. , . f , ' Igor Bogolepov, an escaped Sov-by a compulsory tax on employes ; ¡gt ;poreign Office official and Red and employer.s, along the lines ofjArmy Colonel, said a secret shift the social .security system. i in Communist strategy started a  The Ama has termed Triinian'.s proposal "socialized medicine" and  campaign which is still under way ;p CTpti.ii'o " the brams ol Western.  has campaigned for the extention j intellectuals." of "voluntary" in.surance plans— Bogolepov- said he helped infil-that is, plans which person can trate Communists into the Amerl» purchase if he; wishes, The AMA.¡can government, educational foun-howRver, has never taken a stand i dalions, the newspapers and iithef as to whether it. favored federal | intellectual circles, subsidy of such./'^an.s: ; i The well-groomed Russian testi-.  Tlie oommi.'.'jl . api,-|;ttod in fied before a special House com-November ol" 19.51 to fh» mittep investigating l-ax-free edu^  nation's health nced.s.^ind to iin<'ke;catloiial-apd. phii, .nhropic founda*-vocommendiitions ' a.s it saw fit, itions. The' piriposc is to determine See HEALTH Page ISA iSee FOUNDATIONS Page ISA* -  Tito Breakoff With Vatican Causing Much Concern In U. S.  By JOHN M. HIGHTOWER  Man Rescued After Ordeal  Lost 28 Hours In Icy Swamps  . MIAMI; Fla, (if)—A man who clung tp mangrove bushes in Angel Fish Creek 20 miles south pf Mi-  mem^? S'^c^ th^^eti^^ economic shape than he ex-] day while the Communists bpasted i ; wAHINGTOn" (fl ^ Marshal "^^hi^^f^H l^S^Sl Pected. would be in Seoul by Christ-1 Tito's break with the Vatican  except that he; told the commission ; ^oyery " has taken place in coun- ; hias.  ! ...i.^^. ..n^níi.ív.» TT - C oirl i -Allí  at a private hearing:  "I'm meeting with a singer and See PROBE Page 15A with a piayor and, it looks like  SHOPPING DAYS TO CHRISTMAS  , „ , ! aroused fresh wprry hére today  triés receiving U. S. ^-id. , J Allied planes in waves rained i over the weakest link in the chain  Europe can march pn topvos- high explosives pn the trppp con-1 of anti-Soviet pations in Europe-peri ty, he .said, if it does not lose centration area, which spraw>ls 20 j relations between C o mm u nist  miles-south .of Pyongyang, ; l Yugósavia: and Catholic Italy.  faith in itself.  Sawyer uhd-ertook the study, ended early this month, at Truman's  The Cpmmunist bpast aliput cap-  request. He took with him finance i^iore were damaged, and trade, officials from the Treasury and Commerce Department, and tWo businés.smen, All jpined him, he said, in the conclusions set forth in the report.  .Sawyer did nnt disagree with the idea of extending the roughly 50 billioh dollars in aid Western Europe has received sihce the war. He said it was "indispen-;'  The Air Force said more than 70 i The Amercan government's con-buildings were destroyed and 30 eern with the situation arises from  its desire, as a matter of máJoi' policy, to estàbish the closest poli-  Tobacco Crop Estimates  primary aluminum pig and ingot trolled materials and 4 Per cent on fabricated alum-num products.  crease last August, but they said j ami for more than 28 hours riur WASHINGTON (ff) — This year'.s moderately: below last ; it wasn't enough to meet their ex, ¡„g sòme of Flórida'^^ tobacco crop will prob- weU above the 10-year  pansipn programs and asked Fpw- weather was reported in "satis-1 J®"'^'^'^' ?®®^  - factory" condition in Veterans Hps-;ond^'argest pn i^cprd, acceding pcwnds^fpr all tobacco. ^ , ,[  Ditai t/idnv i to the Department of Agriculture's The burley crop was estimated;  Congress, wheie the anti-Soviet Communist government of Yugoslavia has always beéii regarded with 15 k e p t i c i 6 ni by many members.  Tito brpke with Russia in mid-1948- Since that tinie the U. S. has tightened its relations; -v^ith ' him , arid provided substantial • military and economic assistari:ce. During the fi.scal year which ended last June 30 the U. S. Britain and France together prcv-videdTito .with 120 million dol-' lars, this year their help totals 99 millions. In both years the American share has been 78 millions.  The Truman administration has . regarded Yugo.'5lavia, as a great asset to. the West because .(i). ,;!; is I a living example of the ability of a  sable, to the rebuilding^ Pi ^ j j j ^ ^ ^ said thé news had ' Yugo.slavia coser to the Western i satellite nation to break with Mos-  damag^ed^^conomies ^and to stop-; throiigh Seoul "causing ; European natioiis. and (21 trying to ; cow and survive, and (2) Tito's  ™ """ quite a coinmotion'.' for a^vhile. l-solve the Italian-Yugo.slav dispute 130-Pdd divisipns. though they hav^  No signs have been reported that iPver Trieste. . | been badly in need of . moderniza^  the Communists were massing anv-r Furthermore, .some officia s| tion. are a ; valtiàblé addition ; to where along the front for an of-{think there may be difficulties with I See TITO Page 15A :  fcnsive toward Seoul. ! ■——— - - - — --------—-—i  While fighter - bombers worked  turing, Seoul came in loud speaker; tical and military co-operation broadcasts along the front. High'among all the European countvies, flying Red planes also made a rare , in and out of the North Atlantic appearance over the front, shower- Alliance, in, the Ihtei'bst pf checking leaflets saying^ in effect "Yan-i ng pviet ppwer. ; kee, gp home." ! Tito's dplomatc bireak with the  While Allied Officers considered; Vatican yesterday probably will the broadcasts pne mpre phase of make it, more difficult to achieve the Reds'; psycljological warfare.; this ^^jm in two regards: (li tying  See SAWYER Page 15A  ler for another hike. The DPA allotments of . con- pital ; today.  WASHINGTON (,T) — This year's moderately: below last year, was  average, 'Pver Red cpncentratipns far behind 842 million 're WAR Page 15A  Driver Trapped In Wrecked Gar  May-June quar See STEEL Page 15A  rials for the April ;- Fred Tyzzer Jr released fromcrop report. at; 604 milli arter of i9,-;3 made no a hospital only two weeks ago i Last year\vrecord crop of 1,4.52 only, by last  at; 6(14 million pounds, surpassed ;  year's record 618 mil- .'  Cross In Skies Over Korea  tinMAiinirrf  With a badly burned hand sur-i'"'^Ph ppunds is the only one ex- lion ppunds and 1946's crop of 614 i . vived a night of 35-40 degree cold Ip^^^ ^ exceed this year's million pounds. This year's flue-; ■ ■ •  stripped tP his undershpris. iprpduction.  the 38-year-old Navy veteran i Overall, the nation's  cured crop was harvested from; tobacco 1,114,.100 acres which is only slight^ ;  Junior Colleges Hit By Burglars  watched while a Coast Guard PBY i pi'Pduction will total about 2.2()7 ly higher than in 1951. Yield per | ■ and a helicopter flew pverhead in million pounds pf aU types, the re- acre was lower this year thannnj  search fpr him, but cpuidn't at-^PPrt said. This is a drpp of abput 19.51 for most flue-cured types, the r ml c '  tract their attention. Finally, the 'five per cent from last year's ree- report said, although late season i Taken In ThcftS Coast Guard abandoned the Wd 2,.331 million pounds. I raihs materially benefitted the crop > ti.-  search arid said he presumably There Was little variation from particularly in Type 11 in ^Virginia; ; ,"^^ „ „  had drowned. last year in the anipunt Of land The marketing season : is one of "pim^f I*'! ' " a. police weie  Tvzzer lost his balance and fell harvested by growers, with this the latest of record as a result: searching today tor some thieves frpm the tugboat Lpgan about 11 year's acreage of 1.775..500 falling of the late harvest. who seem to have a grudge against  a..n. Tuc.sday between Cape Fiori- less than one per cent below the Here are the départmnt's esti-  oa and..cuner Bank. He was res- 1951 harvested acres. The yield, isee TOBACCO Page .15A cued late yesterday by Capt. ■; Cleveland KnoviSes aboard his ! fishing vessel. |  "Because; of the: cold, weather,-I had ..plenty of clcthe.s pn when fell off, thè, boat." T.yzzer said. '  Bank Robber is Sentenced  . In the. past several weeks,; the i ^^ state's junior colleges have lost * nearly $20,000 in a series pi daring i burglaries» In all cases, the burg-1 l -.-x ha---' U'o erl til" .; unior col-1 leges, never the universities or high I  In keeping v/ith-the spirit of Christmas, pilots of the 474th iFighter Bomber Wing in Korea fly their F-S4 Thunderjets in |thjs sign of thè Gross as they head for North Korea on a strike at key Communist targets.  ........ ..... . _.... ..... CHARLOTTE; (i) — A slender ' In: Honduraswere his wife and schools.  Thanks to' riiy "training a^ senior ypung; man with a perfect; past their :three babies, aged 3, 2: and,l. Mpst recent in the series was the ' Red Crpss lire saver, i Was able I'cpoi'd, whp made the mistake of Ai-mcd with a clean past record, r o b b e r y, reported yestelda^ at to peel off my .shoes, two pairs ;his hand as a bank robber, a Spanish dictipnary, a Bible,: an Gardner-Webb JuniPr College at; pf spcks, .twp- pairs' pf pants, have to wait at least a year be- .hpnprable discharge from: the Navy Boiling Springs, Dr. Phill Elliott,; sweater and iacket.'-• : .':ipre he can rejpin his native,wife and .several gppd recpmmendations, pre.sident of thé school., said thei  Capt.; George Barpn, skipper of in tropical Honduras.. Colliiis might have gotten the job, . thieves got away .with between S.500 .  i the tugboat. didn't, nptice that his Jack Wilbur Cpllins of Mononga- if .he had the transportation ex- and S6Ô0 in cash and S3.500 in ■ loiiiy crewman.: had disappeaijed hela, Pa., wa.s sentenced to. three penses. ; checks. !  until, half an hour later. years in Federal prison yesterday , After, his Jones interview on Dec. Police in. Cleveland Countv said j  Tyzzer watched the, tug until it ; by Judge Wilson; Warlick, afterio, Collins apparently brooded for a siries of doors Were forced lead-i I moved out of sight,, then shed his Pleading' guilty; to a bank robbery a day and .a half, according to the ing to .the ,office and the combina-., iclothing ;and swam thrée or fpur attenipt at the Bank of Charlotte testimony of-two FBI. agents, be- tion lock on the college safe was I .j miles to the mangrove swamp.'Alii here last:Briday. .Collins Avaivéd a fore making up his mind to pull the punched out.: . ^  iijght long he ; buried his face in ; grand jury indictment,; preliminary bank job. j This wai the identical pattern:!  1 the. mangrove roots to, ward off.' hearing and aid. from counsel.,He ; After ; one false start, during ; -ise---v.-^^k .r'-'-'n $l,'i:000.,'; thé, chill northwest >vind. jcpuld have been sentenceii to 20„ which .he lost his nérvé and w'ent'mostly^ih cash, was liftéd from:'a  : Knowles. who has fished the ¡years.: ,; out for a couple of beér.s to rebuild safe at'' Wingate Jdnior College at •  iirea for 10 years, was headed, for | The hold-up. attempt was made his ; confidence, the ; 28-year-old Wingate, according; to SBI Agent; poit when-he saw. Tyzzer Waving bn Dec. 12, just two days a/ter Col- Pennsylvanian r^-entered thé bank ^ i  a mangrove twig. lins' arrival in Charlotte. He told ; at 4:30 p. m. and shpved a note to At Presbyterian ■ Junior College bed in his wrecked car where he spent two aivd one-hciu  Tyzzer estimated hé reached the FBI acents here that he came to teller R. E. Harris. at Maxtpn on Nov: 29. thé thieves t,-{„„ Ueina rescued at'lark^onvillA FTrr Tînlir-o ■  swampy, mangrove-sfidded shore the city to apply for a job in Hon- It .stated: "We hâve guns ... ho operated differentlV, taking the en- rescued at Jack oi^vHie, 1-la. Police smd  duras with: the J .A,; Jones CPn- alarm or vou get it first . . . hand tire safe from the grounds and Jo'•nsqn lai.led to make a cvrve trovelmg at a high late O^?;: struction Co, ¡See ROBBER Page 15A iSee THEFTS Page ISA i speed. He Buffered only a ioot injur/. :  abput 1 p.m. He waved vainly at See TYZZER Page 15Â  Soäked wit^ gasoline and woter, E. G. Johnson sits lrai>  M.pii'O.'ijW'/'l   

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