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Weekly Standard: Wednesday, August 10, 1864 - Page 1

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   Weekly Standard (Newspaper) - August 10, 1864, Raleigh, North Carolina                               I THE AM W. HOLDEN, EDITOR AND PBOPR1ETOH. TF.RMS OF THE STANDARD. The terms of the tStanrfard are as followa: yemi-Weekly, six three mouthtt, 4 Weekly paper, six months, 6 three mouths, 8 Tbe government through its financial agents, and the corporations and trading men. huving estimated dollar Confederate bills llt two-thirds of their value, wo are compelled to do tho sumo. Persons sending five Collar bills will be credited for two-thirds of their fuco and no more, and no bills duo the olfice can hereafter be paid in fives, s.ivo at such discount. Twos and ones and new issue preferred. Advertisements inserted at three dollars per square of ten or less, for first insertion, aud one dollar for each subsequent insertion. The very large circulation of tb Standard renders it a valuable medium for advertising Money sent by Express at our risk. RALEIGH: FRIDAY, AUG. 5. CONSCRIPT OPPrCE, Raleigh, K Aug. 1, Yoi, 22. KALEIGH, N. C., WBDNES DAY, AUG. 10, 1864. V VU ich> Tho Latest News. Two Yankee gunboats have been disabled on the Mississippi, and one, the Clara Bell, totally The river is said to be in a state of blockade. Eight transports are lying at the mouth of White river unable to assend. The rebels, strong, under Gen. Dobbs, charges Col. Brooks' command of 300 men, 12 miles from Helena, forcing him back and following ton miles. Col. Brooks, several prominent officers and 87 privates were killed. Col. Brooks' remains had reached Memphis. The Baltimore American of 1st and 2d has been received in Richmond, giving an account of the ex- plosion of the mine at Petersburg. The entire work mounting guns were blown into the air. The 9th and 18th corps then charged and the 5th was hold in reserve. The works were carried, but fin- ally, they were driven out of them with a loss of Rebel cavalry crossed the 15 miles above Wilhaw'port and passed directly across and entered Pennsylvania, going through Mercersbuig. About 500 of McOuusland's men en- tered Chaiiibersbmg and demanded the payment of b.-ilf a million dollars, but tho people refusing to comply with the demand, tho town was fired and whole of it burned. Gov. Curtain has called tho Pennsylvania Legislature together to make ar- rangements for the defence of the State. Wright's column, ere this, must have reached Winchester, and if the rebels attempt to retain possession of the Shenandoah Valley, a desperate battle may be ex- pected. Lincoln has' been at Fortress Monroe and has had an interview with Grant. PCTEKSRVKG, Ang. has been no fighting for two days. Grant still sapping and Much dissatisfaction said to prevail in Yankee army on the results of Saturday. From Georgia. ATLANTA. Aug. flairs are very quiet tin's morning. Some picket firing during the night but nothing important occurred. 6oO prisoners wore captured near Newman and sent south from Point. Yesterday about 1000 in all wore captured. Other later news will be found elsewhere. The df the Array. We continue to hear of the coercive measures adopted in the hospitals and camps to influence the voles of the soldiers of thia State. Wo copy the following from the Progress of Wednesday last: from a letter dated y LVNCUBUKG, July 28, 18G4. I am at Lynchburg to day at the election, and I have never seen as much meanness and corruption before. The soldiers voted for Holden, and seeing this, those who managed the polls said the Holden voters were all deserters, and threw out their votes, If nothing had been said, and if the votes had been fairly counted, Holden would have beaten Vance ten to one. The men that voted were all from the same camp, and they counted (he Vanco votes and threw out the Holden votes. This was done by Hospital rats who had never seen a battle When the Yankees were raiding around Lynchburg these rats went into their holes, and as soon as the Yankees left they crept out. I told them of their rascality, and they ordered me to hush, but I told a man with stripes if he would make himself my equal I would tan him on the spot. More than seventy-five men join me in this letter. If Vance is elected it will be by such dishonorable means as I have stated." This letter comes from a good soldier and a man of character, and is no doubt a faithful record of facts. Let the friends of these men remember this to-morrow and vote against those who would inau- gurate such infamous proceedings. Extract of a, letter from a soldidr dated Head- quarters Co. I, 22ud Regiment, N. iroopd, July 2y, 1864: "I worked had for Holden but the officers en masse were against him. Holden got 22 votes in this company and Vance 8. The vote in this Begi- ment is Vance 114, Holden 67; though I under- stand the statement is out that Holden got but eight votes in tho regiment." A soldier writes us from Fort Caswell that the vote in his company was Vance 12, Holden 17, and that the men who manifested a wish to vote for Hol- den were told that their battery would be taken away from them, and that they would be sent to Virginia. This he Caused some of the timid to flag am! fall back, though some of us stood the fray and did the best we could, though we had a hard time of it." We might make similar extracts from a number of letters already received, A soldier lias a "hard time" in service, and he has a uhard time" when he attempts to vote for the man of choice. We do not think, however, after all the force and fraud that have been employed, that Gov. Vance's majority in the army will exceed Wo be- lieve this majority, or even a larger one, wns turn- oU by the people at home yesterday, unless they prevented from voting as they desired by tho been poorly repaid. It is not be denied, that by the sudden and terrible nature of the explosion he produced a temporary confusion in our With a little more energy, he might probably have poured such a column through this breach, as to nave given us very serious trouble. But the the very timely arrival of Gen. Mahone, and the quick perception of his military mind, soon placed our gallant boys in position, and retrieved the disaster. _ THE ENEMY'S LOSSES. Ihc enemy losses from all causes are estimated at men. We have orsr prisoners in our posession, 14 battle flags, and upwards of stands of small arms. We took no cannon, because the enemy brought none with them. The leur pieces captured by the explosion, attached to Pe- fFrom the Petersburg From the Front. An Exciting Day on Our Enemy Spring a Battery and Several Men Blown Portion of Our Gallant Charge of Southern he Workt Retaken, Guns Recaptured, etc. The monotony which has prevailed for several days past, in front of Petersburg, was broken on Saturday last, by an event, which though not alto- gether unexpected, took our troops by surprise, and created for a while considerable confusion. 8PINGING A MINE. For several days past, prisoners and deserters have stated that the enemy was mining, and our officers and men have been convinced that the statement was correct, but whether apprised of the exact locality at which the enemy was conducting his mining operations, we have no means of ascertain- ing. All doubts on this point, however, if any existed, were removed Saturday last at an early hoar. About 4-J- o'clock, a dull, heavy sound was heard, and this was followed by several other sim- ilar sounds, the enemy at the same time opening fa a loss, and many a household with their batteries all along their lines. been plunged into grief. In the 12th and 41st It was then discovered that the enemy had j Virginia, were several companies, made up of the sprung a mine on one of our salients, near the i >ounS nien of Petersburg. Their commanding centre of the lines, and a few hundred yards beyond general has borne testimony to the brave manner the Blandford Cemetery. The chiet sufferers by wllich defended the place of their birth the the explosion, were Pegram's Battery, (formerly j of their kindred, and the spot where lies all Branch from this city, and three companies of i catl the hearts and strengthen the arms Elliott's South Carolina Brigade, which occupied of The memories of those who fell in position immediately to the left of the battery for --1 its support. The battery lost 22 men missing, two commissioned officers included. Some of these men, a list of whom we publish elsewhere, are known to be killed, their bodies having been recovered, but others whose bodies have not been found, it is hoped are prisoners in the enemy's hands. Pris- oners taken subsequent to the .explosion, from the enemy, and near the spot, state that several of our men were dug out of the ruins alive. They de- scribe one of the men, a lieutenant, so minutely, and the description is so nearly like that of Lieut. Hamlin, one of the missing, that there are strong grounds for hope that he is yet alive and in the enemy's hands. The remains of tho bomb-proof under which be slop t, and where Lieut. Chandler was seen arousing him just previous to the explo WHOLE NUMBER 1525. Later from tbe North. ATLANTA, Aug. papers of the 20th ult. mentioned tho death of M'Pherson. The Yan- KAA thelr lossos in the of the i Geary's, Ward's, Williams', McOook's, Johnson's and Thomas' Federal-divis- engaged. The Now York Herald" of mh- u .t8 a 8pecial from Nashville which says the j! No. 87. hereafter apply. P 8 "8 ta those By order of the Commandant- July 8, 1804. been rrn i dedt dispatches, dated Allan- Northern papers, were was of the impression taken, but probably it Reliable information had be about Harper's Perry. It was believed that Burly would of D088 but will attempt to raid into PefcersburS alone has Senator Maltory, of Kentucky, was July. GOVERNMENT publish to- day a number of government advertisements gratia, for the information of the people. Those who have possession of the Confederate and State govern- 1 ments act upon the principle that Conservatives are fit only to pay taxes, fight battles, and serve them. Conservative journals are not only regarded by them as treasonable in their character, but by with- holding the government advertisements from them they deprive a large portion of our people of the means of knowing what the laws of the country are, and their duties under those laws. We observe also that Gov. Vance has directed the State go vernmen t advertisemen ts to bo published in Destructive papers, and to be withheld from the Standard, which is the "Sfate its Editor betog the public printer. We allude to this only to illustrate the courtesy by which that functionary is characterized. If We WCre in his plac, and he in ours, we should feel that we had stained our repu- tation as a gentleman by such a course. But it is useless to complain. Those who admin- ister the governments have seized upon them as their peculiar property, and the strait Conservatives aro treated by them as inferiors and underlings. The "hideous mark "with which the Conservatives of this State were threatened by John Spelman in 3862Js at last on their foreheads, and Gov. Vance is aiding bis new friends in burning that mark into the flesh of his old friends. The Confederate continues to manifest its aver- sion for Samuel P. Phillips, Esq., by a series of squibs that can do that gentleman no harm, but plainly show that there is some peculiar rea- son, not known to the public, for these the Editor of tho mean the late assomte of George N. Sanders in certain naval stores transactions-offended with Mr. Phillips, be- the latter felt that he, the Editor, ought to been required, in accordance with the laws of S State The cry well, Mr. phillips voted ag hfl fe man? other citizens were not allowed to do ww fortunate for him that he happened to be in atuation to exercise his right of suffrage without toted BUt Riatter Mr> PhilUp8 i c> a worthy citizen, a good lawyer and .t1: done i McRac gave of his duties was the examination and settlement of Col cs accounts; and the fact that this was not 13 to be attributed to Gov. Vance and Col. lnd nm to Mr. Phillips. CAST'S Wilson, of Mass., of the Senate Committee on Military af' e course of a recent debate in the Senate, statistical information relative to the 1 of the Union armies, of very great 5t Wars men L ?f ,0c.tobe5: six hundred The Voting iu the Hospitals. We very cheerfully give place to the following statement of Dr. E, Burke Haywood, in relation to tlio manner in which the voting was conducted in Pettigrew hospital. Dr. Haywood admits that the names of the Counties to which the soldiers belong were written on the backs of their tickets and tbe clear inference is that this was done by the inspec- tors or poll-holders. This is, in substance, wh at we heretofore stated. The tickets or ballots of the soldiers were, there- fore, opened and the names of their Counties writ- ten on them. This, as we stated in our last was not only unconstitutional and illegal, hut un- necessary. If such writing on the backs of the tickets was necessary, in order to distinguish the tikets from each other that were cast by the sol- diers from tho difleror.t Counties, the soldiers them- selves should hiive been directed to do this; and they might have been told, in advance, that every ticket that might be found in tho box not thus written on, would be counted as a blank. But the idea of an inspector opening a. ticket and writing on, the bad of it I The law of the State is most emphatic on this subject. It declares that every person qualiBed to vote shall give to tho returning officer, in presence oi the inspectors, or, in the ab- of such officer, to one of tho inspectors, a ticket rolled up, in which shall bo written the name or names of the person or persons for whom he in- tends to vote." The presumption in law is that the voter will hand in a folded ticket, and provis- ion is, therefore, made against frauds by declaring that if two tickets shall be found rolled up together they shall not be counted. There is no authority whatever in law for opening a ticket and writing on the back of it; and though we havq no idea of contesting the election, and especially votes cast in any manner by soldiers, yet we have no hesitation in expressing the opinion that if the election should be contested all such ballots thus marked on the back would ba declared illegal and void. What we meant when we said that Dr. llaywood all in his power to have a fair was this That he caused it to be understood that every one under him would be allowed to vote as he pleased, and that he resorted to no means of any kind with the view of influencing votes. But Dr. H. and others have involved themselves in grave error in adopting the plan of marking the ballots themselves, and not leaving this to tho voters. If voters in Pettigrew Hospital were not deterred from voting as they wished by the adoption of this plan, they certainly were in other hospitals and in the camps generally, especially when this was accom- panied by violent threats against the Holdcn men by those having control of the polls. We may feel it our duty to dwell at some length nerealtar on this subject. sion to go on duty, are yet to be seen near the edge of the chasm created by the explosion, and the pre- sumption is, that he was not very deeply buried in the earth. Lieut. H. was a young member of the Petersburg bar, and his many friends feel great anxiety regarding his fate. Of (the casualties in Gen. Elliott's (formerly Evans') South Carolina brigade, we have no inior- m at ion except ihat Gen. Elliott was severely woun- ded by a ball through the breast. He was doing well yesterday, and hopes were entertained that he would recover. EFFORTS TO RETAKE THE WOHKS. As soon as the nature of disaster was made known, Gen. Hill despatched a courier to Gen. Mahone's headquarters, and that vigilant officer moved off immediately at tho head of his own bri- some and bounnes [ttnforce dollars that period; that thousand men -------since General ins march towards Richmond, of the one hundred days men__ been forwarded to M so as supercede and the French art) talking 1 l. 0 great engineering and the cost is esti- 'Hions of dollars. juierference of the military. We shall soon know. instructions for Saunders' (Ala.) brigade (Georgia) to follow. Arriving upon the ground, Gen. Mahone found twelve of the enemy's flags waving upon the ram- parts of that portion of our line, carried by the explosion, and the whole vicinity swarming with white and black yankee troops. Getting his troops into position, Gen. Mahone ordered his brigade to roake a portion of his works and instructed Wright's brigade to come up in such position as would ensure the re-capture of the re- maining portion. Under command of Col. Weisi- ,ger, acting Brigadier, Mahone's brigade formed into line, and about to move up, when the enemy sallied out, and made a charge. The Confederates reserved their fire, until they could see the whites 01 the enemy's eyes, when they poured into them such a storm of bullets, that the enemy recoiled and fell back in confusion. A charge was now ordered, and Weisiger's men dashed forward with a yell, driving the enemy up to and over the breast- works. On the works our men halted, and deliv- ered a plunging fire, which proved so destructive that the euemy never again rallied on this portion of the line, but left our men in undisturbed posses- sion. In the meantime, Wright's brigade, commanded by Col. Hall, instead of coming directly up, by some means deployed, and came round, and thus failed to retake that portion of the line assigned to them. At a late hour Wilcox's old brigade, now ably commanded by the young and intrepid Sanders came gallantly up to their work, and by a charge' drove the enemy from the remaining portion of the works, and thus enabled us to re-establish our liney precisely as they were before the explosion. DESPERATE JUOHTINft. The enemy finding escape impossible, rushed for saiety in the immense hole or chasm, made by their explosion, and around the edge of this great basin our men closed and fought hand to hand. This was done chiefly by Mahone's old brigade, and San- ders Alabama men. Here the slaughter was ter- rific, and here too, many a gallant Confederate fell to rise no more. As an evidence of the desperate nature of the contest around and in this chasm we would state, that Gen. Saunders' men, after remo- ving a large number of buried in the hole on Saturday night, 55 Yankee negro troows and 178 whites. v TUB TERRIBLE POWER OP GHASTLY SCtNH. At a late hour Staurday evening, we visted the chasm caused by the enemy's explosion. It ap- peared to be about 40 feet in depth, and some 200 leet in circumference, and resembled more what one would imagine to have been the effects of a terrible earthquakfi than any thing else to which we could liken it. Immense boulders of earth were piled up rudely one above the other, and great fragments of bomb-proofs, gun carriages, limbers, wore ly- ing promiscuously in every'direction. One roan was caught between two boulders, near the surface of the ground, and literally crushed between them. He still remained in this painful position, with his head and neck visible, our men not having had time to extricate him. Life had been extinct, but the ghastly looking face was unmarked by a scratch, shoulder PerfeCtf butsliSh% reclining on the The sides and bottom of the ohasm, were literal- ly lined with Yankee dead and the bodies lay in every conceivable position. In one spot we noticed a coporal of infantry, a sergeant of artillery, and a big burly negro, piled one upon top the other.-- Some had evidently been killed with the butts of muskets, as their crushed skulls and badly mashed faces too plainly indicated, while the greater por- tion were shot, great pools of blood, having flowed Irom their wounds and stained the ground. Between our breastworks and the enemy's, large numbers of dead and wounded were atill lying the latter begging piteously for water, and praying to be cared for. Our men could not relieve them, as they were in full range of the enemy's sharp shoot- ers, who had not ceased their firing, even under BUCU appalling circumstances as we have described. THE LABORS OP THE ENLMY. The length of the "sap" Wl11 ever live in the grateful recollec- tion of those who survive them. Their names will be found recorded in another column of to-day's INCIDENTS. The enemy opened a severe fire on the city with IMS siege guns simultaneously with the explosion, and for two hours his shell fairly rained upon our streets. Thanks to a kind Providence, but one ac- pident occurred, and that was the loss of a finger by the Chief Engineer of our flre Department, Mr. n 1een> II was cut off bv the fragment of a shell. The few houses burned, were small wooden buildings, very old, and of but little value, Saturday was the first time that the Army of IJorthern Virginia has been regularly engaged with the Yankee negro troops. The disastrous results to the enemy, have proved that this favorite ele- ment of the Yankee army, is no match for Confed- erate soldiers. Tho negroes rushed wildly forward immediately after the explosion, with the cry of "wo quarter." At a later hour of the day, the time lor the Confederates came, and our brave boys took them at their word, agd gave them what they had so loudly called no THE PKISONEUS CAPTUKED. Among the prisoners captured, is Brig. Gen. Bartlett, of Massachusetts. This officer command- ed the 1st Brigade, 1st Division, of Burnside's Vujth Corps. He lost a leg, while Colonel, at Wilhamsburg. He was badly wounded in his wooden leg Saturday, a ball having splintered Ibis will prove. profitable job for some carpenter at Ga. Tho prisoners report that Gan. Griffin was killed, but that his body was, carried off. We have seventy-five commissioned officers in our possession, among them are three Colonels, and every other grade known to the army. The officers and men, white and black, have been confined together. They have engaged in this un- just and unprovoked war, and fight side by side, and our authorities will not be so cruel as to sepa- such "bosom and deeply sympathizing friends in their captivity. A flag of truce was sent by the enemy yesterday afternoon to General PVs headquarters, the object of which we have been unable to ascertain. It is supposed to ask the privilege of burying dead and caring for wounded, many of whom still remained outside of our breastworks yesterday. Such is war, as conducted by the enemy wi.h whom we are con- tending, The Yankees moving to the Southside. RICHMOND, July Yankees on the North side of James river at Deep Bottom, have recrossed to the South side, reuniting with the main bodv of Grant's army. Interesting from Petersburg. PETERSBURG, Aug. losses in Saturday's fiffcu'r foot up j 300 killed and wounded and 1500 prisoners from Elliott's S. 0. Brigade, Ma- hone's losses are about 450 killed and wounded.__ A mine was sprung on Bushrod Johnston's front yesterday evening. Burnside aent in a flag of truce asking permission to bury his dead. No communication was returned with the endorse- ment that an application from the commanding General of the Army of the Potomac would be en- tertajnedr" Meade then stnt a flag and permission -Was granted and the hours from five to nine were named; this period was diligently occupied and over seven hundred dead Yankees were buried Yankee officers state -that their loss in wounded was Great complaint is made against Burnside for his failure. Our captures in battle prisoners Yankee prisoners say that Grant is organirang a grand raid against the Weldon railroad. Edwiti Pas- J. edftdir of the Nashville Press" was arrested on the 15th gave bond in the sum of 1 he steamer Scotia from Liverpool of the 16th had arrived and reported a fight between the Rear- sage and Florida. An influential delegation had waited on Palmerston on the llth, urgine media- Uon on American affairs on the plea of humanity. Palmerston said both the North and the South were equally sanguine of success, while the South was especially jealous of interference. If an opportu- nity for mediation occurred, the government would" avail themselves of it. Mason had au unofficial in- terview with Palmerston. From Georgia. MACON, August from Atlanta arrive and depart regularly on time. Affairs there wear the usual aspect. There was some picket firine and shelling yesterday afternoon which did no damage. The Yankees have apparently abandoned their advanced position across the Georgia railroad and are massing on the centre and right, endeavor- ing to work down between the city and the river 1 he raiders who cut the Macon and Western railroad were driven to Newnan by Jackson's cav- wry. Their advance reached Newnan just after the arrival of the train carrying Roddy's command to Atlanta. He attacked them in front and his pursuers coming up the Yankees broke nnd fled leaving 500 prisoners, all their artillery 0 pieces, 700 horses in our hands. The rest sought to es- cape across the Chattahooche and it was supposed more would be taken here. Three pieces of artillery captured from Stone- man were brought here. Six hundred horses and 800 are reported to have been captured from mm. Gov. Brown left this morning for Ihe militia pour in and are sent rapidly to Atlanta. SODA quart of flour, one tea cup of buttermilk with a teaspoonful of vinegar in it, a half teaspoonfulofsoda, one spoonful of salt, made into a dough just as thin as can be rolled out with eose, and baked in a quick oven. Put in lard according to i means und taste. Two or three table spoonfuls of vinegar will answer in place of buttermilk, though not so good. A Yankee paper says the following note was found fastened to a tree neat-Washington city, just after the Confederate troops left: v NEAR WASHINGTON, July Now, Uncle Abe, you had better be quiet the bal- ance of your administration, as we only came near your town this time just to show you what we could do; but if you go on in your mad career, we will come again soon, and then you had better stand from under. Yours, respectfully, the worst rebel you ever saw. FiFTy-EiontTH VIRGINIA INFANTKY. August 8, 18G4. A. Qenvial. CONSCRIPT OFFrCE Raleigh, o order OBITUARY Died, inthig City oo the 1st instant, of consumption, Mr. WILEY W, KOJU __..- _ from Circular No. 24, from Bureau of Commandant: Adjutant. BDRBAU OF CONSCRIPTION, Richmond, June 27ih, 1864. No 24.'f II. The sale to the government or to tho fatmliM of soWiers at prices fixed by the Comm SonersTf the State under tho impressment act of the i aole surplus remaining after furnishing the ment with tho stipulated quantity of pr  f ID, pur rn Bourdpay- uljle in uitvunce, or about ptr month, if paid in >t netted EWSPAPERI   

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