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High Point Enterprise: Friday, September 25, 1942 - Page 1

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   High Point Enterprise, The (Newspaper) - September 25, 1942, High Point, North Carolina                                tv THE WEATHER WMtbei Point COLDER TONIGHT THE HIGH POINT ENTERPRISE Em Buy Bonds and 266 ASSOCIATED SERVICE HIGH FRIDAY 1942 WIDE WOKLI FEATURE SKKVICB PRICE FIVE CENTS RED COUNTER BLOWS HURL GERMANS BACK STREETS OF STALINGRAD The War Today i By DeWITT MacKENZDG XWide World War Analyst This conducted as UiJJ feiturt by DfWitt Wide World ivar is telnj written In his absence for a few days BJ i Glenn Tokyo and Berlin are mak ing noisy propaganda today of the claim that a fraction of the size has managed to get into the Atlantic and that there has been an equally mysterious German naval operation in the Indian The one specific claim is that a Japan ese submarine has called at a German naval Eur according to the Berlin again set sail for This much may well be It would be no great feat for one of Japans longrange sub of which she has a dozen or more with crusing ranges of miles and to start from skirt the Cape of Good Hope at a safe distance and turn up somewhere in the South along the West Af rican coast or even reach Bord as the Berlin story But the military value of such a cruise would be Its primary purpose assuming it acually was made therefore must have been to create material for the propaganda blast loosed on the worlds air waves this The United it is appar are not the only ones assailed by the misgivings and misunder standings that inevitably plague allies in a life and death struggle of the kind we are fighting friendless in the midst of her broad coprosperity sphere and separated by the greatest of continents and all the seven seas from her must times feel terribly Even the Japanese fed on a steady mental diet of assurances that they move from victory to victory and that the virtue of the emperor assures their final like the fur ther assurance that they are not one people against all the GRAVE ENOUGH The factors making for division among the United Nations are grave The task of keeping them spiritually together in the common purpose of ending the and Nipponese aggressions is one that challenges nl the states manship at their If there were any doubts of this at mosphere surrounding Wendell Willkies visit to the formal politeness of his the constant questions about the sec ond the mounting evidence oT Russias disappointment in the aid of her allies havedispelled But at least none of the Allies has to contend with the dreadful feeling of physical isolation that must beset the Todays blare of trumpets about the sub marine that sneaked Into the At lantic anly serves to emphasize the strange nature of the Ger manJapanese between two powers that have no really effective channels for the direct exchange of There of channels of intercourse between Tokyo and There is the There remain a few neutral capitals where Italian and Ja panese diplomats are free lo exchange information and The British government has reported that there is even a Iricklc of an exchange of prime war goods of small bulk between of tin and other military on PBRP 1 V GUILFORD COURTHOUSE COMMISSION ABOLISHED Senate Lands Committee ap proved today a bill to abolish the Guilford Courthouse National Mil itary Park Comnussion in North A letter from the Intcr ior Department explained the com mission had completed its contri bution to the development of the xvhich now is administered by the National Park Another measure approved was to authorize acceptance of dona tions of land for construction of a scenic parkway lo provide an ap propriate view of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park from the Tennessee Nations Desperate Demands For Scrap Metal Emphasized By Threat of Steel Shutdown By JAMES MARLOW NEW While the nations newspapers today sparked enthusiasm for the intensive scrap metal sal vage steel men gave this gloomy warning Unless millions of tons of junk ed iron and steel are soon some of their which otherwise could be producing all out for may have to lie vice president of the Republic Steel said Last winter and spring the scrap situation was so acute that Republic had one or more open hearth furnaces standing idle continuously from November through Had sufficient scrap heep these fur naces could have produced 000 additional tons of Since Republic has been able to obtain adequate supplies of scrap for current oierations but has been unable to build up stocks for the winter months when scrap collections will again be New blast furnaces financed by the government will this situation to some extent but Re publics ingot capacity has also been increased since last winter and we are very much afraid that we will lose at least as much ingot production between now and the spring of 1943 we did last executives and men agreed that collection of the vital scrap might be speed ed if city dwellers and farmers knew the why and wherefore of scrap from the time it is found in a home till It is sent on its way as a plate for a shin or Following is an explanation In steel mills can reclaim a great part of the need ed scrap from their own opera tions and it is thrown back into the furnaces to make But now the recovery is smaller because so much of production is for war such as ingot for export to tills countrys allies and plates fov ships and tanks that may be lost at sea or in a If any reading that the mills this year will need more than 45 million tons of gets the idea his little 20 or 25 pounds of scrap is a poor he Is Those poor multiplied on a national become millions of Willkie Makes Tour of Soviet Warfront In Rzhev Area Nazis Not Dressed for Winter Fight By EDDY GILMORE a tour of inspection which carried him within six or seven miles of Germanheld Rzhev amid duelling artillery on the Central Russian Wendell Willkie returned to his capital He entered into the zone of ar tillery action and from a lofty vantage point saw where Russian soldiers were engaged in street Rzhev is about 130 miles west northwest of Mos 14HOUR TRIP Clutching the sides of the leaping Willkie rode to the vicinity of escorted by a Russian It was a 14hour Standing on a windswept he looked toward the It was one Of the biggest thrills of his he Later he talked to seven German Their youth impressed To see the front so intimately Willkie went two nights without He had no opportunity to pull the lanyard of a Russian can AP Newsman Asks For Interview Larry Associated Press cor respondent who fell into enemy hands in the British commando raid on Tobruk floor ed his Axis captors by demand ing an interview with Field Mar shal Erwin DNB dis closed today in a broadcast from f Although the Italian radio had announced the capture of an Am erican correspondent in the To as he said he would have liked raid to to but the firing was under way about him for practically the have been this was Ihe first time that the Axis radio has men Itj I J 11 entire time he was close to the tlonecl the Willkie was an artilleryman in the World SECOND The front was the sec ond battleline he has visited in the past few He went up to the Egyptian desert front in the early part of his Willkie said the German prison ers he talked to before Rzhev look ed like they were dressed not for Russias coming winter but for an African They wore floppy cotton and shivered in the cold and Willkie visited Russian dugouts and studied maps with the line He saw the defense works and also visited what were German defenses be fore they were Tecaptured by the prize winner who had been with the British fleet in virtually all its big Mediterranean The radio said this rather queer wish by the prisoner amazed the captors but they turn ed it even though the Nazi desert commander happened then to be in Ignoring the fact that Allen was assigned permanently to the British the Germans pur ported tha his presence on a de stroyer meant that the raiders in t ded to try to hold Tobruk be cause a Yankee would not have risked his skin for an unimpor tant trip if he had not hoped to get a big DNB said Allen was picked up in a his uniform not even on Pngre 2 WASHINGTON BV RAY TUCKER countrys physi cians are flooding Washington with protests against the haphaz ard manner in which they are be ing compelled to join the armed forces or to face While professing the utmost willingness to wear they insist that heed to the needs of the especially small in which the doctors prac tics should be given considera DREAMS Newly promoted Major General Ira Eaker al most tod a few talcs out of avia tion school when he predicted that an around the clock aerial blitz krieg could bring Hitler to his knees and Germany to the His is bulwark ed by confidential British reports on the performance of our B17 Flying Fortresses over France and the At observers were inclined to discount the power of these But their latest advices express amazement at the devastating sweep of our planes iike the commander of the bombing force in England suggest that they may revolution ize The R17 ac cording to these can op erate from a bright of twenty five thousand fret and drop one out of fpur missiles exactly on the Conlfnnrd tm Pftgre K Compromise In Parity Fight Gains Backers Barkley Says Many Senators Ready to Change Stand for Settlement fP Democratic Leader Barkley Kentucky said to day that an effort to compro mise the fight over farm par ity prices in the administra tions antiinflation bill rapid ly was gaining support in the Talking to reporters at the start of the fifth day of Barkley said that many sena tors who previously had been backing an amendment by Sena tor Thomas DOkla and Hatch DNM to revise the basis of parity upward had informed him they would vote for a substitute proposal directing President Roosevelt to lift farm price call ings where they did not reflect to producers the increased costs of labor and other AVOIDS CHANGE The latter amendment would avoid any change in the method of computing President Roosevelt has said that he was unalterably opposed to chang ing this Many senators who have been committed to vote for the Thom as amendment have indicated to me that the compromise proposal is more workable and more sat Barkley adding It does not have the vice of rewriting the parity Thomas told report ers he thought the compromise was meaningless jumble of words and would insist on a vote first on the amendment he and Hatch There were reports in order to avoid a prior vote on the ThomasHatch the administration leadership might move during the day to send the bill back to the banking commit tee for speedy redrafting to in clude ihe compromise If this the Thomas Hatch amendment would iose its favorable parliamentary position and the administration comprom ise would come to a NO ACTION Barkley said there was little change of any decision by the Senate today on any of the ajor points in the indicating that a showdown might be postponed unti This probably woud delay final enactment of the bill until after the October 1 deadline set by President Roosevelt in his mes sage to Congress on 7 ask ing for minority to cut farm price ceilings back from 110 per cent of parity to 100 per cent and saying that unless Congress act he Administration senators de cided to ask Leon price to outline actions he would take if the com promise were finally accepted by both House and The House already had defeated the admin istration by voting to revise the parity formula upward and there by lift farm ceiling Ship Sinkings Total Raised By Two Losses By the Associated Press The announced sinkings of two more an American mer chantman and a Panamanian car carrier with the loss of five raised to 475 today ihe Associated Press tally of announc ed sinkings in the western Atlantic since Americas entry into the A total of 9S crewmen of the two ships was rescued and landed safely at United Nations One seamon was killed in the U boat attack on the Panamanian vessel in ihe north Atlantic in July while four men were lost when the United States ship was tor pedoed in midAtlantic last The American Swedish news ex change announced that of the Swedish motor freighter Lima by enemy subma rine action raised at least 154 ships hat neutral nations mer chant marine losses in a threeyear At least 92S persons were killed in the the exchange WRECKAGE OF THREETRAIN NEA Wreckage at the Dick where two fast Baltimore and Ohio passenger trains collided with a piled up many and killed several Note the smoke billowing from a blazing passenger in which many passengers Priests are shown at the waiting to administer last Military Rule Is Established In Madagascar ish forces have placed Madagascar under military rule to insure Jaw and order and provide for adminis tration pending establishment friendly the foreign of fice news department declared to The sovereignty of how remains unaffected and the French flag will continue to fly over the It added that the British hope to gain the administrative coopera tion of representatives of the Vichy Small numbers of French and native perhaps as many as who still are ders from the Vichy governorgen Armand have with drawn to the southern part oi the island hut the British were iiupe ful they would submit without iur ther a military commen tator Reports reaching London did not indicate whether the islands defenders who yielded at the cap ital and elsewhere were simply disarmed and demobilized or treat ed as Repatriation was offered Vichv forces which yielded in it was but there was noth ing to show whether a smiliar po licy had been adopted in Mada V THE LONG WAY HOME La tourette lost her drivers license in a year Yesterday it came home in an envelope postmarked somewhere in Paul formerly of wrote he had found it while trudging through Australian bush Miss Latourette doesnt know ho wit got to Shes glad to have it only license expired in MacArthurs Airmen Continue Devastating Attacks on Jap Supply Route In New Guinea GENERAL MacARTHURS Aus fighter planes continued their devastating attacks on Japanese communication lines in New Guinea yesterday while bombing formation blasted enemy shipping and shore installations in New Timor and the Solomon General MacArthurs headquarters an nounced Huts containing stores and equipment were left in a communique by a strong force of Allied fighters which strafed the airdrome at advance base for the column attempting to push across southeastern New Guinea toward Port BOMBED Another formation bombed a bridge near over which the Japanese have been attempt to move supplies for their troops across the deep gorge of the Ku masi The ed over the chasm by viously had been damaged by Al lied and the enemy has been working feverishly to repair Fighting between Allied and Japanese patrols was in the vicinity of lori 32 miles from Port Mores where the invaders have been stalled for more than 10 but the Allied said there was no change in the gen eral The attack on New Britain Is east of New was carried out in moonlight by a force of Flying The bombers were credited officially with scoring a direct hit amid ships on an ton cargo ship in he harbor of When last seen the vessel was blazing fiercely and probably sank the communique COXCEXTRATED An Allied spokesman said there was a considerable concentration of both warships and merchant on Page 2 Railroad Union Is Asking Big Wage Increase Railroad management and labor sources which declined to be quot ed reported today that 15 brother hoods of nonoperating employes had notified the carriers of de mands for a 20cent an hour wage with a minimum of 70 cents an and a closed The sources said railroad opera tors employing members of the brotherhoods were being served with notives of the demands at their executive offices through out the nation The nonoperating unions of personnel such as telegraphers and signal represent more than Representatives of the unions conferred in Chicago several days then adjourned with out announcing the purpose of the sessions or what action might be taken in the Both nonoperating and the big four operating unions of switchmen and trainmen and engincmen ob tained wage increases a year ago through mediation processes set up under the National Railway WarTorn City Is Cyclone Of Armed Action Tass Says Nazis Have Lost Men There During Past Week of Fighting By HENRY CASSIDY Thrown on the defensive on Stalingrads northwestern rimi by the development of the Red Armys flanking counterat the Germans were ported today to have failed In fresh infiltration attempts rectly against the city while battling desperately against the menace from the The epic battle centered like consuming cyclone on the western sector where the had recaptured two dominating heights and nearby populated sec according to todays Stalin grad CONCEDE ATTACKS The German high command clared that its troops had taken further fortified points in fierce street fighting conceding defensive nature of the fight OB the said Soviet relief at tacks against the northern barrier erected by German and allied troops were repulsed in hard The Russian army newspaper Red Star declared that no other city in this war had been such a battlefield as A mili tary commentator quoted by official Russian news agency said ihe Germans had lost more than dead in the course of the last And Stalingrad is not the fort ress which Verdun he Red Star said German tanks were cruising the streets and alleys of seeking to fall un expectedly upon the Russian posi tions and demoralize the men hold ing Despite this it was theRussians were counter ing with antitank guns and generally hold ing their One street run ning from the western edge of city to the high cliffs along the Volga was attacked scores of times by German tank forces and tommygun shock DAY AND NIGHT Heavy fighting rages day and j night in the streets of said a Tass commentary which elaborated on the nature of tank on Page 2 V Giant Government Purchasing Organization To Control Farm Products May Be Created giant government pur chasing organization to create in effect a single market for farm products was reported today to be one possible result if President Roosevelt decides on direct action to stabilize prices and It probably would be one of the later informed persons and would be prrceded by more generalized and less drastic First of if the program un derstood to have been outlined for him were the Presi dent would allocate the nations supplies of whatever commodities were to be brought under control with a request to the primary markets to buy within certain price limits and to sell within a specified markup to the secondary The wholesalers and re tailers would be under price regu lations already in The actual force of this initial order which might specify areas of distribution for some pro duct so as to equalize purchas ing opportunities might be no more than that of a but as a presidential request in war time it would carry considerable A similar method was used in fixing prices on many items prior to enactment of the price control Stragglers could be brought into line through control of trans portation and it was If defections became serious enough to threaten the en tire then the allocation program could be backed up by a requisitioning using the commodity credit corporation as the operating Such a as outlined by in formed persons who preferred not to be quoted directly at this stage of would work this way The president wcuild allocate all of the available supplies of the commodity according to needs first call going to the armed second to the lendlease and Ihe last to If an individual balked at the allocation the requisition power would he employed through the commodity credit corporation which would Jake what it needed and pay a fair and reasonable price as provided by This price presumably would be that fixed under the allocation pro There are other means hy which the overall problem could be some experts but the allocation plan appears to be the most probable Roosevelt is understood to have had the orders for such a program on his desk since before labor and was prepared to use them until he decided at the last minute to give congress a new opportunity to deal with the Raze Buildings To Get Scrap For War Effort fivestory home of tht I Federal Court House and Post I Office Building in Kyv xviil be the first governmentown ed building razed in the nation wide drive to salvage critically needed war The public buildings administra announcing this said the completed in 1S93 at a cost of and enlarged in 1925 at a cost of was expected to field between and tons of wrought iron and two tons of brass and other The structure has not been used since when a new Federal building was con structed for Commissioner Reynolds said PBA engineers were check ing seven other old and unoccu pied Federal buildings to determ ine whether the salvage obtainable would justify their The war production board to called upon all citizens to act as salvage to search for and report idle iron and structure and any large amounts of abandoned machinery and Lessing director of WPBs conservation said there was a vast amount of useful idle and unused in all parts of the It is in build ings and street saMv sunken ships and in other Rosenwald Any person who knows of idle metal in any form was requested 10 send the including I the if possible the ownership of the to j the special projects salvage com mittee of in SCRAP   

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