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Gastonia Gazette Newspaper Archive: August 26, 1954 - Page 1

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Publication: Gastonia Gazette

Location: Gastonia, North Carolina

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   Gastonia Gazette (Newspaper) - August 26, 1954, Gastonia, North Carolina                                Today's Chuckle According it rhil, (hi friendly motorcycle cop, onljr (hree kindi of mo- suburban, and bourbon. (Copyrijhl Utncnl Corporation) THE GASTONIA GAZETTE VOL. LXXV. NO. 204. IN THE OF GROII'ING HKAUTY" -GASTON COUNTY, TI1K FINE COMRR1) COTTON YARN CKNTKR OF AMHR1CA. HE.MRRR AUDIT BUREAU GASTONIA, N. C., THURSDAY AFTERNOON, AUGUST 26, The Weather NORTH cloudy feuiUM with icicttred thunder' shuum over (he northeast portion. Low Umperiturei tonight. mnunUJnt, W to TS the where. Frf- diy partly cloudy with scattered ihijndrrshowm, coflJfr north i 74 PAGES ASSOCIATED rum SINGLE COPY U.S. EASES TRADE CLAMPS WITH REDS Brazilian Cops Crack Down On Commies Californians Say Mayor, Save That Cable Car, Please HA1, SAN you imagine Ihc uproar in Paris If someone proposed razing the Eiffel Tower? Or the screSms in Brooklyn if someone sold Ihe Dodgers to Dallas. Well, the same kind ot tur- moil has going on here all year since they cut San Fran- cisco's famous cable car system In hall. "If we're out to ruin the city, why nol chop the Golden Gale i Bridge in half, demand die- hard defenders of the cable car. The cable car, I long a symbol of f San Francisco io the nation, wits regarded as one of wonders of the (Vest after its invention here in 1873. Today thou- sands qt motor HOVLE BIS regard the antiquated little Tooncrville-type trolleys, which are pulled by whirring underground cables, as one nl the unfortunate trans- portation blunders of history. But the slow-moving little cars will remain seated; gen- tlemen may ride standing out- side, at their own are Ire- loved by tradiltott-prouci San Franciscans. Millions of tour- Isti wouldn't (hink their visit to the ciiy complete without one. It gives them the thrilling feel- ing of a brief journey back into EJI adventurous past. But lime has passed Ihe cable car by in terms of efficiency. They cost three times as much to operate as a bus, move only ahout half as fast, and are great niiddie-of-the-road traffic block- eis. Faced with these stern facts, the Board of supervisors last January cut the 11-mile cable car trackage in half. It retained the historic lines thai would give picturesque visitors the most views of the ciiy. But an immediate, outcry arose, naiionaliy and locally: "Save the cable Letters poured .In from all ovc. America urging that the cable car was the vocal soul of old San Francisco, nail must not be lost. Indignant citizens last June passed, among other measures, an amendment to the ciiy chart- er providing thai the cable car Ehoiild be part of San Francisco forever. Bul, iignificanllr, some 60.000 voters straddled the fence by to vote on the issue. That should have settled the problem, bul it hasn't. Sent! menlalists, perhaps includin many who haven't stepped on cable car since the invention at the automobile, have kept th_ iifihl raging. They still feel, al- though bewildered officials pro test 'tain'l so, Ihe curtailntcn of the cable car network is otilj lite lir.st step in a dark plot to abandon it altogether. So sound trucks sllll rol through Chinatown blaring lh< embattled war cry In Chinese "Save the cable A cam paicn is under way by enthusi- to force the city to restore or even enlarge, the lost cable car trackage. If they succeed, this will take R bit of it would now require the cable cars to run part of their route Ihe wronii way down one-way sireets. i Support for this program Is less than lukewarm among many I ciiy motorists. "Some of these nuts probably would be In favor of coiny back to the snarled one driv- er. "If th-y had to Iry lo drive B car two blocks uphill through heavy traffic bthind one of those cable monstrosities, thai ,-ouid cure some of their quaint idea; The odds .seem to be that pro OVER 100 ARE SEIZED DURING BIG CLEAN UP lapital City Returns To 1 foops Seen" On Streets. HEY MOM, NOT ANOTHER! Five-week-oid Suzy-CJ renters worry and disillu.skmmcnl as her mother, Olga, a Rhesus monkey, drinks heartily from a can at the Ixmgvicw. Wash., home of her owners, Mr. and Mrs Curly Kniiri.s.on. Suzy's concern was groundless, it was only soda pop CAP Wirephoto.) Blue'Chips Are Down 17 States Will Be Campaign Targets JACK WASHINGTON Rcnuh- and Democrats are putting :iieir political blue chips down in 17 states in an all-out battle lor control of the Senate in the 84th ongre.ss. These same stales, along with line others where there are many marginal districts, also may prove to be the major bal- tlegrnunrts in contests for com- mand of the new House. As the situation now sia.nds. with active campaigning just starting, the two parties appear almost evenly matched in their chances to alter the present hair- line in Senate and House. The Senate lineup 15 now 4B Republicans, 47 Democrats and one Independent; the House 318 Republicans. 213 Dem- ocrats, one Independent a n d Ihree vacancies. Thirty-seven Senate and nil 435 House seats are al stake this fall. part_y leaders analyze the mailer, nine Senate seals now held by Republicans and eight held by Democrats are in varying degrees of danger. Republican i n c iimhcnts who apparently face stiff challenge; include Senators Cooper o Kentucky, Cordon of Oregon Dworshak of Idaho. Ferguson oi Michigan. Mundt of South Da- Sallonslall of Massachu- setts and Kuchcl of California Republican-held seats in New Jersey and Wyoming fa! within this category. Democrats likely lo be hard pushed hy their opponents in- clude Senators Anderson of New Mexico. Douglas of Illinois, Frear o; Delaware, Gillette of Iowa Humphrey of Minnesota, Murra1 of Montana and Burke of Ohio The seal being mealed by Sen Johnson Colorado also i among these. House seals in most of Hies ROB HOOT) BOB HOOD TO TAKE NEW JOB uddilion, there are marginal ells tricls in Virginia. We.sl Virginia Florida. North Carolina. Mary Innd, Missouri, Pennsylvania New York and the Nevada at large contest where both partie tisiure they have a chance. That doesn't mean that state jlike Indiana, Kan MS. Washington and Wisconsii will be overlooked. But ih iparttrs' major national effort 'are likely lo be turned cist where except perhaps for a fe 'individual congressional district Public Relation-: Jlan At gre.ss and 'he will pi ombe. In an effort to balm on civic wounds, Mayor Elmer E. Robinson has appoint- ed a committee lo oiganizc an annual lour-clay festival to honor the cable car "We hope." said a hopeful committee member, "the festival will some day rival the Mardi Gras m New Orleans." It looks like the cable car, 91 years after its birth, will le- ROMAN RIO OE JANEIRO, Bra- cracked down on tlie outlawed Communist parly totlay after 48 hours of riols and demonstrations ton died off by the suicjfie of Presi- dent Getulio Vargas. Amid increasing evidence the Reds played a .strong hand in parking Die ijol.s. filmed in part gainst Hit United States, more han 100 Communists were under nest. One was accused spe- ifically of burning a police car. Copies of Imprensa Popular, he Communist newspaper which iiiblishes openly despite the ban m the party, were seized by po- ice in Rio De Janeiro. The news- paper headlined Ils account of 'esterclay'.s d e in o n s I alions: 'Down with Rio's csidenls shout indignantly in it ice Us." A dispatch from Alcgrc aid police raided an allegedly Communisl paper there and ar- -estcrl the editor. Tills capital city's commercial lie gradually returned to nor- nalcy today. Public offices, banks ind shops reopened. A few troops till were to be seen on the streets, bul the heovily rein- forced patrols of the two lays were called in. Joao Cafe Filho, the new presi- denl, cast about for someone 'lo ili the ticklish Job of finance nlnister In the inflalion-plagued "overnniciit he inherited. He oufcrred with individual mini.s- crs and scheduled a cabinet meeting. After 71-year-old Vargas end- tf his life with a bullet Tuesday, lis old friend Oswaldo Aranha, ormcr U. N. Assembly presi- lent, resigned us finance minis- er along with the rest of Ihe abinet. Aranha. who has often been nrntioned as a candidate In the 955 presidential elections, had been seeking in the past lew uonlhs to steer Brazil through i dire foreign exchange shortage mainly by declining coffee exports. The economic straits las been going through had nuch lo do with Ihe explosive polilicol-mililary crisis that shook the country for the past 21) days and culminated in Var- :as' suicide following his mili- tary-dictated agreement to take permanent leave of absence. The rioting crowds thai took lo the streets to hoot against Var ga.s, then began for Ihe old man when Ihcy found he had shot himself, cooled down after two bloody days lha. left four dead and .scores wound- en throughout Brazil. Vargas' body lay in stole h the town hall nf his native Sa< Borja in southern Brazil prio. to burial today. The Roman Catholic Church Will Reduce Goods Banned By One-Third HUNK WASHINGTON. Secretary of Commerce Weeks today eased i cslricUons on U. S. trade vr.th )hc Soviet Union and oilier Communist countrie-s of Europe, bul. lie said he doubts there will be art early increase in the flow of goods across the Iron Curtain. Commerce Department sources SUMMERTIME UP NORTH The Navy Icebreaker Burton Islnnri Is halted with her bow rammed into a will of Ice riming .n expedition into Ihe Arctic In the Bering Sea area earlier this summer. Studies conducted bv scientists aboard the. vessel are designed to make Ihe frozen wastes of Ihc fur north more acces- sible to military operations so that defenses in the Arctic may he .sliriislhciicd.   separated from her husband liaise arrest rhey said Mrs Gll- Grover. Fheir daughter Angela iberison had had him arrested Sunday night and he had been skull fractures and'se vere lacerations on her 'ace and body hrld In iaii overnight Deputies Joe and Mike today. She was held without charge Adenauer's CDU party In famburg, crassed Into the F.a.st ust a week ago with his wife headquarlers, Schmidt- Muct.s in iiccring nud .snullruton detJ.ir. mcnl, stated that Oils Is no "lily In violation of .stnte public health laws bul also Ihe Fedcra Pure Food and Drug law. said thai sodium sulllli In ll.sclf Is a poisonous sub stance allhough Ihn cffecls de pend upon the amount through Ihe month. Symptom do not appear tinlll .severa monlhs later. DKAm.y roisn.v When Injected Into the veins Ihc preservative is rlearlly pol.son InvrstlRatlon ot the -10 mca dealers came after two previnu positive samples had been toinu here. Tlie health deparlmen quickly swung Into action il rounding up .samples antl mak mg Its own laboratory tests. Ti he doubly sure before .swcarirl, out warrants, two lesl.i wer run. Charlotte Is currently in ih process of conducting a clean up of (nod dealers In that city. lying said that although ac cepled laboratory procedure on I requires a qualitative lesl merel to show the presence of sullite. his dcpartnirm nevertheless con ducted nualitatlvp tests more ex- trusive In nature as confirma- tive tests. Thc.sc methods have been ap- proved hy the U. s. Department nf Agriculture, he sairl. Officials of the health depart- jmr-nl pointed that Ihcre are many siillile preparations on the market with the mtist common being a cleaning preparation Largest (Ihr.ck- Kvcr Cftrtl- spe't-iflcally labeled as a product ing To Caplonia sinks. land cutting J'rom Many asing Stale. Is reported, stale that they do so to keep frrsh meat Inokinu' fresh. Actually, it Is against the said Weeks' order would reduce by ow-lhtyl to one-half the list of goods mnv banned from com- merce the United States 11 ml Ihe Red bloc In Kui-opc. The announcement dealt only 'llh Commerce De- (irtmrm Is to nmke public, later sts of specific items to be Irccd Weeks' move came a day after 'orelKii Aid Chief Harold E ttassen announced n similar re- unlhm of ctnhs- on Red trade f filendly naiions getting aid ram Ihe United Slates. Both officials said existing le- trictions still stand on trade 'llh Coinimmlsl China. North :OITH, or the Communist nrcn f Vlel Nam, And hnth said the new policy ownirt trade with Cnmmunlst ounlrtes In Europe would no el slip Into Ihe Easl-Wcsl Iriuli Mream anything of slghlflcan nllllary vnhie. Voicing some skepticism Iha ils new order would re.sulL It sllmulatlon ol Ensl-Wcs rndc, Weeks' stalemenl said "a 'arly lnerca.se In the volume o rade with the Soviet bloc re suiting from this action Is un Ikcty In view of the bloc's aln of self-sufficiency and Its In bllity lo provide desired goorl: n exchange for Imports." Wrcks said the policy would shniten the list of good." which will he embargoed frnu he United' Stales lo Europcai Soviet bloc countries, and pro vltie an opportunity for Incrcas trade In peaceful goods. At nformed source said (he cmiiar go list, now contains about terns and would be reduced I ictween ISO and Stassen's announccmenl deal with smaller llsls of goods whlc tallons receiving aid from Ihl country inusi nol sirll to Com niunist countries. They previous ly comprised 201 items and Stas sen salrl the now lists woul number BO fewer. Rome of the items droppe were listed as flat and tank car. Tttdc and diesel oil. certain type ol locomotives and tractor nomnllftary fires, platinum, c; .1 tiiiiim, calcium, sodium, stron tiiim, vanadium, asbestos nn mica. taken from embargi lhf.se Herns remain subjecl t .surveillance for qtmntiiy -shipmeril.s. of U. S. restrlctioi on Rasl.-Wesl trade fame afte CITY WILL GET POWELL FUNDS Oastonis receive in Powell Mill funds from ihe statf grivernment. I' was an- r.nunrrd in Raleigh today. This money is for improve- ment of nrmhighway system cities antl towns -than a year of mounti; pressure from friendly nallor in Western KurofX1. Polio Shows Drop From 1953 Figures la: cases had her rrporlrd in Nnrth Carolina Ih yrar, a firnp ot nearly 300 cas erve ail 12 warrants in Ihe near future. 11 is nol known when Magistrate Piice will call the Ml ll'illy t, earing. All 12 man up for a.srs will be tried Local Temperalur Last Nil i Torta) McCONNELL CRASH FATAL TOJETACE Thirty-Two-Year Old Pi- lot. Killed As Falls During Routine Test Flight. KDWAR.DS A1RFORCEBASE, Death on a routtni e.st flight has ended the spec- -icular career of Capt. Joseph McConnell Jr., (he nation's lead- lei ace. The 32-year-olrf pilot, credited i-ith downing 16 MIGs in Korea, killed yeslerdny when 'Rfilt Sabrel Jet crashed on the Desert, 12 miles north- asi of Rogers lake. HLs body was lound beside hla lection seat, half a mile from he shiltered plane. Nearby was ils unopened parachute. An Air 'orre spokesman said apparcnt- V he had ejected himself from he plane at low altitude. During the flight McConnell had radioed thai he had lost control of the plane partially, but nought he could make a landing m the dry lake bed. Soon there- after he reported he had lost tha :orkpll canopy. He was advised o bail out. Edwards Base officers aid he probably stayed with the plane loo long. MrCXmnell, who said his pre- malure grey hair came from be- nR the father of three young children and not from his flying. served as a bomber navigator during World War II and "later took flight irninin.g. After Ihe. lighting broke out. in Korea he repeatedly requested combat duty despite being told he was loo old. His request linal- ly wa.s granted and he became an ace In just 30 days last year. After downing his ciih'h MIC. his Sabre was hit hy cannon fire _ al feel near the Man- _ border. He bailed out In the magistrate's court. 2.11 inrhri. hling inaudlbly al limes and slurring his words. He said Western charges that "H. keep.' up." sairt City Engineer W. T. Cox, who put in he had been a traitor are "ritttc- Oaslonia's rlaim for pavmcnt. ileus" because his Intfnt Is new sireeUs 'di-lena Germany and to >'ca1' arut fa mlr Lowell KVANSTON. 111. A vifficirnl emphasis on theiman which these lalse doctrines rut denoimctng rommunism as po.sihlhly of arhirvmc appears lo be sorely un- -i estimated in the report." 'or German unity. He assailed what he called Ihe Western goal of reairmnz Ger- mans to point Ihrm easJward. And he asserted these are the 'llied-Adenauer 1. West German rearmament will go ahead whether Inside the European Defense Commur-'ly or outside It. 2. Tlie plaai have already been drawn up for army, navy and air force hy a committee headed hy Gen. Alfred Ornrnther. U. S commander In chief of the North mnney eets and The stale uses two factors in determinine how nivich money a city will rrc.plve. rhe faclors arc population and .stiect mileage. The city cnRineer completed measuring ihr street milcaze lasl monlh and sent in hi.s claim. Gaslonia ranks ll'h In Ihc Male In Ihe size of ils check. The largest cneck goes lo Char- lolte U396.015! and Ihe others are Winston-Salem. Grcoasboro, nurham. A.sheville. High Point. Wilmington, Kayeiteville and Rocky Mount. Wittmaok echoed many ol the i in the state. 'Hie checks will anti-Adenauer and ariti-Atneii-lbe mailed in September, and the can sentiments voicfcf two weeks] money repie.'ents one-hall cenlj John in his public un-U ihe slates regular gasoline. Church GfOUp Studies Measure______ HoTOvcr, ho lacked Ihc Kim-- Tins will bo ilir larRf.st chrrV; Ly anrl command with vhirh 
                            

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