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Burlington News Newspaper Archive: January 23, 1923 - Page 1

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Publication: Burlington News

Location: Burlington, North Carolina

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   Burlington News, The (Newspaper) - January 23, 1923, Burlington, North Carolina                               THE BURLINGTON NEWS Devoted to Upbuilding Alamance County and to the Best of Our People. Vol. No. 40 Burlington, N. C., Tuesday, January No. 78 GERMANY AGAIN ENTERS PROTEST AGAINST FRENCH Being Sent to French, British, Italian and Belgian Governments of Protest. HUNDRED THOUSAND MINERS OUT IN RUHR Industrial Leaders Again Issue Proclamation Asking Work- ers Not to Deliver Coal. Washington, Jan. again protested to''the world against the French and Belgian occupation of the Ruhr. Formal notes being delivered to the French, British, Ital- ian and Belgian governments pro- testing against the action of occupa- tion authorities in forcing German officials in the affected regions to work against the Berlin government, the United Press is informed today. A specific complaint was lodged aganist inter-allied Rhineiand com- mission, which directs German of- ficials to c'ollect customs and other revenue and turn the rrioney over to the forces of occupation. ONE HUNDRED THOUSAND MEN NOW ON STRIKE. Essen, 'Jan. hundred thousand Kuhr miners are on strike1 against the French occupation and arrest of mine owners, it is an- nounced. German industrial leaders have again issued a- proclamation calling upon the workers to refuse to de- liver coal to the invaders at the hour when Fritz Thyssen and six other coal mine owners were to go to trial.. Thyssen is ill. More and more West Phaliari min- ------en..joined the ritriiers.. .Six.Stinncs nines closed down'in the vicinity of Essen because French refused to workers' intercession on behalf of the sick industrial leader, who it is reported, will be sentenced to six months in jail. GERMANY NOTIFIES ALLIES SHE CANNOT PAY. Berlin, Jan. 23. Germany no- tified the allies that it is doubtful if she will be nay any more reparations for v .'resent, owing to the econo; aos resulting from French vation of Ruhr. A totr.l of about pounds of tobacco was piled on the Burling- ton market today, both the open j market and co-operatives being busy caring for the rush. Local warehousemen say they ex- pect the. increase in business of the Paris, Jan. evidence that the social and economic structure of Europe is tottering on its founda- tions was displayed last night in the magnificent salons at the Louvre when international society gathered at the most brilliant fete'of many months, in honor.of Franco-Ameri- can- unity. From President and Mme. Mille- rand and Marshal and Mme. Joffre down, the high folks of France ming- led with the cream of trans-Atlantic society, with gowns and jewels pre- senting a dazzling pageant. Judging from the new models dis- played, fashions have entered on a "glitter period." Steel and cut glass beads, tinsel sequins, silver, gold am! even platinum were used to accentu- ate the iridescence the gowns, from which the sharp points of light of gems flashed all over the ballroom. A feature of the evening was the number of complaints from Ameri- can and French women about the in- sistence of dressmakers on long skirts. Dozens of gowns were min- ed by being trod on in the course of the modern dances. Many of the stylish American wom- en affirmed that if the Parisian dressmakers continue the long styles they will buy their gowns in New York. Whereas a year ago black was still a favorite color, last night not a single black dress was noted. Aj majority of the beautiful gowns were in bright amber, crys- tal and orchid. The jewel head dress has come bark to its 'own, no fewer than 30 tiaras being counted in the gather- ing. The value of the pearls, sap- phires and diamonds worn could not even be guessed at. One gown of pale green silk, which created a sensation, had a tightly wound bodice almost entirely com- posed" of ropes of gems. INTlQEITHE MtilEIIMITTOlZ New York, Jan. of a 12-mile limit for the three-mile limit now drawn by international law has been recommended to Wash- ington as a means of combatting the rum fleet off the New Jersey coast. This recommendation, it was said ,ouay, was an outgrowth of Ihe con- ference Saturday between Anting Collector of the Port Stuart and pro- hibition enforcement authorities. The theory that extension-of thc customs limit would check smuggling was based, prohibition agents said, oil the belief that the small boa'lii run- ning liquor from the rum fleet to shove would find it dangerous to ply far from shore. I Officials admitted they did not ex- aect an immediate ruling on this point, becjaufce the supreme coifrt now was considering a similar ques- tion in conection with the search of foreign vessels' bringing liquor" into American waters. Officials were concerned today over 'the discovery off 'Sandy Hook' of the cruiser "J. J." She was be-1 ieved to be carrying a cargo of i liquor formerly in the hold of the British sloop Grace and'Edna, which] was captured last May, eight miles off thc New Jersey coast and later released on protest of the British government. The Grace and Edna, which was put under a bond, was found lo be unseaworthy and her cargo said to be worth was transferred to thc cruiser I. I. to be taken to St. Pierce and Mique- lon. Peacock Hat Not Been Arrcited and His Whereabouts Are Not Known. Rumors Are Plentiful. Raleigh, Jan. Dr. J. W. Peacock, escaped inmate of the criminal insane department of thc The members of the Burlington Chamber of Commerce will have a banquet at the Chamber of Com- merce rooms on next Tuesday even- ing at at which time business; BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF ELON TO MEET TOMORROW ui importance will be discussed. The reces, and co-operatives expect an increase on account of the second payment. Burlington, as a market place for the weed is we! known by the farm- ers of many counties. The local sellers- are courteous geiHlemen in the conduct of the business, take a personal interest in the welfare of those who drive' into their houses, and keep the prices up to the stand- ard maintained by any houses any- where selling tobacco of the same grade brought here. son sun sum that fact has come to state officials, ,.A 'lig eroml expected to attend according to an authoritative state- ment, made yesterday. this banquet and it is hoped that new life and new co-operation will result from this joint meeting. At i ;i ELON COLLEGE RELIEF COMMITTEE TO MEET Mr. R. L. Holt, chariman, has called a meeting of the Elon Col. lege Relief Committee to meet in the Morrit Bank office tonight at All memberi are urged to be present. Hum Una jiiuiL, f-ptaimi- Rumors have flown thick between a mccting of the directors of the Ufll rPFIITC Jl Raleigh and Florida points about the j Chamber of Commerce last night ill HnllUL .IlILL URLf! I L fl movements of Dr. Peacock and the j Wlla decided to employ a secretary WCIII 'IDC'IITDHI PTHTF Paris, Jan. of arrested. Governor Ilardce of Flor- j organization will be present at this French plan definitely to separate ida has set today as the time for banquet and come with a dctcrmiim-..... thc hearing on the question of ox-1 tjon to reorganize the Chamber and various features of the legal pro-1 once, and plans were imnle for ccdure involved in. securing his re- making this banquet a successful af- turn to this state. Thus far, it is fair, declared Dr. Peacock has not been We hope that all members of the Atlanta, G.I., Jan. severe sleet storm is gripping Georgia and crippling communication badly and hampering electric utilities in many of the large cities. Accompanied by freezing temper- atures, severe wind storms did con- siderable damage in Atlanta ami other towns in this section. The heavy sleet tugging at communica- tion power lines, put many out of mler. Hundreds here walked to work today as the power lines fail- ed. Over'200 phones are out or- der as a result of the wind itorm. Scores of minor accidents are-report- ed as a result slippery streets. JIarrison, Ark., Jan. 23. Munici- pal officials favorable lo the "citizens which has controlled northern Arkansas for the last week, will replace Mayor J. L. Chile, Mar- shall Parr and the councilmen who resigned last nighl. Thc resignations were offered fol- 'owing pressure of the "citizens' which seized control ivhen suspension of operalions of the Missouri and North Arkansas rail- Iraditing the fugitive from North Carolina on papers ''harging him with violation of the North Caro- ina laws in the escape from the state prison. Dispatches from Flor- ida Saturday night indicated that the governor has already signified his readiness to honor the North Carolina papers. Statements emanating apparently] from sources close to Dr. Peacock i in Lakeland, Fla., where his rela- tives reside, would indicale that Dr. get new life in this great organiza- tion. Further announcement made this week. be Gary, Ind., Jan. seven the Ruhr from Germany became known today. According to best in- formation, the main lines of the pro- posed project are: Many Expressions of Sympathy Arrive Daily Through the Mails and Telephone. MESSRS. B. N. AND J. B. DUKE, EACH WIRE President of Southern Chris- tian Convention, Dr. L. E. Smith, Will Be Here. Elon College, Jan. sions of sympathy through the mails and over tho telephone and by tel- egraph continue to reach the presi- dent's office here over the great ca- lamity that has overtaken the col- lege. All the expressions of sym- pathy carry with them the promise of help when the board of trustees have outlined their program for re- building, which (hey are expected to do at an extraordinary session to- morrow at 10 o'clock. Already the trustees are beginning to arrive, and 1. The Ruhr and n part of the a ful1 attendance of the board is cx- Rhincland, including BuEsciuori, Cob-' lenz and Cologne, to be declared a "ni-ntral stale' 'under the benevo- lent protection of France and Bel- In addition to the regular board TlfT D.r' L' E' Smith' President Southern Christian convention Or Va__ and Dr wmiam g_ gium, with headquarters at Coblenz. I Long, Chapel Hill, founder and first 2. The government of thc new i president of the college, are expect- statc to be carried 01 Peacock has been there recently, has from mayor of Gary down to foreign employed counsel who will represent j workers of southside were released him before the governor, and has On bonds in connection with made the proposition that he will not fight extradition if he is yiven the assurance that in North Caro- lina he will not be tried on any tech- nical charges. The warrant issued against him charges escape, for which he-can be sentenced to two ranging tary pending the establii in by the to this meeting and lend tablishment of and advice- Two North Carolinians.who have civilian authority, but the in Hilary I .-v: J achieved a place of world leadership government to be subordinated to an i the realm of finance, Messrs. B. tie liquor conspiracy with eight" in- interallied commission in control ofjN. and J. B. Duke, New York, hav- diclmenls yet lo be served by United I six men as thc- supreme and final au- >nS heard of the misforlun States marshalls trying to round up j thority. the stragglers. City officials, many of them among those arrested, aided the .federal authorities in efforts to round, up the alleged "rum.ring.' prison.' The 'fugitive- nppar-f Mayor -K: 0. Johnson turned -over ently, if statements attributed to i thc office of government, and placed, him are correct, has no fears as to i tlie at the disposal of the 5- The stale to have-; taking thc college and having been interested in the institulion from lld I foundation, yesterday wired each of above the needs of the to go: ift rf to reparations. :for its 'ege 3. All surplus revenue over am program _ 4. All mines 'and factories lo be] This morning Mr. E. B. Jeffreys, nationalized. [president of the Greensboro. ;cHam- j.................._ ..._t._w indopond-j ber of., writeWfiat -the his .fate .if merely his sanity is in j ijqUOV agents. 'The" alleged Gary j ent currency known as the j board of directors of that body feel- .luestion, having been declared sane ]iquol. ring jm.estiea.! "Rhineiand guaranteed by j ing great distress over thc loss'which by a court of jurisdiction fol. the officials said. llu! forests. i Elon has sustained in thc recent fire, 5 ii Florida. WCITfQFCISPWj S BETTER 0 road was sabotage. threatened because of Km El KILLS PIS EMIMIDITS5ELF Paris Jan. Surctc police be- lieve that Madamoiscllc Norton, pret- ty girl anarchist who shot to death Marcus "Plateau, Royalist editor, yes- terday, was implicated in last year's bomb attack upon American Ambas- sador Myron T. Herrick. Although thc girl, who wounded herself in the breast in an attempt at suicide, is j marriages" ami mate divorce harder, extremely weak, detectives question- introduced in the senate by Sen- ed her closely i-egarding the grenade Capper of Kansas today. Mr. sent to tho Amrican embassy. Mad- 1 Capper presented thc bill to be York, Jan. prices Washington, Jan. i h so slc.ulilv though the darker .___ ii _______....... I phases of thc French invasion of Ihe Crowell, war lime assistant secretary vtf war, pleaded not guilty in the District of Columbia supreme court yesterday to the indictment recent- ly returned against him and six The last provision is likely to be the ih'at Lo be inaugurated, ac the had authorized him to appoint a committee to cooperate with the I others charging conspiracy in con- nection with thc construction of army camps. Jn a public statement issued upon his appearance in court the former assistant secretary declared lie had Washington, Jan. designed to stop "hasty and foolish amoisclie Berton's handwriting com-j known as the Federal Marriage and pared with that on the cover of the box in which the bomb was placed. Divorce Law and a constitutional amendment that would gie Congress Threatening letters written to Mr.. !he power to enact snc.h a law. Herrick also compared. The shooting Editor. Plateau was not premeditated by thc girl whc went there to kill Leon Daudet, Roy- alist deputy and ended by shooting M. Plateau. "Tell the Communists I did my i was her only message. on. FEWS me DEAD n Chicago, Jan. Edith Rockefeller McCormick Chicago's ?ociely leader, and her slaff of ser- vants, were forced lo flee, lightly clad when the McCormick "Gold Coast" mansion was threatened by fire early today. Thc blaze was caused by an over-heated electric Durham, Jan. P. stove discovered in the butler's pan- president of Trinity college, will re-j try, which filled tho house with turn the latter part of the week from i smoke. The loss was slight. Grecr, S. C., where he was. called by the sudden death of his father, Dr. 'Benjamin F. Few. Dr. Few was summoned to Grecr about, two months ago by the death of his moth- er. Dr. Few's father was 03 years old. During the Civil war he serv- ed as a surgeon in Ihe Confederate I army and until a few months ago MR. M'CULLOC.H DIES IN MAINE.] he continued thc practice of his pro- fession. Thc friends of Mr. U. W. Mc- Culloch, brother of Mr. J. C. NEW YORK COTTON MARKET Culloch, of Route 8, will be grieved to learn of his death from pneumonia his home in Orino, Me. Open Hihgh Low Close Mnnuary ..'.28.08 28.45 28.08 28.45 Mr. McCulloch was about 45 -----28.25 28.04 28.25 28.62 old and leaves a wife and one dnugh-JMay ......28.45 28.45 28.78 tor, who will accompany his remains July ......28.23 28.58 28.23 28.52 here. October' 26.34 20.72 211.34 26.IU The arrangements have not I December .20.02 26.40 been nmda. Spots, 28.75, ?A up. MAY HOSIERY MILLS MOVE THEIR OFFICES. The oflices of the May Hosiery Mills are now in the Brown build- ing on South Main street, formerly occupied by the Purity Bakery, where the business of this biff hos- iery manufacturing concern will be carried on pending thc erection of their new official home, store rooms and additional machine space ad- joining thc building of thc National Dye Works, South Main street. With their new building completed and iiiiiny new machines working both at tho Church and Main strcc! faclorics, thc May Hosiery MilKs will have expanded considerably in the making of hosiery and will have added much to the industrial life cf the city. new money may be put into circula- college in any step which the board lion within a few days. i of trustees of the college may wish H is understood Belgium approves lo take in Greensboro, and lo ren- of Hie plan, hut thinks the stale der assistance which may be de- should be run by the League of Na-lsiml in tllc City. In conclud- tions. Italy is believed lo be flatly llis communication Sir. Jeffreys against the plan, and thc Italians are: "We deeply feel your loss and oven reported lo he considering Ihe lo 'lc'l' lo the best of our abil- Kuhr that they needed litlle encour- 1 retiring of their engineers from the, il-v-" ajremcnt in the form of more uplini- islic European cables to show a mark- ed improvement. This impulse came in the form of n French statement that the strike in Ihe Kuhr had fail- ed. Slerling scored a gain of almost a cenl, and francs were higher. The lemlinp; industrial stocks scored a good sized gains on initial sales. Ruhr unless the military is made sub-' scrvicnt to civilian government. hoen given no opportunity lo pn-JCorn Products, Baldwin, Pan Amor- sent "the facts" in these cases to the grand jury, which indicted him, and added that such a procedure, by ican, United States Rubber were the early features. Opening prices were United States Rubber 50 7-8, up iving connection to a false charge ?_S; Amcricanf SS j.4i up fi had consttiuled a wrong against ;Corn 12C 1.2( up t 4 iivery American citizen. Henry L. Stimsun, v.'hy was sec- retary of war in the cabinet of Presi- dent Talf, appeared as counsel for Mr. Crowell and also issued n state- ment in which he declared the charges brought against his client e "preposterous." Jt would be j i sorry precedent, Mr. Stimson .id, if the war work of men like Mr. Baldwin, KCJ M, up 7-8. Tnc Seoul troops of Elon have offered their services for pa- trol duty and for ..ny other instates in which they may help out with the work of setting tilings straight again. Chicago, Jan. raid-' ed tiic liquor vault of Delaney and Murphy, former saloon-keepers, and escaped with GOO case whiskey, valued at today. Jrowell were rewarded by "suspic- on and dishonor." Mr. Crowell, in presenting his plea the right to withdraw it Manila, Jan. Information as to the whereabouts of seven of the fleet of 12 Russian refugee ships en- rnute from Shanghai is still lacking. Thc general belief was that heavy storms bail blown the bessels off of vithin 30 days and su'-stilutc for it coul.so thcy Rr. motion to quash thc indictment ,.ivo Ule t thc wcck Thc New York, Jan. have al- ready rc-iichud the point of riot and bloodshed and unless this thing is IMPOSSIBLE TO TAKE STROLL! throttled promptly, we arc in sight WITHOUT BEING SALUTED. of martial Thomas Dixon, Jr., author of "Tile declared Prince Andrew, banished hrotheri in a denunciation of the Ku Klux of King Constantino of Greece, and j hist night speaking before the his brother, Prince Christopher, who.1 Aiiiericaii unity league. Mr. Dixon are visiting in New York, strolled who immortalized tlie Southern klan across the Brooklyn Bridge late yes- of Civil War days, described the tcrday. modern organization's proscription of They denied their identities, but the negro race under conditions of were recognized by newspaper mon. modern life, "utterly uncalled for, A fellow countryman of the prinn-s: stupid and inhuman." recognized Ihem on Ihe bridge, stood "If the while race is superior, and at ntlcntion and sainted as they wiss- I Relieve ii is, then, it is our duty ed. He was ignored by both men, as citizens of democracy to lift up CALENDAR. Tuesday, January 23. p. in.: Business Woman's Mission Study class, Front Street M. E. church. p. m.: business Woman's Mission.Study class, First Pres- byterian church. p. m.: Pals entertained by Mrs. W. S. Coulter and Mrs. W. E. Story, at the home of Mrs. Coulter. Wednesday, January 24. p. m.: Burlington-Graham Literary club, with Mrs. E. C. Holt, o.vciiuc. p. m.: Kill Rare KIuli, Mrs. W. L. Anderson, on Front St. p. m.: Prayer services in city churches. Tliuriday, January 25. p. m.: Cotorio clnh, Or.nnnc Tea Koom, Mrs. J, W. Lasloy, hostess. chief danger to those on board is be- who plainly wished stroll incognito, lo take tiieir help the weaker Mr. Dixon .said. After viewing Ihe river from the. they walked through City Hall park ami then up Hruadway to Madison square1, where they obtained scats on a Fifth avenue bus. licvcd to he tiutt of running short of provisions. Officials have had no definite word since the story carried j hy the United Prow exclusively that I tht ships were missing. 110 MILE PLIGHT IN 42 MINUTES SETS NEW RECORD. Quantico, Va., Jan. thor- Capt. Harry C. Drayton, U. S. A., j Mr. 0. N. C.nff. of Milwaukee, ough investigation into the activities flew u de Haviland biplane, chief engineer of the Sterling Manu- of bootleggers around the big Ma- ivith a -100-horse power Liberty mo-1 facluring company, of that city, rinc training station has been ordered tor, from the (.urtis Pine Vaticy a few days in this section and! by Brigadier General Butler, com- IS DELIGHTED WITH VISIT. Field, near Philadelphia, to Mitchell Field, Mineola, L. I., a distance of 110 miles, in 42 minutes, at an alti- tude of J.OOO feet. This time breaks service records ind was performed in conjunction with a scries of experimental Highlit determine the quickest flying: time between a given number of points near Mineola. Similar tests will be mnde and ilyiiiB time cut down surrounding points to Mineola, considered an im- portant aerial hub. Tlie tests are part of n general plan to eventually jstabiish airways linking up thc en- tire country. visited Mr. K. F. Williams ,rid oth- mandant, after poison liquor caused ers last week. This was Mr. Golf's the death of at least one marine and first visit to the South and he was brought .wrious illness lo five others, delighted with our people and the: Fast work by physicians is all that wonderful country and says he wants saved the lives of the marines. Their to come again. gradual recovery is expected now. INCREASED AMOUNT COTTON (JINNED SHOWN BY REPORT Washington, Kin- ned up to January K'lli from crop of totalled D.Unii.GOl liales, counting round as halt bales, Iho census bureau announced. This with bales Cor the siuno period lust year. BURLINGTON DAMP WASH LAUNDRY ADDS EQUIPMENT The liurlington Dump Wash l.auijr dry have recently milled new equip- ment lo do washing, starching, dry- ing and ironing, and arc prepared to to snvo tho public iniu'h work and worry. They .arc doing first class finished wrk.....   

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