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Wellsville Daily Reporter Newspaper Archive: July 5, 1916 - Page 1

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   Wellsville Daily Reporter (Newspaper) - July 5, 1916, Wellsville, New York                                 4  „.äfi'w "1. ...............Iii*'  ^èpNfeÔOAY,, JULY 5, 1916.  •V,  Ttr"ô70éiif8 a CJopy.  TIm Woild'i ^nm^h SteliuiTe rraaohli^ With thè Associated Press and the American iUMdattoB,  WELLSVILLE, NiEW YOKK, AF  ; IÄOIN TONE.  BasisofanAtnlcÉe AgreeineDl Is Offered.  HOlìlBEOEJJVmTQDAÌi.  fhert it'daid to*Be No Specific Re-n^war for Recall of the Perching Ex-iwiltlon or Threat oT Attack—Promise to Restore Order In Mexico and Pr^ect the Border.  Wiahtngtoa, July 5.—A note to the United States from the de. facto gov-?rnmlftrtt'ot Mexico reached Klineo Ar-r^Qottdo, the Mexican ambasiiudor des-igUftjte, here and probably will be de-  tivered to the state department to-  -  . 4..  Ì  perBons clqlse to the embassy as to-ing conclliaiory In tone and designed to offer the basis of an amlcalalo settlement oi the differences between the two governmentB. r It ii.In reply to both the last,two rtotc« sent to tTie"de facto government ay Secretary i^analng and eald to bring tho Issue between the two govern menta down to date. The promises to restore order in  ■ • Mexico and to protoct American terri  .........  iuggestion tnat tho pr^aen«^  -.........■ttnm-i:roopS"W"3ffe'xfcrurTon^^ largely  responsible for unsettled conditions, and that their withdrawal .would eo. tar toward eliminating sources of fric lion and difficulty.  There is said to be no specific renewal of tho demands for recall of the _Pershlng expedition, or threats of attacks, but at Uie samo time tho ro------quest of S6'crefary"Lansing for a statement of intentions is met by a general iiscusalon of the «ituatlon rather than by a direct announcement of purpose.  The Mexican government states that it has accejited Its principle suggestion of mediation from other American republics_atld invites the United States to record Itself. It adds, however, that dircct negotiations between tho  "Fring"nVoTe"B result» than  mediation.  Embassy officials believe General Carranza himself framed the language of' the note. It Is said to bo much more diplomatic In terms and tone than any of the recent Mexican communications.  Secretary Uinsing , was told infor-maUy of the arrival of. the, n,otc..andj3f. "what was understood to be Its con-tents. Ho »©«^med highly grHtified, . hut - w-ould- not-eomment- pendlniT tts delivery to him, - . .. .  Mr. Arredondo left the embassy soon nHer the note arrived to spend the Independence day holiday at a "sum-, mer resort. An embassy employe iiad been dlrecte<I to Rive out su^ch _lnfQr-_ -matlon" as was'^esiml to make public before the ambassador would call at the state department.  BIG NOGALES GARRISON  I  ,Over 6,000 National Guardmen Now Occupy Little City.  Nogales, Ariz., July 6.-^-\Vith the ar-rival of the last of the Connecticut Infantry, consisting of the Second battalion of the Fii'st and Second regiments, the garrison here now num-biTs about 6.000 meii.  A steel Jacket, bullet, found in a Car .Occupl^d--by- a--Secon<l - reginvent; company, led .to the belief that it had  ___betik J)y_flu.,anipiir----------------  The engineer of the train, who hp came'TuBcnnsclous in his seat 'as the train ¿pproaQhed Lordaburg, was found to have been wounded on the back .of - ~ men ot  E cothiiiany, hlmoslf a locomotive engineer, took charge of the train and brought it to Lordsburg. '  A report reached here from Mexico to the effect that 3,000 Carranzista soldiers were moving north from Mag-dalena and Imuris to a point 20 miles south of. Nogales.  .......................■MUI» iiNiiiii'mTiinmiiiiiir 1 in............. -Tlftiìniriìri  COIONEL lOHH BIDDLE.  Appointi»di «ft .*4«w-Catn«-nuindan^ at West Point.  THfilE SCOUTS DROWN INmVEBLAKE.  by ine war aepaninent as more inoic-atlve of preparation for war than of yielding to demands for withdrawal.  On receipt of orders to turn over to tho selected commanders that portion  I^lJ'^so.. 6<"Aeral .Kunston ,.wlU-,giv©.Uis fuii attention to the organization of the remainder with a view to their use in Mexico . _ .  SENATE AGAINST FREE SEED  Strikes Proviolon 6'it of Agricultural Bill by 33 to 21 Vote.  VVashlugion, Juiy y.--^Following its annual cOfctoin the iu-nat«} went on '•ecord in fav{)r'of'aT>oltshing tht' frr^ •Mstribution of seod.s by tho go^W:>rn aient. The matter came up on the igi'icuUural apifropriation bill. The vote by which tho appropriation for free seeds' was, struck out waa ;>;} to 21. It is expected that the con ference committee oi the two hous< s of fongroria ^vi!l re.f.l_oro.)Jj.^.prmlhil£  Seharof 'KVnyon. ia auitcklng -the provision declartvl tho cost to the government of the free seed distribution was not to be meastired by the co.st of the stH^ds alone, which for the last four years had reached $1,-110,9'};i. but to this should be added the cost of iwiitage, which would amount to nearly $500,000 for the four years. - ■ • - ""T.r.T.  EXPLODING TIRE KILLS GIRL  Files. Off Automobile Wheel, Striking Her In the Stomach.  Yonkers, July 5.—Annie Valoska, 10 years old, died in St.r Josej>h's ho.^---pital the re.sult of injurie.^ sustained when an explotlinsr automobile tiró' flew from the wheel and struck her in the -Stomach. The accident occurred on Saturday,-and the girl picked herself up apparenUy <inliurt._y(.^.-. terciay sho went to tho hospital.  Edward xUi^^ stfcetT "Manhattan, the chauffeur ot tho automobile, was arrested and pa-rolled.  Were Members of GentraLle^ li][terian CMofRoGliester.  . War.sftw, N. y.. July 5.—Three youlhSt memf«?rs of the Hoy S^toiit .troops ot the Central Presbyterian church, Uoch-ester, were drowned in Silver lake. The troop was eftcamped on the west side of tho lake.  ' The dead: John Cherry, 18 years old, son of the Rev. C. Waldo Cherry, pastor of the Central • rresbyteriaa church.  Lawrence Clark, 13 years old.  Werner Clark. 16 years old,, a broth-er of I>iuvrence. - -  When the boat capsized Cherry, who is an expfrt swimmer, was drown»xl trying to save the Clark brothers. Thrpe otner members of the party of six, which started.aLross the-lalte were feFcufMl'  According to witnesses, the six boys '¡tartcd acro.-s tlie land from Palmer's landing, whiTe they were enennipfMl, to Fairvlew, a1)out o'clock. The lake wa:! rou-ih. and it said the boy.s cap.s^Hl ln tho rowhont in .wlilfh.tlie.^'. .Wrrr.riding-.wUile dodging Uio waves,  LIGHTNING WRECKS HOUSE  Noof Torn Off and Front Caves  £aiïîily™<?.t~Six„ EÄcapcs..-^..  In  th'ough lightning demolished the honn of Joseph Macherowski at nrook.sUU aven\io and Fenimore street, South  the'r four children, who were sleeplnjj on the second floor, escai)e(l wiih onl;. slight injurle.s. The roof was torn off tho house and th(i entir*- front thrown down. The family was hurled to the ground when tlie floor caved in but received only a ie\f cut.s an-bruises. . '  A water tanli'of the T7u Pont Pow der works near .SDllth..Iliver ajso, w a destroyed by liglitnintc and the com pany'ft fire signal system put out of order. A 40 foot tfn sign on the Hayuk Rrog. cigar factory wa% cut In two by a bolt and much other dam OiLC-HfliJi Ifri ty----r"'  COLONEL IN WAR PAINT  Creates Great Enthusiasm In Horn Speech on Mexican Situation.  Oyttcr LViy, Juiy 5.—Colonel Roosevelt put oa war-with-Mexico garb hert He praclicaliy l.-^sued a call to arm.s for the n2iiitary,_divislon he is orga'n-  Alis Ooile >Tlielr Advance in Bis Ortve en West Front.  TEUTON VICTOBY IN GALICIA.  Russian Cavalry Crosses Carpathian Mountains Into Hungary — British Temporarily Halt to Consolidât« Their Gàîns from Germans—French ¿teadlly Gain' In Somme Sector.  ' Ivondon, July 5.~Th<* German wai oificn- last night announced a notable victory for the Teutonic, forces in Cia llcia. Southeast of Tlumach the Rus slans were forÎbd back, on a long drive.  The French troop», co-(jperatlng wltli the British in the Sonnne river re glon, have straightened their line somewhat by tho capture of lialeux Belo.v-F:h-Santcrre and Estrees an(J aro advancing on a considera-ble wider front, toward Pfronue—At-'ilsl^eea wherfi-bQQ prisonfT3 wttg" t!ilr<''rt; tli^ fighting is still going on furiously.  On tho lirith'h end of the line onl> slight progress has .been made at somç pointa. Unoillclal dispatchfiA say that the entire British front of 90 miles i.-  New Brunswick,.„N.. --i*ttt-lt-i»-tmvrmt"rhr'- -?rmiTh "that" the  Heaviest fighting is under way.  A high British officer is authorit> for the statoment that artillery pn-p  lltvrr.-Maehero-<\^iît.--'hlr""Wtff—In some cf^j'^^wonid rejinljif;„mL  try attacks, as th(» resourcefulness", de termination and figliiing <iualities 01 the German.«! as well as the power* ol their dnfenses, are well recognized.  Althouiih the French are making n sti-ady advance in the Somme secto) without apparentjy heavy ciisualtici' and face an easier task, aaecording t< expert opinion, to reach their objec Mve. the river itself, the Verdun arm.\ is engaged in particularly heavy fight ing, th<? Germans not having permit ted the battle of the Somme to Inter fere witli their operations for the cap' ture of t}ie_grejai.j[flj:lxe«Ar  PiERSHING TO STAY  Army OWcBrs DO"Not Believe V. 8. Force's Will Be Withdrawn.  San Antonio, Tex.", July 5.—General Ftinston'continued today the direction of jimjmoblllzatlon oi National Guards-  Z'nieiLcrii^ii^  -CaUfoTJila,-..—™-™^-.-- ™—--------  .„Early-morning-Information reaching General Funston Indicated Qulet along the border. Army officers were frank In the oxpresston, of their skepticism ' '"concerrilugi ttfc*TQi>ort»^tiiat th« admlii: istratlon ia planhnlng^an early withdrawal „pi..„Q!3neral Penthliys'ti troops,. " ' fii view 0 declaration by General POQSton that his chief object in tecommending -the-4lviBioa- oi-autho^ Uy along the border was to enable  Dper-aUdn Ìa Mexìco, aftny fflJRcftOLT®-gard the acceptance of  Epidemic Is Not Abating.  New York, July 5.—The epidemic-of Infantile paralysis here had claimed up to iast night lives. Since Saturday noon there liitve b<»en -'JS Vleaths. Many new cases are reported. The department of h'eaitli is'waging, a cam-vign to prevent the spread of the -epid-emlc and placcd plac«irdH" warning the public to keep away from streets where there are one or more cases; Mgre than 500,000 pamphlets, contain-  tives, were sent broadcast ovot tho city and suburbs.-  "Mrs. Hetty Green Dead.  New York, July 5. — Mrs. Hetty Green, shrewdest and most successful woman financier in the world, died in her 82nd year at 8:05 o'clock Mon; day morning, after_h.a.vjiiii—auftemi "seven paralytic stroke»^... llema^kablti In living, she waa remarkable In death, for while ordinarily three -strokes-of. paralysis cause death, Mr»; Green's indomltablo will enabled her to survive for weeka.  -tElng-t«-bG-offrn?fr to- the' goverhinenf' whenevi-r hosUlitleH begin.  TCT" 5,0CI0" clirzenir"w7i7)se~pati fiad lieen aroase<l to a degree of fren zy and later to the officers and crew.s Ji the war ship Baltimore, the colonel ^ald;  "If what has hapi)ened for three years In Mexico Is peace 1 should pre fer war as Tn6ro pmrt ful. If "tTie'fi^" i-^ war I shall go. I will give the young men of Oyster Bay and Nassau county 1 chance to make good. I cannot ni^k them to do anything I and my sons  woiiT'do;"- " " ........'  y. iL-thj.iL_aiinQun.cemeiiL Quite us uproarious was the demon stration when the coluncl rp.sumtxl:  "I won't take married men with famlMes dependent upon them. It :m outrage that a man whose wife and children are depeiulent- upon him Hhould he compelled to go."  Tho colonel had emphatically do-■otnr.»^d~when iuviti^d to participate In 111« Fourth of July ceremonies that he woU|d_ not "sneak. "But the .unprecedented throng and its American spl.rit gA>t-t4«' better-of "him:..........  flieir" strength to the combined blow a.i.ain.'^t the central |w>wers,, and Buch arei«t reports a significant movement of Russian patrols which are said tc have advanced from KimpoKing, in  Bukowina. and entered Hungarian ter  —' -----------------  All along the Ru.«sian front engage ments of the severest character are in progress and the Russiarìs-, drivinc north from Koloniea, have advance«  ih^a-SiV i^iAr^ - -eiilnt^ to ! outflank trinerai ron poth " And" ITíp " AììstnFG erniíin  forc^sk '' j  í.  Lynching Shows Slump..  ___Mon^gomex}\ .Aja,^.j:uly..^rrrJlficQi4s  k^iT^rii iffio" Tuskei^ .thai- thcre"'wefe"ir5"In the United States during the first six months of this year, compared with 34 for the same period a year ago. .Xw.o.J»hlte3 and 23 negroes were mob vlcttnlB, and eight of them were killed in Georgia. ______....._ ——„il.  §aron Chlnda Bid« Farewell.  :SVa8hington, July 5.—The Japanese ambassador, ' yrho' leave» in | fep  three htgb ranking  pnlts and prepare for possible genei^il  Find Girl's Headless  'i^he headless biKly o'f a girl was found in the river near I-rfvndlugville, about six miles south of Pottsvllle, by workmen. It Is believed to be the body of Helen Hepler of Cresson, wiio with her sweetheart, Clayton Mengel, disappeared the night of Jan. 9. It is supposed that th^y had eloped until April 5, when the body of Mesigel w^a^i ft«ind In- tho "'nv«^r"~hear SchuyikiU Haven. There is doubt as to whether It was a suicide pact or whether thei were .struck by a train and knocked Into "the "river. Mengel's skull was fractured which led to the tH^di~y 1 of foul play. .  Son Administrator of HJU Estate..,  4ttnrin'eiSld"eYff"<Vfllie Gre^^ railroad, was appointed administrator of the estate.of his father, Jamca J. Hill, ia considerably In exces.s of tho $10,350^000 estimate made in tho original petiti/op. Judge E. W. Ba-zllle,  of the probate court, fixed tlïe admin-4arnttoi^s btràlf -at ^200,000.-------------  Baroness Chinda paid.« tarenvell visit  ^ , End Stockade of Greece.  4,tl}ei^B, July 5.—The-Hl»lockado. of  entente, allios before Greece yielded »0 ttieir' commands foiudemobllisation  TOïT'tlïe. y.ferdun fwnt-thft:^dS.ermaBfc Ifrive" I'akVn tiie Thiaumont work foi the fourth time, after a terrific bom bardment and by a massed attack iuoi'nd thi'^ work, which has been tlu (•t>nter of de.'.;peratb attacks and coun ter attacks for many days past, thou sands of men hâve fallen, for tliis is a jMisition which Is «'S.^entlal to the Oer mans for carrying their,> advance near .. fit. to A'crdun- Ruelf r and 40-th^-PYfntîh to k(M'p their resistance intact. —llUM-s ians-amV- M a I ians-a re- lend ing a t  FRENCH CAPTUKE TRENCHES  À»«orlnt6d Ptphs.) ' . . jPacÌRr-U tt. mr,r' July-"G.—Thc P'rench.havo captuMd a Une «f <ier-man-^trenelies of^Oirrln. Thiiy'imvé also captui-ed the Sornlont farm, noar Clery, fonr mltes northoant of l'eronne Tho French resumed the offensivo ditr ing. .the night on hoth hUKjs òf Somiho South of 'Somme tl^py ■ niado further progreHH ' toward the rlv^r. :Aftur-.a heuvy . honvlmrdment thp. iJermans caiiiured part of the vlllage Belloy-Au^ Santcrro bnt tlm Krench nulckly ex-pellrd tlietn t.ikfng tlie entlré vlllage.  Tho (Jermana stili hold a psirt of the town of Kstref«, whore severe tightIng Is stili In" progress.  Tlie num ber of prlsoners taken tluis far iK nino thousand. i)n tlio Vorduti front ìn'avy iighting is stili in progress  50,000 TO AiD PENNSY  Railroad's Employes and One-TIme Employes Volunteer to Fightaiitrike  New York, July Ì».—^Thr --i^mmiyi vaniti railroad has r;'ceived pledgcfc of loyalty from at U-a.;t GO.OOO employes who are willing to report for. special duty in tiu* event of a strike The railroari announcfd th:U fronj tht> number oi letters r>>celve<l It wa»' :ible to a.ssert that a strike would not re.sult lu a couiplete. lnterr»^ption ci servile',,.ori' th'u liucii east'of-'-ritts-burg. ^ .  . "The froedom with which volun-tefrs have conie forward,"' says th»= statement of th(! railroad, "does not mean that a strike of ^».OOO engin men, trainmen, firemen and condui-  ■iif'^FarTTu» raIÌiroad"covJÌ(Ì be kept ii opr-ration except by great difficulty The volunteers would have to be drawn from other branches of the service-  dTtlôïïâT trTïïïiTfig for tìielr nev/ duties.'  Uncié Sam Has, 21.000,000 Men.  Washington. July 5.—A census bureau table issued here estimates the number of able-bodied men of military ru.,«' in the Ùnitrd Statc.s at about 21.ono.noo n)en. Of this number 14,■ 224.f»(tO are native whites. 2,857,00C fl-ir<'ign-born wliitcs, who havr b»^en  ■■intr,ri!llzPii;2.ur)2,ont) neyroo.s and 50,  ................— ------- -.......—'  MONDAY IN CONGRESS  f  School Study of Newspapers.  vN'ew York,-July 5.- -New York nnl vm;ity, to promote the .study ot'.new.s„ papi-rs i"n t.he public scIuk)1s, has an-noime»'/! a special course in joqrnal-•r?-m~iiv'Hie" siniuntir 'scliour for'tiie ben  I'flt of teachers, especially "those at tending the National ÌSì^ wt'TttToTiiìHs'wíuT'îîi  HiiglPM. Bláin, direc tor of the department of Journalism at l-iOuisiana State university, wi' liave charge o'f the oour.se. The schooi opens next Monday,  Can't Find Two Bankers,  Chebo.vgan, Mich., .July ri.--S(?arcli has been abandoned for James 0. Hur ley and Charles MMrci-lle, mi.s.sj;.! \ow York-banker?«, \vho"TiT.riried' ou'" on a lO.OOO-mlle can'oo trip. Georg A« Hurley, banker of New York, lef here after searching tlic vicinity nea \Ibany Island. Blae-k Inker Avhere th-snen spent the winter. -lle. offertHi b n^ward for the bodies.  V " I  X Observktions.of United States y, J. weather bureau taken at B p. m. X X yesterday follow: j-  ' Temp. Woather  New York . ......"Crear " "  r.8 .. 70 i. 60 ..76 . 70  T  Clear Cloudy Clear Clear Clear Cloudy  fl^  All^ny .......  Atlantic City . Boston .......  Buifalo ,.......  Chicago .......  IjOUÌSVUIO New .Orleans..... 80 Washington,: .74 "rtâoiàrg ..72  80  Senate  Met at M A M.  Hesiiniefi debate on agricultural ap-proiu'iation 'bill.  Porto Kican self-government bill fa-.oraldy reiiorted. Adjournerl at:.:l2l\M.! until 11 M. Wednesday.  House  N o t i n K e s si on; j n e e_t s__ \ V «'.dJi s d a y____  SONS IN MANY ARMIES.  Six-Nationalìties Sharo In Distributioi of a- Largo Estate^  Slx natioiiaIltie.s-.\ni«fri«.nii, Kreiieb Itiernia'n. liussi.iii, lt;ili:ili niid lÌniilis'" —will ligure In tlie dlstriiiutiuii of thi estate 01' Mrs, Kleanor K. O'Counoi whotlieil lu I'.ii-ls .MaiTli 11 last".  Mj-s.-O't-ntitiur was ei:rlitT-Tl^T'"'ye!lrr «hl ut the tiuiu uf lier-ileiitii. Slit* \v«.> -boruJn <"aii-  roriiia with her fatiicr. w ho was fortyniner. and alter the ofjji'i  MEXICO'S REPLY  \ya.?hln.gt.(jn, Juiy .3.—ThO- crlal» Jb«^ twtsort tiVe Ur-S. laiid Sf<rjrt«TO viKhalty camo to an.end today "wbon a friendly and cohrliato^ nMc-from the defac'to govemnient-waK-lmftded to Secretary Jjjujsing-and com'munieatfd tn-Presi dent Wilson, Mr. I.nnfting mode no f'omment but gave the impreRslon that Carrair/.a'rt suggestlon for- frien[dIy ne* gotialloni» wUl n\eet wìtii Quiek symj5aliiy hf^re. High onicial« d»'Rcrlb ed fho note aa mofcrthiin i>òn>T1iafi)rv and there seemed to bc no djsjii^wltlòn to doubt tliat the Fnlted .'i<at«'S wnuld he willlng to arranue an early wUh ilrawal of the expodltlonary force l'rom .Mexico, '  I\v tiie -.Mexican emsui .Altliough tìie communication evaderj  (By As^-Mw^lated Press) Wasi'ïlngton. Ju'y :>.—A rf^>ly of thf» iefcK'to government of Mexli-o to th»? demnnds of the Tjiited Sfíite?<. con-cMalory In teins uni' giving ha surances of a Vf4ead  ir"-adjV»'slnTenT of ■ '' "iiHles w.is de lívercrt to the HtaTt 1 I'artnjent .today  nicntio  I speriflf de.'laration on tiuemmulon ')f \^hf»tlier Carranza i'ísilWÉfcínnal irdíTH wlilcli led to an atlark on Smerlea'ns at Carrizal, ,lt Is believed Mint. nrciiiiiini. WlUmn wiF - meet - Ca» -nTT73 -mort<-thTin" half \vay"iri "Ír>rñg"ío ivoid hostilitiííí*.  This conciliatory spirit dot's not con •emi)Iale the removing of General Per •-.liinu's rounm from .Me.xico. nor does t inii)ly any action wiiich would rn  "f the war <?<v»Hrtnient in mnvini; th!> lational guard troors.to the border  HOIST MEXICAN FLAGS  Homes for 5,000 Wounded.  Boston, July . r>.~-Honie.s. for 5,00tJ wounded soldit-rs. In event of !Aat Willi Me.xico, hiive been arranged for ■n Ma'ssachusi Ms. according to an an nounctment made b>*- Mrs. William ly()w-ell Put man. president of tin- Local Auxiliary of the National Security League. Mrs. Piupiatv stated that s.n-  had been in communication -with nnr«-r 1 i-ancA  churchi's and public ofllciaJ.H in everjL4_JLQyilS-_£0it-«^n^  Vorn, Cru?:, July 4.—-Alexican flags veio iioiftlfd on the jtuMle bnildlng« n Vera Cru? in honor t>f the American .;idei>endenc'e. Day.  Th" day was passed^quietly by the leaMy one hundre-ti Aniòrir-an rrfn^tm )n board the Knitcd States transport Mancock :ind tlie sixty or so other îvnieriean.s who'have elected to rennin TV Vera Cruz. ..  of Zlonism,----------- -----------  Pfiiiad.elpliia. Juiy u.-^Bernard A. ;!o!-t'nbiiitt, hoijorary serrctary of Ihe Kedcration o£ Am«^r;can Zionlst"-. in reporting the pioiress made by 5»io» i.sni .«aid that he belicvrd the ultinjate trltunph of Zionism depends upon the lise of a great Jewi.-^h leader in Pale  iine. -................  ■"TheTt^dr ratit»h'■■'allople^a" Ye lavoring the formation, of an intor--natirtnal-orgitniiatiiTn-bPjfore thi'~ei(->?fir )f the Kuropean war, and recommend -ng the prrrticlpiUlon of the federation n ihe Jfwl.'-h coiu;r«"is to ho Ijeld ir Nf'w York in Urrember. The con vntion pl(Mlg<d $:ì.'»,Os)0 toward- the fh-tiililLdiment -iif an - AmeF4ean -ho.'r-lìital unii in Palestine.  rHREE BOYS DROWN  IN SILVER LAKE  OnCj an Çxpert Swirnmer,. tP.scs.JLife Trying to Save Two Companions  Jive (laugiiti-rs, who married gentleniei: of live dilìerent Eurupi'iin lountries The N'on. .John F. K. U'Counor. lives li New York.  The live danghters nHMition'Hl Iti Mì s <)'C(umur's wilL whlch lias l>e'>n tllu ^for [Jiohiite. lire .Mrs. Ellie \:ilU>tte Wll'e of Cuionel Vallelie. ikuv iji tli. French aniiy wlth bis smi: Mrs. .M.nr garet <'anilii-i;-'irl!>, whose ItUNltinnl M.-tf a «UMÌUier of tiie Italiìin foreiun ollirf at Karlsruiie, <Jern\uny. and is .110 conti£K-;ed with the Itnlliin iatiiy; .Mrs Sara K. "Grillin. wlle r»f n jilnsicv.-M llviug at WlmlthHltui.- KncìnDilv Mr.< Fannie Kruuipel. -wlfe 01' ICutlolp!:' "ICrunTpeì of Slo.scow. « eolonel in the I^usslan army, and .Vgiies l\l!j>f(il. wh" illed n'ceutly In .Mui-nster. (Jernmny Iler husbiind Is In the <i'enn;tn armjv  aérophine night. ■ ^  Culture's Climax. ••Public health \,-()rk," .says Dr. W.T. Sedgwick of Bo.ston, "should not bt left to -every -Thomas, líleluir.l and Henry."  boes In a Clubroom.  To- show how ea.'^lly bees nmy be bandied, expert turned loose IO.OÒO ol them In woman's clubrtwm in Cleveland,  Contrariwise.  7CH«to«»er--'\Vhat ibtnit i» your bésjí huusage? Doïàler- My i>v««t, mailum« is toy Yrurati-^Baliimoi-c Ameflcau* .  I'e^y, Jiily youths. -nrem^  ber> c-f tlie boy scout t-'oo-i) of tlie Cen rnl Pre.tl>.vterian Church of Uochcs-ter. were drowne? In Silver Lake litis ¡fternoon, where the troop had gone or an outing. They are: John elgliteejT years oíd, son o-í iev., C. .Wiüílo-.Cheny, .iía^uor- ef tht-hurc)i: I/iwrenco ,Clark, thlrteeíji ^ears o'd, and.AV,íírn-er-i']jKrk.-¿iglilje£n. vears oíd.  T!le hoys^w.e^Jji,> 1 liont crossin  ;-(.\av that the lioys swlmrminvy in i;ie water wf're una-^.i'.e to  tlie lake. The boat L'¡>p-i?.ed and Che; ■ who was an e\-ijort immer, w. (wned tping to .-ave the Clark hoy,  . Th(^ bodie-i had i. een recovered to a late hour toniK'iit,' ^Vhen the Wwat Civ»sized it drifted -o far ■''O'lt in  re.'K h it It was "witìi cnn.si.dcrß.b'ai ■^ilTl.'itrfy tliut tlie survivor.'^ readied hero. Tlie boat wa-^^ not more thati I h.tlf n:i!t; from shore, wlu'u it capsized.- ' ■  i'lii-'l. JiLJI?^*"-. ha ve Ving'tiie ' lake tonight for Vse bodies. Ti;e I'uients of tlie dead chi'dren arrived here tonl.ght.  MAN WAS DROWNED  WOMAN SHOUTS  ffM  ■■ V •J  catlflE Utor Tgwptejt ewÉ.  ASKSABOUTSilFfAMIIIOMit-â  After Secret Service Men Had SilenoiNf the Noisy Suffragette 8h« 0|>«n«(lt Up Again an the^Pi-esldertf «h^ iMfjijl Then Led Away by City r>OiJ«em«n. Gompers Introduced Mr, WUaon. .. .  Washinj^on, Jifly X—pyeffdent^jBT ^ Bon dedicate "to common counina and a common undorntnnrtlng" a Tfthor^irrli  ■-"Mi  Temple erected here as tEe new of thé-Araeflean Federation oTtâXmïi/ '] He told a large, audience gatheréd at lh<i dedicatory exercises that the greatest barrier to industrial ]>ëait;« had been the difficulty of insufing can- ^ did and dispassionate conferencé, and that "giittlng our fighting blood vp" " ' wîià and-Tiot 'the -  wy or Ksctimg-fisHtc- —"rrmr:  woman Interrupt President^  .The presidenfti address wfas inter* rupted twice by Mi.sk Mabel Vemott of the Woman's party, who was standing only a few feet frotxi him, and wiiiiii 1**»  " Wwainror -íjérñilttétt" to IHhE of afiy" one class of persons, she shouted;  "If you truly desire to serve nU , clasbes. why do you block the ntilionai suffrage amendment now before con«  Four million womett'ih" tíite " T. (-ounthy—"  The White House secret service men made tUtir way to Mint* Vemtm and . quickly silenced her. She tried unaue-cessfuliy to induce them to eject her iroiu tlui cmwdv .^-Wliw -«!*«----»»»*»— sought to interrupt the presId«Bt, ft few minutes late, however, clty^ poHce^ led her away from the speaker's atañd. She was not arrested.  The president, apparently, was not disturbed by the incident. He nattsi^a ttpei^-tfetrftrst-rniPSlToSna i®  look at Miss Vernon, who stood with  '•ié  ' >;rifsS  al iinloii; but'he paid no heed to tij^ \ second interruption. • , ■ ^  Nothing that the president «lid aroused such enthusia.sm as his pmise of that section of the Claytoii "actr'dè-" , daring that labor Is not a cbinnaodlty» '  "I am sorry," he said, "that Uiare J'^'^l were any judges in the United States ~ ''' .35:iiiu:::liad... LQ,.be ..tdd-XliaL... —  vious that it seems to me that that ,, sp_cOon_.of__the- Clayton act-.isafi_a_i!fe— turn to the primer of human liberty» bi-i  but .if judges have to have the, prim«'. . opened ^fore them, I am willing to • ^ open it.'' - - _ '/^li  Did Not Refer to Mexico: _jlr,_\Vil»aa'i9r plea^ for-Wm-eowifliea^ brought repeated applause. frOni th« crowd, who apparently interpreted it-as having an Indirect bearing on the: Mexican crisis. The president, however, did not refer to Mexico or any  ather-iore-ijsta. oeuntry-by-aaaie:—.........  Mra-„ \Vllson, Vice Prt-RÌtìlfP* Wwtv ' ,-^Lél shalT and .several members of the cato--net attended the exercises. Secretary ; ^'jg. Wilson of the labor depwtment.Siat___  '¿■ii  M  "íMii  nja'^ter of ceremonies.  President Compera of ïhe fédération,, whi> introduced Î>re8$âettt Wilson,.,-tarted a prolonged demonstration by making an appeal for strpporl of th» president "in peace or war." - -  ■'4  m  m  TM  Lare<io, Texaif, July S.™Accowilng^;  li-t^dohKcripting schoolboys for army -service and they arc being impressed' " ' ' .'''l^ with the alternative of being shot .in their homes, The.se boys, the Amer^ lean. said, are being told lhat if any fjghtlngr occur.s it will be on Ameri» can territory, where the loot they can get will amply repay tljeiti for their patriotism.  .il  Story Brillianta. '  Corns from a ixjcent áhort story i>rl»e rompeiltlou; C  Oh. If my poor old mother coo Id sit up in her cold, eold grave and see .. .V",  how hitppy-»he would ber" - - - -  vXíadeUue seated herself at twM^sftt oi) tho wlííterized piazza," ^ • v>'  Kthel Uecldeti to prepare soinethilBS; ^ „ appltabVe for her husl»anC4i sujai^*!..  Corning Man, In Swimming Contest, Sinks Before Help Reaches Him  C-ornin'-.i:, .inly 4 ~ AVCTile hum'reds c^ soectators stood helplessly .Ivy watching -a mincmlng race from the Northijlde bri,:'ge tonl-iht. George Rch-  drowniHl In the Chemnng river 1>eior« the aid for which ho calle<l w;\ett his strengrth gave out in mid*stroam, coitld reach" liim. .. .. Uohihson 'had ^ihin^ed into t%ie  irtreajn with^nlt his clófíies" on i» an; eStort to win" à tash'ivHiô'wf $10 öfter:, Ott the -^^nwr.-of-tb« istçeç-wWfrh-^-arrfiWîed as a part oí the ^liqoao c«Ce-braiton here today.  «Very morning before breakfast so tîiat »he might take an exhilarating «atW " through the Paris bourse."-^IkKdciiuu».  and the current corriei htm dcmm atreaui Into- swift, vaten  Roil)ln«on called for help Jaiaea ili!^; cock of Painted Poat, who -km TOin« »ear. to7P«d ^ RoMnaoa, liafr-^  -  Robinson had sanH fttfm Babcock wìià roaoh-hiip; :\i  «matter   

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