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Wellsville Allegany County Reporter Newspaper Archive: March 22, 1910 - Page 1

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Publication: Wellsville Allegany County Reporter

Location: Wellsville, New York

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   Wellsville Allegany County Reporter (Newspaper) - March 22, 1910, Wellsville, New York                                 S- >Jk tí *  "mm-  r  FIR TXUL  5SÇ  wnjjmui, nwTOBX, tubsdat, majblcsl 22, mo.  ROOSEVELT AT ; ASSOUAN DXM  w I --r L -  Wis EmmastieOnnti Cm-nplliB aodfipacteil liisBlts.  PikSSEI THE FIRST CATARACT  COfNTESS ANNIE LEAKY  To Pound Croat Columbus Mo* mortal In Now York City.  SPECIAL GRANO JURY SITTING  —  At tho Cátaraot Hotoi tho Ex-Prool-—ëaiw Mo» a Ua^o Wumlior o» Amèrt  , «ano — Colonol Roooovolt Said to Look Marko«y Youngor Than Ho Did a Yoar Ago^HIo Prooont Inton-tlon lo to %ail Prom Southampton Por New York on June 10.  AMOuan, Upper Egypt. March 21.— The fcteamer on which Colonel Roosevelt and the members of h'ls party are traveling reached Shallal early Sunday morning. All those aboard were #8tlr early, and by abont 8 o'clock Colonel Roiraevelt was addressing a deputation of native officers, who were introduced by the assistant director of the state railway. With much vigor and «^mnhasija Colonel Roosevelt ro' peated to them what he had said to the Egyptian ofl^cers at Khartoum, warning thiem against mixing In politics.  Breakfast followed, after which the party aboard of a launch started for Phllas. The submersion of the beau tlful temple on the Island as the re-lult of the barrage of the Nile by the  RESULTOFKIBrSCOIIFESSnil  KNRO^Fom IfORANOTHEB  A SEniÈMENT insüRANCE probe  Ginmrs IMn MÉe-Toifts ^^^ oudosins «ve Risi  BOBERlfLbWEII  Mmtíw Prom OklalioiiMi]  Spoko *t Camotlo ^«H.  Aftor Tootlfylnfl In Court Today KI0I9 wm »0 Takon to RIvoratdo'Poni.  tontlary to Boflln H la Sontonoo of 31/2 Yoaro—Said to Havo Kopt a Rooord of Moneys Paid ^o Counoil-mon and Also Ovor 1Ö0 Registry Ro-colpts Por Mailed Money Lottors.  Mm. Hetty Green to Join Mililonaire Spendthrift Class-  New York, March 21.—With a dull th\»d the sclent iflc world has come to Assonan dam, caused aesthetic regret, I ^ halt In its search for the cancer  although the material advantages obtained thereby were weU understood.  The dam Itnelf was next visited. Colonel Roosevelt was enthusiastic  cure, the hookworm and other diseases of mankind. A public demand has gone forth tbat the searchers after the anthrax bacillus or the mlcrococ-  orer ItB conception and expectation, pus bend all tbelr efforts Into solving  He poured Innumerable questions at Engineer McCorquodale who clceroned the party, and discussed the irrigation protlem with keen Interest The party on reboardlng the launch steam *d through the first cataract to As-Bouan, where they landed arid took lunch at the Cataract hotel.  Here Colonel Roosevelt met the first considerable number of his fellow citizens since he entered Africa. There was quite a crowd of American tourists çHthered to greet him and the lunchtime was very lively. The Americans said that Colonel Roosevelt looked markedly younger than he did a year ago. He has lost his wrinkles and his step was more clastic.  There was another river trip aftei limch with gave the party an oppor tunlty to visit ionie of the rock tombs, which are numerous nereabouts. The heat was extreme, but Cx>lonel Roose velt did not seem to suffer. «The launch steamed to Shallal after the tombs were Inspected and there th» party slept last night, starting for Loxor this mornlfiK.  It Is the present intention of Col onel Roosevelt to sail from Southampton for New York on the steamer Kalserin ^u^'ista on lune 10.  BOUNDARY DISPUTE  Between Pani^ma and Costra Rica to Be Referred to Chief Justice Tuller.  ' Washington. March 21. — The Ion« standing boundary dispute between Panama and (^osta Rica Is now In a fair way to be settled. The disputory parties have signed a protocol referr Ing the arbitration of the question tr Melville W. Fuller, chief iusfire of the supreme court of the I'nlted States. The protocol was signed last week at Secretary of State Knox's residencf» by representatives of Panama and Costa Rica.  The boundary question has been pending since Colombia and Central America hec-ame Independent ot Fpaln.  In November. Ii>n3. when the repub lie of Panama seceded from Colombia Panama Inherited the iKnindacy dt»  the greatest of all modem questions —viz., what's floating through tho air that is causing the men and women of millions to give them awayf  No one was worried as long as Rockefeller, Carnegie. Dr. Pearsons or Mrs. Ruasell Sage gave away thofr mlllons, but now comes the statement —as yet unproved, for no one has seen the monev—that Mr^ Hetty Green Is going to give away 1500,000 of her flOO.OOO.OOo.  Profesisor Mountfort Hooker, forgetting for the moment his learned expressions, was heard to nwitor^ "Tell It to Sweeney." as he slammed the door of his apartments near tho C^ilumbla university.  If the public prints are not over-zealous, Mrs. Green ill going to give away Just one half-mllllon of dollars.  liut It's not to be In money, so the story goes. In fact, It's to he in the shape of property worth that sum and upon It Countess Annie Leary is to erect her memorial to Columbus. Other folks are to help build the memorial.  A careful search of the property In New York city Is said to show that much blasting will be required to clear away the rocks, rind it is a well-known fact that Mrs. Green Is a large stockholder in the gijnpowder trust, so maybe, after all, it's not a ^erin— maybe It Is only tm.siness shrewd ness oh the part of Mrs. Green.  Howbeit, there's something In tho air, and the hliih cost of living takes a back seat In the news line when any one even dares suggest tbat Mrs. Green is about to Join the Rockefeller et al. spendthrift class.  CITY OPTION BILL  Llksfy to Pais tho Legislature Says Assemblyman Holden of Tompkins.  Ithaca. N. Y., March 21.—Assemblyman Fo* Holden of Tompkins de^ dared that the city local option ^ilf probably would pass the legislature. This is the measure which gives cities Hie right to vote whether they shall be "wet" or ' dry."  In talking of the prohibition bills nnw before the legislature Mr. Hoi;  Pittsburg. Mareb —Ah«»t persons in Pittsburg, councilmen and ethers, were Siinday (ormally noUfled by personal messengers from the of-flee of the dUtrlct attorney that they should stand ready to appear in court on Tuesday next to voluntarily confess their part In grafting and brtbery of Pittsburg councils in tho past few years. Those who will comply,will be pormftted to go freet. Those wfio will not appear will be prosecuted.  Ck>uncilman Klein will appear In court to make a statement and at the same time a special grand Jury win be sitting.  Sunday and last night Councilman Klein, who haA "squealed," was looked in a room at the For» Pitt hotel under guard of two detectives. Klein will be hurried V^om the hotel to court today, then to Riverside penitentiary to, begin his sentence of 314 years, which will now, It Is reported, be cut to one >ear because of Klein's turning «tate's evidence.  Klein's Lffe Threatened. In this connection U came out that the life of Captain Klein. Is In danger. Two anonymous spetlal delivery letters reached the Fort Pitt hotel addressed to Klein, but-hjs captors opened them and then telephoned for the l>ollce. Klein nas been kept In ig norance of the arrival of the letters as well as of their contents. ,  "Tor years there has been a nimor that Councilman W. A. Martin, who was sent to Riverside for grafting, was given a great sum of money "not to squeel." and Kltjin has verified this. Klein makes the following statement In regard to this:- "I passed the hat for Martin and got him I30.000 for keeping a stiff upper Hp. but I don't see any one now passing the hat for the little captain. (Klein Is a fcteamboat captain and Is known as Little Captain.)  "Why, I even made Mayor Guthrie, the author of all Martin's troubles, contribute to that fund, ' said Klein, with a chuckle. "Guthrie gave me fSft."  Kept Reccrd of Payments.  Klein appear« to have provided for Jurtt such an emergency as he Is now facing. When he was made official collector of one branch of council and also dlabiirsliig agent he kept a regular set of books showing when and how mik h money was paid out to each councilman This book, has been turned over to the district attorney. as well as more than 100 reg iRtry receipts for mailed letters with money. Klein paid most of the councilmen by mpil and he has the red cards to show that the letters were reecived.  It 1« reported that ten councilmen aie missing, that they left Pittsburg early Sa^urdav afternoon after it had become known that Klein had told all.  PhOftdeli^lti, Vaich tl.—Tbo 00m-mlttM of 19 1^0pr«aentiIkC tlio car mon only refused to aecopt tho terms, Uv out for solo reo<MPiltk>n of tkoir union and tho exclusion of tho Keystone unk»n.lr Tbojr sent represonta-Utoo t%ck to Penrose aslrtng for bet-t«r leiuis. Tlw jiiupuiUluu wi» Ì» I rut to tho strikers for a voto this afternoon.  PhiladelphI«, March — Unrted Sta'teo Senator Boise t*enrose broke tho strike last nigh|. One by one he called before him the reluctant directors of the Philadelphia Rapid Trausit company and forced them to accept the terms that were outlined last Friday night by powerful financial interests.  Ho brought his hand down on the big table in his office with a bang that shook the chandelierst He said that he would break the Rapid Transit company into smash and scatter the pieces over the streets if they con-tinuod to hold out another hour.  He even mòre than hinted at a receivership. He dared the directors to risk action by the common and select COTincils.  The Rapid Transit officials caved in. They agreed to everything that Senator Penrose demanded, guaranteeing terms that give the car men's union nine-tenths of everyth^g they demanded. Even recognition of the Amalgamated union, through a grievance committee, is included In the capitulation. First of all the company agrees to take back all of the men on strike and to restore them to their old runs and their priority on the wage and promotion lists. The pro \i.so Is made that If the company Is unable at once to restore all ^f the old men to fh^ Job«, it ehali pay ^ a day to all that are kept waiting, and that these shall receive their former Jobs within two months.  The status of the 173 motormen and conductors who were discharged for j "Intoxication, knocktng down fares and for the good of the service"—ttie act which precipitated the strike—^Is  KLLOSmER SUHMIWI UP.  pute. rirect negotiations between the two republics for the settlement of the boundary dlsp'ite failed.  WWHlPiaiLYiR DERAILED  Sevan Gara Went Into Ditch; Enfli-neer and Baggageman Killed.  St. Paul. March 2!. — The Great Northern \Vinnli)eg flyer, northbound, left the rails one tnile west of Rogers. Minn., at 6 3: last night.  Seven cars vrent Into the dlich, the engine, baggage and mail cars over turned and Immediately caught flre, endangering baggagemen and passen^ gers. who were rescued, Englneet* Connolly. St Paul, and Baggageman Smith, MlnneaiK)ll8, were killed. Fourteen passengers were badly hurt. A relief train was rushed from Minno-■"«^ialMt-------------------------  den said there *oiild be a hearing for the clly option bill March 30, while tho county option bill will be given a hearing probably In the first week of April. Mr. Holden declared there aeemed a couitenaus of opinion ipi.favor of the city bill and that he thought H would ge through but he was not optimistic concerning the county option bill. :  He gave as his reason that the ohly thing In the a»unty bill which Induces the allied forces of Prohibition to ac cept It was the very thing that would defeat It in the legislature, namely rhe clause which would make a town, city or village permanently "dry" after it bad so voted giving the cold water I»eople in the sections that had gone "wet" opportunity to keep voting until they had accomplished their object, bat giving the other side no such op-porttinlties.  to be left to a board of arbitration of three men. s  The company raqst. according to the terms, deal with Its employes through a grievance committee of 19 men, one from each barn.  The strikers won a point In the matter of wages. Ry their old agreement they were to receive 23 cents an hour beglnaing Jtme 1, ISKV. They were «fitting 22 cents wheh tliey stnick. By the agreement forced by Senator Penrose they go back to work at 23 cent.«« an boar atid they will be raised to 2314 rents on June 1 next. The new men taken on by the company and for whom p'aces may be found are to receive 22 cents an hour.  TWO MEN SAVED FROM DROWNING  One Is Son ot Vice-President ot tlie Reputilic ot GuHa.  nr.. pwaoe  lar's Ufe K is pretty and puts on a »•onderfully rapid growth, which h«» led to its oo^imon use. Hut in age it la poaitireljr ugly and Its roots travel 1 great dlotaace. using up the fertility  of the soil, spoiling good lawns and  Annapolis. Md . March 21.—Through the bravery of Beaufort K. Klrwan, a hospital apprentice at the I'nlted States naval hospital here, and Peter Foy, a' private of marines, and the prompt action of members of the ma rine guard. Francisco Zayas, son of the vice president of the republic óf Cuba, and a companion, Manuel Mar-cer, both sliidents of St. John's eo|i^ lege, were saved from drowning. Th)e young men were In a paddling canoe and overturned i> at a distanoo of .'.U  pushing th^r way iloto sewers where they form a mat that clogs tho tile and renders the ee^er useless. For tCio latter reason most cities and fo^wns ^veT oMlhàììN^s t&etr  propogatión and the authorities will not permit (hem to be planted along thè streets.  Maploo and Elma Choap.  I-  PolMo on WMoh Booh 8l4o Will Roly Thlf Woolc in tho Effort to Convinoo iW loiMiU In tho FInál Wtvliw 9t tho 100^ Words of Tsotlmony.  [Bi>oot^ OorrespoodMioo.] AllMU^, Uarch 21.—Reodtttlono pro-Tftdlag for an Investigation of the flre tnsoranoo bualnooo of fM state win bo Introduced Hm wook. This aovo wW be baood on the disclosures made a Cow days ago by Superintendent Hotchkias.  If this demand for a loitlBiativo Investigation bo acceded to by tho legls-latero a commlttoo will be appointed which will conduct an Inqui^ tflong tbo linoo of the Armstrong probe into tbo Ufe insurance buainess of the stato.  Potl^nK Invootlgatlon RosoiutfiMia.  There are several reeolot|ons provkl-Ing for Investlgatlono of varioua sorts now pending before the leglalaturo, as foUOTs:  For sn Inquiry Into the meat trust. For an Inquiry Into the stock ox-changes of the state.  For an Inquiry luto the allegations of general legislative corruption made in the AI Ida-Conger case.  For an liitjulry luto the municipal court of the city of New York,  For an inquiry into the question of the existence of a "flre insurance trust" Tills latter reoolntion has been put in both by Assemblyman Jameti Hoey of New York and by Assetubly-man Mclnemy *of Rorheeter. Hoey is a Democrat and Mclueruy Is a lU-pub-  The Mclneruy resolution, which", Tn view of the lloti>hkl»s dlwhwures, may be amended to take «-ognlzance of the lIotchki}<H revelations and iWHsed, 1m now in the wayn and lueann committee.  Tho Allds-Cong«r Summing Up.  The attonieya for lK»th Senator Allds and Senator Conger are now cuiuplet-ing the argument with which they will sum up their testluiouy tUl» week and close the trial of Allds ou the Cuuger bribery alletfa'thms.  The sl»tnuuug up will he a review of the vSOO.OOti words <»f testlnuuiy tukeu in the nix weeks through which the inquiry ha« drsgKed.  Oue of the attorneVH for the Cong«T side com mullica ted tt» the writer ti^lay the chief |Kiliitw on w hich the uc<-u«ttig sldH will dfpeiKl in tlifir tliial eiidriiv ors to provt' thiit .MlU.s Ls «iillty us chargetl. These i>oltit.>< are as follows; Coiner s UWII story of .vlld.s' allegeil convenMttlon with th»' «<•< imer ami P'rank í uui;»t. demandíiiK that tin-bridge comprtiiics ■ L'»'t their luaii up to Albany" to s«v him al>out klliiug the Malhy-Steveiis bridge Itill. ami Conger'H story of the alleK'tnl payment of uieuey to .\Ilds.  Testimony of Mo*.  The corrt>l>«rf-atlve »tuay of Hlnun «í. Moe. who said he brought the JH,.".««» bribe fund from liroton to Albany and persoually delivered $1.0U0 of It to Allds on April Si. 1901.  DoCumentftry evkleace. Including the «•heck for and its stub, the two  .New York draft.s for í;í.0"Ki each ami the eutrieM 011 the Inxtli« of the »»rotoii National luiiik. lo support the allega tl«m that the IkhmIU» fund was drawn from Frank Cotitrer's ¡ucount there  What the Attds Sid« R*<i«« On. #  AIMs in his «lefen^e rell+'s tlrxt iip-ni his (iwii Hb-iolute ileriinl of Cnnger-i allyiratioiis retinnlliik' lils > ..nversntlotis with CMii-tfer 11ml his bnitlier Frank. Other nulla |>olutM ure  Testlmouv nf Hiir\ey .1 l>iiniel><. rlerk of ttie a-í^enil'I.N w.ix"« iin<l mesin-< >»«1 KwHlllil C  INITIATIVE AND REFERENOUIt  wiL «HK irnníGMMl  I Organlcâtlon Loadors Muf Her Will »0 Matfo to Wuiwtiirti ê iiilttwi OblTetloiMW» Oâl»--0fllwlt antf SmfM «T flir Commlttoo Will ProtoftWy •• f» New—Do*|ioerato H«mi tho Minwity ReproeèwtsUoÂoi  Senator Owen Soos In Its Applloatlon Remedy For PontloaHllo.  New York. March 21. — U^tod Btates Senator Robert L. Owen o> Oklahoma told at Canutgi«) hall what the initiative and referendum Idea, tn his opinion, will do for the American people if its advocates can only get It through. The address was Rlvea under the auspices of Felix Adler's Society for Ethical- Cultum. . ^  The remedy for the political Ills of tbo nation Senator Owen flnda lif the Initiative and referendum and be ■poke of Oregnn as a state in vhtch this remedy has been "gloriously" utilized. Said he:  "So long as machine pollticiana make the nominations for both par ties patriotic citizens register their votes for such nominations in vain. They have only a choice of evils. The doctrine of Boss Tweed Jn New York might be expressed in these words: 'Let me select the candidates, I care not who elects. Selection is more vital than ele<-tlon."'  When the insurance companies and the  Waahlnston, Marek II.—"nie enti ü 1 ymr vw fit^t tor reiHreaentstkn <m ganized house oomattte« e» There Is ,« general amotts theoi at preeent Huit mcáj« ttie RepobUeui held within a few day« «f sod noi as members éf làut body.  ^TfOe modefiitS^ after their noUble TletofT Cannon orsanltattoB la ■tnmi^y for a better amons the RepublMt tarn Washington. The orsMùMOo» era themselves, wttb poaafUe < tkm Ol Speaker CaxHicHi, m to be eonc Ilia tory and tbey app ing that no att«inpt wfll ^ nominate a comasittee to the radicala.  The rogulani have atreetfy assurances from many el tiM ents \bat DalieU (Pfc.) (Iowa), who served wifk uon on the old coaamlttee, wlB  Tou art  • Picking Up a Pin.  See a pin and pick it up. Uablo to get docked for being late at the office, arrested for blocking the •Idewailt. Infected with the genia of a6me dieeaso and accused of being •tinsy. or at least of harlnf Uttle to  The Simpis LKs. ' Hungry Guest-Afraid I'm a| bit late, bnt hope I haven't keptfbreakfkat waiting. Bosteoii^oh. 1 forgot to mentioo that were try4ug the "no breakiaat' plan and feel so mncb better for It Wo do tmst it will bare the aaine ef leet with you.—London Pnnch.  »ards from the shore.  Marcer held on t/> the craft but Kayas. who la very heavy, was not able to secure a hold and was barely able to keep above the water. He was Just Ht itre wd' trf-im-etrrttgth w^ite^t-^K wan and Foy Jumped Into the water and swam ui him. BtHli rendered ivhat assistance they could, Kirwan jecurlng a hoKI hy the hair and keep-, ^ , ^ , ng his head i^>ove water until a b4>at  win Jtuld be brought and both youths lak  of the greatest ever known to the en into if.  city.  Rates to JefTrieaJohnson Fight.  San Francisco. March 21.—A $72-K>und trip from Chicago to the coast anda$S2-rate from New York for the Jeffries-Johlison flght is what .Tack Gleason expects to secure froin,the Eaatem railroad officials. Ix>u Hous^ jnaiTTyB Itati^^ 1M  written Gleason to that effect.  Oars could not be ontalned at once and the marine« who manned the l*>ats used planks In working out to the stniggllnp men.  The accident took place in a trlb otary of the Severen river known as College creek.  •Miiiniift»»«' ri«>ii) iiiMiex tlu-re i>ii alleile.  hi«' ink eTjxTl«^ . h.«, k -int. ba.l to tw'tKTlT irp  NATURE'S LULLABY.  ANOlSfi tike of a htdden br^ In the imtr mmth of Jane That to tb* BlMptee woo«ls all algtil Stageth a qútet tun«.  Pensions For Boston Teachers.  Boston. March ST.—Pensions are to be granted to the school teachers of Boston. The rite is to be one-third <>f the Hilary at the time of retire flirnt. The aee '.'mit Is <15 years. Others who are liicapscitated after 30 rears' service are included In the or »>r, -  i  ititiiTTtttfer in  nor Mix' enrcnNl tlie . nor palli .\l!iN jiii\ i April '_':5. r.Htl, ^i.-i thes Testliuonv of one of that the (;rotoii liMiik Ite^Mi rfnTiprreri with Mik»«« story  Kffort.H to lmp«';ii ti « ont'er -* . fuirVii-ter hv puttliiu' "II n-onl llie Mlie;;«'^!  Idisimts^ iiieiiiods ..f il,.- I.rul^ie o,.ui  panles 111 wlii' li he Uii'» interested  liletK-e tli.it MUls iuNinimen  tai 111 .lefejtiiii« tlie hii:liv%!i\ l.lll whi. li  ConBer :in.l the iindp- ■•ouipauies waiitetl to pa-s.; 111 I'XK». tlierel.v -.etlinn Up ¡a motive fiK- i 'on;.er « present at tacik oil .Ml.U  0>n«ev'i» letter t.- VlUls. written In May. I'.XU. ludi-atlii^- thai ..^llal r<k latlons epistili l'et^*een tliein a M>onth after Coukrer aliene»* that .Vlids Maik nialle»!" the l..rl<l>ie .ompaiiles for  Ward Bill Com«* Up March 30. Assemblyman \V«nl !» nh<»rt ballot bill wa.-* made n  assembly on !«e»<^nil ami thlnl reedlnji for March ^ The I.It I had set  for dImruHalo« oil March btit It i> to be amende«! and reprlttted; henc« the ctenge made  gigantic corporations raise mil- ^^pt^blo on the new. Tie Hons of money to corruptly Influence jj^y^ „j^jg attempt as yet 1 the elections, when they use the together m tbo rvmaliif&s. ftWP huge strength of flnancial authority I notnin^tod >r ^  with its far-reaching power to affect I cancus, but it Is pnKr Wttmmm' votes In an intensely commercial na-; »dmitt«d tliat Rejirtasattiea llP'-tion, you may expect while machine , (.^n (MaM.^ will be OM ^ (INaK ^il^ methods prevsU that nominations in p^c^Qc coast states Wfll cet iwriiiir" both parties will be favorsble to the resenutlve on the ctauaJtCee commercial Intertsts and that such In • choice aeems to Do bow aanOK terests will «xerclse corrupt and si»-^^ Haw ley of Oregon aa* BMi later Influence '>ver those chosen to (CaL). For the remsie6* Or» jleei administer govemmenl. You «mies of men»»  never control commercial ambition D^ni^y Townsend of VMMInii WP' by your government unUl you have ^^ mentioaed mora ftwUHiffl ftiip, taken your jcovernment out of the g^y,  hands of commercial conspiracy and | ^^ ig metJtod te tie out of the hands 6t purely selllah po- inourgents not to ferae a Utical ambition.- » ^^ peraonnel queetton. T*«r  And the way to do this, Senator ^^eir struggle in the feenWIfr Wtk Owen sa.d. Is by the InltiatiTo and ^^e country as one M tae tW referendum. He declared that this was ^^^ «mireW on prineif^, M« «MF easy to get if the voters would o^ly attempt tm  it in earnest. - struggle on in regard to the  of the committee would  FRIENDLY NEGOTIATION f««^ i"» their^a«^ M  Contlnkod With View of Provontint Tariff War With Canada.  ^ Albany, March 21.—The threatened tariff war between this country and the Dominion tf Canada stepped one pace to the rear after President Taft. W. S. Fielding, minister of finance nf the l>ominion of Canada, and Charles M. Pepper, commercial adviser of th^ department of state, had conferred together for more than three hours in an attempt to find some solution of the problem which has vexed bbth nations.  While no aifreement was reached and while none was absolutely prom-ined by the conferees. It was the general opinion that the meei.ng of the president and Mr. Fielding had been Indicative of a solutkin  Negotiations, which were practically at an end when Mr P^pf^er returned to \^■a-^hln^^ton from the Dominion we^ks ajso. have been resumed nnd ev<>r\ effort will be made by President l>fi. the state department and. It wRs Raul nm< ials of tke Canadian ir<>\"rnment to a\ert a bat tip over the • irifT schedules —T?ie V  m  ---4  inspired by n>otlves ^ pFrstm^ MP-biflon. Fven Victor Mfrrdork im ^  Ing to concede that tlte ......................■  wil make no attempt lo 4 resAQtaxion on the new «MnmUlup..  The Democrats have funt agreed on the minority repr^HMnrCaSlMIP^ of four of the new coaualtt**. M. lia. predicted that the cnttcy^ wS!"^ Champ Clark (Mo.ì^ flte' leader. Representative ^OgtiTtSit Y >. rnderwood 1 Ata ) and BSl (Minn.) Several of fbe Dii'i have been opposed to tbe srieetie* Representative FitageraMk wW m one of the so-called 23 boUerr wl Jumped the reservaiJuff « fear m v.'hen the supremacy of glt>eal>er Cli non was threatened by a cmÉbCSMOi of Democrats and  Si)eaker Cahnon, appareaxly tad ogni^lon of fitxgeraldV servfee* that ^Kht. api>oln»ed htss to tie committee. af*er having made, a *»-rancy hy deposing Rep***ea*a*ive'Perder* ood.  STËEL RAilROAO PES  libati* !r»«T t!ip^t. i for ('anaiia ami '.ti 'o ret;irn to  ^f^ Kit id  Mr PI., r N . vp.  Wh.l»- :iM ?n the ronforenro  were rttut i.r about Jn^t what had u* « r ff. J ÏT i Vñ dt f sffvoVT Thä^ Ti e ¿it nation ;n mn h httu^r «^haiie than It was t>«fiir.. IVcsidrnt Tafi fol'ow Ivff tho f-'U fiTpnce raiised this .xtare-m n' f.) II.,' fivtn oiit ■The ureRulenr Mid Mr Mine »ere in ronfet^nre In rM.».|ii 1 : 'o fhp ranff today for ««ev ernl hours N'-i T'ti/Iusion was reach-id ' the < iï'idii remains 'hat of f-iondl V n. Ki': la'ions "  Th« Spinal Column. !  The spinal column, or backbone. U ^ the most Ingenious engineering »true- 1 ture ever constructed. It contains ' within Its center the spinal canal,'injury to which would produce in us immediate parai/sis. oc death. The separate boo es of thè s|>tnal column aré fitted and adjusted' so nicely tbat there is no danger of thla. and. besides being provided with cushluna it is elastic and strong. An engineer cooid not do better than' to study this re-markablo Inventlou for pointers in bridge and bouse baUding. It la tbo acme of ocientiflc coamfmetkm.  Branch of a $2.000,000 Pininj l^iewiÉa  Corporaiiori to B« Loeatod In Chicago.  Chu aiií». M an h 21. Tie fiiHii 11 ap ^iw'nal l h- eompany. a tSiflÜM®®*--  Pe)int>\Uania i'-<iriM>ration. wiH esMl^ i Its^h a hraiii h ;>lan! Ht OJtiragO'te» airtMi I i,are of 1;.» \\ t^t« rn businesa, "Tw^'eial ; !«irts art' »onnldered. Tie  lion NMii hi- .i. c uied Ht aa «»rty and woi r wiii t>eeiu on the b^l n^'X! moni h  The c-ompr.n% manufaciaw j r.iilr«ad f)»« U.«î ptaw be^-e. It Im mat-I M-i'inff<i will rover over an acre «C prntind and win represeot m ment qj^^pori- than  Dtt'o'* :^frn-f Ente- Prùw fVliiyi New York. March 2?. ~ fHwibF Schmidt, the Detroit catcler. waate tw be «• ^  in a real prise ring. SthnéÉi tir^ be^a receiving Instructl^ frei l-ems. the former welterweigM pion. and has just Issued a to fight any hall idayer hi tlw Mcl^n nf the CinciiniMtt IM ferred. for SO rounds and a tri raagtac frem t&Of to'tfjWH  y   

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