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   Wellsville Allegany County Reporter (Newspaper) - July 30, 1897, Wellsville, New York                                 T-jyot, -Ät^ JJU .çr» ^ • ïi-i^-spri'ï—^ .......................pj'.........  Imueú in Semi-W^Wy dettone. Fir«t Seetiöii Twesday, Fow Pa«es-S€Cöttd Seetiw Friday, Fag^  WELLSVai^B, H. Y^ FMDAY,, 30 I897,  OLD OCËlrS VtCTtiS.  Fi^ Lives aod Brtgantlfie Lost In a CoUtsioQ.  CJAÏÏ8BB BY THE DEH8E FOÖ.  Oocanw^ OfT Bam last  gat«r««y — O!»««'« Wlfa  Otï® ©f th« Üaf«rttBnia«ii. SMp Mmû m of Coal.  BOSTON, Jalf The Allen line Bfemm-sr ScaoÛina^ti arrived from Glasgow sad broQght with her the four sanrlTors of the crew of the British tmrkcntine Florence, Captela Henry Oten, which sunk iQ a collision with tho Smnûl-Bsrian Satiurday In & den^ fog iO miles Kïuth of C^p© Bam. Four mem-ÎJCTS of ß» CPBW wer» drowned, together ■^tb the wife of Captain Olsen.  The Floren<^ was bound from Sydney. C. B., to St. Johns, N. F., with a œrgo of  The men who loat their llT^a were : Noah Nokhis, cook, of St. Johns, N. F. WiLUAM Yabslhb, a nephew of th» captain's wife.  jamms Normäs, ssainan, of St. Johns, F.  WnxiAM Fht, seaman, bolon^ng In Poole, Eng. Captain 01i©n. when interviewed, said: ■We left port on the 80th Inst, for 8t. Johns. Saturday, after being nc^ly three in the fog, Î ordered the ve^el pat about on the starb^wd fâwk. At 1:30 p. m. the fhrill blast of a steamer's whistle was hmrd right abtam, and there loomed îîp, making directly for tho huge hall cf an ocean steamer.  I was below, but was called on deck by the lookout. On ths way ont of the cabin J called to mj wife and eh© aroused First Mate Brodnick, who was asleep in his bank. Hardly had he r€»ched the deck when the simmer SoandlnaTian stmck oson the port side and went half way throngh as.  While the -Pasels wero locked together •we were In no lmm(^late dangsr. The order to reverse the stmmer's engines, which had been given, aoon had the eiîwt eî breaking hor away from na, and in «boat three minutes after she had pulled fecr bow out of the hole in the side of our vessel, the Florence went down in SW fathoms of water. Norrla, Yabslpy and were never seen after the vessel struck us, and they were probably asleep  .:ïniSé forecastle. ......  OIs-D. the boatswain, and Seaman Essens jsmped into the main rigging and were ««in followed by Mat© Brodnick, aod all three swun^ themeelvM onto the stammer's deck hf means of tho lower ff-d3,rû.  Fry appeared at the side of the vessel just before she went down. A rope wss thrown him and he was pulled half way îip the steamer's side, when he relaxed his hold, fell hack and w^ jD£Vet scsm aga^^ - •■•■ Matt' 'Bi^nick'mid :  Immediately after reaching the deck of the Sandinavian, I threw a <x)il of rope to Captain Olst-n, who was standing nt^ the galley on the barkentine with his arms around his wife, who was crying. The captain K>curöa the end of the rope and att%>mpt«i to make it fast about hL^ wife, nut the rope was not long enough, and, the steamer backing away, pulled the line from hia hands. In the escite-Sicnl and confusion valuable time was lort. and before the st<\'imer'^ lifeboat had gotten into the water the barkentine had gono down.  %Vhcn the vessel took her last plunge the captain became separat-ed from his wife. Mrs. Olsen never reapivared above the water. The captain soon came to the s\irfacc and swam to a life buoy und kept atloAt until the lifeboat reached him. lie was coniplftely exhaust*Hi. When it was found that there was ho hope for the remainder of the crew the .stiamer continued on her way to Bo.st<^)n.  The Florence registered only tonti net. the was valued at i-l.DtW.  Colored KdStor Shot and Killed.  Montgomkhy, Ala., July 2".». — Ktiitor Patterson of The Argt>s, the colorvtl i>ii-per here, was shot and killed in t he Col-iimbua Street Colored Baptist church. A conference was in progress and the ad-Eiiissibn of Brown, the deposed jiastor of tte Dexter Avenue Baptist church, w»s cnder dlacmsalon. Patterson opposed Brown'« admission, and Stokes, pastor of the Colombxis street chtirch, favor^ 16. Bot wordj! ensned. Patterson stsnck Stokea la til» face, when the report .pf, a fklstel-waw hi€iaia and Patterson fell dead. Several arrests were made and Ihei« waa great excitement among the negroes.  Later a negro man named Pritehett was caught about a mile froiii town by a negro posse. He oonfes^ to Ìmvlng ^ot Pat-ierson. He Is In jall.  PHIUXS SNOU TWOW  mmhnm Wad® • Grmmé Rirfly. Bn» €J«sia Wil» WlB  PrTTSBtTWj, Jaiy only latewsf-  ing_Incld«nt tn ih© two f^mm w»« la th« Cm, when Pittaborg maOm a rally In th® ninthafid mm© wlthln tu» of tl^g the ThaPhlladelphlapItchejaw^too mach f<» the home player®. The last game cam® nmr Wngafarw. Attend-anoe, 8,500. &5ore:  R. H. B.  PtttKbar«.....0000101 08-awa  PMltót^lpWa.. 20011 101©-« 15 2 Batt^Pries—Killea ««1 Saedca; T^lor «ad UcFmlsoid. Spcond gmoo— B. it. B.  Piitsbnrg..... 100 0 11600-395  PhiJadeIpMa.. 1 « 3 I S 1 0 ! 1—13 18 S Batl«iri»-Hnghi>y aud JiciTitt. flfloìd aad Boyle. _  Indta» »rov« Sffyraoiar 0«t. CtKTEi.ASD, Jaly m—The Gianta fell on Yoang for eight hlti in the first Innlng of Ih® game. Seven runs waa the rcsnlt. After thal th^ wuld not hit hlm effeo-tively, whlle the Indlan» drov© Seymour ont of th® box in the i^xind Innlng. Mflpkln, who took hla plao®, waa pounded hard. Attendanoe, 1,000." Score:  R. H. B,  aerelsnd..... 1 8 5 0 0 1 0 « 15 « New York. . 7 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0- 8 IO 1 ..Batterle«—Yotujg aad -Zimiaeri •Seyiaour, Meeìcin and Wamer.  Orlele« B^ WsalitsgCtmb Washisgtok, July »—The Senators lost the game through poor fielding and base running, and In the last Inning by Te&mn of McJames* Inability to hold down hits.- Nops was substituted for Pond tn the ieventh Inning. Attendance, 1,500. Score:  WaahingtoQ.. 0 i 8 0 I  Bsltimoïi»____0 0 5 0 0  Batteri«»—McJames and Nop« aad Cîarke-  B. n. E. S O O î- T 12 12 0 0 2 7-14 13 I  MoGiüre: Pond.  Ftolier Kept t!»© Hit« Sc^tered. i ixjtisviixe, July 29. — The Colonels played a rtapid game of bed! and tho Trolley DodgeiB won without the slightest trouble. Fisher kept the home team's hita scattered, while Frazer was hit hard. Attendsnoo, 500. Soore:  B.B.B.  LouisTille.... 0 0000001 1—£94 Brooklyn..... 0 0 2 2 0 1 0 0 7—12 14 1 Batteries—Fiaher and Grim; gPraser and Wilaoo. _.  Crbkango Flayed Stnpldl Ball. CmcAiK), July The Colta gav® a good eachlbition of how not to play ball, prewnting the visitors with all their runs. Th© Reds played a perfect fielding game. Attendance, 4,9». Score:  CMwigo.......0 0 0 0 1 0 2 0 O-^»^  CSndnnata. ..020200200—870 Batt«rie»-Prlead .^d Kitiredga; Bupef and Peit*. ■ ,  Boctoa WoQ Ob® From St. toa^ St. Louis, July i2w.—The Bostons won from tho Browns by superior playing. Lucid wa« benched in the sixth inning. Grimes, the home team's new twirler, acquitted himself very welL Attendance, a.ijOO. Score:  H» H E-  .St. Louua..-a......0-0" o--1-■■■o'-^T'i'' "i  'ii'^on . ....0 0 0 3 0 2 0 0 3—8 IB 1 Batten«'« — Nichols and Berffea: Ludd, Grkaesiand Mart»hj.  —Gftmes Postponed. All Eastern league games postponed on account of rain.  Caatí Employé« as ILlfe Savers.  Bald and KImtt I>lTlde.  Bat City, Mich., Julv Bald and Kiser divided the purse in the three-cornered match race, each man winning a heat.  Cooper came in strtmg in the first heat, but his stomach failed him before the second.  Bald won the first heat in a hot finish by six inche.i from Kiser In 3:10 3-6.  In the second heat the judges awarded first place tc> Kiser, although it looked as though Bald had it by a few inches.  Bain prevented tho third heat being rtm. __  JÍO Kpoords Were Brokeo.  Mecfoku, Mass., July 29 —Neither Itob-ert J. (¿ror-a) nor John H. Gentry (2:00K)- fhe famotis pacers, was able to lower his n-eord or that of the track at Combination jwk. The best that Gentry oould do waa 3:i>7 flat, while Rol»rt J. made the mile In The  pa«%rs ma«le an excellent showing, eon-Blderlng that they had the wind in their teeth at th© start» down the stretch amd at  tb0 finish. _  ■r Corto I^nl» Sí®ek Brbkeo.  ClKaKJrATT. July Si).—There was a een-•atlonal aojideat in tho first race at Oak-l^. Corie" Lynn, a maiden 2-5^ir-old. ttimbled at the thre^nartelia. pi^ ■w^t'dowii to tfie^^ m^ of the bnhch, breaking her neck. Jimmy Dapee, her |ock^, fell under the horse and was badly Rba^fct^» ap, but not seriously injured.  Ardvo Farm Horsa Won.  PoBTL-\M). Me., July The 2:33clai^ trot at Bigby was a surprise, the winner. Ciénega, being a green horse from Arden farm, Goshen. N. Y. She was driven by  Sécond Section—8 ^mgmh.  BREAK 1N THEIR RftMKS  Ha?e Quenched the Enthusiasm.  Misers'  OOIFEBEBOE A DISAEPOHTMBIT  Oa® Mtnre KITort Will B« Mad« t» Brli^ Oat Bte Armltt*« Meo — gp^he» Will B® Mad® by SZ and S«T®«al  Othtm.  PiTTSBTim, Jnly09.—The g@ner»I strike ^tuation Is Imn encouraging, from the miners' point of view, than It waa a we»k  Brmkain the mnks of the river men, and a general feeling of flisooaragment »ver the West Virginia situation, have combined to quench enthnsla®m in a markable degree.  One prime factor In bringing about this condition of affairs is thoaghl to be the failure of the Wheeling convention to de-visa ways to Btop coal shipments from the dl«pated territory.  On aU sidea -the confereooo was confidently looked apon by the men as presenting a speedy eolation of tho W^t Vir^ ginia problem, and a meana of making the tie-up general.  Tho Issuanco of long resolationa Instead WM in tho nature of a boomerang.  All efforts will be concentrat«^ on De Armitt'a mines, and labor olScials are to rally the men from all over the country. Eugene V. Debs and President Ratchford of the TTnited Mine Workers wUl be among the chief spe^ers, whllo ther® will a host of lesser officials.  This demonstration la planned with the Idea of making one last effort to bring oat  the working miners by moral «suasion. The meeting will be held at McCrm's Bchoolhonse near Pliim Creek. Miners wUl march to the plac« of aisemblage from all nearby mines.  MINERS' LEADERS SMUT OUT,  All DiS^rencM Mast Be Settled th® Mea Tbemselvea.  PrrTBBTTBG, July 29. — The operators, with a few exoeptiona, want it andewitood that the passage of an agreement whereby all operators are to adopt a similar system and are to pay the same relative price for mining haa nothing to do with the great strike.  The opera tore have also ehat out the miners' leaders from taking any part in the conferences that may take place throtigh questions arising between tue  ■ UFE' ■ JWi>IW-SONWE,HTv  Till» tfl thm ■ l.Hn»«NMid  JBiM'a«!  KbtWkst, Jnly ».—Manuel FMtian« des, the young Am-eriaBa. who was toied by ooartmartial in 'th# |all in Havana, chairged with baring arms against th« Bpmlrfi foverameni and adjudged gailty, w»3 «íalenced hj t.h» tribunal to Impiis-onmsat for life at hard, labor.  At the of the trial the government prosmrutor asked that wntenc® of dc»th be Impourf, but the court suspended the i^ntenco and recommend^ life imprisonment.  . The iw.ntenc® has been referrod to Madrid for approval. It I» bellev«^ that the ratification of tho scntenc© of young Fernandez 1» due entirely to the great inter-efit ^ken by Consul Le© in the case and the strong pi» made perroaaliy by him to Captain Céeneml Weyler.  Fernandez, whose father la a Spaniard, bat a naturalized American citlsen and a R»deat of thin city, was «mrcely 18 f^rs old when he Joined a filibustering estpedi-tloa and 'wtiil to Cuba, two years ago. A few days after landing the expedition was overtaken by a mmpasij of Sfanlsh troop« under Colonel Ochoa, and Fernandez, with eeveml companion«, became eépar^ at€^ from the main body of the fillbua-ters, was captured n«r Jaruco, taken to Havana and has ^oe been confined in Cabana fortre»  One of hla companions, captured at the iam® time, was Chi^^les Govin, who was sammarily pat to death on his statement that he waa a newspaper correspondent and an Americas citizen. Govin"« tragic d^th was wltne^ESd by Fernandez, and It la reported that the most compromising evidence against Sfmnlah ofScials now on file in the state department was famished by him. _  Gsrmeat-Worker« Wla Their Strlk®.  New Yokk, July 29.—The backbone of the strike of the Kn®e Pants Makers anion, which wcarred Monday, has been practically broken. The eagerness on the pa^ofthe manufacturers to enter Into settlement culminated In the" return to work of the employes of Judge. Brook & Co. - This is one of the largest conco.rn0 engaged In the m^anufactar© of fancy goods, and the reiam to work of the company's empiches is taken by the strike liters as an indication that the prevailing dlSerencea betwwn employer and employed will be satisfactorily adJustM bo-fore the end of this coming week. It was learned that all manufacturers and contractors, to whom had been submitted the new price list, agreed to ..j^j tho stipulate prices and will accordingly at onoe giv« the necessary guarantee bonds.  Michlcazii^ Doable Tragedy. CUKTOTT, Mich.. July a».—In Brige-water township, James Jones, a farmer, shot and, fatally woaaded Martha Miner, his sweetheart, and then committed sui-operators and miners by insertingaclause . cide by shooting himself in the head. Mo in tho agreement stoting the commission ; cause is known for the tmgedy.  Wa* Casdtp Slanufmrtarer Dead. SyEAcrsE, July Francis Baunior, the manufactxirer of wax candles for  his home la this city, agai T1 years.  shall be composed of workmen employed by tho subscribers.  It was decided that present contracts TOuld not be maile the basis for arbitration.  _ M^y. .-have.'. taken "'cmt^ stipulated period at a fixed price. It is  anderatood that these shall have the right c ^ i.. _  to supply the product to fill these cSn- ^boon.r Eo^rgy.  tracts at the rate of mining on which the ^ ^w ^ ors. July -.^.-The schooner En-contracts are based. Here Is when? the ® caught fire  miners and operators will sej^rate. ^^»i? ^^^^ leng dock opposite Pier J. in  The attendance at the session of the ' ^^^^ ^^ saye the vcs^l it was  operators was not as large as previous, f nt«?é®ary to sink her, and at p^  Operators from S5 rail mines and five Unt she lies in about IM f,>et of water. Tho  BENHAM CONVICTED.  Th® Batavia Wif© Poisoner Found Cuitty of Murder in First Degree.  WILL DIE IN THE CHAIB.  total damage' is ab.jut The schoon-  ■ er, which is a si-rnasted one, left St. Johns I on June 19 with a rargo fonsi-'^ting of ! barrels of lime. When near Caj.,>e J Cod the lime began to spread. The cargo  There was a close vote ! ^atrht^. carefully, and by gt«>d management the boat linally came into Krie liasin. wht-n» part of her cargo was taken oflr. Before the l»at could be entirely clearixl the flame-s broke out. The fire was discovered near the rear part of the cabin. Fifteen minutes later iircboat Seth Low appism'd. and after a con^uliation  river mines agreed to take part in the convention, which is a larger percentage than it was hoped to get together.  The oiHirators worked siiioothly and few objections were raised to the agreement as ^vritti^n. on the question whether the commis.s.ion to bo appointed should bo privileged to tamper with the differential la the thick and thin vein regions.  Asking For Proteetloa.  ROAKOHE, Ills., July Sii.-Thesheriirhas «.„u ^  ired Governor Tanner asking for troops ' ^^ ^^  wired Governor Tanner asking for troops to protect the miners und mines. The sheriff has sworn in otJ deputies and has some special police, but is unable to procure a suflifient force to resi.st the  the boat^ -This was done.  Seoator Gorman Iq ControJ.  Baltimore, July — Harmorr  pre-  The JnJts*'» Cti.«r®f., the Jmry Wm Kntlr«ly Agrato«^ th® Prtooa«r.  Ijmt Hoars of Tbl« Vmry nmnm-ttocial Trial-^Seeae« at th® Aotnihlag Vp.  jspfcial to The kel^orttis.)  batavia, July 29:—The jury in th^ famous Benharo murder trial camo la this afternoon, and announced a finding against the wife-poisoner of murder in the-fipst degree.. Ho will meet death in tho electric chair.  Batavia, N. Y., July Another crowd that filled the oourtrocHn assembled to b»r t he last of the ©enMitlonal Benimm trial.  There were tear® In Benham's eyes when Leseur was giving him as weata a scoring as prisoner ever received. Ho never removed his eyes from the prosecuting attorney during the whole tim® ha was speaking.  Lesear, on resuming his address, reviewed the attacks by Benham on hit %rlf©.  H® dramatically worked In Mrs. Ben-tam's remark about the medicine; "Too strong; too strong. I told you it wifâ too strong."  He asked If It was not a remarkable fact that the defendant was fully dressed five minutes before his wife died.  H® related the story of Mrs. Farrant'a hearing the conveimtlon between Ben-ham and his wife and told of her pitiful protest against caking the medicine he had preimred.  "I think you are just as mean as yoa tan be." was the last wall of a blasted life and a broken heart. I  Then c^ime the t-errlble death seene. which was vividly pictured, Mr. Leseur standing directly In front ox Benham and shaking his finger In his face as he de-nwinced him as a cruel and cowardly raffîan.  Leseur took ap tha modlcal side of the case and read several autlioritiwi to Bhow that death did not result from heart dis-eai^.  Exception was taken to his remark that Benham had seduced May Wiard.  In closing, Mr. Leseur told tho jury they were here to vindicate truth, honor and justice. They were not here t-o vindicate May Wiard ; they were here to vindicate Florence Tout Benham.  The people's case was. first, that Benham had lost all love for his wife; »econtl, that he wonted his wife's money «o that he might marry May Wiard; third, that he had preineditat«l the crinu»; fourth, that he had purchased the that his wîfè îujd^ died a iuiidea death and that sympt<^7ms and evidfnres of prus-^îc acid poisoning hnd been observed; sixth, the virtual confession to Tozier.  Ju.<5tico I*iuphlin ot once prweeded to charge the jury. He reviewed the evidence, noüirly in full, and instructed them In their duty.  Without going into details over thi> charge it is ni'iugh to siy that it was most severe on th«* prisoner.  Messrs. SciU-lett and Mackey declare that, in case conviction nsult4'd, an nj>-peal would certainly l>e taki-n  Bonhain was muri» dleheartisn^d and practically gave up all ho|)e of iwxiuittai.  Firemen Win Thetr Sail.  Peoeia, July -U—A telegram was r^^ ceivcd by the Hrotherhoixi of Lixxmiotiv,» Fir*>men saying they hmi won their suit apiUnst the n^ceiver of the Phi!adt ]phi:i, Rfiwling and X«w EngLind railmid to prevent reduction ot wages of th»» road men. They were the only organizntion which went into court and fought the r»^ ducfion. In thoy won a similar euit against the Union Pacific.  marching here from several nearby towns. I Democratic state invention  ** ' here, and it was demonstrated that Unit  ed States Senator Gorman still has his  Great excitement prevails.  Miner« on the March.  MiKOXK, Ills., July 2;i. — Dlssatlolit-d miners are marching from here, Luca and Rutland to l^noke and will endeavor to induce the men there to quit mining coal for shipment.  I^rg« Export of Wheat-  New Yoks, July 29.—The dominating  hand on the lever that etïntrols the movements of the organization. The CiindS-dates nominaî-ed by the convention wore selected by hira and the resolutions adop. -ed were of his inspiration. As chairman of thé committee on resolutions, he read the platform. At his suggestion one of the candidates for comptroller withdrew when his nomination seemed assured, and another was taken up by the conven-  Infiaenoe of the stock niarkets' strenth ao^j gj ^ig ^^^est both gold and sUr. wa» the prosperous grain, tri^e waived their^ ^^^^^ for the  Probably over SOÓ.OOO bushels of wheat ojjcg ^nd voted to adopt a platform that were engaged for export to tho continent, declares for bimetalism, bus Is silent as although oaly some 333,000 bushels was í to the vital question of "ratio, reported from outports. The favorable weekly government rejMjrt waa doubtlesa a factor in the recovery of confidence to the disconcerting of the rí»actioni3ts oa the stock market.  6teBl>ra County FIremea.  . . , ^ .. io.tu, ------ ----------------- , Bath, X. Y., July 29.—Annual eonven-  Alb^^ July 29,—Thera tove ^n ^ . w. J. Andrews, who last year drove John | ji^n of the Steuben County Firemen's as-  R Geatrv to the world's record oa the ^i^tion now in session here. Sixty'del-  xnany drowning casualties about the state canals during the portion of the season pas.sed, that Saperiateadent of Pablic Works George W. Aldrldge has decided to make the attempt to creat® a life saving force from the employes of the canal. A card containing instructions to employes along the banks to make especial efforts to sâvo-lives, and giving directions how to resuscitate a ¡partially drowned pemin, has been ls.saed. The cani will contain pictures of the positions to place the drowning person In, and Is intended to be nailed ap at daageroas spots aloag the line of the canal.  track.  hféits.  Cieneça won la Best time. 2:185^.  Raclag at Sarat<^ia.  SAKAW.i.i,. July 21».-After aa Interim of a ye;»r nwrag was resumed on the track here with a small field of good horses. The prograjn that has been arranged for the meeting promis»H5 interesting sport, as the best of the S-year-olds and all-ap-d divisions at Horse Haven are well entered iJB. the valuable stakes.  three straight pg^tes are present, representing »>com-' panies, l>eside« a large number of com-' panics who are themselves here. They were welcomed by Monroe Wheeler, president of the association. The delegates were given an excursion on the Mary Bell. ^^_  BefOndlBS Scheme Dtoeimed.  New Yokk, July 29 —At a meeting of the board of managers of the I^lawaro and Hadson Canal company held here, the question of refunding the f10,000,0t»0 7 and 8 per cent a>year bonds of the Al-l»ny and Suaqaehanna railroad, which is leased by the Canal company, was diseased, bat no action was taken. The opinion prevails that such action will be taken eoon. In financial circles It is said that the Delaware and Hudson company haa earnt-d a large Incrmse this year over the eorresponding months of last year.  Staedard Oil Company'* I^osa.  Decrease In He^lpt®.  Wjvshikgtoj«. July ¿y.—The  WlXMPEG. Jaly29.—The oil warehouses ß^jy report of the coramit«sion<*r of Inter-  of the Standard Oil company, located in the western outskirts of thia city, were totally destroy«^ by fire. Th© loss im bo-tween tao.000 and 8®),000.  Ualt®d States Minister Kot Wanted. Makaoca, Nicaragua, July 29.—Tho  nal revenue for the year ended June 3u, shows that the total receipts during tha^ period were fU6,619,5CS, a decrea^ as compared with the previoas year of fJll,-  106. ___  WUl SISB Peace Pretlmlnarl«®.  Losiios, July 29.—A si%clal di?pitch  McKlnley Pa»«ed Albany.  Albaxy, July Jl).—President McKinley passed throtiKh this city, en route for Lake Champlain. The original plan to •top over two hours at Albany was a!mn-' ioned, and the engine of the Delaware and Hud.son exchan^n d for the West Shore prelimi- a mile below the depot. The special train of thre- cars then proceeded north without delay.  Rain Kain» the Crop».  KiN'ostok, N. Y., July Si».—There was a pouring rain, following the stormy weather for a number of days past. A laige share of the crop^ in the Central Hudsoa Valley Is dojwl rii>e and lodged on the  diet of tb« •Twwfcf.f r».niibHp of Central liOSIWS, JUiy s».—minxmi Valley Is tlOJWl niK' «im H-Ufii-« uu wie  ' AtofeHL^ ^SaT^X^-m^Ä- .The damage is beyond estUnate.  ri^t^^l edTewflk Pasha, minister for foreign af- ^ potätocV an>-rottlng'in'ttegr«^^  WM recently appointed ITnlt«! States ed Tewflk Paslm, miaisier lor loreign ai- ^xhe potatoes n , "  mlnut« trLsSTÀiS^ N^Sm^l^^ fodra, to sign the peace prelimlnarle, ou ^nd the corn is damaged. Roads are al-• - ' ' . *» c-navt. ' juofit Impassable.  gatmniiij uext.  Negro Women Wblteeaim.  MoxTiiOMEKY, Ala., July 29.—A new variety of whitecapers has appeared in Marengo county, Ala. The organization is matle up of negro women, who are Imnded together for the moral reform of their sex. few nights ago a masked band of them marched to the house of a  woman, too*c her Into some woods, stripped her and flogged her uami-rcifully rwith hickory brushes. They threaten to treat all similar e^TenderS In the same wav.  VisoroBs at Nlnetj-Slx.  MIDDLETOWS, X. Y.. July Ä». — Mi^ Julia Sproat. mother of Major E. L: Sproat. lat« of General Rolland's staff, «»lebmted her 96th birthday anniversary at her home here. She Is still in the en-  «nd.i»rsôlialîy. visì^....... ' _ '  POWDER  âb^luMr mim,  fwr Us Kre.it íí»avrníngr »tr»în.gtl» and hf-aithfnUnt«.«. th»-fot-id  alara arí.i »íl •>í suítíiíeratlon common t»  the ROTAL BAKISO p«»WIiEB CO.,  îeKW rOHK.  THE MARKETa  Mbw Tcarîï Sioa®y Mark««.  New Yoms, Jaiy a,  M«m«<y <m call. 1 pw r«it. Prim*- n}«»rraaîili? |»5>er, p«r («st. • BîœrMag eK'.ìtaaig»; Acttial baaiaa® in taalÉ» ers'Mil«. tor demand: M.«^®  «.»HforOudaya. PvMtad rat«^ »487#4.»H  Coiaia.Tcml bill».  Bar fííver. St*^. ___  Mi-xinan d^sUar». tô^ic-'mtvvt (xms^Mtm. Ste,  The average clergyman is not a healthy man. There are many reasons that contribute to make him delicate. He Ivads a ''sedentary life. He doesn't take sufiicient exercise. Just tlie same he is a bard-working man. He takes too much trouble .about other people's troubles to tTOTibie much abotrt his own. He thinks too much about other sick people to look after his own hcalUi. Thé result is that the hardworking clergyman becomes a semi-invalid early in life.  There is no necessity for this. A clergyman adds nothing to bis usefulness, but greatly detracts from it, by neglecting his health. If a man, be he clergyman or layman, will resort to the right remedy just a-s soon a.s he feel» oat of sorts, and knows that he is a little bilions, or that his liver is torpid, or his d^estion is out of order, he will re-main healthy and robust and add much to his Bi^falticss and many years to his life^ Dr. Pierce's Golden Medical I^srovery restores the appetite, makes diges^tion and assimilation perfect, invigorates the livirr. purifies the blood and tones the nerves. :It IS the greatest of all knowm blood-makers and flesh-builders. It cures <>8 per cent, of all cases of con<sumprion and diseases of the air passages. Thousands who were given up by the doctors and had lost all hope have testified to their complete recovery under this marveloMS medicine. It is the discoverr of an eminent and skillful specialist. Dr. R. V. Pierce, f«» thirty years chief consulting physician to the Invalids' Hotel and Surgical Institute, at BuSalo, N. Y. All medicine dealers sell it.  Eight vears a«o I was taken with witat n^ divtor caûed liver ctTmpbin*,"' write* N Kendrick. E«J.. of Catarton. Ôrailcm Co. >>w Hampshire. "I t>efaa doctoriag t»- taking !Mr»aparilla« and other taedicis»esL La«4 Febru-arv 1 had a NIkk^ls att^k. and I couW not sit up long «no««h »o eat. I î>eiïan takino Dt ïHerce s medKines. I haw lake«- ooe hoMile of ' GoSden M(<dical IHicowv" at»d ttnc vUl v>f • pîci».s.<iat  Pellets.' I find no other mediciae eqiaal lo yours  ----------------------------------------------  .....WllhQUl ^att «<ÎT«1 for constij^tion and  biliousness — Dr. Pierce's Plei(.^nt Pellets.  Hew T^li Prodao® Market.  ^FLOUB-City taiila paf<«nt. ÍS-OOf^SJO; idty mia« riaar, winter intents,  4.71»; winter «traiti». t40ó®4..20; do emtra,  do low gradM. r2.»iiiaa>; Minn®^^ patents. Miaae«>ia baker».  aai; »pring ÍÍTW grade«, taaí»#2.90; spring «»-tra. wjaíí^ low grade«.  Soatbt-TO Soar. A.S.  CORNitEAL -- i>ttow western. «Mir»», HOa; braadjrrtct». eity. ei®a  BYE»—Stat.-. No. 2 WMteTB,  tf2c c. I. f. Batíalo; cariota.  BYE FLOUBr-íSaswraae, liW^Sá; tamF<^  BCCKWH.EAT FU>UB-Spot and to arriv®, ^  Bi;CKWHEAT«-3t^io c. t f. traelt: Sm prím» ütate-  BAEUEY — Ffwjding, Ste e. L f. Buffalo; ismittjjg, S&^tóo; wf«t*»nj No. 2 'Milwanìt®«, 3S»4e c. í. f. ; w»«ti»ra.. 2T ts. i. f.  BAKLEY MALT-W«»tera. »jSIc; Ma S 6S¿nte: two-rowed, a«, tór-rowtd,  WHEAT.—No. 1 northern New York, m}^ f. o. b. aa.»í ; No. hard Ntw York. SíM^o f. a. b. Añt^t; No. 1 Borthtrn Dninth, aSotó;. KHc'f- b- añ.Mt: No. 1 hard Manitoba, a«!^ afliiat. Or n- r.s. No- 2 tr-d Jal j ¿](»a<S at Bio ;  7»».»? D«*-, ■ ■  <X>HN—^j'-t -«If^ ';fNo. 2. K'-^e elerator: SSísíT . i--Tmnicr ca:j<xl. No.a.a53ic;  yelio^. ur-^r. ».>;,t;- .-j-» July v5'..s»>d at Aqb , T.. Dec..  OATS~Sp..t Xiv ^'d-'lireired. 21o:  No. y<K whitf>. N<'. a whiu»,  track ru:.st>i \5-.".:<.-r3, track whit«^,,  a,^.«.;,, tnack-wha«^' 'track  whitt' sTíií»», JS-^j yiic. <.>;>t;ijti¡»: .Sept, closedl at Jliic-  r-OUK—<>Si r.-.'-^i. .rs t*»#1.50. family. «9,25B  laSO: rtstrt cli.'Ar, IS75«.§S<í.5íí; «xtra priiaaw  flus».»-  HAY—Shipping. Wc ; gi>«l to ehoic®, SB'S 75c-  BCTTEB .— creamery, 11'$15o; 6a  factory, ; Elgin«. e; imitatloa  e«»ani<Tj. l«'-»-.iiic. f-tslk^.*^ dairy. liX014c; do  cri-aKifrr, U cljr  CHEESE — STatP. iarg«». maaXl,  fa.n«^T. , ji«rt . ftkiiria. i'^ygo; fall,  skinxj», '¿'"^-^ix.  Stat-? s.sd Pf'nnsyÌTanla, lS3~-Oí w«tt'ra fr»«.h. lie: ic*'.hoajje, S2.7i.»ái85; ®oath-  MníTmlo Prorisloa Slarbet.  BcrFALO, Jiüy a ■"^^HUAT—No. 1 hanl. No. I nbrthero.  6414». ■"Wintí-r wheat; No. i r^-d. TS'-sC. <X»BN—Ni»- 2 Tí^liow. Sáa; N<i. 8 yftllaw,  OATS-N.x -i white-, UHti N-x 3 mlsed. ^ KYE-Na. i, í!r..  FL< >UB - í^pnag whíTiat. b(.»«t jxít<*nt. per bbl., t4.5»iíii4.T5; hvte -gnáf^. íi.5i>4-.75; wiBt«r whmt. K-ít faiaUy. «rahata.  400.  BUTTEa—State .crs-airif-rj, I&átlSfío; w^S^ ■ ®rnsl.>.  CHEESE—Faaí-j fuH crs-am. 8.t5-c; chtdí»  do. i:,;ht skitn«. &S,7c; í>l£ÍsiiA.-¿'^'íc.  aad wwtera.  li^llc. ____  KMt Buif^to Liv-e Stock Ifarket.  CATTLB-Ex.trm «jtp..>rt fU'tfTñ. t4.85«5.»: gcoddo, 14.7-144-75; chusce h*-a,vy batchfírs* hsht iiaady d.i>. Si.4i.X#A.',iü, cowaand fceifers. .extra, S4li»:¿5i.5<.>; calvoa. hísavy fed,  14.UUi^75; V. ai«. ■ " . ■  SHSSP AND LAlíBá — Oinsce to , extra wethers, ?4.IS#425; fmr to chojoe «heep, $3.75 (§-t.tU; eoia-ioa to fair, tiS«>.íft3.8i5; choi«» to  eatra sfpTÍn^ larub®. cosamim to  -------------■ ---------------------------------------  HOGS-- a-^arj. $4.005--; medióla asid  mixad. Yurkera.  Bnffialo Hay Mark««.  No. 1 tiraotisy, per toa. fIZOa®ia{» No. i éo^ liaa*ail.i»: haled hay. IMOO #11.00; balad «raw. f5.SftJ&»W; baadi^ ry«>,' fiac0j®11.0a  Waa Not Andree'a Ballooa.  Christiaxi.%, July £».—Dr. Nan^a, m-ferring to the letter from C-aptala Lelk-mim of the Duteh steamer Dordrecht, who says that on July" IT he saw a cariot» object, resembling a balloon, fitrnting In tíie WTilte »oa, declares that It wotüd ba impossible for Anare«^'s balloon to hava reached the Whit* e^ m sooaaft^ti»» aaoeat. . ___  I ; " H»»*y Stprm at Mar««ille«.  Pari.«." Ji^ly 29.—A dispateh from Mai*-lilies says ^hat a violent storm haa In. The sm,s, run mountains high, audi all the mail stmmers are overdue. Many v^®els are seeking shelter la the south coast port«. .-Vll work la the harbor Is suspended, but thus far nocasaaltieshave been reported.  Not and Holt Works RiMnsna.  XoBTH ToXAWAXriA, N. Y., JulyÄ— The former employe« of the Nut and BoU works have been notified to come to work, on Aug. 16. The works will resume oî>-erations on that day and about 800 men, i it is said, will be restored to their  I tion»., ■ __ • _ ■  Ag^ PemioAer** Piatii.  HoaXKLîi:vittE. X. Y . July 29 —Roî»-• «rt Cockran, and old pensioner, was kllloA  He waa 72 years of age aad a weUkootwa  "eharafiter.   

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