Syracuse Post Standard, October 8, 2005

Syracuse Post Standard

October 08, 2005

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Issue date: Saturday, October 8, 2005

Pages available: 129

Previous edition: Friday, October 7, 2005

Next edition: Sunday, October 9, 2005

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Post-Standard, The (Newspaper) - October 8, 2005, Syracuse, New York BOSOX OUT, YANKS LOSE SPORTS, PACE D-1 The Post-Standard Affiliated with Syracuie.com SATURDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2005 FINAL EDITION 2005 The Post-Standard SYRACUSE, N.Y. 50 CENTS GOOD MORNING COOL AND WET Rain will pour down on Central New York today, though it is ex- pected to taper off west to east in the afternoon. By tonight, only a leftover shower or two will re- main with us, with spotty showers continuing through Sunday. Complete forecast, D-16 HIGH: 55 LOW: 43 SU FALLS, 26-7 Index Explosion Victims in Burn Unit Deacon speaks to survivors, who describe Thursday's tragic ordeal at Schroeppel farm. By Molly Hennessy-Fiske Staff writer Ten farmworkers were asleep when an explosion ripped through the kitchen of their house in rural Oswego County Thursday morning. One remembers hearing the blast, feeling the building shake and see- ing everything come down on top of him. Another said he felt the explo- sion, then woke up suddenly in the hospital. One Jamaican man es- caped harm, tried to pull his co- workers from the debris and refused to be taken to the hospital. Speaking in Spanish from their hospital beds Friday, two blast sur- vivors told their stories to Deacon David Sweenie, who gave their ac- counts in an interview. Sweenie, who's worked with migrant farm- workers for the Syracuse Catholic Diocese for more than a decade, has known some of the men at DeMarco farm on county Route 6 in Schroep- pel for six years. He's had some over for dinner. Others he drove to Mass at St. Mi- chael's.Catholic Church in Fulton or St. Peter's in Oswego. A few weeks ago, some of the men attended a par- outing in Fulton, playing volley- ball and soccer. One man played a song he'd composed on guitar. On Thursday. Sweenie was called to University Hospital to identify one of the men killed in the blast Aron Camacho, Sweenie said. Five others were so badly burned, he said, doctors couldn't identify them either. They assigned the men letters SPANISH, PAGE A-l 2 Inside: Propane gas stove did not pass county Health Department inspection three weeks ago. Page A-12 The Associated Press RHEMA FULLER of Con- necticut, comes in to sack Syra- cuse University quarterback Perry Patterson Friday night in Page D-1 ElBoradei, atomic energy agency get peace prize Mohamcd ElBaradei and his International Atomic Energy agency won the 2005 Nobel Peace Prize on Friday for promoting nonmilitary uses of nuclear energy. STORY, PAGE A-5 Senior citizens urged to beware of scammers Scam artists already arc try- ing to use the new Medicare drug program as a prescription for cheating senior citizens. Six U.S. Marines die in Iraqi bomb blasts Bomb blasts killed six Ma- rines as the U.S. military an- nounced Friday it had completed a major sweep in western Iraq aimed at suppressing al-Qaida militants before next week's vote on Iraq's constitution. STORY, PAGE A-S New York mayor defends actions vs. terror threat New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and his police com- missioner insisted Friday that they did the right thing by going public with a terrorist threat to bomb the New York subway. NEW YORK, PAGE A-4 Corrections Weight of crack Incorrect Call Deputy Executive Editor Tim Bunn at 470-2240 to dis- cuss a correction on a news story. Subscription questions? Call 470-NEWS Business...........C-l Bridge...............E-9 Classified..........E-5 Comics ...E-l CNY...................E-l Puzzle Dick Case.........B-l Editorials.......A-10 Entertainment. E-4 E-l Letters........ Local news. Lottery........ Movies........ New York... Obituaries.. Sports......... Stocks Sudoku....... Television... A-11 .....B-l A-2 ......E-4 .....A-4 .....B-4 .....D-1 .....C-2 .E-ll .E-12 THE POST-STANDARD 40 BELOW SUMMIT John Berry Staff photographer NEARLY people took part in the 40 Below Summit Friday at the Oncenter. The daylong event focused on young pro- fessionals and their ideas for making Syracuse a better city. For today's events, go to www.40belowsummlt.com No brain drain at this gathering The 40 Below Summit was anything but cold Friday with double the time for discussion and almost double the attendance of last year. Nearly people met at the Onondaga County Convention Center to discuss the 40 Below committee's accomplishments and more ways to make Central New York a better place to live. John Staff photographer SAM MOORS. 28, of Liverpool a branch man- ager for Bank, chats Friday with Gary Malone, 35, of Brewerton of Alliance Bank, at the Oncenter. In the background is John Elberson, 32, of Liverpool, also with Bank. Pssst! CNY tation ties For nation's cheapest gas n Seneca Falls, drivers ine up to pay a gallon. Deal ends Sunday. By Scott Kapp "taff writer Motorists, stretched in u ser- lentine line of 40 to 50 cars, waited about a half-hour Friday iftcrnoon to buy gas at Lake Side Trading on Route 89 in the own of Seneca Falls. However, no one seemed to mind. After all. regular unleaded gas was selling for a gallon. tied for the lowest price in the jountry and about 50 cents to 70 cents a gallon cheaper than any- vhcre else in the greater Syra- cuse area. "Too bad the rest of the gas stations in the area don't have he same thing. That's my feei- said Carlos Young, ol Ovid, who was filling up his pickup. He expected to save about from the gallon price he was used to pay- ng in his hometown. Lake Side, which is owned by the Cayuga Indian Nation of New York, dropped its fuel prices by 50 cents a gallon, start- ing at on' Monday. The tribe pared the price to on Wednesday and to at 8 a.m. Friday to give customers a break from the recent hurricane- inflated prices, said B.J. Rad- ford, the tribe's chief operations manager. The deal is only good through Sunday, he said. To accommodate the rush of CNY VISITOR, PAGE A-9 DOES AGE MATTER? WHY THE BIG CROWD? WHAT HAPPENS NEXT? SO, WHAT DID YOU LEARN? A debate: Is 40 Below's targeting of young professionals a good idea? Or is it "age PAGE A-6 Participants share their rea'sons for attending the summit. PAGES A-6. A-7 Ideas for a better Syracuse flow freely at a town-hall meeting. PAGE A-7 Tips from Friday's seminars: Advice on handling your money, managing your business and sharpening your mind. PAGE A- 7 Baldwinsville sweethearts escape Katrina Tulane law student Lisa Weaver now-attends SU. Husband's in Gulfport. By Tom Leo Staff writer Someday, Lisa and Rich Weaver will tell stories about Hurricane Katrina. As survivors of the devastat- ing storm, the Baldwinsville na- tives might even smile when they think about the help pro- vided by the folks back home. They'll probably tell their yet- to-be-born daughter, Gianna Marie, due in November, how mom, a Tulane law student dis- placed while the New Orleans campus was shut down, attended classes at Syracuse University. They'll remember how dad stayed put in Gulfport, Miss., and tried to get a house that suf- fered up to in damages back in livable condition. They'll think of the folks at St. Joseph's Hospital Health Center, who provided a scholarship so mom and dad could attend prenatal classes dur- ing one of dad's weekend visits. They'll tell Gianna Marie how those same folks at St. Joe's col- lected donations to help furnish her nursery. It was severely dam- aged due to a gaping hole in the ceiling created when Katrina blew a large section of the roof off the family home. "I'll never forget what people up here have done for Lisa Weaver said. Rich and Lisa Weaver were high school sweethearts who graduated in 1994 from Baker THANK, PAGE A-9 Stephen D. Cannerelli Staff photographs LISA WEAVER, a Syracuse University law student from Tulane University, studies in the third-floor hallway in the Syracuse Uni- versity law building. CNY doctor returns from I N S I D E CRUNCH PREVIEW SPORTS, PAGES D-7 to 10 WOMEN'S HALL OF FAME with Hillary Rodham Clinton LOCAL, PAGE B-3 HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS The latest scores SPORTS, PAGESD-13to15 HOT FURNITURE Old Hollywood inspires latest collections CNY, PAGE E-1 ;

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