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   Post-Standard, The (Newspaper) - May 13, 2005, Syracuse, New York                               The Post-Standard Affiliated with SyracuM.com FRIDAY, MAY 13. 2005 FINAL EDITION O Kff> 'he Pos'.- SYRACUSE, N.Y. 50 CENTS GOOD MORNING BAD LUCK? We head into the weekend with a cloudy and cool Friday the 13th. Unfortunately, there's rain for Saturday and more clouds for Sunday. High temperatures should reach the 60s all three days. Complete forecast, D-12 HIGH: 64 Hancock Field Saved From Base Closings. Walsh Says LOW: 45 Officials considered firing on plane in D.C. airspace As a wayward Cessna flew deep in restricted airspace over Washington, D.C., Wednesday, national security officials were on the phone discussing whether to implement the last line of de- fense: shooting it down. One senior Bush administra- tion counterterrorism official said it was "a real finger-biting period because they came very close to ordering a shot against a general aircraft." RELATED STORY, PAGE A-4 'Physical abuse' reported at school for the blind State police are investigating reports of "physical abuse and widespread mistreatment" at a state-run school for the blind, of- ficials confirmed Thursday. NfW YORK, PAGE A-8 Blair threatens Iran over nuclear concerns A showdown over Iran's nu- clear weapons program loomed Thursday after British Prime Minister Tony Blair warned that he was prepared to refer the Is- lamic republic to the U.N. Secu- rity Council for possible sanc- tions if it proqeiSRhtfith plans to resume uranium reprocessing. STORY, PAGE A-3 'Universal' flu shots possible in the future Within five years, the gov- ernment is likely to recommend annual flu shots for every Amer- ican not just young children, the elderly and other at-risk peo- ple, public health advocates pre- dict. The government panel that sets U.S. vaccine policy already has begun discussing "universal immunization." STORY, PAGE A-9 Microsoft pursues Sony, unveils Xbox 360 game Microsoft Corp. hates to lose at anything, even games. So after spending billion on its Xbox video game system and making little back, there was only one thing to do: Try again, and harder. Thursday it intro- duced Xbox 360 game console. BUSINESS, PAGE C-l Review "Jerry Finnegan's presented by That's the Idea Pro- ductions, was staged Thursday night. REVIEW, PAGE B-2 Corrections Vineyard Institute of the Arts' performance of Camillus Fire Department's pushball Call Deputy Executive Editor Tim Bunn at 470-2240 to dis- cuss a correction on a news story. Subscription questions? Call 470-NEWS Fort Drum awaits word as Rome Lab worries what's next ft By Peter Lyman ashington bureau Syracuse's Hancock Field Air National Guard Base is not on a list to be released today of mili- tary bases that the Pentagon be- lieves should be closed or down- sized, according to Rep. James Walsh. That means the mission at Hancock is destined to expand: The 174th Fighter Wing will be joined not replaced by a squadron of unmanned Predator drones whose deployment to Hancock was announced Mon- day. The base currently employs about people, and the new Predator squadron is expected to employ about 460 people. "It could not be better said Walsh, R-Onondaga. "Clearly, it could not be better news." On Monday, Walsh joined Gov. George Pataki and Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, D- N.Y., in announcing that Syra- cuse would be the base for 12 Predator aircraft. It was un- known then whether today's first ROME, PAGE A-7 Today: Pentagon releases its rec- ommended list of bases to be closed or realigned. Spring and summer The nine- member BRAC commission will spend the late spring and sum- mer studying the Pentagon's list before making its recommenda- tions to President Bush in Sep- tember. He will either approve it or send it back for revisions. Nov. 7: Deadline for Bush to cer- tify the list and submit it to Con- gress, which has no authority to make changes. If Congress does not reject the recommendations in their entirety in 45 days, they will become law. Online: The list of base closings and latest developments will be available today at www.syracuse.com Hundreds mourn Oswego climber By Suzanne M. Ellis Staff writer Strains of "Amazing played by a lone bagpiper, greeted hundreds of mourners who gathered under sparkling blue skies Thursday to say goodbye to Michael Corey O'Brien. More than 750 people from Central New York and around the world attended O'Brien's funeral at St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church in Oswego. They heard stories of "Big a kind and decent man who adored his family and friends; a world traveler who always called Oswego 'home.'' They heard about a man who lived life to the fullest and left an impression on everyone he met, a man who arrived late and stayed later, and a man who died far too young. O'Brien, 39, died May 1 on Mount Ev- erest. He and his younger brother, Christopher, had hoped to be the first American brothers to reach its summit to- gether. They'd hoped to bring world at- tention to Huntington's disease, which killed their mother, sister and other fami- ly members, and to raise for the Hereditary Disease Foundation to fight Huntington's and other illnesses. "Mike has called us here. Not in a way that we would have wanted... but God's ways are not always our the Rev. Joachim Mahugu said. "Those who had a chance to talk with Michael... he kept reminding us that he and Christopher could not wait to come back... to share all the experiences of summiting Mount Everest." Michael O'Brien "was never in a hurry... you were lucky if you only waited two or three hours for Ma- hugu said, laughing. "Michael believed in people. Young, old, it didn't matter. He would take the time to talk, to listen. OSWEGO MAN, PAGE A-5 CHRISTOPHER O'BRIEN and Jennifer Robinson watch pa'llbearers carry O'Bri- en's brother, Michael, into St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church in Oswego Thursday. Michael O'Brien died May 1 after a fall on Mount Everest. Dennis Nett Staff photographer Farm turns out to be cash crop Owner awarded by state to keep farming gets a better oner. By Tom Leo Staff writer After learning how much the state would pay a property owner to not develop some farm- land in Van Buren, a housing de- veloper is paying even more to buy the land. Douglas J. Shortslef, of Han- nibal, says he has an agreement to buy Mike Hooper's River Ridge Dairy Farm at Daboll and River roads. Earlier this year the state awarded Hooper as part of its Farmland Protec- tion Program. Hooper's farm was the only one to win an award in Onondaga County. Shortslef offered for Hooper's farm, or 40 percent more than the state. He plans to turn it into an upscale housing development, he said, with at least 20 waterfront homes. Each lot would be square feet, or almost two acres. Hooper has not yet accepted any money from the state's De- partment of Agriculture Mar- kets the agency that adminis- ters the farmland protection awards. He says he has until No- vember to tell the state of his in- tention regarding the grant. He can't collect the award if he sells his farm to a developer. Shortslef became aware of Hooper's farm in March, he said, after the state awarded mil- lion in farmland protection grants for 2005 to protect acres in 11 counties. He said he doesn't normally read the list of protected farmland to find pro- spective land to develop. Ovec the years, the state has awarded nearly million to protect approximately acres on more than 100 farms in 15 counties. FARMER, PAGE A-7 Index Business___ Classified.... CNY_______ Comks____ Crime._....... Editoriab local news.. -C-l ..F-l _H _E-6 1-6 A-10 8-1 lottery_____A-2 j Movies_____E-4 j New York____A-8 Obituaries___B-4 Sports______D-l Stocks............-.C-3 Television____E-5 Even gan administra- tion, said an as- sociate, John Bolton was often the most conservative person in the room. He has been called the least diplomatic of I diplomats. Former Sen. Jesse Helms j has said "he was the kind of man i with whom I would want to stand at Armageddon." A profile: Page A-6 Nominee for U.N. advances, bitterly By Glenn Kessler The Washington Post Washington A fiercely divided Senate Foreign Relations Committee voted along party lines Thursday to send the nomi- nation of John Bolton to become U.N. ambassador to the full Sen- ate without any endorsement. Republicans agreed to the rare procedural move after a key GOP senator. George Voinovich. Ohio, made it clear he would forcefully oppose promoting the 56-year-old undersecretary of state to the prestigious post be- cause of allegations of arrogance and bullying, but would not ob- ject to bringing the nomination to the floor. Administration officials and GOP lawmakers said they were confident Bolton would win ap- proval from the GOP-controlled Senate, where they said few if any Republicans would join Voinovich in opposition. The embattled nominee might also pick up as many as three Demo- cratic votes, they added. Bolton "is the poster child of what someone in the diplomatic corps should not Voinovich said in a blistering speech that surprised even Democrats with its ferocity. "I have come to the determination that the United States can do better than John Bolton." he said, adding that Bolton's behavior at the State A PASS, PAGE A-6 Selling the farm Mike Hooper won a award from the state's Farmland Protection Program in March with the understanding his 309-acre farm in Van Buren could never be commercially developed. But Hooper, who hasn't yet accepted the money from the state, now plans to sell to a housing developer for INSIDE THE POST-STANDARD FRIDAY THE 13th Take a look at some of the bad things that happened on the 13th. CNY, Page E-2 4 4 NEW MOVIES 'Kicking and and 'Unleashed' open today. CNY, Pages The Daily Dose Belly up to the dance floor and get a little exercise. PageE-8 FINAL TREK' 'Enterprise' ends today, with no other 'StarTrek' series in the galaxy. CNY, Page E-4   

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