Thursday, April 21, 2005

Syracuse Post Standard

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Post-Standard, The (Newspaper) - April 21, 2005, Syracuse, New York r The Daily Dose Meet Bridget Gildemeyer, 39, of Liverpool. A decade ago, she was overweight and out of shape Today, she's a personal trainer who offers advice on healthy eating and For the next eight weeks in The Daily Dose Bridget will offer up a menu of motivation and diet and exercise tips. So read along, and get fit with Bridget. The Pi LOOKING FOR A MATE? You and millions of others. PAGE E-1 9 ways to recognize the right one. PAGE E-2 TAKE US ALONG THIS WEEKEND More than 300 things to do in CNY Wrapup of cool things to do each day INSIDE Affiliated with Syracuse.com THURSDAY, APRIL 21, 2005 FINAL EDITION 2005 Tne SYRACUSE, N.Y. 50 CENTS GOOD MORNING FOOLED YA The clouds are leaving, so it must be warm again, right? Wrong. De- spite the sunshine, tempera- tures will be much cooler today as a high-pressure sys- tem builds back up in the area. Expect clouds on Friday. Complete forecast D-10 HIGH: 54 LOW: 32 Vote could bring work to New Process Gear Members of United Auto Workers Local 624 will gather at the state fairgrounds Sunday to hear the details of a proposal to bring new business into the New Process Gear plant in DeWitt. BUSINESS, PAGE C-1 More than 50 bodies are found in the Tigris River The bodies of more than 50 people have been fished out of the Tigris River south of Bagh- dad, and Iraqi officials said Wednesday that they may be the corpses of the mystery hostages reported seized last week from the town of Madain. STORY, PAGE A-5 GOP offers to probe Daisy's activities, travel House Republicans on Wednesday offered to open an investigation into overseas travel and other activities by Majority Leader Tom DeLay, R-Texas, as part of an effort to resolve an im- passe with the Democrats that has kept die ethics committee from functioning. STORY, PAGE A-9 Civil unions legal in Connecticut Sewage Plant Site: Armory Square -V- ftS fSssKsp wtai: J; iGJpp: 'W% Dicketson'Sfc Sewage treatment plant coming Buildings surrounding the plant are a mix of manufacturing, office, residential and retail. The Post-Standard Area merchants vow they will oppose the project for gays Connecticut on Wednesday became the second state to offer civil unions to say couples and the first to do so without being forced by the courts. About an hour after the state Senate sent her the legislation, Republican Gov. M. Jodi Rell signed into law a bill that will af- ford sarne-sex couples in Con- necticut many of the rights and privileges of married couples. STORY, PAGE A-7 Jeffords cites his health as reason for not running Sen. Jim Jeffords, who sin- gle-handedly upset the balance of power on Capitol Hill four years ago when he quit the Re- publican Party to become an 'in- dependent, announced Wednes- day he will retire at the end of his term next year, citing his own health problems and those of his wife. STORY, PAGE A-i b Corrections Richard Arthur's Book title in Social Call Deputy Executive Editor Tim Bunn at 470-2240 to dis- cuss a correction on a news story. Subscription questions? Call 470-NEWS By Mark Weiner Staff writer Onondaga County has de- cided to build a million sewage treatment plant in an Armory Square parking lot a site selected over two other locations near downtown Syr- acuse. Design of the plant will start this summer. Construc- tion could begin by July 2007 in the 700-space lot behind the old Armory, said Sue Miller, deputy director of the Onon- daga Lake Improvement Proj- ect. Several Armory Square merchants vowed Wednesday to fight the project, saying the county's plant will disrupt Syracuse's busiest and most successful business district. "I wish they tried to work a little harder with the commu- nity to explore some of the other said James Horan, owner of The Edge, a clothing store at 223 Walton St. "I don't think Armory Square should be happy about this because they're getting the wrong Horan said. He said some merchants op- pose any kind of sewage treat- ment plant. They want the county to separate pipes to carry a mixture of sewage and storm water, and build under- ground storage to hold sewage MAYOR, PAGE A-10 Caldwell Gloria photographer THE PARKING LOT behind the old Armory building, in which the MOST is located, will be the home of a sewage treat- ment plant. Construction could begin in July 2007. Index Business Classified CNY........ Comic... Editorials Entertainment. E-3 Local news.......B-l C-l F-l E-1 E-6 A-14 Lottery....._.....A-2 Movies.. Weekend New York...... Obituaries..., Sports_____ Stocks............ Television...... .A-6 1-4 .D-! C-3 ..1-5 THE POST-STANDARD it ii HUD minium Gibberish wins acclaim for students The Associated Press Three MIT gradu- j ate students set out to show what j I kind of gobbledygook can pass i muster at ar. academic confer- I ence these days, writing a com- j puter program that generates j fake, nonsensical papers. And i sure enough, a Florida confer- ence took the bait. The program, developed by students Jeremy Stribling, Max Krohn and Dan Aguayo, generated a paper with the dumbfounding title: "Rooter: A j Methodology for the Typical j Unification of Access Points and Redundancy." Its introduction begins: "Many scholars would I agree that, had it not been for ac- j live networks, the simulation of Lamport clocks might never have occurred." Earlier this month, the stu- i dents received word that the j Ninth World Multi-Conference on Systemics, Cybernetics and i Informatics, scheduled to take place in July in Orlando, Fla., had accepted the four-page "Rooter" paper. I Tne offer accepting a paper j and inviting the students to pres- j ent it in person in Orlando was rescinded after word of the hoax got out. The Associated Press t'Osservatore Romano POPE BENEDICT XVI greets the crowd gathered in front of his former private home Wednesday in Rome. Benedict XVI celebrates Mass, pledges continuity Religion News Service Returning to the Sistine Chape! to celebrate his first Mass as pope, Benedict XVI pledged Wednesday to con- tinue the mission of Pope John Paul II and to actively seek dialogue within the Catholic Church and with other reli- gions. Invoking the name and accomplishments of his prede- cessor 14 times, the new pope made clear his desire for continuity in the church during his homily addressed to the 114 cardinals who had electedhim pope Jess than 24 hours earlier. "Pope John Paul he said, "left a church that is more courageous, freer and younger, a church that, accord- ing to his teaching and example, looks with serenity to the past and does not fear the future." MORE OH m fort PAGE A-S, 1-1 Weapons recovered after brawl Police have knife and part of handgun from scene. Two other knives found nearby. By Alaina Potrikus j Staff writer I Officers have recovered a i knife and part of a handgun from the scene of a violent brawl at a college nightspot and say two more knives one covered with blood were found on the street, possibly tossed from a car as students fled the Palace The- ater in Hamilton. As police piece together how the fight between two men early Sunday escalated into a riot in- volving 200 people, they say they are hampered by 'uncoop- erative" witnesses who have not identified their attackers. Six people were stabbed, police say, two of them seriously enough to require emergency surgery. "AH they know is that they got Hamilton police Chief James Tilbe said Wednes- day. "They don't know how or by who." Tilbe said 432 people were in- side the Palace Theater when a tight broke out just after 1 a.m. between two men on the dance floor. He said officers are re- ONE KNIFE, PAGE A-12 Troopers: Man said he set nine fires One blaze destroyed summer house and classic cars in Pompey in 2004. By Jim Read Staff writer A Syracuse man accused of setting a fire in Pompey Tuesday has admitted to setting that fire and eight others since 2001, in- cluding three at properties owned by a former landlord, troopers said. He might not have been caught had the ex-landlord not -seen him, j troopers said. Mark B. Caldwell, 43, 709 DeWitt St., was charged with arson, a felony, and arraigned Wednesday before Minoa Justice Janet Stanley. He is being heid in the Justice Center on i <f inn nnnKoii Caldwell was charged with setting a fire Tuesday at 7404 Gates Road in Pompey. The fire was reported at p.m.. fire officials said. Peter Fietta, the owner of the house, discovered the fire and saw Caldwell leaving, said State Police Investigator Tim Allan. Fietta extinguished the fire him- self, fire officials said. Fietta recognized Caldwell as a former tenant and called the SUSPECT, PAGE A-l 2 N.Y. may lose two seats in House Census Bureau projections show state population growth outpaced by Florida. By Peter Lyman Washington bureau New York faces the prospect of losing t'.vo scats in the House of Representatives after the 2010 j census, according to projections j to be released today by the U.S. Census Bureau. New York's population is pro- j jected to grow during the next j five years, but at a rate far slow- j er than states in the South and West, the Census Bureau re- ports. Florida is expected to pass 1 New York as the third most pop- j ulous state, behind California 1 and Texas. i "We're.still a big state, but it i does hurt us, no said i Robert Spitzer, professor of po- litical science at the State Uni- i versiiy College at Coztland. Not only will New York's congressional seats be reduced from 29 to 27. if projections i hold, but New York will lose I two votes in the Electoral Col- lege from 31 to 29. It is too early to speculate on the impact on individual House i members. Spitzer said. There I will be three congressional elec- j tions between now and the next j redistricting, and the cast of characters in the New York i gation could change dramatically I in the next six years. I 4 j f