Tuesday, March 8, 2005

Syracuse Post Standard

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Post-Standard, The (Newspaper) - March 8, 2005, Syracuse, New York The Post-Standard -.cc A." TUESDAY, MARCH t. 2005 FINAL EDITION BREAK'S OVER inter reel, us ho! J on Cen- tra! New York tOiijv as much colder air flow s into the urea and ngs at least unomer inch of SHOV. Mine MIUV> is to fall tonight and ednesdav Complete forecast, D-6 HIGH: 24 LOW: 8 Investor Hadod pays overdue tax, water bills Eh Hudad. Miami investor who has, bought numerous build- ings in the Syracuse area. has settled past tax and w ater bills. STORY, PAGt 1-1 Hak and Mac earn top honors Syracuse University's Hakim and Gerry McNamara Monday to the AJ1- Big East First Team. STORY, PAGf D-l MONY towers to get new AXA name AXA Financial says it will change signs on the MONY tow- ers over the next three weeks. STORY, PAGE C-l Proposed panel unlikely to close local hospitals A proposed hospital closure commission probably won't tar- get an} Syracuse hospital. STORY, PAGE C-1 Study: Aspirin protects genders differently Researchers have found that aspirin helps healthy women avoid strokes, but not heart at- tacks unless they're over 64 the opposite of how it helps men. STORY, PAGE A-3 McCain: Nothing wrong with cable company gift Sen. John McCain defended a donation from Cable- visions Systems Corp. to a tax- exempt group he co-founded. STORY, PAGE A-9 Harvard: Hacking files not way to get admitted Harvard Business School will reject the 1 19 applicants who nacked into its admissions site, a dean said Monday. A half dozen business schools were swamped by electronic in- trusions Wednesday, after a computer hacker posted instruc- tions on a message board. Har- vard is the second to deny the applications of proven hackers. The first was Carnegie Mellon" s Tepper School of Business. Some applicants glimpsed preliminary decisions about w hether they would be admitted. 'A Place at the Table7 The Newspapers in Educa- tion serial "A Place at the Table" continues today with Chapter 41 Page B-3 Corrections Spelling of name of teenager found in Thomden Time of GodspeiyE-1 Company invoh ed in asbes- tos Age of pupil at gathering for Date for sen-ice at Episcopal Call Deputy Executive Editor Tim Bunn at 470-2240 to dis- cuss a correction on a news story. Subscription questions? Call 470-WEWS Haness- Oosansd- Index C-I H E-1 Edtoriols. ,A-IO Loco! news. MOVKS------ New York. Obituaries. Sports____ StodB____ Televisor. _ A-2 _H A-8 M .0-1 .C-3 -E-5 TrlErOST-STANMKD ?6404 SYRACUSE, N.Y. 50 CENTS Railroad Crossings Go Unrepaired lor Weeks CSX agrees to change the way it Monitors awl report crossings in the state. B> Erik Kriss Aloany b-reaj More than "100 street-level railroad crossings in Central New York had malfunctioning warning equipment that went un- repaired for at least a day and in some cases weeks accord- ins to an investigation by the state attorney general's office. The majority of those cross- ings are in Syracuse. Clay, Bald- and Fulton. But others are spread across the region. A icu oi the crossings west unrepaired for months. Repairs at the Ricketts Road crossing in Volney took 86 days. It took 73 days to repair a crossing on Phillips Street in Fulton. The investigation led to an agreement under which the CSX freight railroad company pledged to repair such problems within 24 hours. CSX, which owns much of the railroad track in Upstate New York, also agreed to pay SI mil- lion to end the investigation and to reimburse" local law enforcement agencies for costs in protecting crossings with mal- functioning safety equipment. Attorney General Eliot Spitzer announced the agreement Mon- day. His office lynched the in- vestigation last year after two Local railroad crossings that went a week or more without people died when hit bv a tram at a suburban Rochester crossing that had been malfunctioning for eight days. "It's unfortunate if it takes a fatality to get an improvement, but it seems like a step in the right said Diana Dib- ble, a spokeswoman for the American Automobile Associa- tion of Western and Central New York. Sgt. Tom Abelgore. traffic di- vision commander for the Fulton police, said his department had to send an officer to a crossing where soiet> equipment mal- functioned and CSX was slov. to repair it "a or more" times in the last few v ears. "We've had a lot of problems with the same locations over and over again." he said. (CSX) weren't responding as timely as we have liked. As far as ements in traffic safety, it's definitely something we're happy to see." In Manlius. equipment occa- sionally malfunctions at the CSX crossing on North Kirkville Road and police have to direct traffic, town Supervisor Hank Chapman said. There have been no recent ac- cidents reported at that crossing. FULTON, PAGE A-6 Driving in Iraq often deadly Shooting of Itofian at checkpoint is only most recent example. LEBANON'S 'CEDAR REVOLUTION7 GROWS TO OPPOSITION PROTESTERS wave Lebanese flags during a demonstration Monday against Syria in the Martyrs Square in Beirut, Lebanon. About anti-Syrian demonstrators converged on the square, repeatedly chanting "Syria Ma'la Associated Press and most waving Lebanon's red and white flag with a green cedar tree. Syrian troops began a puliback Monday to Leba- non's eastern Bekaa Valley. No deadline was set for their complete withdrawal Story, Page A-4 When teenagers die, communities begin to question alcoholic rites of passage Itv Unwf Kitis drink, By Hart Seely Staff writer Early the morning of June 20. Onondaga County Sheriffs Deputy Fredericka Mendolia entered Examination Room 12 of Community 1 General Hospital's intensive care unit. She found Steve Corselio shirtless and splattered with blood, strapped to a body board. She wrote later that his eyes were watery and bloodshot his face flushed. I "Defendant's speech was slurred and thick." Mendolia's report 1 said. "I detected a faint odor of an alcoholic beverage emitting from his mouth." Steve refused an alcohol sen- sor test and Mendolia began a series of questions required for DWI investigations. "Are you or have you been ill "'Do you know what day it is and what many alcoholic bever- ages have you consumed His only responses: "I want legal counsel." "Is my father here'r" Matt Angeiillo, of Skanea- teles, died the night of June coming home from a beer patty, crammed with another friend into the front passenger seat of a Ferrari owned by Steve Corselio's dad. The car was doing at ieast 101 mph when it hit an oncoming van. This the final segment of a three-part report. The other parts ran Sunday and Mon- day in The Post-Standard. Gkra Wnant Staff ohctograoher THE PARENTS of Matt Angeliiio, Marianne and Marc Angelillo, look at a photograph of their late son in the living room of their Skaneateles home. Matt Angelillo, killed in an alcohol-related crash, was the first person to be accepted posthumously by the U.S. Air Force Academy. The flag, flown over tne U.S. Capitol, was given to his parents by the Air Force at his DAN RATHER SIGNS OFF WEDNESDAY But he won't COT, PAGE INSIDE GCT READY FOR THE CD-DVD Dual Disc hybrid puts special features on the platter CNY. PAGE E-3 CONSUMER REPORTS RECALLS ITS CAR ISSUE Some of its top picks did poorly in crash tests. BUSINESS, PAGE C-1 JMK Bv John F. Burns Baghaad, !rcq an Italian journalist was driven up Baghdad's airport road toward a U.S. military checkpoint on Fn- night, she w as driv ing into a situation fraught with hazards thousands of Iraqis face every dav. The journalist, Giuhona Sgre- na. 56. ran into fierce American gunfire that left her vv ith a shrap- nel wound to her shoulder and killed the Italian intelligence agent sluing ru..u io her. She been released onh 35 minutes earlier bv Iraqi kidnappers who had held her hostage for a month, and the car cam mg them to the airport was driving in pitch darkness. But the conditions, adding to the already forbidding nsi_s ol any journev here, were broadly the same as those facing <J1 ci- vilian dnvc.-, near U.S. check- point? or oonvov s American sol- diers operate under rules of engagement that give them au- thority TO open fire whenever they have reason to believe that they or others m their unit may be at risk of suicide bombings or other insurgent attacks. Next to the scandal of prisoner abuse at Abu Ghraib. no other aspect of the U.S. military pres- ence in Iraq has caused such widespread dismay and anger among Iraqis, judging by their "RULES, PAGE A-iz 33 dead in attacks Attackers set off a bomb Monday in front of a boys' school in the towi of Salad, north of Baghdad, killing eight people, three of them children, and wounding dozens of others in an apparent attempt on a nearby Iraqi army checkpoint. The attack topped off a violent day in which at least 33 people died in suicide attacks and bombings targeting Iraqi security forces. Stories, Page A-5 Contraband scissors land in Moravia schools By David L. Shaw Staff writer To everyone who thought an in-flight haircut would be a good way to pass the time the stu- dents and taxpayers of Moravia say thanks. In a small way. ou and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security have helped trim the school budget The federal agencj has giv en the district 425 pairs of scissors confiscated by security person- nel from passengers at Syra- cuse's Hancock Airport The scissors seized during securi- ty baggage checks are not al- lowed on flights under toucher security regulations imposed in the aftermath of the Sept. 11 tragedy. of us said school Superintendent William P. Tammaro. "It seems like a Catch-22 situation when home- land security gives us a bunch of scissors. we re to set them." An unidentified airport securi- ty worker, who lives in the Mo- ravia district, suggested the do- nation. Homeiand Security personnel told school officials the cost of storing the scissors exceeded their value. "The art department will be able to reduce their request for scissors in next year's budget." Tammaro said. "We'll have a free supply available." f J