Syracuse Post Standard, February 19, 2005

Syracuse Post Standard

February 19, 2005

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Issue date: Saturday, February 19, 2005

Pages available: 97

Previous edition: Friday, February 18, 2005

Next edition: Sunday, February 20, 2005

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All text in the Syracuse Post Standard February 19, 2005, Page 1.

Post-Standard, The (Newspaper) - February 19, 2005, Syracuse, New York The Post-Standard Affiliated with SyracuM.com SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 19. 2005 FINAL EDITION O 2005 The ftost-Sandard SYRACUSE, N.Y. 50 CENTS GOOD MORNING LIGHT DUSTING? There will be a nip in the air and Hakes Hying today as a distur- Q o o bance moves through. About an inch of snow should coat the region. Lake snows will the area might even see sun. Complete forecast D-10 Vioxx, Celebrex, Bextra Get Wary Endorsement Soldiers may have destroyed photos HIGH: 29 LOW: 12 me Washington Millions of people who depend on the popu- lar painkillers Celebrex, Bextra and Vioxx should be allowed to keep using them despite risks of heart problems and strokes, gov- ernment advisers said Friday, concluding that benefits to suf- fering patients outweigh the dan- gers. lilt UUV13Ci'd Vioxx, which its maker Merck Co. pulled off the market in the fall, poses the greatest risk and that Celebrex has the fewest side effects. They suggested that the pre- scription products carry strong warnings and recommended a long-term, study to gain more un- derstanding about the drugs. ministration isn't required to fol- low the recommendations of the its advisory groups, it generally does. Celebrex and Bextra, made by Pfizer Inc., are widely sold and are likely to remain so following the recommendations. Questions remain for Vioxx, Merck yanked from the market Sept. 30. Merck suggested Thursday that a positive ruling by the ad- visers might lead it to consider putting the drug back on sale. But the vote recommending that it be made available to consum- ers close. 17-! 5. STOCK, PAKA-3 WINTERFEST OPENS UP TO S2.000 is up for grabs in our annual treasure hunt. This year there are four chances to win. A medallion has been hid- den in each of the following counties: Onondaga, Cayuga, Madison and Oswego. CLUE, Page B-2 City police catch man sought on murder charges A routine traffic stop resulted in the arrest of Jamel Weston, 28, of 401 W. Onondaga Ave., also known as Jamel Peterson, on a murder charge. He's ac- cused of killing John Dunlap Jr. LOCAi.PAGEB-1 Attacks kill 36 Shiites on eve of holy day A string of attacks targeting Iraqi Shiites on the eve of one of their holiest days killed at least 36 people Friday, a day after a coalition representing the Shiite majority was confirmed as the winner of Iraq's election. STORY, PAGE A-4 U.S. bishops release sexual abuse audit While pledging to stop the sexual abuse of children in the KEVIN BURGESS, of Syracuse, holds on to his daughter, Carly and her friend Phoebe Langton Friday as the 9-year-old girls skate at the Clinton Square ice rink. Kevin Burgess wasn't wearing skates, so the girls pulled him along as he helped steady them on the ice. On a night when peo- ple have to pay, the Clinton Square ice rink gets between 70 Caroline Chen Contributing photographer and 100 skaters, said employee Ryan Brown. Friday people skated free to kick off Winterfest. 'There haven't been that many people because it's freezing Brown said. About 20 people came out to skate. According to the National Weather Service, temperatures were as iow as 8 degrees with a wind chill that made it feel like zero. WINTERFEST tion's bishops reported Friday they had received new al- legations in 2004 against at least 756 priests and deacons. STORY, PAGE A-4 Black History in Centra! New York The Phillips House on Route 34B in Sherwood, Cayuga Coun- ty, was recently nominated to the National Parks Service's Net- work to Freedom, a national pro- gram designed to preserve and promote sites that tell the saga of the Underground Railroad. The Post-Standard series, Stops on the Road to Freedom, today takes a look at the home and the family that lived there. STORY, PAfiEB-3 Three reviews Area residents took in "The "VisitingMr. Green" and the Syracuse Sym- phony Orchestra Classics con- cert Friday night. REVIEWS, PAGE B-2 Corrections Kathleen Sorbello Internet Call Deputy Executive Editor Tim Bunn at 470-2240 to dis- cuss a correction on a news story. After years, man gets to thank mom of kidney donor By Cammi Clark Staff writer Syracuse resident Trevor White called a stranger Monday to wish her Happy Valentine's Day. He also thanked the stranger, Irene Jensen, for the generous gift of her son's kidney, which is keeping White alive. Sunday, the two strangers will meet for the first time in Syra- cuse. "I wanted to see this said Jensen, 71, who lives in Sel- kirk, south of Albany. "He's got a part of my son in him.'' After 29 months of waiting for a kidney. White received one Sept 3, 2002, a day after Jen- sen's youngest son, Norman Jen- sen, 38, died. He died of a frac- tured skull after a fall, she said. As she rubbed her son's foot during the last moments of his Me, Jensen decided to donate his organs. "I wanted to be able to save somebody else's life, just in case they needed she said. NURSE, PAGE A-J John pbotogrepher TREVOR WHITE, 60, will on Sunday meet Irene Jensen, mother of the man whose kidney saved White's life. White received the kid- ney in 2002 after Jensen's 38-year-old son, Norman, died. Pot plants stolen, so what to do? CNY grower calls police Index Business _____ C-l Classified ______ _..... A-6 lfldnws.-..M Ultery New York Sports Stock A-2 A-5 M 0-1 C-2 THEPOST-STWtOAM) 1 III I By Aaron Gifford Staff writer A Madison County man com- plained to police that someone had taken 25 marijuana plants from him. When sheriffs deputies re- sponded to the Erieviile home on Thursday, they found 94 more. "He knew it was said Sgt Jeff Sawyer. "He said, 'I know I have this marijuana, but I'm sick and tired of being robbed of my drugs. This isn't a new problem for David Abbott, 42. Armed rob- bers broke into his 2681 Wood- cock Terrace house last year, pistol-whipped him and stole his drugs, Abbott said. At the time, he was on probation for selling marijuana, so he said he didn't call police. In 2001, he was attacked in an attempted burglary targeting his drugs and money for which three Madison County men were later convicted. "They weren't worth any- Abbott said of the most recent theft. "Maybe worth." A house guest, Michael H. Liddle, 22, of Eaton, was ar- rested Friday. He's charged with two misdemeanors and is sched- uled to appear in Nelson Town Court March 1. Abbott said the young man had no place else to stay. "He's just somebody I felt sorry Abbott said. Abbott formerly owned Big M supermarkets in Morrisville and Onondaga County and is now unemployed. He said he smokes pot to cope with depression. "It helped me through tough he said. "It was the only thing that got me by." Abbott, who was charged with a misdemeanor, is scheduled to appear in Nelson Town Court March 29. INSIDE COMING our one of these characters from "The Simpsons" TV series gay? Find out Sunday. CNY. PAGE M2 Unny A COLLECTOR Each Friday and Saturday, check out our full-page photo report on a Syracuse University basketball player. today: Tracy charges of dereliction, but I not abuse, in Afghanistan. I By Gail Gibson I The Baltimore Sun American soldiers accused of i detainee abuses tried to cover up their actions in at least two I cases, allegedly threatening an Iraqi man with indefinite deten- tion unless he recanted his claims of severe beatings and de- stroying photographs showing mock executions of Afghan de- tainees to prevent "another pub- lic outrage" after the Abu Ghraib prison scandal broke, military records released Thurs- day show. Agents with the Army's Crim- inal Investigation Command found probable cause to believe i that eight soldiers connected to I the 10th Mountain Division from Fort Drum in Watertown could i face charges of dereliction of duty in connection with the pho- i tos, but not the more serious al- legation of aggravated assault, according to the investigative files. The documents, internal files 1 from eight newly disclosed Arrnv i add to what human-rights aclvo- i cates say is a pattern of abuse at U.S. detention facilities in Iraq, Afghanistan and Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. The case from Af- ghanistan also suggests for the i first time that military officials were aware of pictures separate from Abu Ghraib that showed I soldiers humiliating detainees for amusement. The photographs from Fire i Base Tycze in southern Afghani- stan showed soldiers pointing I pistols and rifles at the heads of i hooded and bound detainees in i late 2003 or early 2004. accord- LAWSUIT, PAGE A-5 j Salina boy, 8, Igetsadayin pro fast lane Zach Putman wiii be in San Diego today to ria'e in an exhibition supercross event. By Tom Leo Staff writer Zach Putman's dream is to be- come a professional motocross j racer. The 8-year-old from Salina gets to experience what that life would be like today when he competes in an exhibition at a professional supercross event in San Diego, Putman, a third-grader at Nate Perry El- ementary School, will be among the field of 7- and 8-year-olds riding in the KTM Junior Putman Supercross Challenge at Qualcomm Stadi- j urn. "I get to be a pro for a Putman said. "I'm so excited." Zach is the son of Marty and Jill Putman, who live at 6887 Thomas Drive. It was Marty who got Zach his first motorcy- cle when the boy was 3 years old. Zach's been racing since he was 4. "He was riding a motorcycle before most kids can ride a bicy- Marty said. Was Mom a little apprehen- sive about her baby on a motor- "The bike he started on was so Jill said, "and my husband had raced for so many years.... I knew he wouldn't let Zach do anything he wasn't cap- able of doing. "But now that he's gotten up to the bigger bikes and I see him getting air over some jumps, my -ind nf flnttprc n littV Kit YOUMA6EM X J ;

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