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Syracuse Post Standard Newspaper Archive: February 6, 1965 - Page 1

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   Post Standard, The (Newspaper) - February 6, 1965, Syracuse, New York                               METROPOLITAN FINAL THE POST-STANDARD Weather Official Sttrwtm Am Wwthtr Cloudy with moderating peraturcs today and tomorrow. High today-30 Low tonight-24 136th YEAR 1M N. FEBRUARY 1965 SEVEN CENTS Today in History Cloudy and Warmer Today Is Feb. the 37th day of 1965. There are 328 days left in the year. On This Date In the 20th-or lame duck amendment was pro- claimed in effect. It provided that Congress meet every year on Jan. 3 and that the President take office every fourth year on Jan. 20. In Massachusetts be- came the sixth state to ratify the Constituted. In the government or- dered enemy aliens to regis- ter. 1234 789XH112 14151617181920 In Charles Lindbergh started the first ail mail serv- ice to the Panama Canal zone. In Gen. Douglas Mac- Arthur announced the fall of Manila. In King George of died and was suc- ceeded by his Eliza- beth. TEN YEARS AGO Vico President and Mrs. Richard Nixon left Washington for a goodwill tour of the Caribbean nations. FIVE YEARS AGO A special House committee rec- ommended criminal penalties for those using deceitful ad- vertising on radio and tele- vision. ONE YEAR AGO Cuba shut off the water supply lo the S. base at Guantanamo. Today's Birfhday Actor Ronald Reagan is 54. Thought for Today Money won't buy but if you're going to be mis- erable anyway you might as well be late come- dian Fred Allen. 3 of Brink's Bandits Lose Liberty Plea BOSTON The pet lions of three Brink's Expres bandits asking commutations life sentences were turned dow Friday by the state parol sitting as the advisor board of pardons. Chairman Joseph F. McCor mack said the five board mem bers voted unanimously agains reducing the sentences of Mi chael V. Geagan. Adolph Maffie and James C. Faherty 1 make them eligible for in the near future. Four other men who tool part in the 1950 whicii netted also are serv ing life sentences at Walpol State Prison. They did not file petitions for clemency. Of the rest of the origina three are dead and Jo seph J. O'Keefe w a freed after testifying agains other members of the gang. Suffolk County District Atty Garrett H. Byrne had opposed contending tha the prisoners knew something about the bulk of the robbery loot which was not recovered. Soviet-Freed Man Home NEW YORK Peter a California college flew home from Soviet Union imprisonment Fri- day and said his faith in God had sustained him during 19 nioriths in jail. Landerman was arrested near Minsk on Aug. and sen- tenced to three years in prison for striking and killing a pedes- trian while driving along a dark highway. His release Thursday was de creed by the Soviet equivalent of a parliament on humanitari- an grounds. SIBLEY SWORN IN ROCHESTER Harper Sibley 39-year-old business Friday was sworn in as the city's commissioner of pub- lic safety. Mostly cloudy skies and moderating temperatures are predicted today and tomorrow in the S y r a c u s e area. The high temperature today will be 30 the low tonight 24. Yesterday's high was 30 and the low for an average of 18 10 below the normal for the date. The sun will set at p.m. today and rise at a m. to- morrow. Vehicle lamps must be lighted today at News Digest Negroes resume demonstra- tions in Alabama after regis- trar rejects request to operate daily during right-to-vote cam- paign. Page 1 Eastern part of nation breathes milder but North- west watches new gale- whipped downpours for pos- sible flood peril. Fage 2 Retired Ohio rural mail car- rier gives away in- the money left him by a bachelor brother who got rich in the stock market goes to libraries in two villages. Page 1 The Soviet with Pre- mier Kosygin in reaf- firms its determination for a March 1 meeting of Communist parties which the Red Chinese oppose. Page 2 A West German spokesman says President de Gaulle's solution for German reunification does not ruJe out four-power responsi- bility. Page 2 Syracuse Area Headlines The Most W a H e r A. bishop of the diocese of announces Roman Catholic high Masses may now be sung in English. .Page 3 Dr. Julkis Richmond is appointed dean of the medical faculty at the Upstate Medical Center. Page 7 Justice in New York State will cost more under Gov. Rockefeller's proposed 1965-66 state budget. Page C Young and old enjoy country sponsored by WSEN. in concert last night at County War Memorial. Page Svend Oluf Hnberg. asso ciate dean of State University College of Forestry at Syra- cuse dies at the age of 64. Page Liverpool voters approve plan to purchase 10 new school buses. Page Crusade for Opportunity Inc. and the slate plan ways to use federal grant. Page 6 Inside Today Page Astrological Forecast 1ft Church News 3 Comic Pages lg-19 Crossword Puzzle 18 Death Record 7 Editorial 4 Markets 8-U Morning's Mail 4 Puzzle Quiz 5 Radio-TV Programs .....19 Sports.................. 9-ifl Syracuse News 6-7-13 Tax Hints 8 Teen News...............20 Tell Me Why 13 Theaters 5 Women's Features 5 Wagner and McKeon Face Showdown Feb. 18 Before State Committee Chairman Fights to Keep Job Calls for Showdown AP wire photo Democratic State Chairman William H. McKeon shown at his desk in Auburn yesterday shortly after he issued a call for a meeting of the Democratic State Committee Feb. 18 in Albany for a show- down on demands by Mayor Robert F. Wagner of New York that McKeon quit or be ousted. He Backed Winners of New York Legislative Battle AP wlreohoto Left Gives It Away Ohio A re- ared rural mail carrier gave a inheritance to two vil- .age school libraries he said was the honora- ble thing to The machinery after he finished mail deliveries. He retired in ending a 30-year postal career. Now drawing a postal pension of about a Barr lives on the farm with his wife. Thcv have no children. Mayor Robert P'. Wagner of New whose candidates won the month-long Democratic fight over state legislative leadership in with Republican held a news conference yesterday at his official Gracie Mansion. Wagner insisted he had made no deal with Gov. Rockefeller to end the leader- ship battle and again called for the resignation of William H. McKeon as state Democratic chairman. 6 Picket Bank For 7o Save Jobs RANDOLPH Six men trying to save their jobs picket- ed a bank Friday in an attempt to obtain a loan for their financially troubled but apparently failed to con- A lhe institution's president me I didn't have to do what.to lend the money. vas left to Thomas W. 69. jy his bachlor brother who got ich m the stock market Few heir farm about the fortune me thunder for rerused to'lend'the Barr was of my own slocks to pay Seeks LBJ Help On Negro Votes Ala. Dr Martin Lulher King Jr. said Friday that he left his jail to seek a meeting Monday with President Johnson for help in with basic constitutional privi- leges of assembly and he said. King said that literacy tests should be thrown out ccniplete- the Negro voter drive in Ala-fly. He said Alabama will be bama. King his plan I major target in 1965 but he a plans some acmitr in Missis- By LUTHER F. BLIVEN New York City Mayor Robert F. Wagner demand- ed anew yesterday that Democratic State Chair- man William H. McKeon of Auburn resign. in chal- lenged Wagner to put up or shut up by calling a meeting of the Democratic State Committee. At that session Wagner could con- ceivably if he's got the votes force McKeon's ouster or at least force a vote of no confidence in Mc- Keon's political leadership. The top level Democratic clash stems from the 5-week- old Democratic legislative lead- ership brawl in won this week by Wagner with Republi- can help will be no Republi- cans present and voting this McKeon tartly reminded when he announced the state committee will meet in Albany Feb. IS. Notices of the meeting- will be mailed out Monday. Expects Victory McKeon is confident he can muster a vote of confidence for ew of Hold me I didn't have to do to lend the money. jfcw hours after several hundred muster a vote 01 coniidence lor knewjt said Barr. evenl The State Bank of Negroes were arrested Noisy demonstrations by leadership as he did two me thunder for 1hp here m against ipfusal giocs ad-'lfc and students monev hiougli iome old letters when Off 554 000 settling the le found a note in which his brother said he'd like to help out he village school children with nis money. The Harry. was estate. that's money down the drain now. I'm not going to worry about it. in a while I get into a hole but I'll work things out. Far His Brother important thing is I know it was the honorable thing to the 55-year-old Randolph Seed Robert lhe firm's said. Six of the firm's 25 employes hoisted signs and marched back and forth in front of the bank in this small Callaraugus Coun- ty in Southwestern New York. The said bank presi- to and it's the least I could Jdent Addison G. Crowley. was COLUMNISTS Bridge ..................jfl Dear Abby............... 5 Green Thumb ............13 Jenkm Jones 4 Business Industry 8 Lyons Den................13 Drew Pearson 4 Bill Reddy................ 9 Victor Ricsel 4 Strength for the Day..... 3 Dr. Van Dellen 5 Held n Contempt Ga. A ederai judge ruled Friday that egregationist Lester A. Mad- ox was in civil contempt and tvould remain so until his rcs- aurant served all persons rc- ardless of Dist. Judge Frank A. Hooper ncd Maddox a day for ach day the Injunction Is vio- dating from Friday's rui- ng. lilled in September 1963 when its pickup truck plunged down an embankment in a rural area near his home in this eastern Ohio community. who got interested in he stock market in 1909. left no He invested money he made farming and selling lorses and his diversified enrollments total 1.107'would grant the loan. Hies included many.'WiK. A fund m memory off A Harry Barr will be and is evpecled to provide ___ of county officials to speed up seeking mil rights broke out'fatic registration. While King held 2 news con 15 congressmen from Northern and Western stales met at the courthouse with sev- eral Alabama Republican con- gressmen to discuss the racial situation. Wants Legislation feel the need for new legis- to do in honor of my brother. a protest against the bank's He gave the money lo the policies. He declined comment the right fccl tne lconstltutlonal anicndment. Jation on said- foj a lit r L L1111T LI L j U 1 I 11 f J 1 Jewett and Scio school syslcmsland would nol sav P''obabl-v sct fedcral and set the same1 for both federal and blue-chip slocks. Raised Cattle The brollicrs worked their 240- acre farm in rural Jewett to- gether since the turn A the cen- tury. They raised cattle and and Harry also sold draft and saddle horses. Thomas took care of the farm chairmen backed earlier Friday in leader Tammany Hall Leader J. Raymond one of .Wag- ner's allies voted against Mc- Keon. Two abstained Queens County Leader Moses Wemstem. another Wagner and Democratic County Chairman George Van of Syra- a Wagner admirer. Wagner renewed yesterday at a news conference in New York City his demand McKeon re- sign He said McKeon had lost NEW YORK fAPl cffecmene-s as Uato chair- Church man be-cpiKe he took sides fijamst Wanner in the on page Col. Rob Church Of In Midday janv fampd 'ans estimated a year income. On Tuesday. Scio school offi- cials sold their stocks and in- vested in government now on deposit in a Scio bank. Jewett schoolmen plan to do the same thing. Zenith Heir Death Apparently Suicide Ariz. A as she had only been coroner's pathologist said Fri day playboy Eugene could have shoi himself in the back of the head much The body of the Zenith Radio Corp. heir was discovered Wednesday night in the icrne which he rented in Tucson while attending the University of Arizona. His wrists were In he back of his head was a .22- caliber bullet wound believed nflicted by a pistol found near- by. Blood Tested wrist slashes were not leep enough to sever an art- Dr. Louis Hirsch said He would have lived if he had been shot. Death was due to damage and shock from he A Wood test by Tucson laboratory showed no igns of alcohol or sher- ff's officers said. The body was sent Friday to McDonald's home. An inquest is set for Monday. McDonald was left a reported 30 million in trust upon the leath in 1958 of his father. Eu ene president of Zenith. His marriage a year ago to Virginia daughter of a ctired Nebraska nded In divorce a few weeks ater. She has been in New York preparing to sail to Africa o study art. Interviewed known as to her said she was uncertain about the details of the reported informed of it by McDonald. Left In Dark had been a trying time for she said. took care of all arrangements for the divorce. I didn't want to have anything to do with it Its status conceivably could have a bearing on disposal his share in the trust I She said they parted about the first of last and subse- quently he notified her that the divorce had become abou June as nearly as she can in Ariz. she added that she was not personally present or represented m the proceeding and recalls signing no legal do- cuments about and thus can- not say of her own knowledge Is legal really hadn't been ready Randolph Seed obtained a loan from the bank in recent the spokesman said. It has not been paid she but the company has complied with requirements of the bank. Unless the firm acquires additional she it would be forced lo cease operations this year. She said with financial the company could expand and increase Us work force to had contacted a presidential assistant about a meeting with Johnson. He said that continued demonstrations in Selma were real He said the drive here would bo successful if the registrars would agree to operate on a daily basis and if authorities wouid slop arresting Negroes for walking to the courthouse. plan to be in Selma until the victory for the right to vote is he said. But he said he would return lo Atlanta on Saturday a'ld then resume his office in midday. They held six at gun after handcuffing three o while they rifled cast drawers and a safe. The towering Gothic church which served an intcrdenomma tional fronts or Riverside between 120lli and 122nd along the Hudson and is a major tourist attraction. It had the large sum on hand to cash checks of about 150 men and women employes. The firm's annual payroll is about she campaign during the next few going into some church operates a nursery a kindergarten and Lilienthal blamed his number of social service pro- pany's troubles on lack said that an cooperation from Thursday by U.S. mainly through gifts of said banks in neighboring Daniel H. Thomas in late John D. a munities also have was a step in the right church has had a Baptist-United Church He said he had ample we feel the need for affil- tracts to secure any loan to keep county and.iation. but an might be officials from ministry and congregation. m -m -W- on Page Col. Saturday- Good Day for Home Hunting Begin your weekend shop- ping for' an apartment or home today. You have the en- tire weekend ahead and The Post-Standard Real Estate and Rentals columns can be your guide. Turn in the Classified sec- tion NOW .the new or pro-owned home you want could be listed there this morning. England embarked on an all- night search of the luxury liner Capetown Castle Friday night in quest of 20 gold bullion bars more than a quarter of a million dollars and weighing about 500 van- ished from the ship stores- Convinced that the gold is still on a team of 36 de- tectives and customs men sys- tematically combed the ton vessel from stem to stern. Officials said they were ready to keep going through the night. The loss was discovered soon after the liner docked here early Friday morning. As soon as the alarm went the ship and surrounding docks were scaled off. But by that lime all the passengers were ashore and aboard a train for London About half the crew had been paid off and had The Capetown sailing from South had carried a gold shipment of 873 boxes. Destined for the gold was robbed Fudav of S10...... by four sunmcn 'who strode 'atlve brawl in Al- King baid that one Of his aides boldly into rhurdl-s bust. bany. t -----1.. i..j _ -----i candidates for Senate Majority Leader and As- sembly Speaker defeated an an- ti-Wagner slate backed by Mc- Keon and a group of Democra- tic county leaders loyal to U.S. Sen. Robert F. Kennedy. Candidates Win The Wagner backed candi- dates Senate Majority Leader Joseph Zaretiki and Assembly Speaker Anthony J. Travia jdrew only minority support from 'Democrats in both houses. A majority of Democrats in each house backed the anti-Wagner candidates Sen. Jack Bronslon of Queens and Brook- lyn Assemblyman SlanJey Steingut. The Democratic senators and assemblymen allied with Wag- ner refused for five weeks to bow to the majority achieved by the anti-Wagner group. In the end the Wagner group won as Rejmblieans gave them the votes to elect their leadership candidates. McKeon denounced the coali- uon of Wagner Democrats and Republicans which elected Wag. ner-backed legislative leaders as complete sellout of lhe parly by Wagner's McKeon also charged that Wagner and Republican Gov. Rockefeller engineered a deal which produced the Republican votes for Wagner's candidates on Page Col. Police Search Luxury Liner For Quarter Million in Gold was a regular shipment al- though bigger than usual of lhe kind arriving from South Africa every Friday. The ship's strongroom was fuller than usual for lhe voy- so 10 of the boxes were lodged in an overflow locker. This was the gold that van- ished. The locker had been broken into. Each of the contained two bars and the whole shipment of 20 bars was reckoned worth pounds The gold had been loaded at Durban. After the Cape- town Crtstle made calls at East Port Cape Town and Las Palmas In the Canary Islands. Message's were flashed lo po- lice at all these porls. Checks were being made lo find out many people knew the con- signment was larger than Aflcr the all cars and trucks leaving the docks were searched. customs men and Bank of England offi- cials checked and rechecked through the gold that was off- loaded. Even without Jhc missing the shipment was worth nearly eight million pounds Awaiting the shipment on the quayside was a special bullion train of five armor plated cars The gold that came ashore was loaded aboard the wagons and the train was shunted off police escort to a quiet siding. South African bank and armed police checked the gold aboard the liner and the main consignment was locked in the vessel's strongroom with three all kept by the ship's chief officer. Because the strongroom was ten boxes were stacked in an adjoining mail locker that has five Iron bars over the door. It seemed impregnable. But security men had forgotten a ventilation A hole big enough lo allow R man to crawl through was found cut Into the shaft leading to the locker. Dies After Falling Into Hamper PORTLAND A 3- year-old playing by him- died Friday when he fell accidentally into a metal clothes Chautauqua County she-riff's deputies said. Blninc- Riforgiato was found in the hamper by his po- lice about 30 minutes af- ter the Coroner Anson Steward ruled the death Bl-ainc was the son of Mr. and VIw. AirtJtony Riforgiato of Port- and.   

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