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Syracuse Post Standard: Thursday, July 13, 1961 - Page 1

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   Post-Standard, The (Newspaper) - July 13, 1961, Syracuse, New York                                METROPOLITAN 132nd YEAR 1X1 Number 301 N. JULY 1961 Weather Warmer showers today. High today........... Low tonight Report on Page I SEVEN CENTS AP Wlreohoto BEAUTIES AT A FOUNTAIN Three of the pretty girls from foreign countries in the Miss Universe Beauty Pageant'pose at a fountain in Miami yesterday. They ace Marina Miss South Arlett Miss and Wilda Miss Canada. U. S. Discounts K's Guarantee For W. Berlin 'Lives Could Have Been Saved' Inadequate Fire-fighting in Denver Crash Colo. A dis- pute boiled up Wednesday over the .amount and availability of lire-fighting equipment at Den- airport when a .jet airliner .crash-landed burst into flame and killed 17 per cons. More than 100 ing the crew of from the plane. It was a DCS op- erated by United Air Lines. Offi- cials said 122 were aboard. The victims included 16 passen- gers and a civil engineer working at the Henry C. Blom of Denver. The plane careened into his truck as it skidded wildly down a runway at 120 miles an hour. More.than 50 In- cluding Najeeb adminis- trator of the Federal Aviation Agency and Robert T. vice chairman of the Civil Aero- nautics began investigat- ing the cause of the accident. Not Asked Denver's manager of John M. said three trucks were lined up at the east end of the runway at Stapleton Airfield when the plane came in arid more would have been there if United Air Lines had asked for it. He told a just do not have adequate for these new aircraft An opposite view was taken by Mayor Dick Batterton. have adequate equipment available to meet emergency situations and we feel that every organization in- volved did an outstanding job in averting a more tragic he said. Fire Chief .Feldman said that only a sfandby-call.-was JXjaJg 188 others this before the actual crash-landing.. Some witnesses said it seemed there was delay in getting fire- fighting equipment into but Mayor fiatterton said the trucks were pouring water on the fire within 45. after tbo plane came to rest. Lt. George Agusto of the fire department said the flames were fought- -i after the plane hailed. Lofcg Time An Omaha advertising executive who happened to be with friends on Page Col. 72 Die in liner Hits Power line Morocco A Soviet-built Czechoslovak air- liner ripped into a pow- er line and carried 72 persons to death in an attempted landing near Casablanca Wednesday. The giant turboprop Hyushin-18 by bad weather over Mor- occo on a flight from Prague and Zurich exploded thunderously with a blinding flash of electricity and plowed into the ground at the Camp Gaze airport. Among the 64 passengers and 8 crewmen only Kouli of the Mali Republic got out alive. Severely he died in a Casablanca hospital. Czechs and Africans Cool Pilot Delivers Crippkd Airliner T Arrives Safely An ominous report of eamt from an Eastern Air Lines DCS approaching Miami Interna- tional Airport Wednesday but a cool pilot delivered his 99 passen- gers safely. The huge the same type as tht United Air. Lines craft that crashed Tuesday in veered off the runway and blew eight tires at Capt. H. Hudgins jammed on his brakes. But it came to rest upright in grassy 'area and emergency crews groping through the dust cloud tet up by the reversing jet engines found the plane its pas- and eight crewmen in- said he did not tell the passengers of the trouble because most of them had heard about the Denver crash and 'i didn't want to frighten made up most of the dead in this second disaster to befall an Afri- ca-bound Czechoslovak liner with- in four months. A sister Byuihin- 18 crashed March 29 near Nuern- killing all 52 per- sons aboard. There were unconfirmed reports that the cargo included Commu- nist documentary films and pam- phlets for African distribution. Zurich airport officer M declined to be identified by name said several of the not fully described on the ere Soviet flying instructors on the way to. train Negro air crews in Guinea and The pilot was Josef a decorated veteran of World War II. His big four engine plane crossed the Mediterranean before dawn and tried for a landing at 30 miles northeast of Casa- blanca. Poor visibility forced it on to Camp 10 miles away. Bad weather suddenly closed in there also. Officials said the tower crew instructed Mikus to head for the U.S. air base at 15 miles but the plane was already in its glide path. It hit the power line with a jolt that wrenched loose two big cable pylons. Two engines ripped loose and flew more than 100 yards. Some bodies were catapulted from the shattered fuselage. Cites Soviet's Threats to Use Force WASHINGTON The United States accused Soviet Premier Khrushchev Wednesday of undermining Soviet proposals for United Nations guarantees of a of West Berlin. State Department press officer Lincoln White said the United States could have little confidence in such guarantees when Khrush- chev himself declared the Soviet Union would by force if U. decisions which threatened its Khrushchev spoke in Moscow Tuesday at a luncheon for Presi- dent Kwame Nkruinah of who is on a visit to the Soviet Union. He said even if countries of the world adopted a decision that did not accord with the interests of the Soviet Union and threatened its the Soviet Union would not recognize the decision and would uphold its relying on Following the tough line that has characterized his recent utter- Khrushchev we have the wherewithal to do White told a news conference that the United States has fied 'the of Khrush- chev's statement about resisting international by force if necessary. The State Department spokesman recalled that Khrush- chev had said at the United Na- tions 'last fall that if U. N- deci- sions .went against the Communist countries it would be natur- al for those countries not to recog- nize those rely on their own strength in order to de- fend their White then It can be understood that there can be little confidence in Soviet pro- posals for some sort of United 4Na- tions1 guarantees of the status of Berlin in the face of such state- In prolonged negotiation's over Berlin in recent the Soviet government has made various proposals aimed at getting the United Britain and France to withdraw their forces from the city. Rocky Covers Fast BIN GH AMI ON Wl of HA In Washington the speaker and was Inter- rupted by a hurst of laughter. Gov. who Is be- lieved to he aiming for the Re- publican presidential nomina- tion in explained He spent 836 years in Wash- ington in federal poets. was a Freudian slip of the not of the he said. Rockefeller continued his talk Wednesday night at a dinner meeting that opened a two-day visit to of us In Albany Baseball Scores INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE Syracuse Toronto 2. Columbus Richmond 0. Charleston Jersey City Buffalo Rochester 4. U. S. Satellites In Orbit 4 9 ff 'Ayes Storms. Missiles By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS The United States put a pair of watchful eyes in space Wednesday satellite to spot missiles the moment they are fired and anoth- er to hunt Up from Point went Midas first missile-alarm into a 01- a record for a circular although satellites have er in oval III orbits every 2 hours and 40 minutes and its path takes it over the Soviet Midas III is a 30- foot long space scout with an in- frared eye which can sense heat from a missile's exhaust and then report it. The orbit altitude compares with a previous high for a U.S. satellite of about 300 miles. The Air Force had expected Midas III to orbit at about 500 miles but said the high- er orbit simply means it couid scan a larger area of the earth at any given moment On a day of spectacular U.S. space the Cape Canaver- team put up a hurricane- hunting satellite in a near-perfect launch. It also is in an almost circular orbit ranging from 450 to 425 miles at high and low points. Called Tiros this satellite weighs 285 pounds and carries cameras and sending equipment to relay cloud pictures back Lo AP Wireuhoto PATH OF MIDAS MISSILE SATELLITE Arrowy show record-high orbital path around the earth of the Midas missile-alarm satellite that will pass over Russia repeatedly. Called 'Warfare Against Helpless' I State Orders Newburgh To Drop Welfare Fight N. Y. The state commissioner of social wel- fare Wednesday ordered New- burgh officials not to carry out 13 .stringent welfare propos- als set to become effective Satur- Commissioner Raymond Houston issued the directive to Newburgh City Manager Joseph Mitchell and Acting City Welfare Commissioner Doris Harding. if carried Houston set up an illegal program around unfor- tunate women and and even if not carried they constitute psychological warfare against the needy and Mitchell Houston is not the boss of the city of New- burgh even though he would like to think he is. The regulations are going into effect July 15 as sched- The Newburgh city manager added that Houston's actions prove the point we have been making that the State Board of Social Welfare attempts to tale policy in local government without recognizing the need of such Asked what action would be taken if Newburgh rejected the a State Social Welfare Board spokesman said the full board would take up the matter. Newburgh Mayor Wil- liam D. Ryan asked Nelson Rockefeller to step in and help stop the city's welfare program. The governor's office said it had no immediate comment Rockefeller told sta- tion he saw no occasion to intervene at this time. The interview between State Units in Battle Shape Guard Can Be Ready in Hours the governor and a newsman for the station took place shortly be- fore Houston's order was an- Rockefeller said he was sure Newburgh comply with the ruling of the and he was satisfied with procedures. There was no how- that Rockefeller had en- dorsed the specific directive- by the lone Democrat on tihe City has opposed the pro- gram since it was announced sev- eral weeks ago by Mitchell. At the center of the which has drawn attention across the are a set of proposals that would tighten welfare roles in Newburgh the state saysr ignore state and federal laws. Among the one would pro- hibit further aid to unwed moth- ers who continued to have illegiti- mate children. Another would stop payments to all welfare cases ex- cept the aged and disabled after three jjnonths. High of 86 Is Forecast A high pressure area over the southeast along with the low over the Dakotas will bring us varied weather over the next five days. Wanner today and tomorrow with increased cloudiness and humidity is predicted. We are told to look for afternoon show- ers and thunderstorms however. Today's high should the 68. be southerly at 15-25 m terday's high was 88 the low Yesterday the first day above since July Z this aft- reach 86 inds will was also normal Wire News in Brief Man-to-Moon No Mere Stunt WASHINGTON Administrator James Webb said Wednesday there has been far too much glib talk that this coun- try's mart-to-the-mon. project is a stunt and doesn't mean anything. who heads the National Aeronautics and Space Admin- told a National Capital Democratic Club luncheon the lunar landing project the greatest scientific task ever under- taken by this iplomafic Drive by West Other Nations Consulted on Bonn's Reply Germany Chancellor Konrad Adenauer's government told Moscow Wednesday the sign- ing of a peace treaty with Germany must be preceded by free elections throughout the divided nation. Opening the West's diplomatic offensive in the rising crisis over Germany and West Ger- many replied to a note from So- viet Premier Khrushchev Feb..37 proposing that separate peace treaties be signed with West Ger- many and Communist East Ger- many. Bonn's reply was delayed for consultations with its allies in the North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- tion. Others Preparing The United Britain and France now are preparing replies to the Soviet Union's note of June 4 warning that Khrushchev will sign a separate peace treaty with East Germany by the end of the year unless the West agrees to Khrushchev's terms for a German settlement. Bonn's note to Moscow said a peace treaty must be'concluded with a legitimate German govern- ment elected freely by all the German people exercising their right of self-determination. The memorandum was handed to Soviet Foreign Minister An- drei A. Gromyko in Moscow. time for conclusion of a peace treaty therefore depends on the readiness of the government af the Soviet Socialist to allow the German people to exercise the right of self-de- the memorandum said. The note suggested it would a welcome step if the Soviet gov- ernment come as soon as possible to a suitable decision to make negotiations on a peace treaty with an all-German govern- U. N. Violation separate peace with only.a part of Germany would violate t.he right of .self-determination of nations laid down in the Charter of the United which the Union of Soviet Socialist Repub- lics has recognized and pltdged to the memorandum said. right to sell-determin- an inalienable basic right of all also is valid for the German which is clinging to its traditional national unity and which would confirm her wish unanimously in a free elec- Adenauer himself was in West the focal point of the to demonstrate German unity. Should Khrushchev carry out his threat to sign a separata treaty with Communist East Ger- Allied lifelines to West Berlin would be left at the mercy of the East German regime. Inside Today Airport workers said Hudgins did a masterful job of controlling And stopping the lurching plane and preventing a crackup like the that killed 17 persons and in- jured 50 in Loss of hydraulic pressure fig- ured in the Denver but there it was in the main landing which buckled on impact pressure trouble here was In the nose wheel. wfridl controls ground Rutfglns said he had to Drake and Among fhe passengers was Vaughn ALBANY The man New York State National Guard was reported Wednesday io be ready for duty within hours in the event of a mobiliza- tion possibility envisioned Tuesday in Washington. A spokesman for the man Army National Guard said the state's infantry armored division and its artillery and support units could be assembled within four hours. Brig. Gen. Vito J. deputy chief of staff of the New York Air National told The Associated Press some guard jet fighters could be airborne withing 15 minutes. The complete Air numbering about could be fully opera' tional in than a he said. and Air Guard units in the have not been placed on special alert since Deputy Defense Secretary Ros- well jGrilpatric raised the possibil- ity'Tuesday that some National Guard and reserve units would be mobilized to meet new Soviet threats. Brig. Gen. Charles Steven- vice chief of staff to Gov. training exercises have demonstrated our units are in fine shape. We are readier than we have ever been because so many of our men have taken at least six months of active duty The Ifmt New York National Guard unfU activated was during the Korean when approximately 75 per cent of the state's air units and a quartet1 of the Army units were called. The entire State National Guard was mobilized during World War II. A guard spokesman said the tactical Army units The 42nd Infantry man 27th Armored the 102nd Artillery Bri- and the 187th Artillery Group. These he were up to 90 per cent of be- because of budgetary but the units were armed with nearly their full complement of the latest excluding the tactical Honest Jotai rocket. Filler personnel supplied by the Army he would bring the units up to full strength in the event of mobilization. Aff utifts 107th TecticsJ Fighter with two squardrtms of F-100 jet the 106th Aero- Medical Transport with C-119 the 109th Air Transport with C-97 heavy and the 152nd Tacti- cal Control a radar unit. The 106th and 152nd were acti- vated during the Korean War. there are in the state the Naval with and thousand of re- servists who are controlled directly by the military services. New York State .National Guard facilities include 84 armor- 5 air 3 air the Camp 90 3 tanks and than vehicles and a variety of weapons. Guardsmen take part in 4ft drill periods and 15 days of training a year. Bribes Charged in Driver Tests WHITE PLAINS W-Three State Motor Vehicle Bureau ployes were arraigned Wednesday on charges of accepting such bribes an bottles of shaving and coffee money from a driving school operator. They allegedly provided the school operator with copies of a written test given applicants for drivers' licenses. The operator was said to have used the material to coach applicants who could not speak English. 139 Die as Reservoir Bursts Korea by torrential monsoon an ir- rigation reservoir burst through a dam near Mamwon flooding the city. The South Korean Red Cross reported 139 per- sons dead and 13 and said the death toll could go higher. i 100 Arrested in Guatemala Plot GUATEMALA government of President Miguel announced Wednesday ft has nipped a revolutionary plot and arrested Unofficial accounts said ar- rests totaled abMrt 109. Leaders in the conspiracy Include extreme rightist elements whn part In at abortive revolt last sources close the foremmfirt 25242526272829 Syracuse Headlines AREA SCHOOL BOARD ELECTIONS HELD. ARRESTS LANDLORWT CAUTIONED ABOUT GAMBLING. DR. MARTIN LUTHER KfNO HERE TO OAT. Fare Fat Pmre Pftfft 29 DRAFT RJOTS IN NEW YORK CITY RESULTING IN II Page Comic Pages ...........40-41 Crossword Fuzzle ..........41 Death Record 9 Editorial 6 Food Page 10 Markets 35-36-42 Morning's Mail........... 6- Puzzle Quiz.............. 7 Radio-TV Programs ......34 Sports 31-32-33-34 Syracuse 7-8-23-27-28-29-30-42 Theaters ..................36 Tell Me Why 40 Women's Features 15-20 Women-Social 15-17-20-22-26 Your Horoscope ..........41 COLUMNISTS Bridge 41 Dear Abby Emily Estey Ifi Leonard Lyons 23 Bernard S. Newer 35 Drew Pearson 0. Today's Etiquette Post Scripts 7 Victor Riesel............... 23 Harry Golden 23 George Sokolsfcy H Strength for the Day 7 Wall Street Views .......34   

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