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Syracuse Post Standard: Sunday, November 15, 1903 - Page 1

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   Post-Standard, The (Newspaper) - November 15, 1903, Syracuse, New York                             2 CENTS w'V I X CENTS! SEVENTY-FIFTH YEAR SYRACUSE, jST. Y., SUNDAY MOBN1QNG, NOVEMBER 15, 1903. LATEST EDITION. PLEDGE VOTES FOR CUBAN BILL Democratic Members of House Caucus on Measure. WILL FIRST SEEK TO AMEND IT "Would Abolish the Differential on Re- fined Sugar and Eliminate the Five-year Clause .in the Treaty. DIE IN FIG TJy THE ASSOCIATED PIVBSS. WASHINGTON, Nov. discussing1 the Cuban reciprocity mcusure for three hours In caucus tti-nlsht the Democratic members of the House of agreed to a resolution by a vote of 1'5 to 16, pledging themselves to. support the bill, after effort has been rnaflo to secure Its amendment abolishing the differential on re- f.ned sugar and eliminating the five-year clause in the treaty. The opposition to this action came from the. members from Louisiana, Texas anil California. It is understood, however, al- thouiih not officially stated, that the ac- tion of tha caucus will be considered bind- ing-. Tho resolution adopted was by Mr. AViD'ams. the minority llnor luiicler. Several ineffectual attempts were made to amend It by the members vojjreycntlnK sutrar interests. No other subjects were considered. The resolution udojjted is as follows: Resolved. That It Is the sense of this cau- cus that the minority floor leader be In- structed to offer to the Cuban reciprocity bill, and to secure a yea rind thereon If possible the following umend- Strl'ke from the bill Ihc followlni; lan- eniiKO beginning In line ir, and ending in line L'. pane 3: "Provided that while Haul convention is in force no sugar imported from the Reimlilk- of shall he ad; milted Into the United SUUOH nt n reduction of duty Rivntnr than uvculy per centum ot the rates or duly theivcm vroviiK-d tlie tariff acts of the ITnltod Stiitos approved July 1M. and no sugar, tiie product ot any other foreign country slu.ll K; adrniiu-t! by treaty or convention into the United States, while this convention is in fort.-c. at a lower rate of duty than that provided by the tariff act of the Culled Stales up- proved July 1SD7." Tho Substitute Offered. And liiEtil the in lieu llii-rcof: "That upon thu mniilrK of s-alct agreement and the issuance of nrodainiillon ;uui while Sdkl agreement sUi.'ill remnln in furr-e thi-re shall lit- levied, collccled .tint paid In lieu of tlie duties thereon now provided by law on ail sugars above number ll> D'.iteh standard In color and on all sugar which has Kone lliruuKh M process of n-lining lut- lioruxl Inlo Ihc United Slates one ceiil and fight hundred ;'.nd twenty-live one-ihml- sa'iullh of one cent p-.-r pound." .Resolved further. That upon tho adcption or rt-jeetUtn '.if tills amendment by tho House, it IH thu sense of tlds caucus that the Democratic members of the llor.yo should vole for this bill as :L step in Lho direction of freer and more unlriinnueled trade hetwiien Ihe United States and C'.lba. Resolved furthermore, That K Is tlie sense of this caucus Unit If a lult; shall bo brought into the [louso from !he Cornnill- !ue on Rules shutting off il is the duly nt the .fiemocrutic membership of the House to vote unanimously against tl'.at rule. JAPAN DISSATISFIED WITH PEACE NEGOTIATIONS With. Ilussia May Yet Be Der mnnded. P-EKIN, Nov. was- learned to-day from a trustworthy source t hat Japan Uissntislled with the of thu nego- tiations between that, country ami Hustiia. The Jupanoso Parliament meots December 5 and the government of Jupan tloHlres to be able to report that it has reached an agrnomcTit witli Husyiu as othorwiyo the opposilion party IK certain to attack the ministry, demand with Kusyla and per- haps inflame public sculhntMU to the war point. BIG DRY GOODS FIRM FORCED INTO BANKRUPTCY D. Crawford Co. of St. Louis Owes ST. J..OUIS. Nov. An involuntary pe- tition in bankrupury was IHod to-day against lliL- lariie dry Koods linn of D. Crawfor.1 Co. by t'ircc1 Eastern bankH and thu concern was placed in the ha mis of a receiver. The assets arc said Lo be liabili- ties THREE-FOUND GUILTY OF NATURALIZATION FRAUDS former Slnrshal, Democratic Le.ider asid n Polioemnu Convicted. ST. LOdS, Kuv. ji.ry in tho triple naturalization iratul caaw, in whic-li Thunuis K. Kanc'll, i'oriUL'r of tlie St. .Louis Cuxirt of John P. Uohin, '.-halrnian ol ttiu City Uuni'rai Coinniltlce, unit L'oliconian Frank (Jarrett aru dufemhims, i-L-turnc-ti a verdict of tiUilty to-day. Three Members of Twenty-Eighth Infantry Are Killed.. UPRISING NEAR LAKE LANAO Departure of General Wood for Jolo Is Folio-wed by an Are Finally Beaten Off. BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS. MANILLA, Nov. tho departure of Major-General Wood for Jolo the Moros in the neighborhood of Lake Lanao have become very ugly and menacing- At 1 o'clock yesterday the guard, over a boat near Mariabou was taken. Three mem- bers of the Twenty-eighth Infantry were killed- and one was seriously -wounded. The Jloros were off. The soldiers Wiled were: Sergennt J. G. Stephens at Omaha and Privates Frank Bowser of Marlon, O. and Elmer H. Burltc of Kansas City. Private Fordlnando Kerlhley Verona, Mo., was wounded. General Wood, who left for Jolo November D. took a number of troops frem Lnnao with him, leaving Cnptaln Henry Barber of the Twenty-eighth Infantry In command. Cable communication with Jolo la inter- rupted. BULGARIANS SLAIN. Casualties During Disturbance in European Turkey. SALOX1CA. Muccdunin. Nov. intr to u'ii oUlctui ilie Bulgarians killed iluriuiT Ui.slurbunce in European TurUey 1'ruai 35 to th'j present time total STEAHSHIP AEBIVALS. VOKK, Nov. frmn ST. JOHNS. X. Nov. 33th from SOl'THAUl'TON, Nov. adelphia, from Now York. Nov. Victorian, from New Toik. QUKENSTCm'N. Nov. bromfin. from Lioatoii. ItOTTI-illDAM. Nov. darn, from New. York. GENOA, Nov. .IJUl-tUeuria, from "York. HAMBURG. .Nov. 11.-Arrived, 1'rojn New York. ESTATE LEFT BY W. L ELK1NS Only'One Bequest, Thgt of Made to Charity. PHILADELPHIA, Nov. will of AVilllam L. Klkliis, tlie Inlander, was filed for probate to-day. The testator's fortune is estimated from to Tlie only bequest lo charity is to be devoted to the erection of an institution for female orphans of Free Masons. The lilkins art collection is bequeathed to Philadelphia after the death of thu testator's last heir. Tho bulk oC the estate goes to W.r. Klkins' family and relatives. Two grandchildren will receive cacil. WARNING KEEPS CHICAGO QUIET No One Allowed to Shout Abuse at Police or Carmenr CARS RUN UNDER PROTECTION Strike Managers Build Hopes :on Be- lief That Company Cannot Ba- place Engineers Who Have Quit. MAY DIE AS RESULT OF FOOTBALL ACCIDENT Student nt Blootnington, 111., School- Hurt. BLOOJUNGTON, III., Nov. M.-Kobert Sinclair, a student of the Normal School, was pyobabiy fatully Injured In a football gi'.me at Pontlao this afternoon. NEGRO WILLIAMS HELD FOR MURDER IN NEW YORK Coroner's Jury Bonders Decision in the Green Case. NEW YOUKVXov. coroner's jury In the case OL' Andrew II. Green, tho of GrcnLer New who wus kiJloi.1 yesterday by Williams, to- day round as That the- said I-Tn swell Green came in hi.s death on the UHli of November by a wuiind iniiicio.l a revolver i'i tiio lirinds of onu known as Cornelius M. VnUiiiins. The prisoner wc's'heUl Cor the Grand Jury and coir.miUed to the city without ball. By TUB ASSOCIATED PRESS. CHICAGO, Nov. warned that a person on the sidewalk who shouttd abuae at the police and. carmen would be treated an enemy" oC public order, the crowds Jn the strike district to-day were for the most part orderly and easily handled. They wore kept moving constantly by tho police. Peace negotiations talked ol earlier In the day failed to materialize. General Man- ager McCulloch waited at his office until aftej- the specilletT. time for the giving- of the company's answer, to 'the demand for arbitration, but 310 representatives of the men appeared. Instead the completeness of the strike was accentuated by the engi- neers and fireman at the power houses fail- ing to report for work. The, Immediate shutting1 down of the State street and Cottage Grove avenue cables was regarded by the strikers as significant. In anticipation of a long siege the rail- way company ia rushing preparations for the feeding and housing of Us men. Its coal bunkers are also receiving particular attention owing to the possibility of a sympathetic strike of teams ters. Both sides appeared this afternoon to have set- tled down to a determined struggle for supremacy. Cars Bun. Under Protection. Cars under police protection were operated three times on the "Wentworth avenue line to-day without interference or material dis- turbance, and the one of compre- hensive peace. Two obstreperous hoodlums were clubbud and thrown Into a police pa- trol wagon and this comprised Lhti hostili- ties. The company announced to-night that It would run cars Sunday on ftve-mlinite headway. The strike managers are build- ing great hopes on the bnlicf that the com- pany will have trouble Ir. replacing1 Us engineers. Company managers say engineers will be procured readily. Ail the power Jiou.sea of the company, one exception, are closed. The prospects of pence are not promising to-night. Both sides express themselves .as willing to arbltEJi.te, but etich is waiting1 for an advance from the other side. A grea.t crowd of strikers poured into the City rijill late the afternoon, jammeO the corridors n.ntl attempted to break Into a room wlierc the City Council Committee on .Local Transportation was holding a mooting. They were repulsed by tlie po- lice, nnd then swept down to the Mayor's office to demand the use of tiie coupon chamber for tlie purpose oC hoKUng a meet- ing. The Mayor was not in nnd the crowd ylowly melted away .after two hours of loud talking. CONFESSES HIS PART IN MICHIGAN SCANDAL Former City Attorney of Grand Bapids Bares Some Secrets. GRAND TJAPIDS, Mich..' Nov. K. Salisbury; rorrr.cr city attorney, has rnailc; ii complete confession aw to his con- nection with the famou.1? writer scandal of two yc-urs tiRO in this city. more ar- rests' OL' former aldermen nnd. city ofiicijils are to follpn-. LEFT IN BUGGY AND SOMEBODY TOOK.IT Enilroad President Carried His Cash, in a Valise. DA'LLAS, Tex., Nov. Charles N. Alexander of the. Velasco. Brasos Northern Ra'ilroad has reported to detectives that thieves last night taolc a valise from his buffRy containing S20U.003 worth of securities. The IUISKV was hitched on one of the most prominent corners of Lhe business district. President -Alexander way in an oftlee at a conference. Tlie Situation in Colorado. DENVER, Col., Nov. there Is every prospect that the coal minors in the Northern Colorado ilckt will accept the proposition which the operators have "madt and, return to work next weelc, no progress toward a- settlement of tho strike in the Southern part of the state lias been made. It is reported that negotiations are pend- ing for a consolidation of the United Mine "Workers of America and the Western Fed- of Miners. DOWAGER QUEEN OF ITALY MEETS WITH. AN ACCIDENT Her Motor Car P-uns Into a stone. nOMlU, Nov. Dowager Queen Marghe- rlUi, while riding- in a motor car through the Aosta valley to-day, met with' an ac- cident, her car running against a Mile- stone ner.r Stupinigi. Her tlemnn-in-wat tine, tl-.e Marquis Gulccioli, was thrown a distance of ten feet and sustained slight injuries, but the Queen Mother 'wus unhurt. PROSECUTING ATTORNEY SAID TO BE INDICTED Sensation in the Missouri "BoodlixLg1" Scandal. J15FFERSON CITY, Mo., Nos-. Cole county Grand Jury, which has been investigating legislative made its final report to-day, returning: 100 in- dictments. It IK said that four indictments are returned .against Pror-ocuting Attorney K. P. Stone on tho that he ac- cepted a railroad pa.ss, accepted a bribe for dismissing1 prosecutions and 'accepted illegal fees. Circuit Judge Hazel! sus- pended Attorney Stone and appointed a spe- cial prosecutor until tlie case is heard. At- torney Stone- stiys tho charges are falso. -ALLEGED CRANK AFTER GOVERNOR OF COLORADO Mim Arrested at- State House Said to 1 Have Sent Threats. DENVER, Col., Nov. Riving lus namu as John Otto "was arrested Mils ciftcruoon at the State House, while at- templing: to sain access to Governor Pea- body's Ddvate office." It is said tliat lie !b the n-.itlior of several lettors tlireateniiis the life the Governor nrnl tixlng: 3 o'clock this afternoon as the time.for carrying ou the tlireat. lMV William Zeigler Indicted. KANSAS CITY, Nov. special to Tho Journnl from Jefferson CIty.-says: Tlio Cole county -Grand Jury to-day In- dicted 55oigler of New York, presi- dent of Uio Royal .Baking1 Powder. Oompar.y for connection with alum legislation in the Missouri Assembly of 1901. The imlictment agralrjBt Zeiglor alleges bribery on three couuts. JAMES L. BLAIR HELPLESS. 2To Hope of Recovery; but He 3Tay Live Some Time. ST. LOUTS, Nov. and of Attorney James L. Biair have, It is said given up hope of his recovery of either men tal or physical health. Mr. Biair may live a long time, but h' will be practically helpless. Dr. George. Hornan said to-day that Blai: is constantly brooding over his affairs. "He is gaining Very said the doctor. Boekefeller-Gpuia Syndicate Re- ported in 'Control. FIGHTS .RAILROAD Scheme of -the Capitalists to Secure PossesBion-of.- All iLines. from tlie WANTED FOR INFANTICIDE. Charity Slattery of Pawlings Accused in Connecticut. POUGTTKEEFSIB. Nov. Slat tery, aged 4D yeurs. was arrested at Pawl ings .to-day to the Dutches county jail to await' extradition to. Con necticut on :'a charge of infanticide com mitted on October SO at Sherman, about six miles from. Hartford. West .to ;the toard. Sea- BY THE SSOCIATED PTIHSS. P1TTSBURG, Pa., Nov. Posit to- morrow will piiblisii Btory to .the effect that a. combination formed by John D. Rockefeller, George J. GouliJ, J. J. Hill and other capitalists, has practically secured control of tho United1 States. Steel Corpora- tion, that the acquiring of. tho New York Central and its feeders by the Rockefeller- uld interests .la in .furtherance ol' a plan to secure control .of'all railroads from the West to tho seaboard, including-the Balti- more Ohio, and eventually the Pennsyl- vania Railroad. This'scheme, It in. claimed, is a plain business proposition in which the sy'ridleate has underta-lten to secure control of the greatest tonnage producer !n the world (the United States Steel .Corporation) and provide means for.Its transportation as well as for the immense tonnage made pos- sible by the advent oE the AYapash into the Pittsburs coal and coke producing districts. The article claims that .the time is not far distant when in. its light against' the Penn- sylvania the .Rockefeller-Gould syndicate ll have at Us ciHpoSftl the enormous ton- nage the United.States Steel Corporation and the Plttsburg Coal Company. SAYINGS OF CHRIST BROUGHT TO LIGHT Papyri Buried Since Seventh. Century, Eug Tip. LONDON, Nov. hitherto un- known sayings of Jesua Christ-have been discovered In Egypt by archaeologists who have dug up papyri buried since tho sev- enth century 100 of Cairo. Ap- parently all the were addressed to St. Thomas. One of tlie most remarkable is: "Let not him the I seeketh cease from his search until he find, and when he nrids he shall wonder; lie shall reach the kingdom, I. e., the kingdom of heaven, aiid when he reaches the Icingdom he shall have rest." POLICE SEARCH FOR A PRIEST Lured from Eeetory in Williams- bridgeJjy: Bogus Sleuths. THREATENING LETTERS SENT Theory Advanced That Hissing Man, His Blind Overbalanced by Work, Has Committed Sui- cide. MAY LOSE'HBfcE-JTESIGHT- OF ACID Frightfully Burned through Act of Unknown Person. BUFFALO, Wov. Lennon, :l. 16- year-old girl, was the victim of a mysteri- ous ca.sc oC acid throwing kite to-night. Anna lives with her. parents at No. U2tf G.anson street. Sho wan sent to a store not i'ar ;'rom her ar.d on the way back some one dashed a riuantity of car- bolic acid "In her face. She was fright- fully burned and lose iier eyesight. She is unable to give the police any in- formation that might lead to an arrest. INDIANS WERE KILLED WHO, S.lEW THE OFFICERS "Nine Other SIOITX Are Released After Examination. DOUGL.A3S, Nov. nine Sioux Indians who- were arrested for par- ticipation in" th6 neli't iii. which Sheriff Miller and Deputy Falkeftbiu'tr of Converse county were killed were 'given a prelimi- nary hearing, tolday and .were discharged this evening. _ The testimony s'noweO Uutt Eagle Feath7 or and Black Kettle; bo'th of whom were killed, fired tiie shoty which killed the of- ficers. POPE HOPES .TO VISIT MONTE CASSINI ABBEY Explains to Pather Krug His Long De- sire1 So is-iDo. ROMS, Nov. course of an audience to-day ydth Put her Krusr, who- ia in charge of .tho-abbey .at Monte Caswina, the Pope saiil it'had always been one of his keenest to visit the abbey, but that for several reasons he had never been able to accomplish the journey. His Holiness concluded: "Pray that I may soon be In such a posi- tion as to be able to realize that desire." PREFER SHORTER HOURS .'.TO TEN PER CENT.'CUT Agreement May Be Headied -Bet-ween Men FALL. Nov. tor a prolonged meeting to-night--the- Textile Council sent a "special messenger- to the. :home oC Secretary.Hutliaway of. the Manu- facturers Association request for a conference, between vcpresfjntatlvos of the .council the cotton mills where a wage reclucUon has. been an- r.ounccd. A reply Js expected to-morrow. Tho Textile '.Council--will propose "a" plan ol retrenchment the oper- atives ilia 11. eu.t of ten per cent, .in wages decided upon. the. manufacturers. This is: short time operation the inllls. Reduction -Men. NEW BF.DFORD. Mns's., Nov. gen- eral reduction.of 10 per cent, in the. wages of ail cotton cloth In this city 'was-ordered by'.the'-manufacturers to-day. About hands will be affected. Prominent'. Pittsbui'g.Kan Dead. PITTSBTJRG, Nov.-" S. of the Select Council I and one of the ne-nbers of tnit .Uodyr- died tb-lnJsht; SPECIAL TO THE PosT-fcJTANDjUiD. NEW YORK, Nov. Gluseppi Cirrintrione, puBtor of the Church of tlie Immaculate Conception, in First street, "Will'.amsbrldsre. wns lured from rec- tory last evening- by two men, who posed as detectives, and since then the police un- der Captain Foody and residents of the suburb have searched in vain for sonic trace of the priest. Thfe kidnapping was the sequel to a series of threatening letterfe received by the priest from Italians who demanded Sev- eral weeks agro the first letter was received and Father CIrringione turned It_over to Captain Foody of the Wake field police sta- tion. Other Jotters followed, and they, too, .were disregarded by the priest, fxcnpt that he gave them to the detectives who were working on the case. Two men, who said thcw were police of- ficers, called at the rectory last evening, and told Father Cirringiono that Captain Foody wanted to see him. He left the house with the men, and has not been seen since. A few hours Father Cirring- tonc did not return to tlie house. Father Anthony and another curate attached to the church, and .Tosopii Penn, the sexton, went to the Wakuueld police station and rr.ndc inquiries for Father Cirrlnglone. Captain Foody said lie had not sent for the priest and sent out a general alarm for the clergyman. The family of the priest, who live at 300 West Seventeenth street, were communicated with, but they said he had not been there since Thursday night. A Mysterious Telegram. This afternoon a telegram was received at tho home of the priest signed and-reading: "You had better call on the archbishop at once." .Who "France" is the friends wore at a loss to know and the receipt of the te gram caused considerable speculation. olien Captain Foody said to-dny that in his opinion Father CJrringione, his mint! probably having given way under the strain resulting1 from .too much work, had committed suicide. The captaJn said that the priest first informed him of the threat- ening 3 e tiers Father Cirrinffione was at the WilHams- bridge station'at. C o'clock lant nlffht. He was warned by Captain Foody not to leave the house under any consideration. Cap- tain Foody, and Detective Curry called the parochial residence last evening ;mO the captain maintains that no bogus officers had, been thore. Anthony Gullota, a partner of th? missing lawyer, received a letter from Father Cirringlone to-day, which he mailed last In !t f.ho pastor s'tid that he would be unable to keep his appointnien for to-day with Gullota, as he was ia great trouble. The missing- pi-Jest also wrote a letter to another friend, which was received" to-day iincl In which lie wrote that he would be a his friend's oflice this afternoon, adding: "I God spares my life." DEATH FOLLOWS DEATH IN SCHWEETERS FAMILY Poison Is Suspected, but Coroner Claims Heart Trouble. UHRICHSVILL33, O., Nov. M.-Slraiiff circumstances surround the deaths of D and Mrs. Matthew Schweetcrs and their 10-year-old daughter of Lees' ville. The child died suddenly early in tin week. Shortly before the funeral Dr Sell wee tens fejl into convulsions bes the coflln .and died. That night Mrs Schweeters sont the watchers from th room and shortly afterwards she died Powder papers, indicated that poison caused. Uie deaths, but tlie coroner returnee a verdict of heart trouble'. TWENTY NEGROES KILLED IN REAR-END COLLISION Tlie Injured number Thirteen, Some o: Whom "Will Eie. NEW ORL.KANS, La.. Nov. rear end collision on the Illinois Central Rail road near J-vuntvi'ood. La., eighty-live mile. from New Orleans, to-night resulted In death of twenty negroes. Ten other ne groes and three white men were injurcci some of them fatally. The collision wn between the McComb City uccommodatioi and the Northern Express, bound to Chi cago. Tlie rear coach of the accommoda tion, filled with negroes, was completely wrecked. DE WITT'S KICK BEATS YALE A CLOSE GRIDIRON BATTLE HERMAN OELRICHS' WIFE TAKES SURPRISING ACTION Revokes Power of Attorney Held by Her Husband. SAX -FRANCISCO, -Nov. formal revocation of the power of attorney which Mrs. Theresa A. pelrichs granted to her husband, Herman Oelrlchsr of April 21, has been filed here, at the request ot Mrs. Oelrichs. It revokes the powers granted of control over all property belonging to Mrs. Oelrichs in this city and state goner- ally, .Mrs. K. Vanderbilt, jr., a sister of Mrs.1 Oelrichs, is also to revoke the power of attorney she gave to ilr. Oelrichs on April 21, 1S97. According- to Reuben P. Lloyd, who has been attorney; for Mrs. Oelrichs and 7.1 rs. Vanderbilt, tixg revocation of the power' of attorney to Hermann Oelrichs was a mere lefjal forma HO' marking the termination of the management of the.Fair estate. The .estate has been distributed and finally set- tled and nothing1, more remained to be done ija the; matter. DE WITT OF PKIETCETON KICKING A GOAL (Star of yesterday's foothall .11. n the cunlesl f'ir !bc J> v-.n and the man whose Ulck Princetofl Captam Snatches Victory from Defeat in the Last Five Bftmites of by Old Eii Responsible for the Defeat of the Blue--Contest a Stubborn One. SPKCIAI. TO THE POST-STANDAHCT, NEW HAVEN, Cunn., Nov. Hi- score tied and less than live play remaininH: in the second of Ihc an- nual championship fooiball belwo-.-n Yale and "PrlncelDii tliis artpriiu'.in, De- witt, the punling phenoinen'jn of tin- New Jersey collcgf. kicked a wamlerrui from placement and won the eunu-.-.; Old Nassau. Klfcvon to six way Ihe final in OIK- of tiie most specuu.-'.ilnr griou-un baui'-s over witnessed on Yule Field. Having the pigskin iH-hJiul hj.< opponents' goal pesls in tlie first half aTler a sjjrhU of eighty yards, the plucky rriii-.e- j ton captain uJiicd laurel after laurel i" his crown as the game until ho drove the ball clear oil "Kale's b.i.' 1'ur lliv winning score. Dewitt the hero of the tamo. To- night he was the hero of Ihe tuwil. His magnilicent gridiron work, has won lii" praise of even Hie blue-rest of his uf thu blue. Frlnei-ton folluwer.-i inarebcd the streets OL tiiis college 'town and and shoiucit the j.rnises uf idol. Smarting under the sting ot three su-.1- cessive defeats, the men who wear the on their football jerseys battled as they never buttled before and overthrew seas of Old Eli. Hushed with pan .suc- cesses. Cnuss for Kejoicing. j Every men of Nassau, wherever he may be, lias CLiuse tor at victory oC the giant football warriors of Prinve- I ton. Full of confidence and .'it for tiie fray, they invaded this CojinA town and lor the first time since defeated their strongest foemen in a dramatic game. No football eonlcst in years has btcn more stubbornly tought than that of to- day. The result was in doubt until almu.-.t tlie last minute. Not since the day of Ijamafs fanmUM run, when Princeton snatc-hed from defeat in tlie last minute of play in Ihe contest With Yale in Itfi, has such a scene been witnessed OM a loolbull lield ;-.s wip-n Uewllt kicked his way to victory to-day. Tho great grandstands that line the Yale Held were choked wilii humanity. Yale meji and Princeton men, Yale alumni :iad tlK-lr friends and Princeton alumni and then- friends, fair supporter.-; of both great schools of learning, tiie uJd and llie young, the weak and the strong had gathered for the fray. All down the line ol' :-tandini; and sluing, there waved the blue and the orange and tile black. Kings anu streamers Jloated everywhere. Gay gowns of society women lidded color to a Kaleido- scopic display. Brilliant Plays Cheered. Cheer after cheer renl the air as brilliant play succeeded brilliant play. K.illyiipg songs of Yale and Princeton were sung to urge the warriors on in their desperate en- counters. College yells came like crashes of thunder. The scoie stooil 0 and 0. Vet.ltrlcin had heeled tiie biill on Yale's -iij-yard liiu: after a fair catch. jjev.-ltt'.-i opportunity had come. Not a sound broke from the great crowd. Amid this almost breathless suspense the great captain of the Princeton eiovcn stepped back for a try at the goal placement.. The kick-was a one. Straight, as a cannon sliol the pisskiu. It cleared the bar and. what proved to be the winning points for 1 'rineelrm had been made. Ore.ii as Ihe demonstration '.in Yule held iViiir years mfu when rrineelon also dffMle'.; Vale by a Held goal, It coilUl not romp.-.ii- with the oxuburt-rt to-dny. From of U.Toals came a cheer that and across the (jrKiiron. waved, "bunds played, old men and yrung men and women 'screeched theni- selv'.-s hoarse In iheir ovation to Dcwltl and fo J'rJncelon. Yale and caeh made touch- (Piwu. which a son! was kicke.-l. These iwn i-.emvs Wt-i e all ibat cairn; in Iho first lull; and when that closed, il luujteil like a vieniry. 'i'liu New Haven col- lio-.v.ver, were iin.ilil'.  a whole. 'I'Jiere wns a dc-al oS limiting. In whieh had Ihc ad- viintsiK-'-, while Yale did belier at line-buck' ing. The play was slow .is Ihe men showed Die effects of their hard work. Within four- teen minutes from the lime play began Yale had turn through Priin-et.Hi's llm- r.nd sent IloKan over for a Inuch'lown. Prince- Ion could do r.olldr.K with Ynli'V defenso and the play was largely In tin- territory, of the playt-is from New Jersey. DeTWitt Kicks Off. Dewllt kicked off for Prlnct-lon. tho ball Hiring out of bounds beyond the goal line. The ball was brought back lo tile 'J5- yarcl line, where llllclx-ll IcIvlivJ It to Prinoelon's lo-yai-d ran It for- ward Ihlrlevn ynnls. Kafcr th'-n went ihnuiKh Kiniicy for live yards By a series of line plunges l.he ball was car- lied marer and nearer Ihc Prlncelon goal, -.mill llogun ilmilly went over for ilio louch- down. Yalfr up IK-I- ailviinliige ami toward Ihe Tlgi'rs' isonl line. A bad fumble by Milchdl, Yale se'-nied aboui lo a second louchiiown.. r-lard- inl I ho progress of tin- WH-. 'be 1 illcr relaiiK-d llu- half, and Talc iiuarter- iKK'k. 10 pnvr- his nvn. slunalfl'l for .-in atlemiil nt a. g.vil frnn Hi.- li'.-ld. Mill-hull IKK li for a try :il Mil from rrini-fton'is lino but til.- kick bl.ickcO. IJ.-will broke, lln-oiisb. snnu-ln-d ball on Yale'.s 30- iir.o anil ran Ihe l-nulli 'it -.h" lichl for a loui-lKlown. Vi-lvrli-in kicked tho Ifn-'il li.-ing the Yale rounded Ilio Tlce'rs ri-jicalflilly tinill Prineelon's IS-yard line, when time was Tiie players for bolh learns appeared for the second half ir. good with the In this respect slightly In Prliice-on's favor. Again It was ap- irilT-nl tl-.nt Yale's offense w.-is to that of Prlncel.Hi's, for Ihe -vnarcrs of Hie bluo In the play In Princeton's half of Ihe most ot tho lime. Twlrft Capi.'iln Raffcrty's men carried tho ball toward the Princeton goal lino, anil twice with touchdowns In night 'he Yalo nifii fumbled grievously. Viilo ploughed through only to lose llieir last chance by holding In the line and sinTer- ing a pen.-iUy of 20 yarCs and Ihe surmvleB of the brill. Battle Waged Furiously. The '..Mllle wns furiously and thO Yalo men were Hie ilrct to show UK; ef- fects of the smiBBlo. Prlii'rcton. mi amvhlle, never wav'jrcd, the cirnimc and bJack lino sci ming'ly growing slr-ingor. After fifleen minules uf play during which both shies had kicked four times. Tale got the Kill or. Princ-lonV line. Again. Hoiran was callf-d upon for the nnoi-Kfiiry distnnce. He fouyht his way live yards further and two more rushes carried tho bail to Princeton's lino. Just as a touchdown sccmeil cer- tain, a wretched fumble lost the ball 'to (Continued on Second Page.)   

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