Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Syracuse Journal Newspaper Archive: February 22, 1938 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Syracuse Journal

Location: Syracuse, New York

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for Liking us on Facebook

  • We are retrieving your image from the archive...

  • We are converting your image into tiles...

  • Almost done...

   Syracuse Journal (Newspaper) - February 22, 1938, Syracuse, New York                               Syracuse Journal's Great Daily Features Include EXCLUSIVE SOUNDPHOTOS and EXCLUSIVE International Service Dispatches WEATHER Smmw sy i A- _____ M UMIKI ____ 14 fTXKiKf k H VOL. XCIV; XO. 44 SYKACUSE, X. Y.. TUESDAY, FEBEUAEY PEICS THEEE CENTS CITY CHAMBERLAIN LASHED BY LABOfflTES; FRANCE SPEEDS HUGE DEFENSE FUND Japs Slay Thousand Chinese Distributors Attempting Wreck Rogers-Allen Law, Charge. CROSSING SWORDS WITH REALMLEADER ALBANY. Feb. 22 Charging a conspiracy on the; part 01 some large milk dealers! to "wreck" the law-. Senator George Rogers. SHANGHAI. Feb. 22 j 1.000 Chinese in a' I "'preliminary battle." Japanese troops today captured the stra- 'tegic city of Htvaikrrs. 10 miles to i north of the ill-starred Yellow; House Labor Committet 'Kiver, Japanese headquarters; Given Confidential Report announced today. f The Nipponese were said to hate seized the city m a sudden swoop that left corpses of defenders lit- tered arouni> the defense lines. At the same time, reports reach- 's fa British Hongkong said On New Measure. By WILLIAM 5. HEAL, l.N.S. Staff Corresponding WASHINGTON, Feb. 22 Rochester Democrat, today Hankow Railway in retaliation for the Chinese guerilla warfare that called for an inTesrisation delayed the Japanese offensive rt.1 tfce Lunghai and other tattle their activities by the federal! trade commission. Eogers made his request 5n a let- Lieut. Gen. Iwane ilatsui, ousted from command of the Japanese ter to Representative George Kelley, forces in the central Chinese area 'i administration's original -n-age-honr bill ivat dis- carded today in confidential bills distributed to members of the House labor committee by Chairman llary T. Norton of New Jersev. Hso of Rochester. _____ __ ___ _____ _ __ r __ _. The Eogers-AUen Jaw was enacted departed Quietly for Tokio, after re- i prepared Mter las: Tear after the state stepped oat lumuishinj: his command to lieu- of conferences between milk price-firms. It authorizes j tenant Colonel Hata. ilatsui may iirs. Norton, administration effl- jbroducers to form bar-gaining J become a Japanese abmassador-at- j 2nd to the best possible j large with dealing- with a Japanese- I membera of Congress are sponsored central government o' China, shortly to be established at legislation. banking. a. fleet of 60 Japanese warpianes raided Canton, bombing tha southern port, citj's railway One raider was reported felled by Chinese anti-aircraft guns. prices for their milk. Senator Rogers charged that Jnany of the distributors are delib- erately attempting to prevent the producers from forming their bar- gaining groups. OPPOSED LAW 'junctions aim persons while scores more were Rogers, who succeeded Congress- I wounded, Kelley as chairman of the' Eenate agricultural committee, pointed out that the groundwork for the Rogers-Allen law was laid, fcy the federal trade commission when it made its report on the Kew Tork shed- "It a matter of common Rogers wrote, "that milk and ai a whole violently opposed to the law. They uied practically all the at their command to stop its enactment. "Subsequent to its enactment, majority of them have done possible they could do to wreck it. The chief evil the prcductr-j in our milk shed have I designed to effect a compromise In One measure adopted code wages as "standard" the minimum wages In an effort to mollify bitter southern opposition, which throttled wage-hour legislation in the special j session. OPPOSITION RAISED. A second confidential measure submitted by ilrs. Norton would grant a federal wage-hour author- ity virtually blanket power to fbc wages in low-paid industries and vaguely retains the 40-cent-an-hour minimum and -SO-hour maximum work-week principle of the Black- Connery bill. The proposals aroused immediate opposition among members of the labor committee and cast -further doubt upon enactment of a national wage-hour bill in the present ses- sion of Congress. i The two measures will be thrust LONDON, Feb. 'before the committee Thursday !n -rt to find a compromise ac- e to Congress. The bills POLICIDF By International News Service. j The opposition had its chance in the House of Com- 'mons today as Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain, firm in the belief he hss parliamentary support behind him, moved I toward bis truce with Premier Mussolini. Developments: i by Arthur Greenwood, in the House of Com- i mons, the Laborite opposition moved a vote of censure against Chamberlain. of a French cabinet split arose as Premier Camille Chautemps prepared to state his views on tfie European situation. The government approved extraordi- nary appropriations for military defense. as the first result of the Anglo-Italian rapprochement, the BARI radio station ceased broad- casting anti-British propaganda to Arab listeners. Austrian Government clamped a strict ban on all political meetings and parades except those of Chancellor Kurt Schuschnigg's Fatherland Front as offi- cials united to prevent repetition of clashes between Austrian Nazis and their foes. Spanish Loyalists Evacuate Teruel Reform Battle Line South of City Anthony Eden was Lord Stal and re- purded "comer" when this picture was made on the-occasion when he conferred with Adolf Hitler of Germany in 1935. At that time Hitler had told the world that he was rearming Germany and the suave yonng- captain (left) was one ot those delegated by Britain to curb the dictator. Eden, cuftinj his career short, has resigned from his post as foreign minister, rather than betray his principles of npnconciliation with Germany and Italy. International News photo. Expect Roosevelt To Restate Poky Spanish press agency here had to suffer has been from the announced that lojaiist forces have j J activities of dealers in coercing 1 evacuated the strategic city i Tenifil. Intimidating their j The Metropolitan Producers' Bar- ernment a wage-hour admlnis- trator with authority to name Loyalist sources announced boards. Establishes as troops had launched a. gaining Agency, a statewide body i counter-offensive against insurgent of dairy farmers organised under strongholds within the city. the Rogers-Allen law. filed a com-1 Republicans were reported to Dlaint with tie federal trade corn- mission last summer concerning the practices of certain dealers. COERCION CHARGED. Senator Rogers said the coztmfs- oas sent investigators into the lield and two of them, a few days 4SO, came into the stats seeking evidence on the alleged "coercion" eases. "If federal trade commis- sion te come into this rnilk shed, particularly into New York Rogers added, "and ittue formal complaint against one or more of these milk dealers, it would have a far-rtaching effect upon morale of our dairy After attorney general df the state is morw or less powerless in the metropolitan market -where interstate milk is involved and where only the fed- eral commission has juris- diction.17 Senator Rogers told Congressman Kellty that "we must do something" rave reformed their !ine on the plateau Puerto Escandon. short distance south of Teruel. determined to hold oat at all costs. The plateau is a natural jumping off point for a push on "Valencia- Latest dispatches received here reported another air raid on Bar- celona at p. m_ the third of t- e day. There were no details. AMERICAN 50 Seized in Raid On Hungary Nazis BUDAPEST. Hungary. Feb. 22 persons, including the Xazi leader. Major Salaszy, were arrested today whea Hungarian po- lice served notice they want no expansion in Hungary such as is lasting in neighboring Austria. wage the wage paid by industry in 1334 (when XKA codes were in TVage-hour board and administrator are directed to fix wages and hours to bring them up to the "standard." Also provides the "standard" can be exceeded. PROVIDES FOR BOARDS. 2. Second bill sets up wage-hour administrator in labor department and provides for appointment of various industries. Prohibits feeing of wages or hours in any industries where minimum wages are above 30 cents an hour and hours are 40 per week or less. Gives administrator and boards power to fix wages and hours as low as they see St. Provides that wage-hour adminis- trator shall act when conditions In industries "are inconsistent with a Talk on European Crisis Awaited By GEORGE DURNO l.N.S. Staff Correspondent. HIDE PARK, Feb. 12 "With world attention focused oiti ferences between the two powers. President Roosevelt and his reac-1 chiefly those created by Hitler's Hitler to Seek Early Terms With Britain Copyright, 1938, by l.N.S. BERLEC. Feb. 22 Chancellor Hitler has been given a in Central and Balkan Europe by the' resignation of British Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden ivas the' conviction voiced today in high Nazi circles. As a consequence. German Gov-4------------------ eminent quarters evidenced a dis- position to" come quickly to terms Cabinet Split Fears Grow .as Hitch in Program Looms By KENNETH T. DOWNS, I.N.S. Staff Correspondent PAEIS, Feb. 22 Spurred by the menacing situa- tion arising from Reiehsfuehrer "Fafe of World Rests In Says Greenwood By KQTGSBURY SMITH, t.N.S. Staff LONDON. Feb. 22 The League of Nations as con- stituted at present 5s a failure Adolf Hitler's Nazi expansion %reat nations cannot de- in Europe, the French govern- ment today approved extra- i ordinary appropriations for pend upon it to protect them against aggression. Prime Min- ister Neville Chamtterlain told .doptcn Umister Edr.oard Dai- establishment of an j the House of Commons today. proposal1 He TCas answerfns. a Laborite altnouSh with Britain on the outstanding- dif- tion to the European crisis, indi- cations today multiplied that Chief Executive might use Wash- standard of living for! health, efficiency and general wel- fare." In this case wages are to be ington's birthday as a vehicle to restate American foreign policy. This afternoon he was receiving accompanying reporters ic his Hyds Park study for the Tues- day press conference. There -were suggestions that the President might make some observations on the troubled state of world affairs and the increasing trend abroad toward Fascism. In advance of today's press con- ference, where President Roosevelt will be directly interrogated on his reaction to Britain's cabinet n't and Hitler's bold statement of Nazi expansion plans, the temporary VThite House continued to best back all inquiries with the set an- swer. "No comment." The arrests were made when of- fixed "which shall be as nearly ficiais suddenly raided the Xazi j adequate as is economically feasible party headquarters tere. carting- off to maintain sach minimum all party members they couid find-1 of iiving." It appeared that if anything was to be said in behalf of this gov- ernment's concern over develop- the Continent that Mr. to teach many of these milk dealers and distributors that they have got j to stop ..trying; to wreck fanner producers" "You your at the trade concluded, "that they laid foundation for Rogers-Allen law And that if want to give additional final boost to H and its ben- te dairy they shauld ahead with their prepotcd colonia! demands. This trend toward Anglo-German friendship was motive the based on a solid i desire to avoid weakening of the Rome-Berlin axis by the impending Anglo-Italian agreement. In plain words. Hitler is deter- mined not to be caught napping while British diplomacy tries to woo Premier Mussolini away from the Nazi-Fascist alliance. CONFIDENT OF SUCCESS. Believing his Austrian coup and his Reichstag- speech Sunday have given him the upper hand in the diplomatic catch-as-eatch-can same, the Reichsfuenrer was repre- sented as being- confident he- can now extract from the British at least some of the concessions he wants. A provisional understanding for the progressive return of Germany's prewar colonies would constitute not only such a concession but insisting that the Ger- man minority problem is a domestic issue which only the league of Na- tions is "qualified to handle." Nazi circles made no. effort to conceal conviction that intensiOed j German pressure will soon convince i Prague that the minority question is not a but a German- Czech issue. Moreover, it is the impression here that both France and Soviet Russia, military allies of Czecho- slovakia, have been reduced to vir- tual diplomatic impotence fay Eden's departure from the British cabinet and Prime Minister Neville Cham- berlain's victory. Franco-Soviet opposition, there- fore, was relegated by Nazis to a minor role. answering a. adier for establishment of an jrotc censure which accused him autonomous sinking fund apart ot treading the path ot "anarchy from jrenera.1 treasury funds to and by abandoning collective meet defenes expenditures from j securltv and embarking on the con- ilarch 1 onward versations with Italv that led to .V board directors to handle j the fund was appointed, including I resignation of Foreign Secretary the ministers ot war and "marine Edcn" Ho said: and representatives oC the Senate! e mult not to I small and weak nations thit will be protected fay against aggression. Nothing of Ministers voted] this "prepared- French Steamer The Council oi unanimously for uil cabinet split -were expressed as a result of Hitler's fighting speech to the Reichstag Sunday p.nd the resignation of Anthony Eden as Britain's foreign secretary. A general declaration of policy was expected shortly following a review of the situation by Premier Camilie Chautemps. There was some belief the declaration might prove to be a strong warning to Germany to kep hands off Szecho- s'.ovakia, France's ally, and main- tain the independence of Austria- Any hitch in this program, jt was as long as members are nominally bound to impose and force in support of its Arthur Greenwood, Laborite opened the onslaught against the pnme minister for Ms stand ;itt favor of immediate negotiations j Roosevelt would say it himself. i The President was f-jily apprised j in Hitlers cap. of the debate in which! Meanwhile, the fact that MARSEILLES. France, Feb. 22 i would likewise put another feather i French steamer Prado I .youth was near death Eden iTC3S today by an -nis companions in 15 A A ot me asoiite :n waicii i m.; xdui. j S Edea's resignation] and his collective security precepts unidentified airplane off -Xanencia, Denied in Rumania as British foreign minister and the i have been swept out of the British I House of Commons debate over j Government was viewed by Nazi England's future ItaJo-German re- eyes as a. development clearing the according- to word receded here. Origin Of RCpOTt i_ Rnmo Ic ln K0me 50UgHt Officials, 400 Soon F -xvv avu.fl M i Feb. 22 A rnmor i from Carol of P.amania. iad been jsmated caused a brief Curry ot ez- EDGEWATER, y. J, Feb. 2Z! Toe rnasor filtered into official- hundred striking em- i sources ia the Italian capita! mcd' of the Lever Brothers of it was telephoned cere, AI plant bere returned to work today pew minutes of checJans by tele-j after their representatives and the phone with Bucharest and otier' company agreed to abide by the iia-1 capitals showed that it was with- tionai labor relations board's deci- j oat foundation. i on matters in dispute. The j Reliable sources in wnicb ______________________________ workers walked oat Sunday Bigot; heard the racier were at a loss to, when the company to rein- j account for its origin and -wide cir- j Bucharest disposed of it as frould- lations. path towar, Official pouches from 'Washing- I manic community ton pave Mr. Roosevelt lengthy dis- patches from American chancello- ries. The telegraph wire that con- nects the White House and Hyde Park worked steadily. Finally tie President was on the long-disiance i phone talking to nis diplomatic aides in the national capital. of Postman Admits blanketing the Danube Valley and of the attack from Touion. the Balkans. j------------------------------------ Therefore, informed quarters here expected the immediate future to j witness a new by Hitler I of German with Italy which led to resigna- tion of Anthony Eden as foreign secretary. Chamberlain answered the charge by telling the House of France had been told of the pro- posed negotiations as far back as j (Continued on Page 2, Column 5.) i Jan. 25 and cited this as refata- 1-------------------------- j tion of charges ho had "gone be- hind the backs of friends" f "If Mr. Eden felt the principle I of international good faith eluded the conversations with i the premier said, "He should have resigned when government first became ccrff- mitted to the "The fate of the Green- wood said, "rests in the trembling hands of Mr. Chamberlain. The government has abandoned (Continued on Page 2, Column 1.) today, three Jail, and a, fifth was sought as the culmination j of a 19-mile gun duel with Police gave chase 1 back fth befaeiry Destroyer was rusned to tne scene in a stolen suito. ignored com- j i mands to surrender, speeding away, j SLAYER WRIGHT the Eeich, And it appeared logical that saca a move would be directed Killer to Be Freed Within Five Days, LOS ANGELES, Feb. 22 fire days, daring whicn the ques- fi i lifts I far f UCtA 1 CHI i same as that which overtook Austria last TORK, Feb. 22 bert H- i five days. entitled to 3emand that 'WrigSt _____ r coart jury formd him: subnut the question of ais present i j.jwi m. break !n Czechoslovakia's i 5nsaae atjhe time he shot r-velyn; sanity to a jury, or any "interested 43, a postoffice letter j is Imminent was toe i and jumrnel to j party." including relatives of the carrier, wfll tave a year day meaning read into adncei fieati! in tte vScttes who aiay make seen a cs- in ptnitentiarr in which to fig- j {ronj reaching Berlin i :COT- after them in an: mand through the district attorney. KIXG CAROL a diacJuu-jed emptoye. I eolation. Direct contact wi; th [less saort ure out a Eew and better systsm to beat ponies. He was sen- tenced after confessing ne took MO from a registered letter to bet oft from reaching READY TO NEGOTIATE. asserted compromising embrace, i bat a lunacy commission yesterday Sowever. the iikeiihood that advices qooted Czech govern- raled that he is sane now. ment quarters as saying they are j Under California law, Wright MtoUaU" wftl cannot be released ffom. custody for j free. action would be taken was so smail tbat apparently ail "Wngr.: has to do is count tie days until he goes Editorial..................... I Edwin C. Flashes, by Nelson C. Brown.. 3 HcaSih Talk, Dr. O. O. Mclntyre............... 8 Paul Mallon 5 Radio.......................-. S Serial Story.................. 9 Sports ..................11-12-13- iC, 30. by Frankim 3 Theaters..................... U Walter Wirchell............. 1S Winting   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication