Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Syracuse Herald Newspaper Archive: May 10, 1938 - Page 3

Share Page

Publication: Syracuse Herald

Location: Syracuse, New York

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for Liking us on Facebook

  • We are retrieving your image from the archive...

  • We are converting your image into tiles...

  • Almost done...

   Syracuse Herald (Newspaper) - May 10, 1938, Syracuse, New York                                FUR STORAGE -KING- STORAGE WARKHOU8E 28883 Fur Coats Cloth Coats. I'lCKCT AMI DEMVKKY FUMIGATION. KIKE AMI THEFT' INSUKASCK SI'KCIAt. I'KICE ON aRIIUP FUK ASII CLOTH OARMKNTS ji- KNTSl Niirlli Side Itnini-ti Warehouse 755 N. Salinn St. 4t years in Business MAKE KUOM BY CLEARING our the olosfits for summer. .But be sure to protect against motlis. by storing your clothing at King's Storage Ware- house; also furniture- stored in -mod- ern fire protected warehoVise. Let Us Help You With Your Hoofing Problem We Have the Right Roof -for Every Purpose Convenient "Better Roofs" "Better Sidewalls" Phone 5-5763 EE. F.WILLIAMS j ROOFING CO. S 357 W. Fayette St.. 5 Free Advice and Estimates g K. WILLIAMS ROOFING COM- I'ANV. 357 West Fayette Street: Is the oldest residential rooferii In Syracuse with over satisfied customers your DEAFNESS No Longer Handicaps A X e vat-mini Time AM Called PERCEPTKON A Renlljr Natural SONOTONE j uiiy iiank J'li. Name......................... THE NEW SOXO10NK -PERCEPTROX not only provides gloriously linprovetl hearing for', conductive deafness, but brings more eflectiveVcorr'ectlon than most dim- cult types of "deafness; PHOTOGRAPHY Equipped to do all kinds of COMMERCIAL AND MOTION PICTURE 16mm and 35mm projec- tors rented or sold with expert operators for all occasions GENE W. LOGAN 239 N. Clinton St. I'hnne 2-8927 NO COAIJIKIJCIAI. OK MOTION I'lK- TIJKI-: job Is too tough lor Gene Logan to tackle. He has the strongest" illu- mination of any !Gmm projectors. isit Our New H No Parking Problems Room for 25 for Your Convenience Barreled Sunlight Thibaut Papers Devoe we 0) RE EVE V) PAINT 1426-430 Brie Blvd., Cut I ______ (.U SUIe SI.) i AT THE XF.W rni.tlK OF THE O JI. PAIXT COMMNV at 420-430 Eric Boulevard. Eul. Uitte U fadllUcl lor Uie parking of 3S can lor the cor.-' vtntfnrc o! tbclr Tlicre In nn dtlar when chopping at Ihls pnjvular paint and vallpiprr hoiue. Wtoft1 PrWicb Waterproof d l Will) t JIT, TOXIC flurti tn tnif VWWHV VHhHVv Wl 1.1107 Ji airfCf tUiK tot f3ftg aua din airfti to be to l tor m lew n Parcel iStrike Police Investigate At- tacks on Homes of Two Company Official! Driver Is Paroled Swears Out Warrant for Man Injured by His Truck; Picket-lines were extended'Tuesday by striking.drivers of the Parcel Inc., following clash between union itrlkf- hreakers and attach upon' gf two.officials of the company Mon- day-. Aa the drivers, on strike since Fri- day, began picketing stores-' served by the delivery service, police inves- tigated complaints that missiles ha4 been hurled at the two officials' Mrs. Donald R. Kraus, 835 Vallej Drive, wife of the president of company, told police that a bottle containing something that smclled like sulphur was tossed into their living room Monday at P. M. The bottle landed near where she was sitting, she said. She picked It up, ran to the'door and hurled It after an automobile-which, she said, disappeared before she could note the license number. A complaint also was received bj police that a stone waa hurled through a window In the home of Edward R. Spencer, 457 Plymouth Drive, treasurer of the company, at M. Paul Saambati. 20, 128 Oak Street, driver of the truck, which Leonard Machut. 29, a striker, Mon- day, was to be questioned further ai Police Headquarters. Alter statement Monday he was paroled Machut. who suffered concussion of the brain, body bruises and lacera- tions, is in Onondaga General Hos- pital. Sgambati, who told pollen that Machut was one of a'group of pickets who jumped running board of the .truck and tried .to beal him. swore out a .warrant Machut'with disorderly conduct. Sgambati contended that Machin was struck after he jumped from tho running board and ran in front at the truck! Union men, however claimed that no one molested the driver until after the accident. The.strike is an effort to enforce a demand on the part of the drivers for vacation with pay. Southern Tier Dairymen to Oppose Order Northern Pennsylvania Producers May Also Fight UiS: Control Special Dispatch to The Herald Binghamton. May 10. Federal pro- posal to control sales of milt: will meet with opposition of Southern Tier and Northern Pennsylvania producers. It appeared today. Following a meeting at Whitney Point, where the plan was explained, spokesmen for the producers ap- peared cold to the proposal. Elwyn H. Shllln-.an of Smlthvflle Flats, president of Crowley's, Milk Co-operative Association, said he never had seen "such tre- mendous amount of propaganda di- rected upon iiny group asils now-be- ing directed upon mtlk producers -of the State." "This propaganda, which !s being put out by proponents of the pro- posed order, la extremely mislead- ing." he cald. "For example, they claim it is a order. Again, they say It will not effect any producer. These arc Inconsistent statements. If It Is a order. It involves pro' duccrs. If It is an it Involves and necessitates surrender of rights. "They, say It does not regulate milk producers nor Interfere In any way with the business carried oh by pro- ducers. Isn't taking away a producer's money and glrlng It to an organiza- tion interfering 'with a producer and his Producer members. of co-operatlm arc not protected under the order. Mr. Sklllman said. "Operating co-opcratlrcx may sell milk to anyone on any terms of pay- ment, whether It be now or next he charged. "Suppose a co- operative sells to dcaicr, or, dealer Itself, sells to a cuEtointr and gives that customer three months' credit, then It Is obrioue that It docs not that money to return to the producer it U agent (or to the 'producer It accordingly aflectad. What aJTocti pro- ducers Affects School Children to See Safety Films Sound morlci UlUitTAting nitei of traffic will .fee fhown Jo Syra- cuse Irom Mty is lo June 1 under ol the dirJtlon ol Mle.tr. Chamber at Oonunrrtv, I4n P. tie tfiiifdrm, innounocd of UJP Cliw u part of a o ftnthfT ttit nuin- ibcr off school children knfetf In Before of ihc 11 tWlflitn vttt an BjTaruw m e bu a-frfl yew, hurt U.S. to Arraign Barth In Mail Fraud Case The Her. Kurt A. Btrth, town SWtfal iaifc frank Oosjw In jUbmjr Vhandqr cm a tintfe et tantatnait Jraa lie lit wan u ihfevfi %at an AdjlDttnmftfil VH lilrflij larUi ato a Oiarfe of a% moil, fciwd a warrant bf cue, Mm. fcrti, Ite SB Omtflo tktu turn State Dental Convention Monarch Club Picks National Delegates Victor-J. Aclamy, Ward Handce and Burr Kccgan wcro named to represent tho flyracurx) Club In nation convention of Monarch Cluba. to be Held Junu 20-21 In Wilmington. at n mectlnj; In the Hotel Syn> Monday. Claude Urov.-n, Dr. ITiomas II. M'jfllck antl Joreph Over were chosen PA alternate delegatcn, N. Grimm, executive jct-re- ary or the Syracuse Housing Author- tl, waa guest speaker at the luncheon which followed tho meeting. Mr. told of tho progress of the housing program and the correlation between housing and city planning. SPEAKERS AT OPENING SESSION OF DENTAL SOCIETY convention in Ilotel Syra- cuse. Jjci't to right', (lie licv. Darwin I'1: of the First i'rcsbyicrian Church, AVatcrtown, who gave invocation; Regent Thomas J. Mangan, chancellor of the University the State oi A'cw York; Dr. Kihvin J. Jlarringlon, jiresident of the society, and Dr. George Barton of Colgate University. Dr. Mangan Lauds Ethics Of Dentistry State Regent Pleads for Co-operation of the Professions .A plea for en-operation between the professions and the Board of Re' gents was -voiced Tuesday by Dr. Thomas J: Mangan of Binghamton. chancellor of the University of lho State of New York, 'as he 300 'delegates of the New York State Dental Society In convention at the Hotel Syracuse. The conclave, to last until Friday. was opened at 10 A. M. by the so- ciety's president. Dr. Edwin Har- rington. of Watertown. Lauding the. dental' profession lor having cleaned' house as lar as prac- tice and ethics were concerned, Dr. Bangan asked members ol that fol- lowing to lead the way for other pro- fessions and to aid the Board o; Regents in securing co-operation irom all professions. The State University chancellor outlined difficulties experienced by the Regents In efforts to obtain fair and practical legislative measures for the professions. Taking a.cract at "three wnators." whom he did not mention by name, for. their attempts- to -influence thn Board of Regents when that grown was ruling on a physician alleged to have violated the ethics of_ his pro- fession. Dr. Mangan demanded that "the State Constitutional Convention" imend n measure providing thai no member of the State legislature ippcar before any board" In Buch cases. He also regist- ered nurses seeking to outlaw prac- tical nurses. "You can't have both freedom unrt was the warning sounded by Dr. GcorRe Barton Cutten presi- dent of Colyate University, as He spoke to the dentists on "Is Nature "The only chance for equality is through regimentation which seems to be the current Idea. But the question is whether we're going to be free or whether vre're ROlns; to be equal." He decried "insipid attempts to se- cure co-operation, and urged ihat unlimited competition arncnc the group be fostered. The rule cl unlimited competition 1-j one of na- tures. he asserted, and- Is necessary for progress. Unlimited co-operatloi, within a group is needed only la fighting an outside group. Dr. Cuttca declared. Dr. Cutten attacked social fccurii; for old dcscub.ng It as a viola- tion of natumj laws mncc nature, he said, meant It to be .that the young mould care for the old. I'd rather see a few ol the olfl people suffer than hire the race go soil." Dr. cuttcn Mid. Educating tlie public to "tho need of more adequate dental care for ihcse to -arhom It Is not now avail- was proposed by Dr. Harring- ton. who will retire m president ct the -society during the contention, to W nuccccdcd by Dr. Ruiscll Tench of New" York. "In 1934, according to the Division of Economic Rctcarch, Income Sec- Don. there were prictl'lr.p lljis with an arcrage net Ineonw Assuming their gross in- come wry jencrouriy at fS.OPO ]n we have (W2.C75.0CO Jc: 4cntal fcrrtea at a i more than 11 Umcs that for tobacco, toll drlnth, shewing gum. Ice toilet prepariUons and bcuu.y par- lar U there not room 5m dental inlrsknm? Oiwuw4on and conducted during lh; tioon, Investigation Called As Oneida Hospital Head Is Dismissed SptttAal Dlrpalcli to MtttM May ATI Aldtrauttc Into the of the c Oncidn Cli? Roland Hackett) Amnesia Victim, Freed of Charges A free man by virtue of two court orders, obtained alter he had con- vinced authorities ho was an amnctla victim lor four mcnths, Ronald K. Hackett, 21, planned to leave Syra- cuse-Tuesday and return to his wife and baby at Pa. Indicted on a forgery charge loi gassing two at Camllliu. Hackett pleaded guilty in January. 1938. and was placed on probation Authorities, informed he hod been arevlously convicted of felony in Pennsylvania, were pressing an In- vestigation Into his when he wai aurt in an accident at.Penn Yan on March 20. At a hospital in Pemi Yan, where be was taken. Hackett surprised in- vestigators by averting. the last thing hs rem'embeied was hitch-hiking to see his wife and new-born baby on Thanksgiving Day, 1937. Annri K. 2tHlntT4 following tiofl ol lut Jiifihl in WaJin- eutiUn Mm Cu dthum The nox ttfW fit .rfrwc flfe-mati Iwktd vai upprt i Miif sn. JJif Kit. raifcn Ibe te Robert Chard Heads Young Republicans Robert Chard has been named chairman of the 13th Ward Young Republican Club, It was announced Tuesday. .-Miss Vivian Wallace was elected vice chairman. James Walsh was made secretary and Miss Dorothy Chard, treasurer. New district leaders are John Mes- mer. Carl ndleratein, Buell Miller. Miss Florence Barnett, Ray Wallace, s Madeline Neupenur, Donald Mar- oner, James Walsh, carl Walbcl. Miss Dorothy Cbard and Robert Chard. Antique Exhibit Will Open on June 27 Special Dispatch to The Herald Cortland. May annual Antique Show at the Cortand Y. W. C. A. has been announced''or June 27-JuIy 1, opening on -Monday and Josing on Friday. Herbert L. Smith, who has returned from Florida..will again be in charge. It Is expected that the eld exhibitors will b2 bach. Clary Again ToHeadBoard Of Education Kaiser to Be Continued Acting Secretary at Annual Session Reelection of F. Ware Clary as president of the Syracuse Board or Education was indicated as members prepared for their annual meeting in the Department of Education offices, Tuesday night. The annual meeting, set by law for the second Tuesday In May, is for the election ol a president end clerk but it was indicated no action would be taken on the clerkship and that Harry J. Kaiser would continue to as acting clerk. He was appointed acting clerk on tiie death of Milion F. Wagner two years ago. Other members of the board are C. L. Amos, Charles M. Gib'os, Dr. W. W. Street, -Mrs. Alexander Mason. Dr. Clayton L. Ripley ajid Cleliand S. Porsythe. Farmer Hang's Self In Barn at Pompey After Long Illness Peter Schuh, 61, farmer In the town of Pompey, took his life Ail. Tuesday In the barn at the rear of his larm. Coroner WlHiam R. Issued a verdict of suic by hanging. .Mr. Bchuh had been 1J1 about five years. Schuh's body was found hanging trom a rafter.in. the barn by a fanner neighbor. Alfred Kesscnden. alter he was summoned by Mis. Katherlne Schuh. wife of the suicide victim. Mrs. had visited a neighboi and on returning could not find Mr. Schuh. She found the bara door locked irom ths inside and summoned Mr. Fcssemleri. Mr. Schuh Is the brother of Pa- trolman Joseph Schub, and Anthony Schuh. Superintendent Is Host At Grand Jurors Luncheon Members of tho Ornnd Jury were gucsu of Superintendent Herbert H. Paddocfc for luncheon at the Onon- County Penitentiary Thursday and. following the luncheon, they made their regular Inspection of the prison. The Grand Jurors Included the first four women ever to serve in that capacity In this county. They were Mrs, W. S. Spauldlng, of Marcellim; Mrs. Edith A. Foster, of 305 Brattle Road; Mrs. L. M. KlnnD, of 1830 Soutn Ballna Street, and Mrs. Albert H. Fox, 130. Redflcld Place. Cheater Fuller' la foreman of the Jury. In tho party Included Ad- Blatant DtMrlct Attorneys Uncklew and William JI. Sheriff Edwin H. Aucr, Underaherlff Edward W. Clock and County Attor- ney Truman H. Preston. The Jury expects to complete con- sideration of more than 80 cweJ Thiirdsay and to report to the prcme Court on Friday, FIRE HECOKP SALE of our ENTIRE STOCK OF SUITS Were. to 35.L were lo 49.50 HIGHER PRICED SUITS REDUCED PROPOKTIONATELY, Man-Tailored Suits Reefer Suits Three-Piece Suits Bolero Suits Combination Suits Costume Suits SHOOKD FLOOS Why Do Better Painters Always Standardize BECAUSE THEY KNOW that, with Bar- reled Sunlight, they can do a belter job, faster, and at lowest finished cost to you. But, beyond this, the experienced painter looks to the future anticipates the next repainting and knows that Barreled Sun- light will give you such a long-wearing job that hell be asked to do your work again. That foresight saves you money each time you redecorate. Finally, they know that no matter what finish of Barreled Sunlight you select... whether in while or one of the beautiful, rich colors... you'll be getting the highest quality paint ever made and at a fin- ished cost lower you ever thought pea- Thai's why bcttrr paintcn always standardize on Barreled Sunlight. Manu- factured by U. S. QutU Pcrcha Paint Co., Providence, R, I. y PAINT At 42C ERIE MHILEVAKD, E. W SMr flrrtt) Whtrt Yea Can REEVE PAINT   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication