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Syracuse Herald Newspaper Archive: April 19, 1936 - Page 14

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   Syracuse Herald (Newspaper) - April 19, 1936, Syracuse, New York                                Page Four SYRACUSE HER'ACD Sunday, 'April '19, '1936, ALL THAT'S SPORT Baseball Season Starts Too Soon Greenberg De- fends Holdout Tactics Indian Broom Is a Real Threat in Derby Don Meade, Once Jockey Ace, Will Work in His Tourist Camp. T I _1E old, old cry that baseball attempts its sprint: opening games at too early a date is heard throughout the length and breadth of the land but it falls, on deaf ears. There will be no change. Managers and with their best interests at heart aud concerned only with the al! important matter of winning and losing games are agreed with fans that mid-April is hardly baseball weather in the north. But club owners, whose eyes are on the office and upon receipts, have no time for the suggestion The cljb o-tncrs w 11 take a chance en the weather, knowing about one >ear in n.e the; will be with fine spring wea'her and also being confident that In cold, II the team clicks, they will enjoy splendid patronage. Baseball, as represented bj the buslrcis office, would like a six months season tve sport to and a hall months In the majors and to flte In the minors Is not aU what the fiaanceeis wart. In the o'd dajs baseball opened as near April 10 as possible and closed Oct. 4 Starting as near April 15 cs posslb'e and closing as near Sept. 30 as Is practical Is the only concession wh'ch has been made toward a ihorter season a-d It Is likely to be the only one that the major leagues do mike. The b'd Idea Is to tome games played. :vc s'a-ctng of clubs fo: a ago set a record and an eighth when he pat'oraje. nhei the good weather does come around in Ap-il or early May. Much is from tirrc to time about the inad.isabUils of opcr-lng the In'crnat'o-al League season In aid-April. Yet the fact rcma'ns that mid-April we-athcr Syracuse Is no worse than that experienced at the time In Boston, in Clete.flnd. In Detroit and In Chicago ard only a little worse than that which New York. Brooklyn. Philadelphia. Pitts- burgh and some o: the other major league, cities H _____ ftc- 1 teat tha older Top Row by seven lengths at railoran, be shipped 'ANTC GREENBEHO. big first base- man of the Detroit Timers, has a younger brothe-, Joe. Is b-eaklni: Into organized baseball with the Charleston. West Virginia club ol the Mid-Atlantic League. "Joe has slgred for a s-Mary of a Hank explains. Per- haps that fact better than anything elvs explains why I made a flght with club over salary the Detroit spring. "A ball player receives little money he starts his career. Tho Mid- Atlantic season runs a little less than five months Joe reported to the Tigers and trained lor a period of time, being git en his room and board, but without salary, the Ameri- can League season started, he was transferred to Charleston where he trains some more without salary until season starts "At Charleston he hires a roo-n and pajs nis ootiia viucu itio c.au home. His saving actual IMrg expense out of that will be little or nothing at the end or eacn month 'If he next jeir hell probably get 8200 and 8250 a month II tTcrtuaVy reaeies the minors he'll start lor small money until he becomes a fixture. Tien It will be up to him "I played for small ironer In my early days, too, and I didn't kick. Now, I am col'ecting for those early hardships while I arn In a position to command money. Im like etery ball player that lUed In the Tact that I realize I hare only a few years of top notsh baseball in me. Ruth, Cobb. Lajole, Wagner and Johnson, to of stars, and all others who plajed baseball had Just so many years before they found their slowing up. their anns going tad, old age creep'nt, o- them 'I love baseball. No man who aidn't it could stick to It ard flght his way up from the minors But 1 also mj future to looi out for rn> ard present on which to collect TIORSE racing followers arc inclined to ha'l Indian Broom, owned by MaJ. Austin C. Tajlor, ai ore of the strongest threats to win the Ken- tuckj on May 2. The thiee-year-oM colt, which a ARMY TEN SWAMPS SYRACUSE Risko Demands to Defend Title Against Steele Cadets Run Wild, Rolling Up Record Score as They Down Orange IS to 1 to churcnnl Downs this week and to be one of tve riost capable performers In pairing for the Blue Grass Classic Despite the fact that ne established a worlds record on a dry and 1'ght- nl-g fast t-ack. Indian Broom is hailed as a mud runner and a muddy track at Churchill Dowrs Is lively to fird him rulirg a favorite at race Ime. Those who point out that the Dsrby weight c.' 126 pounds maj stop him familiar with facts True he made his world record with only 97 pojnds up but Broora has won four of his lost me races he carried 1J4 pounds In winning eacn o" two events. A colt that can carry 124 and win a mi'e has ro'hlng to fear from wf'ght Imposts of 126 pounds. MEADS, sensational Jockey who was bdired from racing In Florida this sprlrig ard who has found that Northern States intend to respect UK ban and leep him out of tho saddle, has gone back to his home in Cali- fornia His plans are to put in his time helping his father and mother con- duct a tourist canp which he bought out of his savings I'll ne.ei take on any weight and 1 hope 111 get back In the saddle soma Meade sa'd as he went West. Meanwhile racing circles are buzz- for his suspension, ana leaders the thoroughbred world a-e pre- tlng tint Meadc will never be able 4my's giant team to square blmwlf. its worst defeat In the his- after taking pass from mate at net (22) tvho is covered by Captain Ed Jontos. WIDE OPEN LACROSSE at extreme left in picture, casts ball into net for score West Point Smothers Syracuse in Record Loss Cadets Run Wild to Pile Up 18 to 1 Victory in Lacrosse Orange Is Outplayed Future Generals Score Pour Times in Four Min- a winner in tv IV-by rncc ride known but otherwise ll'.tle wlU be heard of him L S WAS expected Jlmmle Clark, the Jamestown Negro welterweight, and Joe Cnurch, Batavla's lightweight, haAe won their v.aj Into the O'ymplc flrals These two amateur boxers are amorg the top notchers or the coun- try and It wouldn't bo at all surpris- ing to see the-n Included on the teem to make the trip to Ccnnanj In quest f the Olympic boxing championship. Clark. In particular, looks like one of the really great mlddlewelghts ol tho countr, regardless of classifica- tion as to pro or amateur. He hca had npeatcd, offers to turn pro and he Is of the bus'est amateurs the country has ever known. For three jears he has fought with the O.vmp'.cs in nlnd and It is c'l'mcd his ciTb't'on Is to win an Oijmplc crown, then tun pro la Europe, fight 15 or 20 times li and England before returning to his nathe America, hoping he can brirg a European pro title, as well as the Olymp'c crow-n, back with him. 18-1 fcefo-e SOD cpACtato's In Archfcold Stadium Saturday afternoon. Armj's superior speed, pwer and ab'lity to pick up loose balls paved tho way for the downfall of the Orangemen, who were completely at a loss when the Cadets posses- sion o: the ball at the opening whistle and retained It until the flrs. qua-ter 'was over. Tho Soldiers rained In four scores In the nrst four minutes of play. Their rough and ready attack men dro.e through the Orangd defense u-i'h Big Ed Jontoa stared two other goals with heroic body crocks but his little. Individual efforts Nautilus Club Beats Rochester Swimmers 37-29 Special Dispatch to The Herald Rochester, April Syracuse Kautllus summing riub won its third Mrs. Dora Knaus And Mrs. Kale Are High Utica Scorers Special Dispatch to The Herald Utica. April Syracusans were in the Hat of eight high quail- meet of tvc I-crc tonight, JtMers of the D'srvnd Medal At the opening whistle Jim Scott, Irslde for Army, made the nrst or his six coals of the day on a short shot past Hague, Hill goal'c Hardly had the ball been returned to play when Johnson whipped In an- other short shot as Scott faked Hague away from the goal. Bill McOee, second scorer for Army with four goals for the after- noon, then started on his scoring splurge as ho drove In a side shot. Amtcke of tho Cadets looped In lorg ore and the score stood 4-0 as Coach Roy Simmons made frequent substitutions to stop the carnage. Syracuse had Us best chance to score midway In tho second the strong Rochester Monroe Bowling Tourra-rent at Rogers Al-1 when Scott was banished from the- I leys tonight, although they were not game for blocking. While he was la Y.MC.A. tank squad, 37-29. Alihougo ni.a oniy den the visitors showed individual power In capturing six out of tho soven nrst places. Konipf, Fleet Nau- tilus Club flnshaker, took Individual scoring honors AS he defeated Hill, Rochester star, In both th5 50 and IQG yards free stjle events. In the Kompf s time of 58 seconds lowered the pool record by a fun sec- ond. Sinclair. Harper and Aarons the other Uctors for the Xau- tllcs Club. Jn tho Rochester city champion- ships preceding the meet Kompf twice equalled the State Y-M C.A. rec- ord for the M-jard dash On both occasion Kompf touched out Mater, Buffalo aquatic star to win In eecands Sinclair of the Nautilus Club placed third la the IJO-yard Junior free style championship. Azucar Captures Fashion Stake At Bay Meadows Bay Meadows Track, San Mateo. April 18 wno oaoe captured a Btake, led his the fractious Dark Win- ter, acrow line the first "k- running of the W.OOO tolled Fashion Stakes at Bay The Fred M. Alger, Jr, No. 1 horse took the race by one length with Dark Winter place, nosing cut Jorious for the Azuctr, converted from a steeple- i In tint to win the f Aniu handicap, America's rtce, tapped around cral today (n 3-5 wconds for ratle test flrtt race ol the MUOD here. wu a heavy favorite in the mu snd ptld only M W to win. S3 2o to and 13 CO to ahow. Dark Win- WM coupled with winner in bettlnr. Jorloui paid x H Rolling In the early squads Mrs Dora Kcaus of Syracuse, last gear's champion, totaled 532. while Mae Kale of Syracuse scored 527. Neither tally Is expected to be high enough to make them qualifiers for the championship plaj off next Sunday Alice Rose, Schencctady. led the qualifiers to- night with 552. with Ole Brlscoe of ie same city, second, with Another of will be In action here torrorrow. The early Syracuse tcows: Bra ml! t............ Heis KllKbrind S Kusch 137 165 1ST 145 153 I TO 17) US 155 17: 153 IM 160 131 1S1 148 144 137 IN HI 111 177 Sykes of Elmira Barred From Ring For All His Life St. Paul, April 18 for life of Art Sykcs. Qmlra, N. Y.. boxer, was announced today by John J. Ahern, St. Paul Association presi- dent. Ahern said the action was taken because Sykes left the ring Wednes- day night during his bout In Chi- cago w :th Bob Pastor, New York heavyweight. The association presi- dent the action would bar Sykes f am fighting In 38 states affiliated with the AKtoclatlon, Tha boxer has been cited to appear April 27 before the Illinois Boxing Commission. INFANTRYMEN TRIUMPH Led by Capt. N. Hawkins, who scored 382 points, the 390th Regiment Infantry pistol team defeated the Onondtga Rifle PUtol Club aquad. to Saturday night at the BUto Armory down the Held with the ball In possession. The short handed Army team, in- stead of retreating, swarmed out on the field and took the ball away Irom the Hlllmen after Maury perl stein's short shot hit the top bar and bounced off. At the end of the first half Arm? led 11-0. The Cadets had two whois teams In the fleld dtirlrg the flrst two At the start o.' the last half the Orange got Its only consistent at- tack of the day under way. A pass from Jontos to Porter advanced the ball to mldfleld and Maury Perlsteu. outspcedcd tho Army defense to push In a line ehot for the Syracuse counter ol the day. The came right back and dropped In three successive goali The tired Syracuse team tried to keep down the score In the last quarter But the Amy shock troops rang up (our more counters before the final whistle blew. The only excitement of the after- noon was furnished by group or boya who tried to run sway with the ticket booth. They tipped It over partly and were on their way towards the gates before two scrub manigers itoppcd their proper. The summary: ARMY Flekei ............Ooal Tronton Bcore b Army 0- 3 4-1 Scott MeOtt 4 3. Ha itrro 2. Clirk. Johnson, Eherburne, Perl sttln. Substitutions Brneust: Eiartd Shtnktn. minim. KWdnll. Bliden. Arm? Tlncher Pour, Nmrrc, SoUohub. Ref burst, Goldinp. N wit on. SoUohub. Joitph JulJca. JadM Dr. Syracusan Turns Aside Offer For Services Steele, Conqueror of Risko in March Bout, Demands Title Chance Hailed as Champion Northwest Fans Call Ta- coma Boy Uncrowned King- of Middleweights ONE OF MANY. -Here is Scott, star of the West Point team as he cast one of several goals against the Orange. Staff Photos. Herald Bridge Aces Meet Friday In Title Test 24 to Survive First Test and Meet for Cham- pionship The fourth annual pair champion- ship play-offs or the Syracuse Bridge Club will take place next Friday at the Onondaga Hotel under the direction of the Club Director, Mrs John 3 Jacobs The winners ulll receive vuatody of the Victory Pair Trophy. Individual awards and approximately 20 City Muter Points of the U. S. Bridge Association, under sponsorship of which the games are conducted. There trill be 13 teams. 24 playeri qualified at the game Friday. These players will compete In the cham- pionship game held one week later at Mrs. Jacobs' home. Carryover points will be Included In the Anal scores The successful qualifiers who have survived a series of elimination tour- naments held on successive Monday evenings, beginning Dec. 30 last. Mo as follow: E L Austin, Mrs. A. Ammsrman, D. E. Balck, John Brown, E. P. B.-ennan. J. A Conley, Mrs B. 6. Cooper, Dr. R. 5. Cooper. C. Cadwallader, Mrs. J. E Doyle, Dr. P. Dslton. Tom Dwyer, Mn, Boyd Dudley, R. Eaton, Dr. R. W. Elcholtz. Mrs. J. J. Edwards. F. B. Flt7serald, Mrs. E. Ferris. R. F. Francis. Mrs. H. D. Oros, Mrs. E C. Gilbert, George Greer, Joe Glass. George Helndorf II, Ambrose Harley. Miss B Johnson, Robert KeneBck, Mrs. Robert Keneflcl, Dr. W. Lawler, Jake LatlbT. Mrs. 3. Mar- low, c. C. Marrlon, Mrs. A McCarthy, John MKMly, Stanley Morey. Major McCuUheon. Mrs. C. Nugent, Ed O'Connell, Art Oley, C. J. Parker. Joe Renaud. Dr. H. M. Hoblin, Mn. Ernest Reed. Dr. Ernest Reed, Mrs. H. M. Roblln, A. B. Stafford, R. P. Strough, Mrs. E. J. W. Scott. Charles W, Spencer, Alan Schroeder, S. sun den. H. A. Smith, Mrs. H. A. Smith. Mrs. W. S. Street. Mrs A. B. Staf- ford, M Slffln. Ned Turner, Mn. Laura Turner, Mn. F. S. Tracy, Mrs. o. 1. Vincent, Mrs. H. U. VuBerien. Dr. Z, S. VanDuyn, Mrs. E. B. VanDuyn. Mn. R. S. weekcs. R. S. Weekei, B. D White, Miss Marlon Wurzbergtr. Harvard Crushes Princeton Tossers Under 9 to 2 Score Princeton, M. J- April 18 vard defeated Princeton, today In their first Eastern Intercollegiate Eaceball Leagui game of the season Harvard has beaten the Tlgerf regu- Irly since The Cambridge men reached Shorty Morris, Princeton'! ace pitcher lor It hits. Ed Ingalls, Harrard hurler, allowed slz. Harvard opened Its drive for runt in the nrst Inning, jot two, and It-uilng t to 0 by their half of the Princeton twice in their half or the Innlnf. Harvard tot an- otner run to the seventh and four In the ninth. Detroit Fetes Champions With Tigers, Wings and Joe Louis Main Heroes Michigan City Calls Itself Capital of Sports World as It Honors Its Teams and Individual Stars Detroit, April 18 hundred Detrolters. proud, patriotic and sufficiently In funds, tonight handed over 63 for the privilege of fittending affair designed to pay Just homage to those groups and Indi- vldaa's responsible for Detroit's ncrc sobriquet, "city of champions" The mayor, city councilmen, the governor and other notables, although they did not purchase tickets, all were on hind to toast the boys and girls, tell them "how proud wo and point out their Individual and col- lective value to the city and state. The Detroit Tigers came. In for most or the pretty speeches, hand- clasping and back-pattlrg, because they are Just setting out to retain tr-elr World's Baseball championship. Also, there were more Tigers present than any other group. But tna Red wings came In for a good shxre of the complimentary talk Because tr-ey recently won the Stanley Cup signifies "you're the tops" as far as hockey Is concerned. The af- fair, hostvcr. was a dull one for tha Wlrgs, who remembered the cham- pa tj OWTCT Ii'crrls. Sr. threw for them In Toronto the- night ;hey won the cup. The Olympics, winners of the International League Hockey title, also came In for praise. Next In came the Detroit LSons, wxrld professional football champions. Although disbanded foe tho many of them could not te restrained from coming hundreds, and "even thousands" of miles to at- Und the 'tome town" affair, Individuals came In for their Ahara of attention. Gar Wood, undisputed king of speed on the water, ended his vacation In Florida to return w the "Capital of the Sporis World" for tonight's banquet. His speedy Miss Americas bare discouraged all hopes of foreign Invaders to race for the prized Harmsworth trophy this year. Joe (Spellbound) Louis.' Uncrowned King the sat through the affair as much a stoic as tiio nights he kayoed Prlmo Camera. King LeTinsky erd Max Baer. There was a radio broadcast of the Ings but the promoters knew better than to schedule a speech from Brown-Bomber. AH tbe speakers agreed that the heavyweight title would rest In Detroit before 1937 rolls The city's lesser champions were out In force and applauded when in- troduced to the 500 loyal banqueet- They Included: Dick Degener, National A.A.U, dlr Ing champion. Clark National M-pound weight throwing champion. Esther Chancre end Constance- O'Donoran, national publ'c court doubles tennis Herb Mendelsohn, owner ot thi Notre Dame, winner of the Prtsj dent's cup race. Eddie Tc'an, profc-slonal running champion. Geneva High Lacrosse Warriors Turn Back Orange Cubs, 16 to 7 High .School's over-powered the Syracuse freshmen, 16 to 7, In wild game at Hendrlck Field yeaterday sTternoon. The visiting aggregation ran rings around tee yearlings, who were never Managers of Two Baseball Circuits Meet on Tuesday of Onondaga dingerous. Dobbin, Foster and Ferris each scored four goals for the Tlsltors. Scherwrliom, fcox.e for yearlings, sank three during ths aft- ernoon to lead his mates In scoring. 8TRACUSE GENEVA cox ..............Geti............ Ltmn 0btw.............Point........ Keal ..............C.P......... AnUitucei ...3 A.... ...1 A.... ...OH ...J.H.... MorriT Hirt AI1U W.... S J 1 ___..... 144 Hirt 2. AI1U, horn X Lower? 3, CMciplin, Wirdtn, Per- ils t Dobbin 4. rosur 4, aubetitoUonj- Sfncute, Orrtorj; IM Joha. Krtntcr, Jartiae. Lrttl. Peril. O'Connor Is To Direct Golf Leagues Public Links Loops to Be Organized at City Hall, April 27 Industrial and Commercial Golf Leagues are being planned by WPA and Municipal Recreation Depart' mcnt and representatives of indus- trial plants and commercial houses rill meet April 27 at City Hall to further plans. Public links at Bur- net and sunnycrcst will be used by the golfers. Maurice O'Connor, well known Syracuse golfer, will have charge of the leagues and at Is busy contacting heads of Industrial and commercial organizations In an effort to get the teams organized. Among the business houses and factories of the city Interested In the project are: LearburyX Continental Can. Rollway Bearing. City Oarage Leroy Casper Sales Company, Syra- cuse Journal, City Engineer's Depart- ment, Crucible Steel Company, Nei Process Gear. L. C. smith Company Nettleton Shoe Company. New York State Tax Department, United States Immlcratlon OTlce, United States Be- cret Service, Syracuse Fire Depart- ment, New York Telephone company Syracuse Lighting Company, Depart- ment of Public Welfare, Atmospheric Nitrogen Company, Coughlln Candy Company, Wells Coverlys', Eas; Washing Machine Corporation, Trav- elers' Insurance- Company, Adult Ed ticatlon Department, E. W. Edwards Sons, Sun Oil Company, Grouse Hinds Company, Lemson Company Owen-Dyncto.Alex Grants' Sons, Puss Seymour, Syracuse Ornamenta Company, WlU ft Baumer Candi Company and Scars Roebuck, Inc. HOBART DEFEATS UNION Geneva, April 18 Col- lege plastered 20-to-8 defeat on Union College In a lacrosse game here today. It was the highest score a fiobart team has ever rolled up. Rose ed the attack with five goals. Countr Baseball League Mil meet Tuesday night o'clock to draw up the schedule and complete final plans for the opening of the season. May 10. Members of the Junior Baseball League will meet Wednesday nlghV plan for their opening. Ma; 10. The sessions will be staged at Alex orant's Sons. Teams entered In the count; circuit are: Nedrow A. C. Martsons, Kren's Whippets. Chlttenango. Uuitangs, Belle Isle, Y. M. C. A., Industrials and Apex A.C. Efforts are being made to add lour clubs to sute It a circuit In the Junior circuit 13 teams have been signed and others are expected to join the Among the clubi listed are He'olrs. Ortolet, Judges, fa- lastl A C., Clippers, Blsont, Majesties, Stan, Solva; Polish Club, Panthers, Split Bock, and All- Stars. Seattle, April 18 Steele, young Tacoma middleweight, ,oday ttanuj In the fUUc as result of his smashing victory over Eddie "Babe" Risko, world a middle- weight caampion, In a non-title bout, Pacific Northwest fans call the "uncrowned middleweight cham- pion." Now the 23-year-old sharp- shooter Is awaiting another shot at the crown at stake. After the bout here on March Risko, battered and bruised, Ignored (25.000 offer to put the title ca tho block In another Steele bout. wants at least Stcele's stock soared to the highest peak of his six-year career In the rlnj. It was his 85th match since he started boxing professionally in 1930. He won 36 by knockouts and 42 by de- cisions. Fire were draws and two to Tony Portlllo, Seattle, in 1931, and the other to Tommy Herman. Los Angeles, in 1832. later avenged both defeats. At 10, Steelc, then skinny and frail, vowed he would come day DC a oox- Ing champion. His first flght, at 13 years, was the result or an argument over a girl. Another youngster, Jimmy Brttt, and Steele often came- to blows over that certain sehoolglrli They had agreed to settle the matter In a preliminary bout on a weekly boxing card at Belllngham. Wash, then Stccle's home. They slugged through three two- minute rounds to a draw. Then they forgot the girl, became close friends, and later joined the same flght stable. Steele family moved to Ta- ccma when Freddie was 14. After school hours, he frequented ft gym- naalum operated by Miller, portly boilng manager. The young- ster weighed 106 poundi and received no encouragement. He became errand boy. water boy or caddy for who- ever happened to need him. At 15, Steele was promised his first bout, a four-rounder. To surprise, the skinny kid scored quick knockout. He did the same In the next match. During that first year, Steele won 12 matches, most of them by knock- outs. Then came and the youngster, now carrying 130 pounds, topped his first card In Ta- coma. He won everything In short order and bccime the most popular flghtcr In the Northwest He was improving steadily, adding weight power. Then came- misfortunes In 1931 that nearly cut ihort career. First, he developed kidney trouble, and physlclaru slid he must quit the ring. For months he rested. BASEBALL-Too AY Chiefs vs. Montreal Municipal at 3 P. M. -ADMISSIONS- rt.it snti...........................fl.io Reserved Grandstand Seata.......... ..99 Vnreseiyed .85 Unreserred under It JU .63 under 12 -W under 12 ........U   

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