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Syracuse Herald Newspaper Archive: October 2, 1929 - Page 1

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   Syracuse Herald (Newspaper) - October 2, 1929, Syracuse, New York                             js the Only Syracuse Newspaper with Complete Wire and Cable Reports of Both the ASSOCIATED PRESS and the UNITED PRESS: ESTATE'S GREATEST INDEPENDENT, A f -ng _ T "Y ___ T T "V Owned in Syracuse' T f i I tP A T 1 I Heart o, Nation', InduHria, Zmplr, RALD 2, NO. EDITION SYJUCUSE, Y., WEDNESDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 1929. THREE CENTS BOARD nn Two Slain in New Guardsmen Ordered to Quell Marion Union Battle 18 Wounded as Workers Walk Out and Clash With Police Form Picket Lines Sheriff and Deputies Are Clubbed Trying to Dis- perse Fighters Raleigh. N. C-. Oct. companies of National Guardsmen today were ordered to East Marlon where a riot occurred this morning a; the Marlon Manufacturing Com- pany's cotton mill. The Salisbury and Worth Wllkcsboro companies were ordered lo entrain for Marlon us soon as possible. Marlon, N. C.. Oct. 2 men killed and IB others wounded, 12 of them seriously. In a battle be- iivcen union and non-union, workers at the Marion Manufacturing Corn- pay cotton mill here today. The dead are Sam Vlekers and Randolph Hall, union members. Those shot were: Sparks, Miss Lucy Sparks. Rome Mln- iih, 1.. S. Long, W. S. Black, Kermlt Fender, Elsie Baliard. Luther Brysoii, Hohcr'B, Wyklo, McComb, George Jonas end Deputy Sheriff Taylor Green. Sheriff O. F Adfclns and Deputies William Bigger T5 Gannon ar.C Alljc SUpp wert painfully but not seriously injuret with clubs. Reports from the Marion Genera Hospital at noon that five the persons injured probably would die. The condition of a numbei others was doubtful. Sheriff Adkins announced that he had telegraphed Gov. O. Max Gard- nrr, asking for troops. The trouble started when 80 mem- bers of the United Textile workers of America, which recently settled a ttrlko at the mill, walkd out and lorrncci a picket line outside the mill gates. At o'clock this morning, when rhlfts changed, several fights started. Sheriff Adkins end a number of deputies Intervened. Some one fired a shot, and In a. few minutes i-here was a general fusillade. All of those Injured, except Sheriff Adklns, Blggerstaff, Stepp and Can- non were shot. These four were clubbed during the affray, Sheriff Adkins said that he did not know where the flrst shot came from, but that he thought it came from the picket line. He said that u number of those wounded had been shot down by their own people, asserting thai, one man standing him fell as a number of shots wertf sent in ilia direction. The Marlon Manufac- turing Company resumed operations on an open shop basis viiree weeta ogo nftfr having been closed for two months due to a walk-out of many of their employes who were mem- bers of the United Textile V'orkerfi Villon. This strike was followed by clos- ing down of the Clinch field Manu- idciurmt; milt two nukes distant. There were a number of fights at the Marlon Manufacturing Company mill during the early days of the 'strike, but nobody was hurt seriously. j Wherj Uie Ollnchfleld mill prepared to resume work two companies of National Guardsmen were sent to the village but when no trouble occurred thoy were brought to Marlon and oil letted. A non-union worker moved Into a company house at the Clinchflcld mill. Alleged strikers and sympathizers the furniture out of the house ,and beat deputy sheriffs who inter- 'lured. The troops were sent hack to ,the village and two additional com- panled called out. Nearly 100 per- jsons were arrested and 54 were in-: (ilctcd by the Grand Jury on charges; of Inciting to riot and rebellion. i Two weeks ago. through the cf- j lorts of N. A. Townsend. executive I counsel to Gov. O. Max Gardner, the t-slrilifi uuc tfiUItti. Unlou worker; I have claimed that mill executives" .hare failed to live up to lha terms of the settlement. Officials of the United Textile Workers of America, who called the strike early today, gave their treasons for ordering the walk-out that mill officials had failed to carry j out terms of the agreement by which the recent nine wrcfcs' stride British Designers Would Add Motor ToVanOpelPlane London, Oct. 2 corn- bin iition motor-and-rocket plan- wub butfijtibieu oy Brilish airplane designers today as a result of Fritz Von Opel's brief but successful flight at Frankfurt. Germany, Mon- day in an airplane propelled by rocket explosions. It lias long been known, the de- signers said, that while the full power an airplane Is required for tho takeoff, only one-half Is needed to maintain level flight. Therefore they asked: Why not equip nn airplane with a half-size engine plus rockets, the rockets to assist, the engine in the only? Tariff Bill Attacked as British Spy Plot Charged By Shearer Navy Expert Offers Docu- ment to Prove Alle- gations Inquiry Adjourned Further Hearings to Be JLJ-i.HJ.Vf I; Hiram Johnson De- nounces Flexible Pro- visions of Measure Forms World Bank AIJLUCJUUllttlU D.eparts Washington. Oct. 2 the verge of nn expected call for a ne-r naval limitations conference, the Senate Shearer Investigators ___rf had clamped down the brakts on their Inquiry into what took place two. years ago at the unsuccessful Geneva conference. Menn while, the Senate Itself spurred by disclosures made in the Shearer inquiry and statements that efforts have ..been, made to Influence tariff legislation, has directed Its Judiciary committee, headed by Sei ator Norrls of Nebraska, to conduct a general investigation of lobbying under the sweeping terms of the Car- away resolution. When it will begin its sessions remains to lw decided. With Prime Minister MacDonald Hearing the American coast, the Shearer committee decided to post- pone further work until he has con- cluded his visit to President Hoover regarded Rg for the pur- pose of cementing more firmly the friendly con7ersations which have :aken place between London and Washington on the limitation of naval armaments. This decision of tho committee will postpone during MacDonald's sojourn an airing of a so-called British document received by the rommlttee yesterday without being made public, which purported to how ihe existence in this country of an extensive espionage system re- porting to London. Committee members arc consider- ng being made public, which pur- sorted to show the 'existence in this ountry of an extensive espionage yatem reporting to London. Vote in Few Hours California Republican Says He Will Be Against Hoover Washington, Oct. 2 and politics have figured in the actions of the tariff commission dur- ing the past seven years, Senator Johnson. Republican, California, de- clnred in the Senaie today during speech denouncing the flexible tariff. Johnson opened what was ex- pected to be the flnal debate. A vote was expected within n. few hours. The California senator announced ie would vote against Presiden t Hoover's flexible tariff program, de- claring "it would be criminal to alter the age long Anglo-Saxon law that confers on Congress the taxing lowers." Johnson echoed the warning issued )y Senator Borah, Republican, Idaho, ast week, agaist transferring the .arid making powers to a-commls- Eftst. "Have a care ye out there in Cali- fornia." he said, "against con- centrated, power in the East, lost in tiie luiure you rmd you have lost that for which you fought in the j dp.ys or the past. j "Where would you rather I your chances behind the closed'doors of the Tariff Commission or in ihe open before Johnson asserted that when the Senate approved the flexible tariff in 1922 It was an emergency measure and there was no thought of maklnc it permanent. Johnson read a campaign speech of President Hoover in October last year In which Air. Hoover said the American people would never for delegating constitutional powers to commissions. "I stand with that statement o! I President Hoover when I stand agalast .the flexible provision said Johnson. An pmendment to the tariff bill to eliminate that section forbidding importation of immoral literature, books containing threats against the President or other American citizens out receptions was introduced today by Senator Cutting, Republi- can, N. M. Russian Guns Smith Succeeds Thunder; Big Marshall as Trustee of Casualty JLlSli Manchuli Reports Severe; Fighting; Chinese Towns Hit Paves Way For Start of State Forestry College] Elimination Next Spring Americans Come Out! Harbin Hears Offensive to Begin; Soviet Pris- oners Tortured Eiclusii-c Cable to The Herald Harbin, Oct. Russian bombardment "-25 reported todav! i from ManchuM. contiiniini; until late! in the afternoon and resulting in a j big casualty list. received todav of! n Chirac villages near the junction of the Sur.gari and Amur Rivers. Harbin Is filled rumors that a new Russian offensive :.s Hkfly to start at any JACKSON L. REYNOLDS Paris, Oct. 2 E. Reynolds, president of the First National Bank. New York City, has been, chosen chairman of the com- News also mlsfjon to organic the Interna- i attacks tionai bank for handling German reparations payments, H was said on high authority today. Reynolds and Melvin A. Trsylor, president of the First National Bank, of Chicago, arrived in France on the Leviathan today as the Uni- delegates to the com- at Baden- L-ondon, Oct. 2 Exchange Telegraph dispatch from Hong Kong today Gaid. that the American consul nt Wuchow had been advised- to orrti dren to evacuate in view of the ex- pected occupation of the c.l Cantonese revolutionary forces. ted Stati mission, which meets Baden Thursday. Hurricane Swamps N. Y. Ferry Docks U. S. Women Are Ordered Out of Zone The dispatch ihe occupation. Commuters Delayed by High Water j Russians Tortured Syracuse Gets Taste Storm's Fury Abates in South With Flood. Averted Marketing Aid for Grain Growers May Be Held Until 1930 Washington, Oct. 2 Sam R. McKelvle. the wheat rep resent at Ivc on the Federal Farm Board, said be- re the Senate Agriculture Com- New Voik. Oct. 2 j Itself out in n gale along the Atl.inU In China's Prisons Moscow. .Oct. 2 tales of Chinese cruelties to Russian prison- ers in Manchuria were brought to JJoscovr today in a 10 official news from. Khaua-! rovsk. Soviet arriving from Northern quoted. The dispatch taiu the Chinese subjected their prisoners during cress j examination to bearing and un-' speakablc torture, Internal injuries j were Infilcied on prisoners. It was' charged, by pumpinr sir into their bodies and subsequent Amended Plan Is Held i Legal, Adequate, Not i Excessive in Cost jCity to Do Widening Central Must Bear Cost of Junction Connection and Station Flint Over Appoint- ment There tlons. vere'a number of to The tfrra.'d Fifteen bodies were found j Aibany. 2.- rortr.er Gov. Karbln. and six others were; frsd E. Smith today was appointed a member ol Bsard of Trustees o! the College o! Forestry, Fyranw University. He will sucreed ;j.a late Marshall. The appointmen: ar.nouncetJ nltttt today that the Farmers Na- seaboard, the remnants.of the erratic. tropic hurricane today drove the highest tide of tho year over Hudson River piers. At some points the water was so high that ferries could more than nn hi from Staten Island and Jew Jersey were delayed at the height __ _ ____ r____ _____........... _..p___ of the morning rush. West Street, then are addrd to the Acting Many prisoners whu were aneiied at "I am extremely happy ;o i night time are clad only in under-; nounce the o: wear. dysentery.' a man 10 the v.vMr.ry nnd scarlet 'ever prewilent. dcitli i A Herbin. Manchuria, dispatch, J--------------------------- snicl United States Consul Hanson there was imderstod have re- i taken from the Sungarl River. In every case Identification was to impossible, since the heads were gone. Prison camp conditions vvcre  y the railroad, along with liuiited ;o welcome forrr.er Governor cost c' conatructlng a passenger Smith. I ihin.i: ii Is a very fine -ip- [standing that he appear i mac for ti force.- High waves swept tip Boardwalk there, damaging lonal Grain Marketing Corporation jrobnbly would not be prepared to function as far as effecting the nrice jn-tii lujjuitiUK JJUUMUll. i, tljv Pllt-l- Committee members are consider- j conceriied 'untii nwt ng this document, which was hand- d to it by William B. Shearer, the or repon Three days of light but almost In- I cessant rain has added to the troubles I of the Coney Action. Hundreds of m IIIL. cellars were reported flooded. _ storm of the city. n the detention camp on the i ffic dc- I shipbuilders, and with it a from the Navy intelligence which Ssnator Allen, Republican. Kansas says disputes its authenticity. Other ramifications of the picture that has been drawn up lor them by the var- ious witnesses also are being sized up, and it is the opinion of the com- mltteemen that most of the leading (Concluded on Page 2, Column 5.) BODY RECOVERED FROM CANAL Rome, Oct. 2 The body of Eu- gene Parmelcc, who disappeared Sept. 26 and for whom a statewide search had been instituted, was found floating in the Barge Canal here to- day, Paint on the hands and cloth- ing of the dead youth corresponding to that on a nearby guard rail let: police to express the belief he had committed suicide, although no mo- tive for the act could be established nt the mill, which Is located in Etut WM settled; that more than 100 former striking employes had not been given employment as agreed and j thut mill foremen would not hear the Srlevflnce committee. Mill officials Asserted thftl a rmm- ber of tho strikera refused to accept Ihelr old i HER ,Knin tonight; Thursday fair, slowly rising temperature. t .Candy Dance, Pompay Barn, David Lawrence Page 2 Night Flying, on Albany- Cleveland Mail Route Starts Nov. 1 page 3 John J. Clare Saved From Armed Bandits by Wife's Screams Page 4 MftcDonald Is Good SaUor, Joins Ship Games Page 5 Hnnna Calls Rail Experts to Get "L" Blurted Realtors Will Fete Davlson, Air cnlcf Page 7 PageS Page 9 Theaters Crossword Puzzle Page SECTION TWO Sears, Roebuck and Co. Opening SECTION THREE Knight Charges Governor Evaded Rothflteln Probe to Save- Tammany Comics Radio Programs Page 1 Page ia Paga H Social Activities and News of Interest to Women Pages 18 and 19 New Reforestation Scheme Page 20 Starts Tomorrow SECTION TOUR 21, 21 and Ogdcn Hammond's Resignation as Envoy Accepted j ngion, Oct. 2 res- toriay. Washin_ Isnatlon of Ogdcn H.' ambassador to Spain, effective Nov. 15. has been accepted by the State Department at Hammond's reffuest Secretary Stlmson announced today! were choked end iaj-ed in flooded streets. By tonight, the storm area w rcacn its I York, perhaps bringing a northeast gale or CO miles an hour and hcavv A wind of 56 miles an hour at Atlantic City _. Storm warnings have been ordered as far north as Portland, Ore. At noon the weather bureau an- nounced the storm warnings had been changed to northwest from Sandy 4) j Tunney Undergoes Minor Operation in Chicago Club Ban Is Lifted j Dynamited I Bv Treasury! Bv Bombers! (Concluded of Page 3, Colum Dining Car Crew Under Arrest Charged With Cut In Portions Served Public Receipts Kept and Split Between Steward and Crew, Say Investigators Who Arrest and Hold Men P n f Berlin Sanatorium i Previous Order Reversed; Gangsters Go Outside of station. The commission reserved, in 'its order, the right, to allocate between ri-.y. raHroat! and Slaie various other upon, which detailed, plans are cot yet complete. The wentis! or eaactlns clauses of the order, which, iinkss some new proceeding ts launched -the final chapter of a fight in which Syracuse has been officially cncazeU for nearly 20 years, are follows: "This com mission, after due uemg of ine public safety requires the ellmlca- Rerlin, Oct. 2 Tunney. former heavyivjlghi cham-1 plon. today underwent a successful minor operation at a local. torlum. j The retired, champion, soon alter j the operation, returned to hotel where Mrs-. Tunney. the former Polls Lander, joined him. to Include Members of Congress Underworld With Terrorism mployes after a long Investigation directed by C. W. Stephenaon. superintendent of a nationally known detective agency, at toe instance of railroad who werfl puzzled by the-continued 'occ of seemlEeTy nonnal patronage tlis cars. Stepbenson nnd rdilroad htadB pre- dicted that numerous other Arrests would follow in coneequenco 'of ad- missions Involving iclloW'-emploTM which were said to have been made under- questioning by the arnisted The d. lining car steward Hartford and the road through a drastic i reduction cf the were arrested Lindbergh Party Reaches Panama, Hops Off Again avid, Panama. Oct. 2 Charles A. I.Alndbergli and party landed here at A. M.. took on fuel and hopped off again at A. M. on their way from Cristobal. "Janal Zone, to Manngua. Nicaragua. David, his only scheduled stop en route, is 325 miles from Crlstob.il and 4-15 miles from Managua. pantryman.. THe waiters, as n rule, pocketed half of the amount of the nistomer's for themselves. In order to conceal. the fact that more food should havo been served than tho actual receipts showed. reduced tbe ordered por-i tlons by about two-thirds, it was as- serted, in that way, although food nnd {he latter' were far below the amount of bus- iness anticipated by the road on basis of. past averages. The men under wrest here are Ebeii H. Murray, a stewnrd, whose home Is In Somervllle, and Complete Reports Of Stock Market that the .waUer, 3lVSoy A 'smfth? aoT hid tlllUry.lSewHIIv negro waiters Oscar all Complete, revised, ftccuratc of the NCT ycrE stocs Market and the New York Curb I and bond markets, two full pages of business news by the wires of the Associated Press, the United Press and the Con- solidated Press, printed in the FINAL (five-star) Edition of The .Herald Because of the change from Daylight Saving to Eastern Eiandard Time In Hew York City, the stock markets are now closing an hour later than during summer months. Headers rely on The Herald's FINAL (five-star) edi- tion for tho most complete and accurate Stock Market'reports .printed, Washington. Oct. '2 trcas- I Chicago. 2 a. year of today issued thai Coc- j nearly 300 bombinrs. last night's dy- grsfismen ar.d j.v.-crnrr.fr.t r.nmite aiMrk -.spcm Take Sliore official? are cntlilcfl to free entry when they return abroad on government bujir.c-'e sncl ta courtesy -of' the port ivhcr. they return Irom Athlotic Ciub as the firs: to be pleasure trips. The instructions :nade aaainst a fashionable and ex- clusive group of Chicagoar.F. The bomb was tcsied through b window of the clubhouse. tearing a hole In the wall of ihe supersede orders. The order today tbat of JU t last June 1 in that It high natft torlum. The club Is in Luke Shore Drive, in ihe heart of the Gold Coast. The force of the explo felt in nearby and _ government 'officials and conpress- hotels. Several" members men returning froai pleasure trips asjioflter room men and entltleri pcditecl. having their baggage ex- Previous ,re.gijlatlons pro- In the vomen In the loung? of the club were stag- gered by the blast. frit nk J. Locach. 76-year-old as- issued only tn of passengers re- slstant state's attorney and member turning with the body of a relative or Irleiid where they were seriously ill or infirm or summoned home by news of affliction or disaster. The June 1 order was Issued presumably as the result of protests that fol- owed the arrival of a party of con- ;ressmen from Panama. Part of them and received. expedite orders and >thers demanded them upon their irrlTAl In New York. It was charged ;hat the party was returning from a rteasure trip and not entitled to the Courtesies of the port. FalJ Asks Court Dismiss Indictment Charging Bribery Washington, Oct. 2 B. Fall, former .Secretary of Inttrlor, today ashed District of Columbia Supreme Court. Justice William Hltz to (Jlsmlw tho bribery Inalctmcnt agalMt .the ground that a trial, ra this charge would amount to of President Hoover's Crime Com- mission, was aroused from sleep in his Drake Hotel apartment and Joined in the investigation. "The persons u-ho did this bomb- ing." he said, "advanced to the very door of the civic leaders of Chicago. The bombing must be solved." The actjlftl TVM ftt "a few hundred dollars" and was confined to the natatorlum. Police were Investigating two the- ories, one that the 'bombing may have been done by terrorists em- ployed by garage racketeers who In turn were disgrunted over the fact an adjoining vacant lot to park their care. The other theory was that rival cab vyintr for the privi- lege of waiting at the club entrance for had resorted to violence to ahow their dissatisfaction with the present arrangement, which givei the club business to a single com- pany. The bombers, in an ware seen as they, tossed ttisYibombj ified by said map filed at the hearlnd on July 29. 1929. said crossings beta! as follows: "Main line: Complete elimination Road, Irving Avenue, Forman Avenue, Almond Street, South McBrlde Street, South Townsena Street. South State Street, Montgom- ery Street. Eass Gcncsce Street South Warren Street, South Salini Street South Clinton Street, South Franklin Street lengthwise occupation of Washington Street from the easterly line of Irving Avenue westerly to Onondaja Creek. Partial elimination Avenue. Pine Street, Wilriut Avenue, University Avenue. SouKr- Crouse Avenue, South Wes; street. South Geddes street, Hiawatha Street and lengthwise occupation of WasJf-' lugton Street from, the easterly line of Irving Avenue easterly to a noln' east of Beech street. "West Shore: Complete elimination Avenue, Peat street. Green- way Avenue, Teal] Avenue. North Beech Street. Elm street. North Street. Bride Street. Brown street (lengtS- WM Townsend1 StrMt- Street. East Willow o Boulevard, Korth NOrth CUnlon Avenue and TOUlrty to"   

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