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Penn Yan Express Newspaper Archive: April 18, 1884 - Page 1

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   Penn Yan Express, The (Newspaper) - April 18, 1884, Penn Yan, New York                               VOL. 50 PENN APRIL 1884. WHOLE 3-131 PAYNE'S IO Spark-Arresting Engine bu cut ft. of Michigan 1'ine la 10 burning slabs from lie saw in leagitu. 10 Horit Guarantee to famish power to MW of Hemldck Boards In 10 hours Our USortt icUi cut in mine lime. Our Engines are f.Uiiu.vTHEii to furnish a horse-power on leis foci Truer than any other Kn ine not filled with an Automatic yon wan or Portable Clrcu- Ofl. If yon want a Stationary STEAM PRINTING HOUSE. lar STiaftme or cast or Moddart'i Patent Wroneht-Iron tf-ncl for our illustrated No. for Information and B. W. PAYNE Y. Boi WITH OUU NEW STEAM ENGINE MANUFACTURED B5T LeRoy this we are enc.bled to exeonte all kiuilH of .1 o 0 0 DISEASE CURED Without Medicine. A valuable Discovery for MipplyliiK Mnj-'iittiMii to the. lluaiau Hyntum. blectrielty and Magnetism utlllzi-d aa n ever bu- tore for Ilea.lng Hie Sick. TIIK MAGNETON APPLIANCE CO.'S dfngnelic KIIKM FOR MEN IS TfiPIIRP WAnnAtliLU I U UUIIL the following utecutiett without in the Head or Ncnousi ItlieumiitUni. Dlxeunexol tliu ISpinal 1'frpid He.'niiml Heart UUIIB- Ikrula or elc. When any de'jitity of the OKSi.UATIVE Olt- OAN8 IXWT VITALITY. LAOK or NKIIVI and WAHTINU -WhAK.sKFN. and all those dis- eutteH of a personal fioin uhutuver conlinuouH ptreani of the jwrlB muct restore Ihern to n litallhy nciion. IB no miHtaku appliance. TO THE LADIES of the Fulling ul tin- Li-ueur- ijiunic Ihfltiininfiliun 1'k-er.iliou Hie Womb. Incidental Sujipn wc-il unii Lile. Him it- the i EBT UHAT1VH AtlKM KNlAV.S. for ail ol It is un- inrpiuw-d by uoytlilnK before n huth a curative und tie a eource ol poutr nnd vlializn- lluri. Price ol either Hell w th lu-oles. Bout by C'. O. nnd ujcnniiimtion uUuwi tl. or by mall on receipt in ordering semi meamire of und xizeof plioe. Id-mil lam-ast can bo made In nent in letter til our risk. The Magneton Uannentu are adapted to all are worn over the next to the btxly like the many aud Electric ImnilmuK ailver- nml should tuk'.-n uU at tight. Thoy hold their POWKB aud aru worn at aU of the Hdud nUnp for the New Departure In Medical Treatment Without with of teetimonlalR. THE MAGNETON APPLIANCE if IS .-stale 111. ono dollar In pontajje or our- reucy letter at onr with t-lzu of nlioi- usually and try a pair of onr Magnetic and be convinced of the power residing in our other Mug- nutlc AppMnnctc. Poi-itlvely no cold feet when they are or money refunded. octliyltoS-l JOB WOKK. JOB JOB WOHK- JOB WORK .JOli WOHK JOB WOItK JOB WOKK JOB WOKK Vromptly and at the LOWEST PRICES. We have all the Modern Styles of for fancy and Ornamental and we do Plain Jolj Work with the greatest rapidity. Bring or send in your if yon want printing done in a style to ploaae you Travelers' Directory. Ki UK.3.. Season of 1884. The West of tiic Crooked Lake Navigation now ninuing us Lcflvci Hftinniondvporl S.OO A. M ArriveK ul Pei.n IViui Van nt p. M Arrivrhat TJ.IIO Fan' III cento. 0. Sup'l. I'enn ISS-I. T11E BATTLE fZAO Off DuAH. The tented field wore a wrinkled And the emptied church from the looked down f On the emptied road and the emptied he cried out suddenly. That summer Sunday morning. do you know that before that boy had got back the Frenchman was as easy as a lamb but that is better 1 that's POWDER Absolutely Pure. powder never vtmert. A mnrvel of purity itrenfjth and More economical than he orilinary ami cannot be sold In com eti Ion ivlth the multitude of low t-hort wci lit 'Itim or phosphate powderp. hltl frjilii in cant. UAKISO POWDER Co. UiiWnllSt.. New York. that's for ten or here was the and there was the j fifteen minutes he weEt on just as if he really had been relieved by having his leg straightened out. He never said another word about being cramp- but declared his leg was perfectly easy now. It wasn't a gray And a wide green valley rolled away Between where the battling armies The sacred Sunday Young Custer sat with impatient His restless his troopers still. had been and then all ho said As tie watched with glass from the oak week aftenvard that we told him what set hill That silent Sunday morning. Then fast he began to chafe and There's a battle Hag on a bayonet Too close my own true soldiers set For peace this Sunday but I knew my leg was kinked up all the time.' he added you may explain that as you like Artistic D've cut linir in Longtroe bang asked n plain ift'oman with gray pasted on her hollow blind-bridle fn'shion. we cut the jLansjfry answered a youtiij lady with a Bunion I coiffure and bla'ck with you Iiko to havo romantic I said Ride over some he haughtily j you may believe it or not as you like oring it to in bars' ITR. J. II. Park New is mi I ed to contract for In the PENN VAN DEJIOOHAT at our blood red And in stars 1 will stand and overhead Will daunt it this Sunday morning Then a West-born pale faced and Rode and touching his cap to Swept as swift as the swallows That anxious Sunday morning. Oh never rode man in the word so well From hill of heaven to valley of And foeman and as in a Stood still that Sunday morning. on through the valley any- where but all I can say is I saw and there were plenty of others who knew about it at the A Soldier's First Love. THE BEAUTIFUL GIRL WHO CAPTURED GEN HANCOCK'S HEART. The name of the gallant soldier Winfield Scott is fa- miliar to millions of Americans. Bui That pale-laced lad like a bird through few know of the many and great hard- Spring Opening tor ISSi. CARPETINGS. We arc now prcpured to offer to the cltlzi-nB o New York the new i ehotr4 for this all the leading urpct of the comprising all at from the belt NORTHERN CENTRAL RAILWAY. TllltO l.l.VK BETWEEN IlAl.Tl- AND TIIK KOCH- NlAI.'AHA Tune Tahiti ill elli-rt JVov. 1883. 1IEAINK LEAVE I'E.NN VAN. A. tor llulfiilu inul Kullc. 1OO A. M. Accommodation for El- Willlainsport mid connect- ing ut Iltmiphurg wilb Express train for Phil- having through palace Hleeping cnrti and pac.nenjjer eo.icliea attached urmeB ai 3.05 A. M. i-. lor Buffalo and Ni- iiKra Kails. 4.09 i- for Eluiira. i-. lor and 7.46 KxprCBB for Bun- iiarribbui-g. Washing- Ion Philadelphia 7.5U A. New York I l.au 7.40 A. M Wanh- S.60 A. M. Palaco sleeping curs arc run on i Ills train from itocliedter to Baltimore and and through pamci.gcr couches'to Baltimore. TKAlN.i HOH PENH YAK. RochcBtcr Eiprese leaven Eluiira 6.00 A. driving at Penn Van A u. Niagara Kxprena leaves Philadelphia 7.40 A. lialtiinore 30 A. M. Arrive at Penn Van 7.'26 r. a. Parlor eara are run on this train from Philadelphia to and passenger coaches from Baltimore to Cuiandalgua aud Itoclifstcr Northern Exprewi leaves Philadelphia at II.20 p. i-. Baltimore. 11.20 r. M. Arrive at Penn Van 1.53 K Palace sleeping cars are run on thin train frorr Philadelphia lo and Washington toCuflanduigun and Kocheuter. For tickets and all Inquire of tlu ation CUAb. K. P TORPID DISORDERED and MALARIA. Ule3u three-fourtlis of tlw of the human mcu. Tlieso symptoim mdionuj of Jlowelx Sick Heud- fulliuu oftey eat 111 nv.-r.lon Sie5 or Kiuctatluu of of J.on- A feeling of having Dots belore the col- ored an.l mnnil I ho ugo of n rumoily thnt ni-ts directly anthiii. Ivor. AflnUvur mc'illatno TWIT M no Tholr action on tlin Kliliiny.siimlSk.il iHnNn removing nil linnnriMns tlirousli ttnce i-cnv- ungera of fhu proiliiRinj.' nppr- sound rcprulnr it o.c.nr sklniinil a vigorous body. TTTTT'S O.IIHH no nnuscn or gilpinff nor luturluru with dully wovlc and nro apcrftct ANTIDOTE TO ni5 FEBI.S T.IHK A NEW MAN. Irivo lind with Constipa- two anil hnvci d tfin illin-icnt kind.H of nnd TBTT'S arc lliu first Hint Imvu rionn mn RUT good. Tlii-y limu clcunrd mo out. nionfy. lly i.s fo diircatt inul 1 n w liiiMi nutaral pB-tsnt'i-s. I fei-1 lik u new W. 0. .V. the air Kept on till he climed to the banner there The bravest Sunday morning And he caught up the and around his waist He wound it and he fled in And swift his perilous route retraced That daring Sunday morning. All honor and praise to the trusty steed and and all God speed God's pity for you in your hour of need This deadly Sunday morning. deadly and shower of lead I iron rain on the bare head even the leaves from the trees fall dead This dreadful Sunday morning. But he gains the oaks Men cheer in their ships which he labored under before attaining his present honorable posi- tion. He was born in Montgomery February 1884. His father was the owner of a welL-paying farm there. Unlike most farmers Mr. Hancock made up his mind to give his son all the benefits of a good education. At the age of six years he wss sent to an academy for young gentlemen in the neighborhood. He remained there until he was sixteen years of when he was graduated with high honors. His parents then wished to place him at work in a large i wholesale dry-goods house in Phila- Btave Duster is weeping in his delight I delphia. He had different views for he is embracing the boy outright This glorious Sunday morning. _ _3B GHAT HAIR on WHISKERS i-inmpr-d IP- Btillilly II ItLACK IIV II sill-Iu jilli-Htinii of iliis Siihl by in-ai-nt by cxjircss on n-ccipicir S I. 44 Miirmy Xru- York TUTT'S MAHUAL OF USEFUL RECEIPTS FRtf Btution ticket J. K. Pans'gr Ag't. MOQUETrBSf BODY TAPE8TBY ThBEE-PLY AKD Down TO TUB COXHONMT GOODS MAKE. Oil C'riuiib in rurpct Cnrpet Ar. We buy cvcrj'thlng direct from thcmanufiictDrcrfl for net thereby tavlnc the joboer'n profit. Our IB rfry much the larytaii anil tholeeti In Wsateru Nuw and our priccB AS LOW any In the State. 37 State Street. WatkiiiB.. lllmrixta Drsuden.. Geneva... Oencvs... Drotulfui.. Himrodn. Watkiim.. Corning.. and Corning R. R. IIO1NII HOBTn. fl.OO A.H. r.K. p M. p. 7.85 HM 18.D3 1.31 1.B5 i.30 UOINU SOUTH. 9.33 10.16 10.36 11.10 7.00 7.60 7.42A.M. 1.05P.M. 6.60 P.M 10.15 A.M 8.14 1.65 7.35 11.09 8.38 S.Sii SM 11.40 0.10 3.T2 8.42 12.4B r.M 4.4B 9.40 2.15 A. II. Sup't. RangesiCookingStoves NrUW.H Open tht' pcnpon nnd offer for side the beat line of STOVES AND RANGES In tlie market. Among the KanifeH aru the NEW RANSOM. IROOtJOIS He unwinds the flag. It is striped red With his heart's hest blood and he fails down In God's still Sunday So wrap his flag to his soldier's and asked that he mitrht lie permitted to go to West Point to study for the army. Mr. Hancock placed no obstacles in the way of his son. He was admit- ted to West Point in 1840. He de- voted himself entirely to his he was thus enabled to graduate Stars and Stripes it is stained'and after four with a lieutenant's And under the oaks let him rest and rest i In God's own Sunday The K-inoked-up AN OLD WAR HOSPITAL STEWABD's STORY OP AN AMPUTATION. The conversation had been running on wooden so far as commission. He returned to his er's bnt he was of a too active' temperament to remain long inactive I With a party of army men he started out to explore the great West. Their first stopping place was St. where they remained. Gan. Hancock at the time made it anything on wooden legs could run- a Practice to take tt ride hol'seback and ufter all manner of strange rios from various members of the every morning. While taking his usual daily consti- ceived a cordial invitation from Mr. Russell to visit his house. He avail- ed himself of the invitation and there- after became a constant caller. The sweet-faced young lady ed to be as deeply in love with the young soldier as he was and six months after their acquaintance was formed they happily married. The lady has prov-' tnuu- ed herself a devoted wife. They have had two a boy and giil. The a man thirty-three is a wealthy planter in but the fondly loved daughter died in this at the age of twenty years. This was the General's first and only love. He had served with tinction in the Mexican aud civil and was rapidly promoted from grade to until at present his title is wa.s blllck r come TT- but tirno changes us all. Juojor General. His nomination and grand raco for the Prociclsnny is_also fresh in the memory of all. The soldiers under his charge on Governor's Island love him as a father and not one of tbem but would bi willing to lay down his life to savi the General a moment's anxiety. His wife is sincerely adored for her many charming and lady-like New York Morning Journal. ofl'a last and tho hiiir artist iiW She was soon seated in a elmir in flCgiit of a liu-jre mirror which made her loo'k four timos as old ami twice as ugly she did at homo. don't want it nut real fasli iou- sho as tlie girl wrapped a calico mantle over her shoulders ''and took out one by one tho f hairpins that ifi-ld a back wisp in pM'1' darter had an' sho'sV1'- luz 'You do look so unfash'rv'i- ble.' what do you du with hair that's out il away unless you want g-u-e-ss 1 moujrht as well hov iL I'd like to send some of it back East. tolling how frieids of theirs tutional fchron8h streets St' and they once had lost.Lonis early hl3 and how they had had them tion was ttttracted the siPht of a an old man spoke up who had hfindsomo lady standing in the maintained a profound si-1 handsome window of one of the most fashion- DUliSDHN. STOVES St. St. Kt. Maple New Bc lHc Sunny New COAL AND WOOD V JLOK NTOVJKS. Alt. N. R. A H. Long Offer tho Stovra of tuesc Varieties In a Splendid rown Superior. Sir Sully ormutm FunnU-. Alsw received the the Magec Furnace Co. NKW Bcnutlfnl. The stmpe Is licc- Audnionhar zra pnwtit of furnltur assortment of COAL rA.Ui.UKS. Ontario southern HAIMVAY. Tikegcftucl Jnly 1883. SOUTHWAHD. Modus Point.................. A. a. i 1 30 r. M. Stanley.................... NOHTIIWAKD. r. si. A. x. Sodiis I M. WAU.INCITON-N. W. 0. R. 740 a. 1 Sii p. m. 11 'M a. 6 M p.m. N. Y. C. 11. K. H. 9 SO a. 3 97 and S 'L-L p. in. 34 a. 7 23 mill IB li. 111. PUEU'S U.K.U.K. 7 I'l aud 663 p. m. a 30 and 4 26 p. in. C. H. 8 05 slid '1 I 63 p. m. M a. and 4 KS tt p.m. S. B. Sup't. THE CELEBRATED BARNUM CHEESE SAFES. Opi.ion u to I of thftrf Siad for cinuUr ROCHESTER DYEING CO. WM. MATHS. WM. LKACH. 4 ilKTUODtSl Kl'lS OI'AL CUUKCU. KEV. K. M. r. at A mid T P. M. Sunday school. Junii-s A. at Iv 1'rnjer MtvtinK P. and 7 P. M. Cltton .Meeting ut I'l nnd Tut-Hdiiy uveu- at I o'clock. BAPTIST Sunday Scn-tcrn ut A. and P. M. .School nftt-r st-rv ce. 1'rayor Tliurwlaj at 7.30. I'HKSHYTKIUAN ClirKCH. KKV. D. H. I'su-tor. Suuday Sccvicec at A. and p. M. rfunrtaj SeliiHil iniinediutt-ly after uioralup U. Supertntouricnt. Lecture sud I'rayer Thcredsy evenings at 00. ST. CHL'RCH. 8. Hector. 4. M. and r. M. Bandar School 18 s. tfertlce Lecture r. ST. MICH.KL'8 Riiv. Pastor. sts.30 A.M. HlRh and Sermon at A. V. Snndsy School at P. M. Vespers IETAIL HUY HAVH NOKB 1 UsaNoNsElI The celebratsd BARNUM For snle generally by tht wholesale woodenwaro jiul grocery dealers. If y nirjobbei Jannot supply scncl your orders direct to us. 1'itf E. T- Barnum WireA Iron Works A of the SnExrmc con- tliuio to net Solicit urs for Trndo Murks. for tho United etc. Hand Book ubout Tlilrty-covon ywirs' oiperlcnco. tliroachMDNN k CO. are noticed free. InthoWlEXTIPKI tho wtdoly rlrrulnted scientific pa Wfoklr. Bnk'iidid engnivinps an forniHt'ton. Hpi'cJmpn copy of tlio fciciputiflc Anipr- IL-II n sent frof. M DNN SclLNTHflO AMERICAS Office. Kl Neir Yort. and fiMuyear. In- STEAM DYE STEAW AND FELT WORKS. c sn Ladies' and garments srf aud none Bui rtret-d.w Oar Iscilltitj for Dyeluc snd umi's garments srf iK-r vrorkmtn are employed Our Work Gives Perfect Our Velvets and America. is cannot be escolUd n illd veiurncd by express. KrjcnEJiTEK W and 40 Momfvrd St. HOCHBSTKK Y. OT 1 C E TO r K K D I FO II S. Pursuant to an order of Hanford Strnhle. Snrro- ol all lisTinc claims against the John S. Kergupou. late the town ol in raid are re- quiri'tl to present the wilh tin- vouchers there- of. Jonathan sdrainis- of. of said at ttie rcfideuceof Pittston lence. i able houses in the city. Up to this ho I time nad remained know a good deal about wooden 'notwithstanding ttmt numerous young I have probably seen more legs society ladies wore only too eager to putated in a day than you have seen become Mrs. Hancock. But the wooden legs in your lifetime. I was iiospital steward during the war with. countenance at the window gave bim his heart-flutter. Almost the One-hundred and eighteenth involuntarily he stopped his charger York volunteers. But out of all the and doffed his hat. The young lady bundreds of legs I've seen taken off blushed waved one fair white thero are only one or two that made hand toward him in much impression on mind. There and then let t was one cireumstanoe connected with tains fall. a leg which puzzled me at the blushing like a thrilled has puzzled me ever and will wltb a Dew ancl Bweet flenss go on puzzling me as long as I live. Afttr returning to his hotel he it was ttftur the battle of West Cl'me 80 Abstracted as to excite uud thoro was a Frenchman in our intention of regiment. I foigot his but he ion of ft fair Sirl standing at a token of fare- et tho window cur- toward his hotel sensstion. the The us in company A. he had his k.-pt continually m his mind. leg broken by a a compound He conld not rosist tbs temptation to fracture above the and it to be broken off at the thigh. had and take a look at the house He wher6 hia divinity lived. As he stood and did not want to have reached the place she was just leaving but they made him the house on the arm of a hand- this it was his left gray-whiskered gentleman. being taken off so high you The lady apparently recogniz- mere was a good deal of and the him. for roey blushes chased one noys did not want to throw it out into another in rapid succession over her so they looked about for fair countenance. With her companion thing to bury it in. At last tuey sbe entered a handsome carriage round a cracker but to get it in standing in front of the house and ttu-y had to double it bend the was rapidly driven away. The bril- k i.e sharply and turn the foot littnt JOUDg officer determined at dotted with tiny b _ f W.nch they and then buried it. h.iz-irds not to let this opportunity of It will be remembered that when the verdict in the Guiteau case was announced the prisoner leaped from his chair and God will pun- ish you for and then ed a prophecy of vengeance upon his their and the jury. the District has lost his and is looking for something to do. One of his ciate counsels took to drinking soon after the and is now a common drunkard. Two of the jurymen are two of them have failed in siness and another is hopelessly in- sane. Three of the medical experts who testified to his sanity are and a fourth has become insane. And now J. W. the chemist who discovered the poison in the bouquet Mrs. Scoville sent to her brother the morning of his has gone and been committed to the 3overnment asylum for treatment. a Masher. Talk ahotit pretty she was vrild-flowur nnd no She got on tho train to go over to Meridian from and she was nil alone. There a sort of sidelong movement arnong'five or six but a drummer 'or n Philadelphia snddlory house got there first. He grabbed np his grip and walked square up to hor seat and took possession of it without asking a and in ten minuuis he seemed .0 bo perfectly at oho answered 'lis and ho hud the kind of work to keep up con- and ns the train approached she suddenly want to telegraph papa from here. Will you help certainly. I have a blank in my pocket. Write your telegram and I will run into the ofiice with Wo missed him when tho train start- but by and by he was found in an- other his hat crushed down and his nerves nil on edge. When asked what had happened ho drew forth tho telegram which tho girl had requested him to hand in. It your shotgun with you to pop over a drummer who has dreadfully annoyed me. Shoot to he onc so fair could be so murderous. I'm all in a I want some of you to stand by We got his grip from the traded hats and coats with and the way ho slid from the depot when the train reached caused a hotel porter to but thnt white face be- longs to an invalid and them legs to a deer. What sort of a coon can ho Enquirer. A Prize Beauty in Court. Louise Korepnugh's ex- sat nearly all day in Judgo court waiting for tho trial of suit against the circus manager to re- cover tho prize to come on for trial. She wits dressed taste- and fashionably. Over a skirt of black elaborately she wore a dark biuo tight almost to the point of bursting. She had about her neck ft narrow ribbon of soruo shaggy sttifl'in silk that was tied in a aud ondetl in large tassels. Big solitaire diamonds sparkled in hor pink-iind-white ears. Her hair was combed plainly In front and drawn up in two knots in the which ware held in place by a silver skuwer with a round gilt lop. Hur hat was like ft big fiat covered with brown vel- vet and orirnished with beads and long ostrich plumes. It from tho forehead. was worn far up A shadowy ails. er the Frenchman caoie round finding out who she was pass. He There was not much ft Cilb- ancl Riving the driver a the lint's nriin nn of liertlainiy nose. of her complexion lepended from just lo the tip Tlie and white seen this h W.H uneasy. he but he wished to directed him to koep ness he could straighten his thu carriage in sight. Who -1- 1 AID prepared to fill orders for Pittston coal now. I aW hsve plenty of the MoiriB Ktm SOFT GOAL For generating steam and AncWtf JOHN CONKLIN. FREE for TRIAL. ot said at me resilience ol HANOVER'S SPECIFIC. An onfalllng and Wforire Kereuwn's on or More for Nervous Debility and Loas Vltalily Nervous t'ebrnarv'iiii ism' or any erll result of _ _ 1 I.Aknl _ I_____ fehlttd JONATHAN' Administrator. sit cents for and 1 rec. ivr h.ix of which mil help to mure niou- rn-ht than aimMun In this world. MlcCoed first llie lirosd road to fortune opens before the absolutely .ure. At once TRUE Mftuie. abuses of forty thousand Send ISc. postage on trial box of 100 pllig. Dr. M. W. Cur. Clark St. Calhoun 111. yb t ut This Out can de hia he felt all kinked scribe his feelings after an i at you haven't got a left we hour's riding he saw the carriage con told him. I know he m but morbleu it feels all kink- ed up just the same.1 I did not comrades. In a moment his mind _i __ _ TT_ J- _.. J taming his charmer draw p at the door of a house of one of his old arm j kaow anything about the burying of made up. He dismissed his cab h 8 and when he said this to me walked slowly in the direction of I thought it was just the ordinary lie He kr-1-3'--J pain after the though I had and wns ftt ODCB never heard any one else describe the friend in PerBon- pain so. and believed it would pass off. But it did not. He got more and more and kept deplaring that his left leg was and if theyoung lady His friend laughing- 1 complied with the request and led into the parlor where the lady skin as thrown across her lap. The too of a tiny kid bool now aud then peeped from under a part of it that trailed on the floor. The spectacle was full of lor half a score of country witnesses in a suit about a Roxborough bnrn that had a place before tho beau- ty's suit. But the beauty seemed no more sensible of their admiration than if she was a wooden woman. The suit dragged so that it look up all tho ses- He knocked for siorfand the beauty found herself left Under the rules of the court her case With many blushes and hesitancy he made known the whole affair to and begged to be introduced to be could only atraighten it out it would be all riht He went on in i America. AMoh this way so badly that at length one and gentleman were already seated of the boys who bad buried the leg He wae introduced to Miss Mary got without telling RnaseH and the gentleman with her be went dug up the straight- her one of the merchant 6neditout Dd it pnncesof St. Louis. Before leaving Times. the b03. the housn that afternoon he .___A Great Discovery. Mr. Win. of wife has bsen seriously affected with a cough for twenty-five and this spring more severely than ever before. Sho had used many remedies without and be- ing urged to try Dr. King's Now Discovery did with most gratifying results. Tho first bottle relieved her very and the ieeond bottle has absolutely cured her. Sao ban not had so good health for thirty Trial Bottles Free at T. F. Wheeler 4 Co.'s Drug Store. Large size DC don't make it too-short. you like fo have it onvlod af- ter it's it doesn't cost any more. I used to have renl nice ringlets when I was a gnl. Wore 'era all around with n pink bow on the lop of tho head. Didn't thiuk anything of pinnm' it rifjlit 011 to the scalp. who's Rly darler won't know me from a side of solo a great said the girl as sho picked out the hist gray curl. nskucl the woman ns she stared at herself in the glass. don't know as I kin toll but its a com- fort to look different to what I hev for tho last twenty year. Seems to me tho1 as 'f there was no fools Iiko old fools. Any nil 1 dcu hope it will please my And tho woman put on her bonnet and wont out. Tho face that hnd look- ed plain in the scrono bauds of parted hair assumed a strange anil never-to- be-forgotten expression tied up in that Quakerish with a curlod layer of fringe piled high abovo tho spare features creased aud crossed with lines of care and disappointment. Nor was it any ghastly attempt to coquette with but an unselfish regard for tho interests of that daughter at that led tho good woman to lay herself on the altnr of sacrifice as a wearer of tho Laugtry Detroit Free Press. Sympathy. Among the families who excited much interest at tho baby show last says the Detroit Free was ono which consisted of a deaf aud dumb father and and a very fine ba- by. Tho ladies were all pleased with the and mncR interested in tho little who smiled and watched her offspring with the keenest solici- tude. Some of tho questions askod wore very but an aunt of tho baby acted as interpreter. At a- time when tho museum was quito some ladies passed in front of the 'group and studied them care- fully. A young man wan writing on slips of paper and passing them to tho little ho also talked to her in the sign language. explained one her husband. Now you would never know to look at iier that sho was deaf and but yon can sue the af- fliction in his face.1' How ftsked another studying the mobile features of tho un- conscious young man. look at his Soo how dumb he 1 have often remarked if people would convoy their thoughts through the tho dumb would be able to answer and ox- plain their thoughts much easier lima by the sign that is an old said tho iirst labial language is well understood by watch mo and sho turned upon tho young who was caressing tho and looked him steadily in the at tho same time slowly articulating aud touching her lips. y-o-u replied tho man. shout. 1 can hoar 'Who arc gasped tho woman. 'One of the I can uso tho sign language if you prefer I learned it sonio years At that moment the real husband and father of tho pretty baby camo up and tho interested ladies made a speedy extl. A Story of Talleyrand. Gen. W. C. of is stopping in the city and will remain several days. In n conversation about Alexander ho told tho following story of the great French to save liis neck from tho was forced to leave and ho became sn exile to tlie United States. said Gen. in 1794 and when he spent n portion of his time near N. whero ho re- sided with Count La Tour du an- other French with his ac- complished was concealed for six terrible weeks in during the bloody atrocities of Tallicn. Ho ar- rived in Boston with two trunks full of fine the only property thoy had saved from tlie wrock of a larga estate. the was also a mem- ber of tho same and they sold butter and eggs in Albany to eko out a living. Talleyrand returned to Franco on the first change of and for many as is well known swayed a great political influence there. Soon after his return to Paris ho was asked what were tho most notable things ho saw in Americn. most wonderful thing 1 said Talley- tho great Alexander Ham- ilton crossing Broadway in tho with three big law books under his going into court to argue a St. Louis As a cure for tardiness in tho schools of Superintendent Barn- hart has hit upon a novel nnd unique idea. An elegant banner is presented in each school to the room having the least percentage of tardy pupils at the end of tlie and that room holds the banner throughout the next month under tho title of after which it is again awarded. The scheme works to perfection so far. The plow in general u.so in Mexico nowadays is the same ns the Egyptiaus used years ago. It consists of a crooked slick with an iron point nailed to it or tied to it with a piece of raw- a small handle for thu plowman to steer and a pole t.o hitch a yoke of to. This so called plow will scratch a furrow in the soil threo inchas deep. A French Story. Her beauty was an iutoxii'alion to the eye. Sho was 21. She answered to the sweet name of Amelia. For 1 wns and credu- and llsppy that i Kuril. 1 Wed hor one loves but or twice- or thrive at most. My i When I pronouneed naive thero were a grand concert in my heart and a symphony on my lips. My 1 met her lirsl in a was alone with and her pantomime of delicious timidity made me risk tome of insinuating politeness. Hy the time other passengers arrived I hail arrived at permission to call. But why aroii.se these poignant mem- My frieu pour me a little of that absinthe. I will .-pare von details. Wo eaeli other for tinvu weeks. I will tell you neither of her charms nor of her Tho enumeration would pages. Only amonir all ihoso attractions was one 'fatal gift which transported mo Such hair. All blondo di- could you iuit Hut inom- tuv a of lli at absinthe. When onc hand over tho silken tresses there wuV 'ho sensation of satin combined with tlia't-yOf with the addition of an electric thrill. As to the in his days would have broken his pallet spite. The hairs of that dear head did not to run in m'ne. One after long hesitating to risk sueli a bold 1 I am afraid you may bo ofl'endcd at what I desire.1' If I eau please you know very well 1 am ready to do as you wish.'1 yon have hair of the .Sultan's know 1 detest does not keep you from valu- ing that head of your .sake to please then you will not refuse me let mo oul oil' a lock of Bui why arouso ihoso poignant mem- My pour me a little of tho Chamberlin. I waited breathlessly for her answer. I trembled lest sho refuse. But sho smiled lovingly upon mo aud that sacrifice so What a to believe I love him too littlo to nceord him such a slight proof of love. Mr. Doubt- you shall have tho aud what is 1 will take it myself and liavo it made into a our initials you I but when not to tako down my hair- this moment I will cut tho lock off With my own my adored one- only tell tho jeweler to I was radiant. My heart leaped for joy. That it was the best I could sent Amelia a pair of dia- mond earrings. But why arouso these poignant mem- My pour mo a littlo absinthe. Three days passed. A Each inorning I hoped to find at Amelia's house tho promised treasure. At the fourth as 1 down mo my is dono. make you Chevalier of Love and 1 pass around your neck tho badge oi my locket with tho It is ad- How tho hair is it is only your silky ringlets that would bo flexible enough for such curves. And that that 1 should recognize among what do I There do not exist two like that on tlie sur- face of tlio you arc am in That night I had to make her sonio 1 sent Amelia a Indian shawl. But why arouse these poignant mem- lly pour mo a little of that absinthe. There are moments in life when ono does not understand why tho heart docs not burst. 1 experienced such a moment. I had gone homo with my precious lovo token. what had increased its value a hundredfold sho had sworn to mo that I was tiio first living being to whom sho had given such a present. 1 wa.s seated by tho firo but not sinco tho locket recalled her. turned and re- turned that talisman. I covered it with burning kisses. I could not get enough of that speechless contempla- tion. A whole world of thoughts were awakouod by looking upon it. I re- viewed tho past from our mooting in the car. i peeped into tho future fidelity for life lovo unalterable. But why arouse these poignant mem- My pour me a little ab- sinthe. A few days Intor sho was ill. A slight but love fears everything. Without saying anything I took tho irecious locket and went to a clair- voyant. I camo to consult you about tho health of a person who is dear to Tho took the felt of and angrily amuse sir. Thnt lock of hair came from a dealer in rabbit-skins. Jt IVHS in a lot bought by an artist in ivho cut up those sort of things for tho ove-tokcns given by certain 1 muttered an oatli and took But why arouse these poignant mem- My pour mo plenty of champagne. Making Hie Legitimately. There is much in the present bull market to remind one of the man down n Indiana who was the only man in lis village having any loose cash cap- tal. He was one day explaining to an eastern only stock afloat in our neigh- jorhood are five shares of an old daw mill which hasn't paid Iheso last ten ears. On Monday I circu- 'alo the report that a syndicate has bought tho aud will at oiico put it repair. Tins sends the up to and 1 sell legitimate.'1 'On Wednesdays 1 lot it be under- stood that the is and that nothing will bo done to tho mill. 'This semis tliu ntock back to 10 and I load what do you do on arc my regular days for working up a fooling in the county that I to bo paid a bonus for converting the sawmill into a distill- W.I .3. EWSPAPERl EWSPAPERl   

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