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Palladium Times Newspaper Archive: November 26, 1960 - Page 1

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Publication: Palladium Times

Location: Oswego, New York

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   Palladium-Times (Newspaper) - November 26, 1960, Oswego, New York                                LOCAL HIGHLIGHTS Police Group Out Be- quest For Salary Boost After Meeting Mayor, Page 3. Tests Sought In County Civfl Service, Page 12. THE WEATHER tonight; continued wain Sunday. noon. 54. VOL. 279 MSMMR AMCMTID HUM OSWE60-FULTON, N.Y., SATURIAY, NOVEMBER 26, I960 linn TIAR AB DAILY NCWSPAFM PRICE SEVEN CENTS FBI Seeks Kidnaper Of California Sportsman SAN DIEGO, Calif. A wealthy sportsman held 24 hours by kidnapers was report- edly under guard today as au- thorities sought a convicted murderer they said helped kid- nap him. Anthony Alessio, 41, was re- leased unharmed after ransom was paid his kidnapers. Alessio's family had been warned he would be killed if police were called. FBI agents arrested a man and two women as Alessio's kidnapers and said a fourth man is still being sought. Agents recovered of the ransom paid for the release of Alessio, who with his six brothers operates the Caliente Race Track at Tijuana, Mexico. Ninety minutes after an un- identified man collected the one of the highest ever paid In the United States 210-pound Alessio was discovered handcuffed but un- harmed in a San Diego motel. Word of the kidnaping Tues- day night was kept quiet by the FBI and San Diego police until Friday night, at first to protect the victim and then to prevent tipping their hand to the abductors. Alessio was freed late Wednesday night Those arrested in Los An- geles soon afterward Robert James Gorman, 29, an escapee from the men's prison at Chino. Calif., where he serving five years to life _for robbery: his wife. Ruby Elaine, 30: and Selma Clark Man-one, 25. of Los Angeles. Mrs Marrone's husband, Frank, 31, a former bartender free' on bond pending appeal ot a conviction for second-degree murder in Alaska, is being sought. The women wept as tnev were booked on suspicion ot kidnaping, a state offense which carries a possible penalty of life imprisonment without possibility of parole Bail of the trio was set at was reported back at his San Diego home under guard San Diego police re- fused to discuss the matter. however. Authorities gave this time- table: Two armed men accosted Alessio at 5-30 p. m Tuesday as he drove into the shrubbery- shrouded driveway of his lux- urious home in a fashionable section of Pan Dieeo They slapped handcuffs and a blind- fold on him and whisked him to an abandoned house. Within minutes, the said they telephoned his wife and demanded ran- som. Virginia Alessio was warned that they would not hesitate to kill her husband if she called authorities or failed to Negotiations lowered the initial demand to 5200.000. At about 10 p. m Wednes- day the abducted mans brother John, executive direc- tor of Caliente Race Track, drove 120 miles to a parking lot in Hollywood. On the back seat, as ordered, was a duffle bag containing the cash in bills of S100 and less. John Alessio walked off. leaving the car unlocked. A man removed the duffle bag and disappeared in heavy traffic which followed a. big Santa Claus parade. _ Ninety minutes later, Alessio was found by FBI agents m San Diego. The FBI would not say how his whereabouts was learned. On Thursday Mrs. Gorman was arrested walking on a Hollywood street and Mrs. Marrone was taken in her apartment. Friday Gorman was seized on a Hollywood street. None was armed or offered re- sistance. Mamie's Nieces Make Debut At White House WASHINGTON and Ellen Moore are a pair of special debutantes. They made their plunge into society at a historic White House tea Friday, sponsored by their aunt, Mrs. Dwight D. Eisenhower. "I'm up in a is the way dark-haired, Mamie, 18, expressed her feelings after- wards. Her sister, blonde El- len, 19, agreed. "I thoroughly enjoyed it. Youth does something to said fond Aunt Manns Eisen- hower. "We'll never forget add- ed the mother of the girls, Mrs. Eisenhowers only sister, Mrs. George Gordon Moore. Mrs. Eisenhower said it was "an old-fashioned debut the kind she remembered from girlhood, where old friends were invited to meet the daughters of coming out age. Mrs. Eisenhower launched her nieces, standing in a re- ceiving line with them and their mother in the Green Room. The executive mansion was decked with flowers, the red- coated Marine Corps band played waltzes and show tunes, and" tea tables were laden with goodies. Katanga Feud With Congo May Be Over ANTI-UNITED NATIONS speaker addresses crowd in Leopoldville Nov. 21, during a demonstration against the United Nations staged by the anti-Lumumba PUNA party. (AP Wirephoto) LJEOPOLDVILLE, the Congo' of the most some lends of the feud-ridden secession of nun- eral-nrh Katanga Province may be on the way to a solu- tion. A dramatic announcement from Elisabethville in Kami Friday night said three leading ministers from the cent'al gov- ernment in Lenpoldviile had reached an agieoment win Moise Tshombe. o! the hieakaway province. A communique said a vo- hour meeting was held in a cordial atmospheie and ed in a "perfect identitj of vie'vs" on a program of action in the "internal aftairs of the former Belgian Congo." As a result, -aid one of the Katanga parnc pants in the meeting, a round-table confer- ence on the fuune political suuctuie of t.y Congo prob- ably will be held in Ehsabeih- villt' month. Tsnorpbe set up Katanga as1 an independent Mate with nts rental at HisatKMimllf 11 aftt r tliP Congo got its i-inoppndere" iiom Belgium on HP 'ook tr-p action, he vi'd bPtv.use Patrice Lu- mumba then the Congo miei was usine disruptive Commurisi tactic1; to neate diso thionghout the ronntrv. i Katanga, with 'is uranium, copper and other minerals, is the economic back- bone of the Congo and is center of operations of a giant Belgian mining combine. One of Tshombe's quarrels with Lumumba the Ka- tanga ifadei s insistence i.pon a form 01 decent' fedfial goveinmont vvh.c1 IIP --.i''l wtiilil he suited to the localized tribal structure L'l- m'lrnba tavo'ei a stiorg ccn- Congo P-esidr'it a decc.1- tr.-il bed federal goveiiinrnt UN Rift Worries African Leaders British Sympathetic to U. S. Quest to End Dollar Drain Vatican Protests To Haiti For Expelling Bishop VATICAN CITY Vatican has officially protested to Haiti for the expulsion of Archbishop Francois Peirier. the Caribbean island's highest Roman Catholic prelate The Vatican newspaper L'Os- sprvatore Romano, indicated that responsible for the expulsion may have incurred excommunication with conse- quent loss of rights to the sacraments. "We are informed that the Holv See has already presented through diplomatic channels its expression of profound sor- rorv and its protests for the grave thp paper Now in Paris, the French- born archbishop said, "The situation in Haiti is too deli- cate for me to talk." Strained relations between the Vaitcan and Haiti were emphasized here todav bv the absence of Haiti's ambassador. Antonio T. Kebreau. from a memorial service for cardinals who died durine the past rear. Pope John XXIII presided at the ceremony. All other members of the diplomatic corps accredited to the Vatican, as well as 23 card- inals and other high church prelates, were present. The Haitian ambassador said i his absence was due to rheu- matism. Vatican sources ascribed his absence to "diplomatic illness" UNITED NATIONS, N. leaders at the United Nations deeply concerned over the rift in their 25-nation group that flared into the open on two fronts this week. It was a week that saw- neighbor nations from the Dark Continent denounce each other as lackeys in the Congo debate and swap charges of imperial- ism, during the discussion of Mauritania's independence. When 16 new African states joined the U N. family this fall bringing the bloc's v ot i n g strength to 25, diplomats looked on it as a formidable force. Both the Soviet Union and the West began making overtures to win support from the Afri- cans This week's bitter clashes prompted predictions, however, that the Africans will be divid- ed on most issues. Differences between African states of varying political back- grounds are deep-seated and Happy Kennedy Visits Wife, Son At Hospital; Says Whole Family Is Fine LONDON UP) The U. S. economic mission led by Treas- ury Secretary Robert B. An- derson headed home today from its European quest for means to plug the dram on American gold resenes. The biggest gain seemed to be British moral support. Anderson and Undersecre- tary of State Douglas Dillon left London for New York in a U S. Air Force jet plane after talks in Bonn, Paris and Lon- Burns Fatal To 4-Year-Old Girl SAN ANTONIO. Tex. Plucky Peggy Roller died Fri- day. 32 hours after the opera- tion doctors hoped would help the 4-j ear-old girl survhe critical burns. Doctors at the Army's .cmvo ,.i .Brooke General Hospital agreed don. They declined to make that the child's Determination any statement at the airport. Britain promised support Fri- day for Washington's drive to persuade North Atlantic Treaty Organization nations to shoul- der more of the common de- kept her alive nine days after an unexplained tire sent ner sciearning from her home, her dark hair ablate. (More than half of her body was burned. PeggVs father, ilaj. Harry WASHINGTON" The Kenneajs mothei, fatner, newborn son are f.ne That was the report from President-elect John F Ken- nedy today after a 15-mmute mid-morning visit with h.s Aife at Georgetown University hospital He reported initially that his wife and son were "fine." Then, to make it unanimous, he added that he, too, was 'fine Dr. John W. Walsh, who de- livered the baby early Fridav morning, added an official note. Speaking through Pierre Salinger, press sec- retary, the doctor said thp baby vvas doing very well and _Mra> "recovering rap- id! v. mure lapid.y inan her r.rst child.' And, to round out the family picture, that first child. 3-jear- old Carolina, who celebrated her birtnday in advance Thanksgiving Day, was basily everybody about ner baby bro'hT. The named John Fitz- gerald Kennedy. Jr.. was de- scribed by Carolina as a birth- day present Her description stemmed rrom Kennedy's state- ment to her that her mother had gone away from home Tb.ank.sgA ing night to bring i ner a new b.iby brother for her i birtnday which conit1- officially Sun-day. At tne hospital the baby is taking and retaining iittie of sugar water Decisions on. a f omul a may be made later today baby which weighed s K pounds, three ounces a! birth i Friday morning, is still in an ex rent feud elod and thetrmn Rolled of El Tex, stood staged bv the on U. S. gold supplies, now be- by her bed a, her We ebbed between Joseph Kasavubu. West-supported Con- go president and Patrice Lu- mumba, Soviet-backed ex-pre- New Zealand Prime Minister Loses WELLINGTON, New Zealand Prime Minister Walter Nash's Socialist Labor gov- ernment was defeated in gen- eral elections today by the private enterprise National Party of Keith Holyoake. The National Party won 45 seats in the 80-member House of Parliament, and Labor took the remaining 35. Nash had a one-seat major- ity when the House was dis- solved for elections. It was possible that the count of absentee ballots would result in a change in one or two seats. Nash conceded the election to Holyoake, howev- er Two other parties in the election, the Communists and the Social Credit League, did not win a single seat. What's Inside Radio 2 Bridge 6 Pulton 10 Editorial Churohw 4 Fimcralt Sporta 7 11 mier. low the SIS billion mark for away, the first time in 20 years. President Eisenhower's cam- paign to conserve the gold and "said simply, "It's a rough world." Three veteran sergeants, who -who have played fairj god- The dispute has been simmer- ing for weeks m closed door meetings of the African group. It boiled er early this week when the assembly neared the vote which won Kasavubu the Congo's empty U. N. seat. Charles Okala, outspoken for- eign minister of the newly in- dependent Cameroon, accused Ghana of working w ith the So- cost of their foreign policy." viet Union to set up a Commun- 1J ist regime in the Congo. Ghana Ambassador Alex down foreign aid alone. Bn- Quaison-Sackey, considered by I tain, along with the rest of the some a spokesman of the Afri- j Western Alliance, must accept can group, countered that Ok- the cost of unity, which is eco- ala was acting in bad taste and nomic interdependence. That was guilty of unparliamentary mav mean paying out hard behavior. i cash. It will also mean bear- African delegates became ;ng some of the shocks now LMLJt 11 LW A- Ow I drew sympathetic support from each donated 128 inches all sections of the British press. of skin applied to the burned West Germany came in for areas on the girls body m a sharp criticism for refusing to two-hour Thanksgiving morn- contribute to the support o U. S. forces m that country. The conservative Daily, Sketch said: "The Americans i of two children, iinaiiv spoke. ing operation, were silent told of her death. Sert. 1 c Earl D. rather "Well, we tried JI i-gt. Wil- mother to FAirope for so ham M. Foodloe, fatner of are getting tough about the three, and Sgt. 1 c Harold S. "America could balance its hooks tomorrow by cutting embroiled in another angry ex- change in the political commit- tee debating a Moroccan pro- test over Mauritania's acces- sion to independence granted by France. Fireworks erupted when the French-speaking new nations from Africa banded together elDSClllJt. IAJ .1.-.---- and the situation between the against claims that Maumania Vatican and Haiti. I belongs to Morocco. NATO Proposes Formation Of Nuclear Fire Brigade PARIS from 15 North Atlantic Treaty countries today recommended the formation of a military fire nuclear weapons at its meet any type of Communist threats to the alliance. The lawmakers unanimously approved the idea originally put forward by Gen. Lauris Nor- stad, supreme allied military commander in Europe. They also asked that NATO be granted political control of atomic arms and delivery sys- tems. At present practical control of such weapons in the alliance rests with the United States. The resolutions passed at the closing session of the annual conference of NATO parliamen- tarians carry only advisory weight. They will be sent to the NATO Council for official consideration. The proposed fire brigade would not necessarily have its own nuclear weapons, although this had been one part of the resolution when it vvas first de- bated. The final resolution simply said that the brigade "must be in a position to use" nuclear weapons. The parliamentarians avoided anv mention of NATO as a "fourth atomic power." Their resolution on the eventual con- trol of atomic weapons simply urged the NATO Council to es- tablish its own "political au- thority" over nuclear delivery systems and their use. At present, Gen. Norstad needs permission from the White House before employing atomic devices, although he is pledged to consult the NATO Council if there is time. Giving NATO political au- thority over the use of these weapons appeared to mean that in the future the supreme com- mander also would have to seek the permission of the 14 other NATO countries before dipping into his nuclear arsenal. The parliamentarians said the fire brigade mobile striking force should employ nuclear weapons only where necessary to counteract a nuclear attack. Invoking Norstad's own speech earlier this week, they said the use of atomic weapons should result only from a "specific, de- liberate" decision at a level higher than the commander of the basic combat elements. Other resolutions urged great- er coordination in the develop- ment and production of weap- ons and greater economic cohe- sion with NATO alliance. Spaak told Ihe 200 delegates a commonly controlled force "would be the best means to furnish the alliance efficient means for defense and would also have a psychological effect, notably on the interior cohesion of the Atlantic being borne by the American conomy." Newspapers noted the Amer- icans did not ask the Britisn for support costs for American troop? standing guard in this country- But they insisted Britain must give its closest ally every possible help. Orff. fatner of fne, nodded. Goodloe, 45. of Earhngton. Ky Bieler, 26. of Machias, and Orff, 37, o' Milo, Maine, volunteered for the op- erations because, Good'oe "sometime it nvght happen to one of us.'' The sergeants will be hos- pitalized about two weeks, after which they will be given month-long convalescent leaves. KILLED AS CAB HITS POLE YOIIXGSVILLE Steele, 20, of Livings ton Manor, vvas killed Friday night when the car he vvas dm ing left Route 52 and crashed into a utility pole. Debbie Reynolds Weds Shoe Tycoon Harry Karl BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. UP) Reynolds, who want- ed her two children by Eddie Fisher to have a family Christ- mas, wed multimillionaire shoe tycoon Harry Karl, 46, Friday night. The fourth was no surprise. But the tim- ing was. The 28-year-old ac- tress hurried home from a day of filmmaking and was mar- ried at a friend's home. Monday she will be back before the cameras. "We decided a few days ago to get married said the beaming bride, "so the children can have a real family Christ- mas." A wedding trip will be de- layed untiJ January when the couple will visit Miami and the Bahamas. "But the honeymoon starts the actress told news- men after the rites. The couple left in Karl's Rolls number SHU   since its inception. Karl, plucked out of a New York foundling home when he was six weeks old by a child- less Los Angeles cobbler and his wife, now owns 330 shoe stores in 15 Western states. He and his late father have given away more than million to Catholic, Protestant and Jew- ish chanticb. The distinguished-looking Karl has long been a favorite squire of Hollywood's beauty queens. The actress said there are no plans for Karl to adopt her two children. "They like Har- ry very she said. "And he likes them. It will be a real Quistoiu for them." FAMILY John F. Kennedy helps his three-year-old daughter, Caroline, down steps from their Georgetown home as they leave for a stroll with her doll carriage Nov. 25. Mrs. Kennedy is in Georgetown University Hospital she gave birth to a boy, John F. Jr., earlier in the day. (AP Wirephoto) Nations Holiday Death Toll Continues to Rise 1 (By the Associated Press i Traffic ...............210 Flres....... Miscellanous Total 305 Deaths on the nation's high- climbed steadily today as the normal influx of weekend travel added to the flow of Thanksgiving holiday traff.c. The toll mounted to 197 as the four-day extended holiday period passed the halfway mark. Other violent deaths In- cluded 29 in fires and 59 m miscellaneous tvpc mishaps for j an over-all total of 2STx The National Salety Council says traftio on Thank.sgiv.ng is not as heavy as on other est.mate of tafal.ties for the maior and m-ulo ".o period. The council has est i- mated, however, that 407 per- sons would be killed in traffic during a four-day weekend period at this time of year. This year's total was running only slightly behind the total counted clunng an Associated Press -survey period covering Itht 102 hours from i p. m- edn.esaay Nov. 9 and rmd- Sunday, Nov. 13. The fIK1 ires mat period were i 433 trafnc deaths, 69 fire deaths and 144 m other acci- dents for a total of 6-16. During last years similar Thanksgiving holiday period the AP counted 443 traffic deaths. 70 dead in fire and 135 in miscpllaneuos accidents for a total of 650. ALBANY New York State today counted 20 persons I dead in accidents during the Thanksgiving holidav. Traffic accidents, as usual, I were the chief killer. Since 6 p m. Wednesday, 9 persons died on the highvvavs. Firrs had killed 6 persons Other tvpc-s 01 accidents had cla.mfd 4 A voar ago, 24 poisons m traffic accident i during trie Thanksgiving holidav. Three persons perished m fires and 8 died m other accidents. Earlier this month, in a com- parable non-holiday period, 16 wore killed m highway mis- 2 in fires and 2 in other accidents. Kennedy nas not seen her son jet. But Salinger said she will see bab.v possibly this afternoon, if she feels we1! enough when she gets up in a w heelchair. Kennedy arrived at the hos- pital this morning hatless and earing a topcoat crisp sunny air. With him was Dr. Janet Tiavell. a New York C back specialist and Kenned} doctor. Salmsjw so., that Kennedy was no! trouSje wit i nis back .nj'irrd in youtn and again ir War IT. He sai3 Dr Travell is, in oid friend of thp family and mere- ly waited to see the babj. Talking to reporteis, Ken- nedy said ne stiil couldn't say who the baby .irked bit II! le' voj 10A. Kennedy p'.aiia 'o iia'-e a cLn- nor ani his bro'her who pis campa.sn manager. They will at Robr-1 Kf1'- ned> s home in after Roberi s return Florida. The planned anotner to hospital late in the arternoon. Trie congratulations contin- ued to fiow n. v-'ih a personal message :rom PTP- ard MI-S. E'scnnower head.ng the "ist Eisenhower JOJTS me Li warm congratulations to ;.oa and Mrs Kennofij on trie b.-'h of your son We ad-3 o-r sroocl wishes to little daughter on her anproacnms tmri birtndaj 'ne hower message sa.d Tne Kennedv o.an. from rather to grand.ather to great- grandmother, '.v as delignted. Kennedj's father, Joseph P. Kennedy, former ambassador to En? and, v. eleorned his ISth grandchild. And "de'-spted' .vas just the word from Mrs. John F. d, 95 t is ares.dent e.ec; s grandmother, for ner 30rn great-grandchild. Tne object of all the exc.te- inep.t. baoj Jonr, Ken-eJ.v, Jr. described DJ .Ts joctor a V-TX ?ood ..ookir.g very neaknj witn a losty remained ,n a incubator. There was a char.ee h-.s mother. Jacquel ne Bouv.er Kennedy, 31, m.ght get to see him for" the first time todaj. Trie baby .s expectei to stay in the incubator another day and a half, according to wnat pnysicians describe as routine hospital procedure with prema- ture Mrs. Kennedy is scheduled to stay in the hospital 10 or 15 day's. She has been reported doing excellentK and rest.ng comfortably after tne caesarean section. She has nad intra- venous nourishment and a transfusion of two pmU of blood. Her after hectic turn-around fi.jht from Palm Beach, Fla because of the un- expectedly early birth, finally got a mint's sleep. He spent 45 minutes in the trip there ro shortly beio.-e 9 3O p PRKr.VKKS MORK TROOPS FOB COXGO Ireland (.iP) land is preparing a second bat- talion for United Nations duty in the Congo. I-t will relieve the battalion already in Afri- ca, which is to return homt in January.   

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