Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Olean Democrat Newspaper Archive: December 18, 1890 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Olean Democrat

Location: Olean, New York

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Olean Democrat, The (Newspaper) - December 18, 1890, Olean, New York                               The can JDemocrat (I V r VOL. XI I CLEAN. CATTARAUGUS CO. NEW YORK, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 18, I 890 4 SITTING BULL KILLED. HE FALLS IN AN ENCOUNTER NEAR STANDING AGENCY. The Wily Old (liieC to Deputt for tlie Hiiil JLan-N "VVhru Ar- rested Ijy Indian Followers Attempt HN Ilcsciie it UIoo ly Battle Ensues, lu Bull'-. Iittlinn I'oliri- Killed. ST. PAUL, Minu., Mil-s has recchuil di-sji.iti h .t in a fight ne-ir Standm- II IL': .ry vos'cr- day Sitting Bull :i.nl .1 u'rnot'L- 01 "..in police li-ul kilie 1. 'I Le ilH'Utf-h was from Pierre, IX, --t .tin., iliac Sit- ting Bull and his sou bad been killed, but giving no further I urticulurs. The dispatch was from Stiindii-'t; KocUagency, S. D.. andsiatei! that th- police started out to arrest Sitting linli, having learned tl-at he proposed starting for the Bad Lands. The police were followed by a troop of cavalry under Capt. Fechet and under Col. Drum. SEARCHING FOR A BROTHER. Tlirrc You: and -Man" M. dink Mlclim-l Hal Winnifred nay :.re in great distress EYHAL'DTIIE STKAMiLKII. HIS TRIAL FOR THE BAILIrr GO'JFFi: MURDER OF lonf last wi- started Ccij-o'l fiirht v. Logan'- over the disappearance of their brother, Mi'-hm-l Murray, wlio Iris been mining sine.- Dff. 7. They U-l t-vu that he hiis Lt-'ju mr.niv-r tl uud b ive the police to in', L: iti1. Mtirmy 1 vcd with his bi-tci- at 300 t.ii'l worked for PutiickMa- >Vo-r street. He worked c Sutid'iy until 6 o'clock, when he wii.Ii Edward Kirk and John to attend a wake. They had a h boiiic toughs in front of Thomas salcon. First aienue, between Forty-seventh ati'l Forty-eighth streets, in which Murray was pretty roughly han died, bnt not disabled or crippled. UI don't know what became of Murray after th' fischt." said Kirk to a reporter. "He ugly and wanted to fight with me. Carroll tried to pacify him but could not, and we left him. He was not drunk or we wo'ild liave taken care of him.'' The police have been hard at work on the and have learned that a friend of Murray ran into him late at night wandering around on First avenue, near Enst river. He advised Murray, who was then quite drunk, to take a Belt Line car for home, and that is the last trace that can be found of him. Late that night Capt. George Wallis, whose canal boat was unloading coal at the foot of East Thirteenth street, heard the cry of a man in the water near his boat. He searched long and thoroughly with his lantern to see the man whose shout he had heard, but failed to find him. There was no sound of a struggle. Capt. Wallis told the police and there was no one in sight on the docks. The detectives believe that the man whose drowning cry was heard by Capt. Wallis was Murray. They think he fell into the water while too drunk to help himself and was drowned. The closest search has not revealed the slightest evi- dence of foul play. BILLY MURRAY KNOCKED OUT. BITTING BULL. When the police reached Sitting Bull's camp on Grand river, about forty miles from Standing Rock, they found arrange- ments being made for departure. The cavalry had not yet reached the camp when the police arrested Bull and started back with him. His followers quickly ral- lied to his rescue and tried to retake him. In the fight that ensued Sitting Bull was killed. Five of the Indian police wers also killed. One of the police rode back to the cavalry and infan- try and after telling them to harry up to the stippart of the police buried on to the agency with news of the battle. CHICAGO, Dec. following tele- gram was received at army headquarters: ST. PACT., Minn., Dec. 15. Col. Corbin, Assistant Adjutant General, Chicago: S tting Bull arrested this morning at daylight "by Indian police. Friends attempted his rescue; fight ensued. Sitting Bull, his son Blackbird, Catch Bear and four other, were killed: also Indian police. Capt. Fietchet arrived just in time witli two troops. Hotch- kiss _'n'i Gatiin guns drove Indians away and secured the body of Sitting Bull. By command of Gen. Miles. MATTS, Aide. ST. PAUL, Minn., Dec. When the Indian police whonumbered about twenty men reached Sitting Bull's village, they found the Sioux all ready to depart for the southwest and instant action was net-essary to prevent this movement. The police at once made a, rush for Sitting Bull, surrounded him and telling him he was a prisoner started ar once on the trail for the agency. The old chief made no attempt at re- sistance. Hardly ha.l his capture been made when his son headed a party of Bull's followers and attempted to rescue their chief. A desperate fight and the police were gettiug the worst of ifcin the skirmish. Bull attempted to get awa; from his captors and to join the attacking pany of bis iriends. He fought wildly and was killed with several of fol- lowers. Seven of the Indian police n fell dead, and the whole band would prob- ably have been massacred had it. not been for the timely arrival of the cavalry. The St. Fa.nl Kid After a Rattling Fight of Thirteen Bounds. NEW YORK, Dec. much-talked of prize fight between Jimmy Kennard of St. Paul and Billy Murray of this city, 110-pound men, took place early yester- day morning near Stamford, Conn., and was witnessed by 300 sports from this city and vicinity. The fight was for a side. The men were in perfect form. Kennard was handled by Joe McAuliffe and Joseph Quinn did the honors for Murray. Frank Stevenson acted as referee. Ken- nard began the fighting, Murray acting on the defensive, but up to the eighth round very little execution was done. The eighth, however, was a rattler. It was give and take all the way through. Murray had a shade the best of the round. After this there was a lull until the twelfth round, when there was another rattling set-to. Kennard had much the best of this round. He landed heavily on Murray's stomach and face time and again, and had Murray groggy before the call of time. Murray planted many blows in Kennard's face during the round, but they lacked force. Both men were com- paratively fresh when time was called for the thin eenth round. Kennard began rush- ing matters and put in some heavy blows. He bad his man dazed, and before the round was half over he got in a stinger on Murray's jaw, completely knocking him out. About changed hands. UNDER MARCHING ORDERS. 3Iove THE DEMON JEALOUSV Causes the Death of a Prominent Citizen of City. KAXSAS CITT. Dec. W. Simmons, a well-known livery man and undertaker of Argentine, Kan., was shot a-id perhaps fatally wounded by James a rail- way engineer, at Jleal's home in Argen- tine. Xeal is a switch engineer, with night duty. He returned home unf xpectedly, he says, and found Simmons ia wife's room. he said, aitt mpted to through the rear door of Ire honse and Nenl shot him. Simrnnn- inade auv-Tnorri in He said he went to NVai's 10 collect a bill Mrs. Xeal co-neil the door She had on only a mcbt  4 re ''-T) aiid tbe r-ar 01: t the canal, Carroll arrl M c' 'in.i coal, w Fatal n i W C ,1 177-; (V' T Kv fiT'J K 1 A f f i o' mn.e iiiii A Dec i, tin into tni.l, r, n two Both ,-ty mi es HOTEL BURNEp. Jump from the I-atallT Injured. Drsi.iv. Ix-r. The botel at Kilkecl. County Down, caught fire and was ripvtroved. The fire brokf out while the were nnd whpn they wrreftwakpnpd they fonn-i the usual of exit cut off ht tbe The pr-ir-n'-t-or and his family "r'upvd on the Boi Bo'h 'i and the k-.L' g the arr'-l OVPT tools. Ro'te v from New York Darby I n 'tins it in r ryine him 1 rt a Thp i.i'l was gronnd an 1 w The mi-1 from tnc 1 r r- to and far- thrpw him out i man on th' ir.jnrv jun jv- od sl-iv'ht dow d.e. Thf> Some 3li-.-i.-.mt Throws a K-ig of Lime in His BALLIXAKIU., Dec. Davitt, ac- companied by Father O'Hallaran, arrived n the Citv square yesterday and addressed be cro-d. There were cheers and counter diet .'3 and various partisans shouts from tbe members of the two factions, and much disorder. As Davitt bepan his speech a wagon with William Redmond and Father Ryan and other Parnellites drove up to the lower part of the square. Redmond began speaking simultaneously with D.ivitt. Another, crowd hea-Ied by Tanner and several priests also appeared on the .scene about, the same time and the con- fusion was indescribable. In the midst of the uproar Mr. Parnell and a large party of his supporters made their ap- They were greeted by shouts of: "Ially ho. the fox behind Kitty's and other offenM-e cries from the anti-PairtellitfS, while the Parnell faction replied with equally violent attacks upon their enemies. Mr Parnell addres'-ed the crowd in his v'cinity. saying that he would not insult anybody unneoes'sarily, tut in regard to Hf-nnessy, he was a man wbo went to par- liament "in as a Tory and supporter o! and now wanted to go as a Liberal ar.d supporter of Gladstone. In 1861. Hennessy defended in the honse of commons the evictions then proceeding throughout Kinjfs county. of "to hell with him "1 Would Kilkenny as her a man who aaro- caied oXt-rnnnatian of people? of Tbedisorder cotrin iiily Mr. Parnell was ar.-l at '1 there were manr ijoinR nn TH the The became ALMOST AN OCEAN TRAGEDY. The Mate of an American Schooner Stabbed by a Xegro Seaman. NEW YORK, Dec. Clay Smitn, a negro seaman on the American scboonde Lizzie Heyer, was taken off the steamship Orinoco in irons and brought United States Commissioner Shields. Ife was charged with .Vf-tnpting to murder Samuel H. McCobb. the first mate, Dec. 5, while the schooner was four dai out from Bermuda, where she was bound fi-'-m Bangor, Me. McCobb said that on the moraine of assault he was forward while Smith at the wheel. He gave an order to whic Smith replied impertinently. The told him to hold his tongue when Smith whipped out his sheath knife and made 0 lunge at him. He tried to ward off f blow, but the knife entered his side, sailor lunsed again and stabbed the in the back near the shoulder blade. Chadwick. the master of the schooner, and the seamen interfered and Smith put in irons. When the vessel reached Bermuda tto American consul shipped the nejyro, tro mate and George Mapp, a colored seaman, as a witness to New York. CommissiouOb Shields fixed bail at The matl'b wounds are still very troublesome. A YOUNGSTER'S NERVE. An Eig'ut-Year-Old Boy Runs Away from Home. NEWBUEG, N. Y., Dec- Saol- paugh, only 8 years old, was given faa charge of the police here by a of a "West Shore train. Willie Qo left bis home at Pouckhockie, a suburb Kingston, last Friday morning owing his stepmother's treatment He went a train to Coeyman's and stole a ride fib' Weebawken, where the railroad men took care of him and pnt him on a train to home Saturday morning. Instead of going home he went through to Coeymnn's, earned 25 cents working in the West Shore yard, slept in a railroai shanty over night and on a raft; road man pnt him on board southbounji train in the care of the conductor, helped him off at Kingston. After starting for this city he found 1 boy again on the train bound this he paid, for New York. The gave him over to the police and he sent home in the custody of a de The boy says his father his a boat THE WAGES OF SIN. A Wealthy Tbroofh CHICAGO. Dtc. Emil of a wealthy merchant in Jn raving in a ceil in tbe Detention with an uply in wriM, tbe result of an attempt at suicide. wto is 21 years old. was a postofBce clfrk ta hi? nntive country. He Mo> a smaD amount r.f money from the r a K when offifpr1! wer? abont to to the Her" rk.ns: out ac almost and nsh plant a prominent 11 thn started frr thpwa.-on -IT) f Hf" to 1 io at old JO and the farrily ai until lie in 1 Hr Ing t   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication