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Olean Democrat Newspaper Archive: November 20, 1890 - Page 1

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Publication: Olean Democrat

Location: Olean, New York

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   Olean Democrat, The (Newspaper) - November 20, 1890, Olean, New York                               n I The VOL -n. CLEAN. NEW YORK, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 11 REX" B1UCHALL SWINGS. LAST ACT IN THE FAMOUS BLEN- HEIM SWAMP TRAGEDY. The Murderer of Frederick C. Benwell Fays the J'enalty of His Crime on the Gallows Unrepentant to the Birchall Goes to His Awful Doom Un- faltering and Apparently Unconcerned. The Closing Scenes. WOODSTOCK. Out.. Nov. 15 q'clock yesterday morning J. liesiinald Birchall was banged in the jail yaid here for the murder of Frederick C. Benwell in Blenheim swamp on Fob. M lu'-t. About 200 people witwssr d tlie execu- tion from the jail yard. !-c m UOL-J saw it from windows, top ic T'-c being 1. Recline BiroU ir, h's Pirrt.all was uying, not irom a oroaen n'crk, but from strangulation. NX after the weight fell Dr. (.'hainbtMla'm, the prison inspector, pro- noi.lit. d Birchall dead. Tim bo !y WJL- cut dou n in <-i min- uto and an autopsy was begun. It was then discovered that Birchall died from strangulation. "The neck not diblo- c atfed." ud Jail Surgeon Rice. It IIP-, been definitely lemned that Birch- til died thout making any confession. DRAWING CARDS. Annual Meeting of the New "Vork State Architects at Buffalo. BUFFALO, Nov. annual meeting of the Western New York State Associa- tion of Architects began yesterday at the Iroquois. The president of the asso3iation, Mr. J. G. Cutler of Rochester, briefly outlined the work before the association in a pleas- ant The treasurer, Mr. George M, Baxter of Syracuse, presented his report covering the period from Oct. 1, 1889, to date. The receipts aggregated The disburse- ments for the year were 1294.91, leaving a balance in the treasury of 8232.42. The report was referred to a special committee for auditing. The following officers were then elected: President, W. W. Carlin, Buffalo; first vice president, H. C. Wicks, Buffalo; sec- ond vice president, Fred H. Gouge. Utica; secretary. J. H. Pierce, Elmira; treasurer, George "W. Baxter, Syracuse; members of executive committee, J. H. Marling, Buf- falo; J. H. Kir by, Syracuse. The amendments to the constitution and by-laws of the association were then considered and necessary alterations made to enable the organization to become a chapter of the American Institute of Architects. The important changes provide that any member f ailin g to pay his dues on or before March 1, may be dropped from the rolls; that the an- nual meeting shall be held between Nov. 15 and Dec. 1 of each year, and that the expense of members of the executive committee, the committee having in charge the pushing of the bill to license architects, and of other committees shall be paid in the discretion of the executive committee. These expenses include rail- road fares and hotel bills. The association then resolved to organise itself as a chapter of the American Insti- tute of Architects, the president and sec- retary were instructed to apply to that society for a charter, and the constitution and by-laws as amended were adopted. A ATTEMPTS TO MURDER A YOUNG LADY IN NEW YORK. Bliss Gladys Price Shof Shrouj-h the tuiiR by Man ho She His Bfatiioc TK-claren He Will TuKe cx-Fresldent Young is in a Ciiticstl ConOitior.. XEW YORK, Nov. 19. MKs Gladys Price, aged 24 years, was shot through the left lung last evening, by John T. Davis, aged 45 years, and now lies iu the hospital in a critical condition. Price is the organist at the Mariners' temple, corner of Madison and Catherine streets, and was just leaving the building after the evening services when Davis shot her. Davis is a lunatic of the most pronounced character. He has at times followed the for a living and lately has frequented the reading room base- ment of the Mariners' temple. Davis was at once arrested. At the station house he declared that Miss Price was his the girl avers that she never spoke to him. He also declared that Grover Cleveland was continually following her. He had chal- lenged Cleveland to fight a duel and last night saw him iu the church sitting by tbe side of Miss Price. He said his object was to kill her and then kill Cleveland, who had led her away from him. Davis expressed no regret at his act, except to he was sorry he did not kill Mr. say Cleveland, which yet do. _______ be declared he would Big Blaze in Jamestown. JAMESTOWN, N. Y., Nov. Ed- munds' livery was destroyed by fire early last evening. It was one of the largest in the city, consisting of four two-story bams joined together. All the horses were saved and most of the carriages. The building was insured for and the contents for The loss will be nearly The cause of the fire is unknown, although one theory is that it originated from electric light wires. Chamberlain Silent on the O'Shea Scandal. QTTEENSTOWS, Nov. Joseph Chamberlain, who arrived yesterday from New York, was asked by a reporter to give his views on the O'Shea scandal and its effects upon Mr. Parnell's political in- fluence. He declined to express an opin- ion, and laughingly advised the inter- viewer to ask the Irish members about it. THE KNIGHTS IN POLITICS. The Question of Organizing a New Party to be Discussed. DEXVER, Colo.. Nov. Knights of Labor will probably adjourn to-day. The question of organizing a new polit- ical party will probably be settled then and a place of holding their next annual assembly be chosen. Yesterday a general executive board, consisting of Messrs. Wright, Devlin, Holland and Davis, considered the ques- tion of strikes, and after a brief discussion agreed to let the clause iu the constitu- tion relating to this subject remain un- changed. The committee on the good of their order made their report, which was ac- cepted. Thoy recommend a federation of all labor organizations; the appointment of a committee to attend the next annual convention of the Farmers' Alliance; sup- ported the recommendation of General Master Workman Powderly for the pre- vention of needless strikes-, end strongly recommended the appointment of a com- mittee to bring about the forfeiture of the New York Central railroad to the state. WASHINGTON GOSSIP. A Memorial to Gen. Grant Proposed. Hcpoit of TreOMiry YV Nov. an interview pulr.Uhed hrn- Ut-ii. Edward F. of C.ilnornia. who was zm intimate friend of GIT Grant, proposes the erection of a m.u'iniiceiit memorial to the distinguished chiLfuan. to be placed m the circle south of the executive mansion. Gen. Beale says that not be necessary for the remains of Gun. Grant to be placed under the memorial any more than it would be to remove the dust of Washing- ton from Mount Vernon. (Jen. Beale thinks mat a memorial to Abraham Lin- jlu misiht also be erected m the feamo enclosure. Tne tr_-Jisurci of the United Sta-es Hon. James X. Huston, has submitted to retary Wmdom his report on the opera- tions and conditions of the treasury fo? the fiscal year ending June 30, 1890. Thn net ordinary reveneus amounted to OSO.OS2.03, a'sum but twice exceeded in the history of the ernment. The war department is in receipt of no information tending to confirm or dis- credit the alarming news published in thn newspapers about a threatened Indian uprising. Several new men are now Indian agentn at points in the Sioux nation and being unfamiliar the Indian character, they have become, in tbe opinion of officials, unnecessarily alarmed by the demonstration of the In- dians, and have out to the newspa- pers an expression of their fears which i's is believed will prove to be ill-founded. Bids were opened yesterday at the treas- ury department for the joiner's work eft the public building at Pittsburg. The bids took a wide range, the" highest bein? and the lowest, Woods, Jenks Co. of Cleveland, CONGRATULATING PATTISON. TERRORIZED SETTLERS SEEKING REFU3E FROM THE HOWL- ING REDSKINS. Ex-President Cleveland Expresses light at tbe Former's Sncceas. PHILADELPHIA, Nov. having been asserted that ex-President Cleveland had neglected to congratulate Governor- elect Pattison, the following personal let- ter is given to the public: XEW YOHK, Nov. r, 1890. Mr DEAB. I know that you are overwhelmed with congratulations, I cannot resist the temptation to express to you my de- Railroad Directors Elected. YORK, Nov. the annual meeting of the stockholders of the Buf- falo, Rochester and Pittsburg Railroad company, held here yesterday, the follow- ing directors were elected for the follow- ing year: Frederick A. Bell. Wilson Bissell and George Lewis of Buffalo; Frederick A. Brown, Walston H. Brown, Adrian Islen, Jr., Wheeler H. Peckham, Alfred Roosevelt and J. Kennedy Tod of New York; Edward Gibbs of Norwich, Conn.; R. M. Gnrnmere and Warren A. Wilbur of South Bethlehem, Pa., and Arthur G. Yates of Rochester. Subsequently the following officers were elected: Arthur G. Yates, president; William A. Baldwin of Rochester, vice president; John F. Dinkey of Rochester, auditor and treasurer, and John H. Hocart of New York, secretary and assistant treasurer. Chamber of Commerce Banquet. NEW YORK, Nov. 123nd annual dinner of the Chamber of Commerce was held at Delmonico's last evening. Presi- dent Charles Smith presided. Among those pressnt were Grover Cleveland, George William Curtis, C. M. Depew, Carl Schurz, Dr. C. W. Eliot, president of Harvard: Gen. Sherman, Bishop Potter, Gens. Schofield and Howard. The prin- cipal speakers otherthan President Smith, who delivered an introductory address, were G. W. Curtis on and C. M. Depew on Reciprocity with Other Carl Schurz on "The Development of Foreign and President Eliot of Harvard on '-Education in its Relation to Business Affairs." _ _. your state and have great sympathy with the good people there, confronted as they were with everything that was bad, and indorsed and supported by a party claiming an im- mense majority of the voters. It seemed to me that the condition was almost pitable and that the straggle between right and wrong, at such odds, ought not to have been forced upon your grand old common wealth. But TV hen. it came, precipitated by the arro- of those accustomed to deceive and be- way the people with impunity, I almost held my breath, and, as an American citizen proud of his country, prayed God for the people's safe deliverance and demonstration that they had not lost their love for honesty and right. The demonstration came: and I am now glad that the issue between right and wrong was made so clearly, and that the wrong so im- pudently displayed the banaer under which its fortunes were gathered. I want to thank you, as a citizen and as one of the people, for the galiaat fight you made and for all that you have done in this trying hour to save the American character. And I am Elfcd that this thing was done tinder Democratic auspices, though I think every man who voted for you deserves the gratitude of bis fellow countrymen. Yours very sincerely, GROVER CLETEIAXD. To Hon. Robert E. Pattison, Philadelphia, Pa. Intcusc lixists in Country Districts of Prepared to r.flU-vc AJM Hiiirj; t bo ut the In- I'cople Clamor for Guns and Oidrred to the Stone of the Threatened Outbreak. M D.Nov. IIOUM; in the town is full to overllov. IM.; vuth refugees from country district1- 1 here is intense excitement in the countiy. w-l- tlers'are to believe about because of their queer ac- tions lately. Several families tame in yesterday afoot, a distance of twenty miles and too poor to own wagons. In town somewhat tension exists ow- ing to the receipt of 300 guns from the state government and the fact that a company of soldiers will be here to-day from Fort Totten. Last nigLt there were 800 Indians in town armed. b'it citizens are armed, too, and patrol- v.il be out and people will sleep with tr.e.r clothes on. The population is thoroughly arouse i and although conservative men are doing their best to quiet the argry there is every reason to beli'-'.p tha' -i.- less the government takes immediate to increase the force of sold.ers it Fort Lincoln, every Indian coming the county will be killed. Nearly a hundred settler; werf- on a train last night from West End going to Bismarck for safety. Ac Glencl- lea, forty miles west, citizens turned out j en masse, throwing up circular breast- works by moonlight large set into for protection. A supply of riSes sent to each settlement in toe county. Telegrams are coming in constantly for supplies of ammunition, A telegram received by a correspondent from New Salem stated that 1-50 Indians are camped south of that point and che people are clamoring for guns and powder. A number of determined men bent on driving out of town the Indians camped here, deferred action on the Indians promising to be peaceable. While the correspondent was writing this a band of redskins were having a grass dance, making night hideous. Their shrieks could be heard for miles. While the ex- citement in town is subsiding because of the presence of plenty of guns, agitation in the country is worse than ever. This is caused largely by the insolent and menacing attitude of roviag bands of In dians traveling through. Agent McLaughlin wires that there is no cause for alarm, but everybody believes this is buncombe. A DISHONIST POSTOFFICE W. W. Alien ou Trial tor I at A i :srr v X V, Nov. W. W. i y MipcrintondenJ of J'ufT.ilc, rout i Rates' ronrf yesu-rday bt -Jit in the <-xamlnftlTOI witness n'.ioxu letters found po'scs-ion of th- when Cb.-irlf- H Thorn of CbarU'-s Barr of Cofetello, and fied that he did not receive the leitor by liarr. Mar E. Murphy of Buffalo, Wflltafll Mavis of V. E. South wick of Kil- senbuj'g. nida; Georgp Barnard of_, falo, idem i tied found on person at the time of his Lynn of New York testified arrest. _________ that he never received the letter sent by Southwiek. Charles R. Clark of Wolcott. the _ office inspector who was instrumental! bringing about tbe arrest of Allen, itm- the last witness sworn. He detailed plan which resulted in Allen's arrest i was then taken in hand by Quinby and to a rigid ex- amination The testimony thus far been a repetition of the evidence given Allen's former trial in Buffalo, the only new witness being William  1 farmer of t hisown hycut'i-c fr" m, Mr t in a be in R< fios at and id Ct, .i poiitj aged Nov :9 -Ihe CAbinpt cidwi to tbf pay of tbe police JEWS PA PER I SFWSPAPFRI   

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