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   Olean Democrat, The (Newspaper) - August 7, 1890, Olean, New York                               SIXTEEN PAGES. The Olean Democrat. VOL. XI. OLEAN, CATTARAUGUS CO. NEW YORK. THURSDAY, AUGUST 7, 1890. NO. 37 KEMMLER ELECTROCUTED THE DEATH PENALTY EXECUTED THIS MORNING. SOMKOFTUOSK WHO WERE PKESKNT He Away Quietly, Without a Struggle and his Death was Apparently Arrangements and Preparations for the Autopsy, AUBURN, Auj. suspense is ended and Kemmler is no more. He was electro- cuted in the room prepared for that purpose in the basement of the main prison building this morning at o'clock. The apparatus worked without a hitch and the condemned man passed off quietly. His death was ap- parently painless. N. Y., Aug. conversation with a special correspondent of the United Press lust evcninc, Dr. Southwick, the author of the new liit-rliod of legal execu- tion, told some interesting things about it. "I have come prepared for the he said, "with etc., with which to take the temperature of the re- mains so as to be sure that death has in- tervened before the surgeon's knife is used. The law requires that the autopsy shall take place immediately, but that will be interpreted to mean within a decant time. So soon as the temperature of the man is below the point where life can continue to exist, the operation will be begun. So that explodes the idea that some people have had that if the electric Bhock' did not kill him the surgeon's knives would." said Surgeon Daniel, who with Dr. McDonald and Dr. Spitzka will have charge of the autopsy, "there is no necces- sity for performing the operation directly after the shock has been administered. There would be a great public outcry if we did. It is likely that several hours will Intervene between the time when the man ia killed and the time of the autopsv." "I have been asked very said Dr. Southwick, "whether the death would be instantaneous. That is dependent on what you are pleased to term 'instanta- neous.' You say that the sensation when the shock of touching your finger end is transmitted to your instantaneous. "That sensation travels at the rate of 250 feet to the second. Now the rate of the electric current is times as great is it will travel at the rate of 000 feet a second. There will be no strug- gle before Kemmler is put in the chair I think. That is not the record of men who have been executed. They usually walk to the gallows quietly. As to the action of the current, you may be sure that it will cause one little twitch and then the body will be rigid and motionless. When the current is taken off it will collapse and be perfectly limp." Dr. Southwick has had no conversation with the warden about the matter, but he says the execution will take place proba- bly between 4 and 6 o'clock, and that it will likely occur this morning. The hours mentioned were the limits fixed in consul- tation last April, and the? will likely be adhered to. Warden Durston has heard from Elec- trician Barnes of Rochestei. Mr. Bai-nes telegraphed that all of tbe interviews with him printed in a New York paper and a greater part of that printed in a Rochester j-ajurr, were incorrect. Mr. Barnes has arrived here and it likely he will be admitted to the execution. He was not invited to the execution at the time set for it before and he was invited to be one of the of Mr. Durston this time .is a 'avor. E. F. Davis of X-w York will have charge of the techuirai features of the exe- cution. Mr. Durst on lias invited three local physicians tc among the assist- ants. They are: Doc'ors J. M. Jenkins, T. K. Smith and H. E. Allison. Kemuiler Spends a Quiet Day. Kemmler spent, the day quietly. No sign was given of his impending doom. His friend, Rev. Dr. accom- panied by the chaplain of the prison, visit- id him and spent tbe greater part of an hour with him. Thero is still a possibility that the execution will be until Thursday morning, b-it the chances are that it will occur shortly before 6 o'clock Wednesday morning. The doctors in charge of the autops-y will prepare a care- ful story for publication at the earliest possible moment. All the "Witnesses Arrive. It was learned last night that Electri- s1an E. A. Kreiger of Corning will be Mr. Davis' assistant in the management of the slectrical apparatus He been here for two days. Dr. T. .Ic-nk'ns of New York. D. O. A. Jenkins of Buffnlo. Tracy C. of Buffalo. Dr. Louis Balch o'f Albany and Dr. Henry Argue of Corning arrived in the afternoon. All of th" wit- nesses from abroad now here wnh the exception of Mr. MtMHlan, who cannnt tome. At T o'clock, the hour announced for the conference of the War-3on Durst on w; in the loVhy of tLe bouse in rrnvpi-sntirin with some He there until whs-n be t-o the prison in company with Elec- and Huntlry. It -was nearly 8 oV'vk when the witnesses sum- moned by warden assembled in tbe warden's Outkitjp the Prlion Walls. A curious gathered the Younc anil old were prfisifd apflinii the hfavy iron bars n tithrr of the Little i' tered .t alornj the pavement T.JP sifittr: r :n front of tbe prison, p.rp- !y ontlmt d brii'jjt gr'-f-n ivv f "ir-i i 'iff to thedu'il pr-iy wail. 1) was a l.jfljt ir. in -Ve men, H i I.ght ;n ,v Onrt of the f oat land. s.v si t on tl? K J oui- sidp which vcr-med to afford them much Arruniti-meiits for the Autopsy. Inside the warden's office a consultation was being held about the arrangements for tho and the most appropriate time for holding the exeeutt.oy. On the fiiM point there were few differences of opiuion. Dr. Daniel of B-ifTalo, one of the known of United States, had come prepared with all the instruments necessary for the work. Dr. Poufhwirk smreested that Dr. Daniel could better do the actual work ou tne autopsy and Dr. Spitzka and Dr. Mc- Donald were chosen as his assistants with the understanding that Dr. Spitzka would make a spucial examination of the nerve tissues. It was suggested also that Dr. Jenkins of New York be called in as con- and this doubtless will be done. Discussing the Time of Execution. When the discussion of the second point at issue was taken up there was wide di- vergence of opinion. Some favored hold- ing the execution during the day, while others suggested if this was done it would be necessary to stop all the machin- ery in the ouilding so as to turn the power pn the dynamo. Warden Durston was asked about this mechanical difficulty, bul without replying to the question, he saic cae aoctors w'oula u-asttr roiire aft the conference, leaving their addresses with him and ha wanted them he would send for them. The time of exe- cution was left in vague uncertainty. Testing the Current's Strength. When the conference was at end the warden asked the party to go with him to the execution room. The electricians, under direction of Mr. Davir, were already there putting in place tbe volt meter which the warden took to New York to be repaired last Friday and which Mr. Davis brought back with him yesterday morn- ing. The dynamo was running in the machinery room, and when the volt meter had been adjusted the current wr turned on and off several times and the double row of incandescent lamps on the wall was thrown in and out of circuit to demonstrate the current's strength. Mr. Davis said the meter did not work as satis- factorily as he could have wished, and that he would have to make some changes in it. Doctors Besieged br Reporters. The doctors left Mr. Davis and his as- sistants at work on the meter, and at they left the big building and returned to the hotel. Two of the doctors said to the special correspondent of the United Press that, while the matter was left entirely in Warden Durston's hands, their impression was that the execution would not occur until this forenoon or to-night. As quickly as possible the doctors shook off the crowd of eager newspaper men and retired to their rooms. The trouble with the volt meter cannot delay the execution. The current's strength can be tested satisfac- torily without it. The Execution Postponed. Shortly before 11 o'clock last night in- vitations were issued to F. W. Mack of the Associated Press and George Grantham Bain of the United Press to attend the ex- ecution in the capacity of witnesses. The warden stated to these gentlemen that they were invited not as press representa- tives but as citizens. It is the general im- pression at midnight that the electricide cannot take place before 7 o'clock in the morning._________________ IN HOUSE AND SENATE. Mr. Brechenridge's Seat Declared Vacant. The Tariff Discussion. WASHINGTON, Aug. house spent most of the day yesterday debating the resolution reported from the committee on rules asking the secretary of the navy for the reasons of the increase of force at the Kittery navy yard, as a substitute for the Cummings resolution of Inquiry. After adopting the resolution and re- ceiving the report of the election commit- tee in the Clayton-Breckenridge case, which declares Mr. Breckenridge's seat vacant, the general deficiency bill was taken up in committee of the whole. Some progress was made with the bill, but without finibhicg it the house ad- journed, j The senate worked industriously at the tariff bill all day. The glassware and stone schedule was finished. A number of amendments proposing to reduce the committee rates, offered by the Demo- crats, were rejected. The metiil schedule was taken up and pending a discussion of an amendment offered by Mr. Morgan to admit steel ores five t iie senate adjourned. Senators and Call made speeches duriniTt'r.e afternoon ou the general sun- ject of legislation, and in opposition to the pending bill. THE MYSTERY DEEPENS. Four Codies Found in the Unknown Barge Wrecked at Ixing Branch. LONG BRAXCH. N. J., Aug. mys- tery in connection with tbe unknown barge which wss wrrck'-d at this place a few days asrn Yesterday morn- ing an artist on Harper's Weekly, who was ihs wrcrx discovered a foot kins out of the w.itcr. The coro- ner was notified. An investigation at once and four were found. The 7i.TT.H- or number of the bartre can- not be ascertained. The theory i5 that she tV.p birpe that was by tbe Tljincvalla. Ifthisi? tbe case tbe baref had four nr-a aboard of ber and was B 13 from Newport News, Va, Tlie nnmps of those on the barge were: Dick Waters, a man nirr.fi Kleminc whose name is Vr.own. On? of agents of the wbo is he-re f-.ik-i to recog- r.ize the IXTLYflO-XS. THE DISPOSITION TO BE MADE OF HELIGOLAND. Two Prominent Shot, HALmm-m K TPT Aust 6 ble W. v; and Tucker, two dovrn ontha p'jbnr }.j- .Tc, rtbfr-. .Ir and arH Vr tbe tbe 'e.rr. a of T TV men nrH leave Mr a candidate for ooaaiy. Conference Uetn-es-n Count von Hatzfeldt and Lord Salisbury in Regard to Ger- many's Newly Acqtiin i Territory, tabor Troubles lirewing In Wales. Westminster Abbey Has Itoom for More Distinguished Dead. LONDON, von Hatzfeldt, the German ambassador, had a long inter- view with Lord Salisbury yesterday after- noon on the subject of the formal transfer of Heligoland to Germany. Count von Hatzfeldt, fresh from an audience with his imperial master, iully deiiced the in- tentions of Germany in regard to the use to which that empire will devote the newly acquired territory and specifically indicated the extent to which it will be fortified. The conference concluded with a complete arrangement for therelinquish- meut of the island by England and its official acceptance by Germany, including a detailed program of the ceremonies which will bs observed on the occasion. After the interview Count von Hatz- feldt returned to Osborne to report to the emperor. Ou Thursday Lord Salisbury will go to Ohborne, where Le will have an interview with the German emperor and an audience with the queen. To Antagonize Trade Unionists. The Chamber of Commerce of Cardiff, Wales, has aroused the bitter hostility of the trades unionists by the passage of a labor resolution at a meeting of that body. By a vote almost unanimous ,'the chamber resolved, in view of a probable strike of dock and other laborers, to maintain the right of free labor and urged the employ- ers not to accept the dictation abor unions any longer. The resolution is re- garded by union workmen as wholly gratuitous aud unjustifiable and the ac- tion of the chamber will be resisted to the bitter end. Ample Room for More Gravest The commission appointed to investi- gate the condition of Westminster abbey in respect to its further use as the burial place of distinguished persons, has com- pleted its investigation and is preparing a report of the results thereof which will shortly be published. The commission finds that the necessity for discontinuance of the practice of depositing the bodies of noted persons in the abbey is not nearly so great as has been represented by the oppo- nents of the custom and is of the opinion hat there is yet room for a hundred or more graves. Killed by an Overzealons Sentry. evening a pedestrian passing the West End barracks was shot dead by one of the guards. It does not appear that the unfortunate mau was even by ;he sentry, nor does the latter claim that victim was straying within prohibited limits. The guard was arrested and ex- amined as to his sanity in view of the wantonness of his action. The examina- ;ion abundantly proved that the culprit was sane, and he was committed for trial on the charge of wilful murder. Socialists Expelled from Warsaw. The police of Warsaw have expelled 'rom that city fifty-four foreign Socialists with the warning that if they return they will be imprisoned at hard labor. It is reported that cholera iu a virulent orm has in several Russian owns on the Polish frontier. Sanitary jrecautions are being taken to prevent the pread of the disease. A r.iOM GOV. He Newr Kaltl Would Oppuse the of the Ixxtg-- 1' M. Con O.. AUK. i.vi-uing having stated (jov ernor i.dl had threatened in conver- sation to out the militia, incuse ;ir. Jittfinnt should by made to c-uforco the lull'' in Ohio, t'n3 governor has .sent editor the following i'cter: 5, Au Mr. J. H. flal'-raith, Kihi-ir S'lc -Tho C'omiiiercia' iiti'iiiy th.it on- ol tii-; txl- r i ii.vr cUi'iix l pre.m.'i to u ,tn a wnm v. f ji.u r.ljollj stoi-y con- v, .ipji u-c i in ir of hiiy x'S. I i  v ID-true for writing wtui-n in The For'riiulitly Review, ciiHit 5hc murder of tLe czar. Mr. O'P'iit-n was proceeding to read the pwn when the nkcr called biui to onU-r. s.syini; thai coui-i not coiiT i the poeint-of :-iiirnc. TLe speaker'.- remark cau.se 1 laughtcT. i The Order of Torrytm in Order of a to ex: Crack Cantons Begin Their Prize Con- Work Predicted. CHICAGO, Any. 50.000 visitors, including ladies, have so far arrived intue city to participate in tbe Odd Fellows' can- tonment. Nearly all the preliminaries of tbe great program were completed day morning, so Gen. Underwood and his assistants were able to devote themselves to the plea'-a-irer duty of receiving friends and renewing old acquaintances made at Los Angeles two Every train brought one or more cao.- tons. each numbering from fifteen to fifty men, exclusive of officers, and every de- partrneut commander and staff officer is now on the ground, the last having ar- rived yesterday morning in company with the Ohio cantons. In the afternoon, be- ginning at 2 o'clock, the crack cantons, classed as A in the competition schedule, began thfir prizs work in the inclosure- opposite the Auditorium. Class A is com- posed of prize in former contests and the judges predict some excellent work. Five Persons Orowned. Xnw OKLKAXS. Aug. steamship City of from C'eatr.-il America, re- pjrts thnt Capt. Itawley of thi- Macheca of New i.s. lond- ing off Livingston, Guatf-iv.al-j. in a sailboat bound to tbe v.-nh the commandant, the judge of t're r-'-rt and tr.-o unknown persons and bcaf- nun. seven persons in it s-iz-'l ilnrinsj a squall. Ail drown. exf-pi Tl.e two wLo in reaching the Ijcach. Capt. Rawh-j's body alane wa> recovered. Granted an A'v. l-.r n a v t :o ri m i ir.ai 01) Otfi, t d tL e s- V. connty. bui a y, p.: An of Arrrcterl. 'ii1- pert or b cr ft for K: f TJme. of c'c Co.. fcrti- 1 o tha s com- ex- the a re- rnrnitorf T ar'or.T Kn-np'l. well WR? .rned at vest' r dav mr-ming. insaranf nothing. Prr- fr- -A of i h was a verv en- ANOTHER NIAGARA MYSTERY. Clothing of a Supposed Suicide Found Near Kails. NIAOAKA FALLS, N. Y., Aug. 6 o'clock yesterday morning Officer Mc- Mullen of the reservation police force found a brown checked coat, a black veM and a-derby bat on thi' bank of the river Prospect park, about 300 feet above the American fall. In the pockets were found in money, several small articles an'l a nickel watch attached to an oxydized silver There were also found four cards bear- ing the address: "Jacob J. Kirshner, Dealer and Manufacturer of Cigars, Brant- ford, Ont.'' In one corner of the card were the words "Presented by George Kirshuer." Several letters in the pockets were addressed to Jacob J. Kirshner. A letterhead of the Palmer house, Toronto, Ont., had this memoranda notes coming due: Xov 3 Dec. 3, Jan. 3, The hat bore the store mark of George Glass Co Brantford, Ont. D. Littlefield of the Park lunch house states that a man wearing the coat found was in the lunch house Monday, and asked for a drink, stating that he was broke. The drink was refused and the stranger said he was going over the falls. It looks as though he had kept his word, and that he was J. J. Kirshner of Brantford, Ont. JUDICIARY REVISION. The Commission Begins Its Delibera- tions at Albany. ALBANY, Aug. commission to revise the judiciary article of the consti- tution began its deliberations yesterday in the senate chamber, Judge George F. Danforth presiding. The report of the sub-committee on supreme court was pre- sented as published. Joseph H. Choat of Xew York said the cardinal feature of the report was the rad- ical change it was proposed to make in the constitution relative to the general term of the supreme court. In many cases the functions of the court were performed in a very perfunctory manner. The committee generally felt that there were too many limitations to the work of the general term. By the changes proposed the general term would be made practically a new court. The court should be divided into four departments, and five judges assigned to each department. There should be twenty judges elected by the state for these duties. They should not be selected by local constittiencies. Another feature proposed was that the general term should be purely an appel- late body._______________ MURDEROUSLY ASSAULTED. An Attorney Brutally Beaten and tefl to Die on a Railroad Track. ST. JOSEPH, Mo., Aug. J. Baker, a prominent attorney of Troy, Kan., discovered lying near a railroad track in the Kansas City yards Sunday night, his right arm cut off at the elbowaud his head gashed. Monday he recovered conscious- ness long enough to state that he met a stranger in a saloon Sunday night with whom he took severs 1 drinks. At nig'-t, while walking along a dark street, the stranger stiuck him a crushing blow on the back of t he he-id. This is the ast he it is supposed that after robbing his tne stranger laid the body across tat; ii.iuks. a few yards away, where it was soon struck by a train. A Klndzuiizi's Antics. GEAFTOX. N. D., Aug. C. Xeil- a jeweler, became insans last week and for three days hfc barricaded his store, an.: refused a-1 minion to citizens. Several attempts to dislodg..- him failed. Xeilson ;i revolver se-.vr-.l tinvs at the citi- zens. Monday Maj Chandler, with IOC others, went to the store and endeavored o g-t Xeilsou out, bur the only reply was a pistol shot. Subsequently Frank Tombs. hief engineer of the lire department. lorci'd his way into the store and found Xeilson dead, he :nst having fired a bullet into his heart. Mardered His TVife and Killed Hlmtelf. I.VUEX. Neb.. Aug. long standing quarrel between Hans and his wife in a tragedy Monday. :Ia! .-c-r. i.ncr-i i his team to go to c. i n.r> J.p .iri'i v rr with his v.-j.Y. i a olu'i inner s'-ci.ii. her He (iracr-rc-C t-" the wlu-r" he it from a iv.fter a rope. He then tried tc ii.-iMn Hms-eif with a portion of the rope. but faiiiug to the house and blew out with a shot gun. Prefers Death to Scrrcnd-r. CITY OF Aug A says Presi'lt-u: li.iriila.-. tie- l.irsf he no; r-f'-i'i'i sa-i i to pr.TTvn'ter. D.-jiat'-ht-s rH br i'ie f-r 01 the iaf ii; O iTr.-ii ia FOR SELLfNG The Manager of the American Company ArreKfctl in YORK armed with a wi--- of tilt-To iii tendenl i'.ritton forcfment of the Patrick ;U: Viirlc. nmrning; ican Xews company, named resp r-f rn'.ut of a.j t.ie o' 1.7 :r. the inttnor covera- on tlir PAV Tex Ane A-; n t-nvn of rtiw M' i. i.iy j firp M. xr Ma'r HaturT .T ki nr, 5 Sheriff I. >eri- while to ar A of ranker? and 'a-Ti-j'y Inrf Msrfa tc the 71 i- tafivf-u hurawl. but ac partic uiar- hs- received Flrrd I ffm of from of S-.ntiay n-ght 'ri "k'> k ud. iK--r. n Ht-nry It i? 7 x-- a partj 01 tlw th? cnme GOT, c Kn- ..rreatcd rijr. Amer- J' clerks .John C. Flannagan and Ed ward The pri-.o-sers' were arraigned before Mi.'-riynt the Tombs court and were in the cus- tody of their counsel, E. A. Carley, until this morning, when examination will be bad. Among the books the sale of which brought about the action of the society are the ''Kreutzer by Tolstoi; "The Clemeuceau by Alexander Dumas, and the "Devil's by Balzac, all of which are by the society alleged to be obscene publica'.ions. STABBED THE CHAMBERMAIDS. Inrane Act of Frank Tiffany in a Hotel at North Adams, >IasSi NORTH ADAMS, Aug. day afternoon Frank Tiffany of the firm of TifffiTiy Bros., knitted goods, of Ben- niiiKtoii. Vt., aad a guest of the Mansion house, stabbed and severely wounded Ross- anna Cain, aged 21, and Carrie Halberg, aged 19, chambermaids, employed in the house. Tiffany, who is believed to be in- sane, was secured after a hard struggle, and just as he was about to spring from a window. He will be brought before the district court in the morning. He is a married man and the father of two children. The injuries of Rosanna Cain are dangerous and she is in a critical conditioo. Jfo mo- tive appears for the deed, to have been the result of an uncontrollable outbreak of madness. His Head Severed from His Body. BUFFALO. Aug. Epkel, Tyeajs old, and living at Goethe street, met with a sudden ?nd violent death last night. The Lvl standing on the Etic tracks undernsath the Lackawanna trestle and gazing up ;tt a passing train. The noise of the train drowned the noise of the approaching train on the Erie, the engi- neer of which did not see the boy until it was too late to check the speed of his en- gine. The boy was struck and instantly killed, his head being severed from bis body. Anti-tottery Convention. Xrw ORLEANS, Aug. Baton Rouge, La., special to The Picayune says: The delegates to the anti-Lottery league con- vention, which opens on Thursday, have already commenced to arrive, among those who are now here being Messrs. C. H. Parker and John Dymond. A number of the alliance delegates are also members of the anti-Lottery league and will with the session of that body. Postal Elects Directors. NEW YORK, Aug. stockholders of the Postal Pacific Telegraph company had an election yesterday at 1 Broadway and re-elected the following directors for the ensuing year: John W. ilackay, W. C. Van Home, Sir George Stephen. Charles R. Hosmer, Richard V. Day, A. B. Chand- ler, H. De Castro and C. G. Ward. The election of ofncers will take place at annual meeting next month. Amuerst's Xew President Arrives. AMHEHST, iiass.. Aug. Merrill E. Gates, formerly of Rutgers, the newly elected president of Amherst, has here and will be met by ths membsrs o{ the faculty to-day. Call for Republican Convention. HARTFORD, Conn., Aug. Repub- lican state committee has decided to call a convention at Xew Haven, Sept. 6. Verdict of Justifiable Homicide. CHARLESTON. S. C., Aug. corn- ner's in the case of Green who killed his wife's iiHramour. yesterday re- turned a of justifiable homici'.if A Loan Association ia Trouble. Aug. Sefton Dunn, with two of their clerks and all agents of the National Capital Building and Loan association, were remanded Monday night in default of bai! each. The charge was conspiracy tc de- fraud, and was made by a score of vic- tims, with more to hear from. The main office of the company is in Chicago. An Inlinman Mother's Awfal Crime. STRACF E, X. Y.. Aug. John Nabor p.ivp Hrth to a child mornin? which ehe tbrew into avault and then banned its by pounding it on the head with cobblestones. She re- moved to tbe hospital and held en a charge of murder. for YORK. 5 F'.rr of tii" ;nb -.vard, X. .1 V.as i hi" f' 5 name t. ,v.-ard L. Car' ihree and for sn 1 the n.-.n.e of R. to oni- h r. for Hogate in 1 Xrw A-r-ve'5, M---im f r< m Awlw :i 1'tiii M A., B Pirn- frori Lr.' ;j" Movnir. York for Thf i'r f-n] W r wnl I'rtri fit -if iinti to VJ whiia i'., will go York IN SPA PERI IN SPA PERI   

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