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Olean Democrat: Thursday, May 29, 1890 - Page 1

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   Olean Democrat, The (Newspaper) - May 29, 1890, Olean, New York                               N PAGES. PAGES 1 The Olean Democrat VOL. XI. OLEAN, CATTARAUGUS CO. NEW YORK, THURSDAY, MAY 29, 1890. NO. 27 THE CLOSING DAY OF THE CONFERENCE AT SARATOGA. A Resolution I'aKsert RpgardJiig the Kx- cluslon of the Bible from Uio Public Schools The Report of the Standing Committee on Publication Detroit Selected as the Next SARATOGA, X. Y., May At tiic ;ifler- noon session of the coher- ence yehter-lay Rev. Dr. nittccl the follow IDS.; resolution regarding the ex- clusion of Bible from the public schools, which was unanimously adopted by the assembly: Wberoas, A recent decision of the supreme court 01 ono of our states has affirmed the Bible to be a book, and its use in the public bi-liO' 1- 10 be UTieonstitutionHi: and ja% V, o in tius decision no mere local realtor vc h affects fcimplv the people of that sft- but ulininailon cf that effort inn v -to Ith raieutlessptrteraclty by a fvj'eit 'i biv-ra'-tln to erthro'.v the sys- tem cf ppbi.f- fctiools thiotighout the land; therefore. iiesoh ed, That ve affirm the importance of our public i-cbools to the welfare of our people; that v .111 intellectual caitivation. must go moral tiaiinag, or the schools may prove a curse rather Can a but this moral training miiit be ba'-ed on rellKion, otherwise Its sanction will not be strong enough to grasp fie conscience of the people, or its utterances obligatory enough to shape their character; that, as the Bible is the source of the highest moral teaching, we regard its exclusion from our public schools as a menace to the national welfare, and we urge the members of our church to areii.se public thought ou this sub- ject from the pulpit, the tress and the ecclesi- astical assemblages that this book thai! be re- stored to its true place in our bystem oi educa- tion. The Rev. Dr. Howard Crosby presented the report of the standing committee on publication. Considering the stir that this board has created during this session it was a very impartial statement of the work that the board has accomplished dur- ing the past year. All the departments of the board have met with a large measure of prosperity. The business department closed the year with net profits of which enabled it to pay over to the mis- sionary Although the sales of books aad tracts were somewhat less than last year, the sales of periodicals h; largely increased. The missionary depi taent received larger contribu than in any preceding year, and was tyst enabled to place a larger dent missionaries in the field, crease the number of permanent It has established Sab from which already churches have The following by BE. Crosby adopted by the assesn Resolved, That we -rega licatioa and Sabbath.school most important agents of tlon, and that as sseh its mi should be liberally supported churches. Resolved, That our churches should as possible use and circulate the pubEcai of our own boar.i as a sound and wholeso: Christian literature for both old and young. Resolved, Th-tt patters be urged to explain to their people1 the difference between the business and the missionary department of the board, and show ihem that the latter de- pends chiefly on the. contributions front our x churches and Sabbat-h schools. Resolved, That the board tahe into consider- ation the advisability of publishing in the German, Spanish and Scandinavian languages such Sabbath school books and papers as may supply a want in our tr.vn schools where pupils speaking these languages are found. The names of the committee appointed to make an investigation into the founda- tion of the reports, almost diametrically opposite in tone statement of facts, that were submitted by the special com- mitte aisd the business committee of tbe board of publication are as follows: Alfred J. Hard, Pennsylvania; Eliae Montfort. Cincinnati; A. D. F. Randolph, New York; George S. Draper, St. Louis; Reuben S. Smith, Cleveland: W. C. Mar- tin, New York, and W. A. Brodie, Koch- ester. The repart of the committee on the freedmen, as to allowing colored Presby- teries to directly to the other boards was against the request. The report was taken up. Dr. Booth was opposed to discrimination, and thought- one Presbytery was as good as another. To place the colored Presbyteries in a sep- arate category was unfair, and while it was done the ir. m'.ood of the colored peo- ple was and they could not feel at home in the Presbyterian church. He moved that their request be granted. Dr. Morris said the freedmen's board was intended to carry on a specific work among the colored people of the South. In brief it does the work of all other boards. He thought this board was needed, and must do the work it does for the wards of the church at large. It is a question affecting the very life of the board and to repeal the rule is virtually moving to abolish the freedmen's board. Dr. Crosby held that the New Testament recognized deaconesses. Dr. Van Dyke was surprised to see such a revolutionary movement emanate from where it did. He did not think there was Scriptural authority and we have enough on hand in the revision business without undei taking other Dr. Agtiew opposed the paper. Dr. Stevenson said Dr. Warfiold had said that Princeton was distinguished for never bringing forth ;i new thought in and he was surprised that he should propose this innovation. Mr. moved that no further action thnii that, adopted be taken; reading action of previous assemblies. Air. Warren's resolution was voted do'vu and the recommendation to send down was adopted, after Dr. Moore had amended that the deacon- esses be simply set apart by prayer. At the evening session the nominating committee announced tbe committee on revision as follows: H. Greene, Princeton; Thomas S. Hastings, Union; M. B. Riddle, Allegheny; W. J. Beecher, Auburn; E. D. Morris, Lane; Herrick Johnson, McConnell; William Alexander, San Francisco. College Presidents Francis L. Patton, Princeton; William C. Roberts, Lake Forest. E. Moore, Columbus, O., (moderator of H. J. VanDyke, Brooklyn; Ebenezer Erskine, Chambers- burg; J. T. Leftwich, Baltimore; S. J. Niccolls, St. Louis, E. R. Burkhalter, Cedar Rapids, la. Elders Ex-Justice William Strong, Washington; ex-Senator J. R. St. Paul; Judge Alfred Hand, Scran Pa., Emerson White, Cincinnati; J; Henry Sayler, Huntington, Ind. throp S. Gilman, New York; Eumere, Trenton, N. J.; Covington, Ky.; George Junkfn; phia; Charles R, Charnleyj' This is the the actual work of re vising on and will report to the' The by the A PAX-AJI. BANK. committee as assembly by Detroit next meei A comzn; of placeof the Arrangements for the appointed, with Dr, as chairman. A BILL FOR ITS INCORPORATION SENT TO CONGRESS. The President Indorses the .Scheme of the International Amerlrr.'i Conference. A List of Prospective Commissioners. The Capital Stock to be A Letter from Secretary 151 aim1. "WASHINGTON-, May The president sent to congress yesterday the draft of a bill to carry into effect the recommenda- tions of the international American con- ference by the incorportion of the interna- tional American bank. The commis- sioners named are John B. Henderson of Missouri, Cornelius N. Bliss of New York, William Henry Trescott of South olina, T. J. Coolidge of Massachu? Andrew Carnegie of Pennsylvani ent Studebacker of Indiana, Hanson of Georgia, Henry (J, West Virginia, Charles R. York, and M. M. Este of are authorized to open stock subscriptions in. New York, or at botfi" other principal cities of'i and also in DYN XPL DES. n .11. li Nearly I'll I i! to People. vii.! r, X. Y.. Mnv A largo number of front all over Central New York C-.VIH- here by s-t.-rial and regular niiddny truim; yesjeni iv to wit- ness the public experiment, of t'ie Dr. Justin n.Mnile gun. Thg wt.'f'u'r was fine all th.- but at noon the clouds to lower with a pro.-spect of rain later. Much interest was shown and every- thing pointed to another successful ex- periment. The c.-miMi'i was fired at 3 p.m. and exploded into a thousand pieces. No- body hurt but there were uar- and Central may be INTO INFAMY. hel inese Gambler's Peculiar Method of liaising NEW YORK, May 28. man was yesterday the Tombs police cou: buying Suen Yee, girl, and .keeping her poses. The girl -was born in San Francisco about five employed as hand-: rich Chinese merchant Chinese gambler name there and fell in love several meetings whic' Kjand the girl was dis: was taken in chargi San Francisco, where she remained Ah Phoon tried to induce her she refused. Ah Phoon then the mission he the girl. She then left -was the last of heron San girl to 11 Mott street, where some time. Finally Phoon lost gambling and sold Jxe KM for 1600. or in in such States, of South 1 Mexico, as they capital stock is to to increase by a two- The shares are each. When 25 per to the capital been paid in ca.sh the cor- begin business, but at least is to be called and paid in cash a year from the date of organiza- The principal offi ton or Xew York, determine. The bank] to receive deposits, change, etc., but not late as money. It agent of any government, municl person, etc. It may acquire real estate not to exceed in value 15 per cent, of its paid capital. It may be designated by the secretary of the treasury as a depository of the public money or may be employed as a financial agent of the government. The board of directors is to consist of twenty- seven persons holding at least 250 shares each, and fifteen of them shall be citizens of the United States. The commissioners are to meet in Wash- ington, within sixty days after the passage organize by___ Tl .on. .ed be! escapes. Huge of iron were iiundreds of feet. A piece of can- four feet through, camefly- iirough the air and landed within feet of the Syracuse Herald corre- entwfco was watching the proceed- igs from beaiud tree. Another large piece went in jshe direction, tear- ing a large cluinkf rom the counter of a temporary refresfittteiit stand about 500 feet f Tbe keeper of "was inside, but the njissile grazed TaefUl eiid scattered the contents of the stand.' -it suid that the dynamite did not -the but the charge of powder. Among the visitors who afternoon were Lieut. Com. Maynard and Lieut. L. P. Dav navy and Commander Theodore F. of the United States naval station, Newport, R.. I. Five hundred peopl present. The cannon used weighs pounds. The bore is 12 feet long and 9 gun, in diameter. The luff about one-third of a target was a mile from the nts loaded the Two of the ghteen pounds have twenty- g Wing, repre- was here to-day. The premature explosion has caused some speculation as to how it may affect the development of the invention. Dr. Justin is, however, confident that the catastrophe was due largely, if not en- tirely, to imperfect metal in the construc- tion of the shell which allowed the outer steel shell to break and let the dynamite explode. His backers, Messrs. Patten and Dewitt of Canastota, say that they will procure another gun and go on with the experiments of throwing a magazine of GENERAL FOKE1GX NEWS. MR. GLADSTONE ADDPESSES AN IM- MENSE GATHERING. The Kx-I'romliT Frequently Interrupted by Wants England to Kvucunte Ksrypt. in Ketiun the Former Would Her Eights In IJcrJin Sensation. LONPOV, May immense- g-Uher- ing of on the grounds of ILiAvanl n -ib yesterday to li.-ten to anaddiv- )r .Mr. Gladstone. Through- out the mousing special trains prcked with people from English and V.'elch towns and illages, far and near, were constantly arriving, while hundreds of persons living it hin a few miles of the premier's seat, joined in the procession and marched to the castle. Mr. Gladstone was in excellent form and voice and ad- dressed the vast crowd from an elevated position in a corner of the castle yard, while Mrs. Gladstone held an umbrella over his head to shield him from the rays of the sun. He was frequently interrupted by applause, and the utmost enthusiasm prevailed throughout the day. Among the gathering were many recognized Con- servatives, but the speaker's remarks elicited from them no signs of disapproval. DISSATISFIED DOCK. LABORERS. The discontent of the Liverpool dock laborers has manifested itself in the of their number engaged in timber, who strxick yesterday of wages to 6 shillings a is in itself, encouraged in their Support of the Dock- liklihood that it is very to fill the places exl lite by force of gun' Jsion yesterday caused ernation among the m is considered almost ke was killed. The twel pattered in fragments If a mile. floor of 11 --her to meet pefused she submission. ,ty Samuel Lee Khi kept Mott street and Chinamen there, was beaten and starv She was found at Landon, a newspaper for the arrest of Lee Khi. face to face with Khi in the the girl ran behind the justice fo tion and did not become calm was taken from the room. He will an examination to-day. Dr. Patterson with the colored and did not want them branued with the stigma of inferior- ity. Other boards CAD take independent action with their Presbyteries and all should have it. Dr Crosby said the logic was with the oolorrfl I'TY-t hren. The vote taken on Dr. liooih's amendment nnd the call of division Defied it in the affirmative. Tbe vote stood l.'rf) to 14T> aii'l was taken amid considerable t-xcitemeut The motion to adopt the report WAS car- ried, the Ix-ing 179 to 125. The report on deaconesses taken from thr docket. Dr Warneld advocated the report. He thought women who the church have ecclesiastical Pr out the fact that the wonifTi not asking for the office, and Dr VanDykf said that women it Leaped to Her Death. NEW YORK, May Towne, aged 80 years, of 123 Forsythe street, committed suicide by jumping down the air-shaft of her residence and was instantly killed. Early in the day the woman had made a complaint of abandonment against her husband, Edward Towne, in the Essex Market police court. While she vas giving her testimony Towne entered the court room with a woman who said she was Clara Towne and was married to Edward Towne in Philadelphia fourteen years ago. A charge of bigamy ws-s pending when Ellen Towne commit- ted Miiri.'e- Clara Towne appeared ac-iinj-t husband and he was held in bail. Mr. Gladstone Arraigns the Government. LOXDOX, May Gladstone, speak- ing at Hawarden yesterday, predicted that a general parliamentary election would take place at an early day, and ap- pealed to his hearers and the electors of the country generally to give final utter- ance on that occasion to their condemna- tion of further paltering with tbe Irish question. He denounced the government's bill to compensate publicans. The con- trol of licensing be invested in local elective bodies. It would add to tbe national debt, he declared, to pur- chase the of the publicans. Tbe workingmen, knowing the of drink, ought against the govern- immoral plans The following letter from the secretary of state accompanied the message of the president: To THE have the honor to sub- mit herewith the report of the committe on hanking as unanimously adopted by the in- ternational American conference, recently in session in this city. It was the wish conference that this proposition of such] interest to every American republic promptly as possible secure the earns tention of the congress of the United Stal The foreign commerce of the nations soutl the Gulf of Mexico and the Rio Grai amounts annually to more than At present the people of the United States ei a meagre share of this market, but the act! of the recent conference will result, I beliej in the removal of certain obstacles which d tend to obstruct; the expansion of our trad! One of the most serious of these obstaclt- the absence of a system of direct exchal Sand credits by reason of which the export] importing merchants of the United Sj in commerce with Central am have been compelled to London a tax upon eveT day.s but moveme men's will spread great. As yet _ of the strikers consequent- ly there has been LOOKING FOK The Figaro, in an article the relations between advances the suggestion bury fix a date when ate Egypt. Such action on Great Britain, The Figaro assures iS ers, would be the beginning of a s settlement of the existing difference tween the two houses, over which the has been so much fruitless controversy. In return for England's withdrawal from usent to relinquish dland and thus the .tion between the ernments would be believed that the ggestion is made and put forward as few Officers for the ORK, May 28. of the Pacific to-day the control ids. The Gould pa rould, Georpe J. [ney Dillon and retire, and a new beard .'consisting of P. Huutington, I. E. Gates, Henry Hart, Edward Lanterbach, Calvin S. Brice. Samuel Thomas, Oliver H. Payne, J. B. Houston and one other still to be named, will be elected, and J. B. Houston will be elected president in place of George This outcome is a complete de- 'the Gould interest. The control Accumulating stocks over three and now hold shares, or [a majority, that no contest is ex- The Villard interest has no place ticket, and the scheme to have made a terminal point for Pacific sffectually blocked. STEB RESIGNS. ian minister of position in his taken his departure is given for his rmised, as one of embers of the Bis- ound himself not in accord with the policy of the present ad- ministration. In accepting the resigna- tion of Dr. von Scholz the emperor con- ferred upon him the order of the marck ministry, commerce with the countries to of which the merchandise were valued at of specie and bul- lion uur exports con sisted of at and in sptea. Of the merchafidiS6iiBpirted into the United States the for by remit- tances to London pf the conti- nent to cover drafts letters of credit. For the use ot a com- mission of three-quarters is cus- tomarily paid, so that the en- joyed a large profit upon irKh a minimum of risk. This system resvlts in losses to oar merchants in differences in exchange as well as ii' sions. losses would be largely to onr by the an international system of banking between ILa American republics. The merchants of this con n try are as depend- ent upon the bankers of Europe in their finan- cial transactions with their American neigh- bors as- they are upon the ship owners of Great Britain for transportation facilities, and will continue m labor under tljvse embarrassments until hankinc sy'-tems are ostaWished. The c.f t} rnniipitlee hcrt-to attached methcd of relief Mid the enjMiment of tbe recom- mended will, in ihf of tbe crmfer- ence, rwnit in th- of proper facilities- for hanking. suhmitted. XF.WPT.RT. bailor and wife, To Elect Ky.. May Governor Buckner kas an elf-rtiori for a -'ir ressor to Senator CarTi-Or. to be -Tune 21. There are a of in- cluding Theodore Hallara, Carlisle's law partner and 'Wife Ark -Harrison and inoffen rifsr r home Monday tension of Time Granted. May adjourned of the creditors of the Oriental d A. A. W. G. Reed was held The committee of creditors the former meeting reported investigated the affairs of :al mills and of Messrs. R< xrand an unsecured quick assets amounting at _lttee's valuation to Tte mittce reported that there opinion sufficient propertv in full and leave a surplus Reed. An extension o: granted the mills. Beaten to YORK, dispatch from World says: The dead A. X. Kimball, a native of but for forty years a man of this state, andiertiwf of public moneys under was found by the road- side Tesfcerifey morning. He had been attacked tffnile on his way to bis residence, just the city limits, after mid- and beaten to death with a club. e to the murderers has yet been ob- but it is believed that the deed was committed by negroes with robbery as tbeir object. A Snlt S. .1. TildriTft Will. w YORK. May 2S of George H Tilden to have the trust clause of the will of bis urcle. the late S J. Tilden. set as void, becun here yesterday. T" riv vias tried once before, but was ;it bark by the general term on a re- of the formal p'lt in showing the total value of the estate to be A SENSATION ES BEELIN. A sensation has been caused by the discovery that the Ru Wessiliski is the owner and Russian newspaper agency capital. The this enterprise has so great a degree of closure is somethitt shock. Coupled'w equally startling. baron's CAj. i Lf, I HOMP6ON Startling Create t iji JJivi.riAMroN, X. Y., May nt of leading us Ilk t t I tlic U-.M "M f U of i i teuient -In the is a, to the confer' aave, that il v. i i.on-, ai'we not exceed 1 lie exviU'inent is grt.iUr I'J-MI ;it any nu'sime when the Kink of si..i Thonij -.on', spnca- v.-l'i h :ire the   becin the be I.-JT -1 his s "I'lT1 1' 11 fv> r.ini. in f- i msjffl.l to a If f.i of of s of by arc best M lo the A o" men All TO.- SPAPFRf   

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