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Olean Democrat Newspaper Archive: April 17, 1890 - Page 1

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Publication: Olean Democrat

Location: Olean, New York

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   Olean Democrat, The (Newspaper) - April 17, 1890, Olean, New York                               Olean VOL. XI. OLEAN, CATTARAUGU8 CO." NEW YORK, THURSOAY.APRIL 17, 1890. NO. 21 ENGLISHMEN DlSGUSi'ED AT THE OPERATIONS OF GERMANY IN THE DARK CONTINENT. Remarkable Activity of the Kaiser's Sub- jectR The I'.ritisli Overridden at Zanzi- bar The London Press Utter Pro- tests Mr. Gof-chenN liuclgct Caunlng Much Anxiety. LONDON, April Dispatches from Zanzi- bar state that the operations of the Germans there are of the most vigorous character. Every one connected in any capacity with the project of Maj. Wissmann is displaying a degree of activity singularly at variance with the German national trait of delibera- tion, and everything pertaining to the preparation for the new Emm expedition is being conducted with marked thoroughness. The town has within an incredibly short time become so entirely Germanized that old residents find themselves almost strangers. Several large offices and depots have been established by the Germans, and each of these constantly displays the German flag, while the German uniform is everywhere The British have no office at Zanzi- bar and consequently the English flag is not to be seen, much to the disgust of English- men who view with disgust and indignation the Germans' preparations to extend the in- fluence and power of the empire into terri- tory hitherto tacitly admitted to belong to England if it belonged to anybody. The occasional dispatches conveying assur- ances of the safety and successful operations of Dr. Peters, several times declared by pre- sumably competent authority to be dead, and to extensive preparations for Emin's de- parture, have created a genuine alarm here for the security of British interests in south- east and equatorial Africa whi -h the press are unanimous in calling upon the govern- ment to protect. The Standai d insists that the English and German spheres of influence in Africa are marked with such precision as to preclude the remotest possibility of any misunderstanding; therefore any encroach- ment on British rights must bs made deliber- ately. The Post declares that the German maps purport. ng to fix the boundaries of the two spheres are wholly inaccurate. This being the fact Germany must be at on-e in- formed of the inaccuracies and not be allowed to become unfriendly to England through the aggressions and misrepresentations of the German press in desiring and urging the ne- cessity and importance of Ei.iin's expedition. MR. GOSCHEX'3 BUDGET. The popular murmuring against the inti- mation of Mr. Gosehen of the government's intention to retain the present duty on beer increases daily and has given rise to some uneasiness in the ministerial fold. It is now coming to be generally believed that the budget which will be presented to-morrow will show the extent of the government's alarm by not only removing the recent ad- dition to the duty on beer, but also by taking the duty from foreign platp. It is hinted, too, thai) a further concession to the popular cry for reduced taxation is possible in the lessening of the income tax aad the tax on tea. DEATH OF ALEXANDER MACKET. The death of the famous Uganda mission- ary, Alexander Mackay, has cause 1 the publication of a great deal of interesting and important information concerning him, of the general public was ignorant. Mr. Mackay was a mechanical engineer and went to Africa in 1876, assuming almost im- mediately a leading position among those doing mission work in that country. It was he who first brought Emin prominently to the notice of the pponlo of Europe by a serits of admirable wherein he described tha achievements and dun _-ull ies of the govern- ment of the Egyptian equatorial province, and it was mainly tli rough information fur- nished by him 1hat tha necessity for Eiain's relief became apparent. A serious riot occurred in Rome yesterday as the result of the action of the police in dispersing a Socialist meeting. The meeting was the largest one of its kind ever held in. Rome, and emboldened by the great increase in the number of their auditors, the speakers who addressed the gathering indulged in revolutionary haran.crues of the most violent description, while their listeners evinced their approval by howls, cheers and curses as the sentiment expressed demanded. The police were finally ordered to disperse the crowd and were attacked with stones, clubs, etc., until they were compelled to charge upon the mob with deadly weapons. The were scattered, several of them seriously wounded, and the police made a number of UT nnnouii'-C'i mat report tin COW- mitk'u of inquiry, n-cfntly sent to Panama to the would soon be published. He be   that he could not force the men to ork if they did not wish to do so and he make no such endeavor. He the assignee to comply with all tLe the hours a day, rents an hour and fu 1 recognition of their union. A meeting of the union was called at i o'clock the matter brought before the m MI. It caused a rrcod deal of jor among ti.en1. I lit no arti' nlar a< ti( n was taken on tfaf SH'PP -t. f the of the union .--d-l tliat no men v.-. mid be sent to the build- States, maybe a Ulll to the tlon o  a resolution for the imme- diate eoiiMuen.tii >n of the bill to define and regulate the j'lris.lictioa of the Unite 1 States courts. The previous question was ordored and re nays 101. Mr. Carlisle ot Kentucky moved to recom- mit the resolution with instructions to report it back with pro-.'isiou for two days' debate. The motion was to stand. The resolution was 118, nays 09. After a -short discussion ilr. Mills of Texas offered an amendment providing that of the additional Mrcuifc judges (seventeen in num- ber) one-half shall be appointed from each of the political parties. 94, nays 110. The bill was lol; nays, 13, the speaker counting a quorum. The bill withdraws all original jurisdiction now vested in the circuit court-, of United States and the in the district courts of the United Sfrr< and also trovides that the circuit of United otates shall exercise such juristic! by writ of error and appeal as they have exercised under existing laws. The circuit court is made an appellate court exclusively, except that it has the power to issue all remedial processes. The cindfut courts are to consist of the present circuit judges an-1 two others to be' appointed in each ciicujt bv president, by and with the advice and con--i r.t of the senate. It requires three judges to consti- tute a quorum, and in case either of the judges is absent at any term the s nior circuit judge of the circuit may require any district judge of the circuit to sit in his stead for the time being, but there must always be one circuit judge present, and no circuit or dis- trict judge before whom a case was tried in the district court can sit on the same case in the circuit court. The circuit courts -.re to be courts of rec- ord. The terinb of the circuit court are to be held at the following places: First circuit court, Boston; second. York; third. Philadelphia; fourth, Richmond. Va.; fifth JSTew Orleans; sixth, Cincinnati; seventh, Chicago; eighth, St. Louis: ninth. San Fran- cisco. Writs of error in proper cafes and in all cases of appeals may be had from the dis- trict to the en cuit courts both at law and equity, and in cases of admiralty and mari- time jurisdiction within six months after the entry of the final judgment of dr-cree in the district courts the circuit courts shall have original jurisdiction to issue certain remedial writs and to establish rules of prac- tice not inconsistent with those of the su- preme court. A writ of error from their circuit court or an appeal to the circuit court may be had in all criminal cases wherein the circuit court may now exercise jurisdiction by writ of error: and pending appeals of writs of error, judgments of the distnct court in all criminal rases are stayed until the case is fully determined by appellate court. Civil causes, novr removable from state courts iiito the circuit courts of the United removed into district Hurrah Tor law -ii.d liberty, tHo people woo cwi curruptloabits uont to their For the placod tho bun upon the inou who utole Uu- The niourueis iu whtKjKTic there's crape upon door The GUP. killed by stealins Precinct So. 4 Mr. HOWP said that as he understood the Demo-Totic majority in Butte, which u year ago was WO, had IKMMI reduced to about that at Precinct "A there was not a single voter If ft. All of tit voters l.u-l like last yeur's snow bunk. Hi1 li ft. he K liis "friend from NurthCaiu- lint to comic Hlmanac Mr. Vance The "senator from Massachu- fetts deserve-? as rji.jcli comfort out of small tnaterial as any senator on this floor. My information entirely difFere t. 'lli city of Butte gave a Republican majority last year; and there has been a great ''turn over" in of subsequent proceedings. Mr. If the senator had been in bed at 2 o'clock night his ideas would have been clearer this morning. Mr. Daniel, resuming his argument, criti- cised the majority reuort. The action of the returning board of Silver Bow county in excluding the votes at precinct PA and the accounts of the territorial returning board. he said, was an open and notorious develop- ment of a conspiracy permeating -all the office holders of Montana, in order to get control of political power by fraudu- lent pract ce, sharp device and unjust meth- ods. 1 he whole machinery of the adminis- tration of the law in that territory, he said, had been prostituted and debased, and tort- ured, and corrupted in order to exclude from the legislature Democrats who would have voted for Clark and McGinnis, who were here asserting their righteous title and ask- ing equitable Without concluding his speech, Mr. Daniel yielded for a motion to adjourn and after an agreement that the vote on the Montana question would be taken at 5 p. m. to-day or earlier, if the should be ready, the sen- ate, at p. m.. adjourned. ing iiiitil a .t-e.'eral arrangement had been made to alloiv to work at other places. .VAITING FOR THE EARTHQUAKE. The increased military activity in Southern Russia has given rise to a variety of surmises as to its object, ami perhaps Austria will feel called upon to make formal inquiry. The nobility residing iu the Russian province of Volhynia have joined in a petition to the czar praying his ma to prohibit Ger- mans from acquiring estates in that district. A Letter from End In. BERLW, April The National Zeirung publishes a communication that comes indi- rectly from Emin Pasha, in which he to rectify the statements recently made con- cerning him by Mr. Stanley. It says that when Emin left the equatorial province with Stanley be was aceompanird by a few soldiers only, but this was because the period of twentv days which was fixed by Stanley as the time for leaving the provinces was too brief to allow the to be re-enlisted. The communication further says that Dnfile re- mained in thf haivK of the Egyptians when Emin Irft. Stanley Emin only twenty boxes of ammir'Ti -n whfn Emin at that time bad in his posw  tho a dec'. fit Invalid. April Deadv. United cimiit court, rendered r n in tfce cases of the Vashfoiirn .p company. and E L. Wood of TvV-ill.. 11' Burrell Co. P.-i-lRnd. for the ay Pit injunctions, p-s invalid. P., IS THE SEN" WASHINGTON, April senate yes- terday continued the debute on the Montana election cas. s a.id agreed u> take a vote on tlieni not later than 5 p. ni. to-day. The >enate assed a resolution calling on the secretary of the interior for the report of Jesse Spauldinsc, govern-nent of tbe Paoi'-c railways, as to tbe general manage- ment of thf Pacific railways; al-o a tion  It Tl'-vnM V TI f ,r 1 tl ir nr- 'i'-Mrc fit ?T mi i r ''-i 4h'n v-iaraV-lv 'Hvvf'ce 1 f r :f f -.limns of 'ra- T T 'h to r-rinvpY them of i1 i O.-.1 T In Tnrntrm- "0 A r 'h" f.f ticiilar du.'n'-t inert I h" 1 'n tuat tri" par- wii'Op e-mi V formT I T _' ha-.-" in i 4 fi Thf Panama I ir P...... i lurnM mt' A SWELL WEDDING. CONGRESSMAN JOHN M. WILEY MAR- RIED AT INDIANAPOLIS. WORKING GIRLS' CONVENTION. They Will Attempt to Form a National Day's Proceedings. NEW YORK, April Working Girls' association of the United States and Canada held a convention in the Metropolitan opera house yesterday for the purpose of forming a national federation with the aid and under the direction of a number of wealthy women. About 700 delegates were present from all parts of the country and more are expected to arrive. Miss Grace H. Dodge called the assembly to order, and Mrs. Richard Irvin, Jr., de- livered the address of welcome. After the appointment of committees the formal exer- cises were begun and several addresses made on the subject of working girls' societies. Last evening the annual meeting of the New York Association of Working Girls' so- cieties was held at Cooper Union. Reports were read and Miss Grace Dodge, Mrs. Ter- hune (Marion and others spoke on "home-mak- ing" and kindred subjects. The delegates do not look like working girls, but like young ladies who have independent means of sup- port, but choose to follow some light occupa- tion to earn pin money. None of the thou- sands girls who work in factories or at cloak miking, cigar making and other un- healthful, laborious and ill-paid tasks, were present. The girls were nearly all well- dressed as the fashionable ladies who are patronizing them. They Joined the Union. CHICAGO, April was a bit of ex- citement yesterday nt the new Brotherhood baseball park nn Wrr.tv. orth avenue and Thirty-third street. The contractor secured fifteen carpenters from various country towns the past vieck and started them to work yesterday on the new grand stand. Within a <-hnrt time a committee of tbe Strikers from the headquarters at Thirty- seventh street ar.d Wabash avenue were on the ground reasoning with the men and en- deavonng to perouade them to quit. The contractor feared violence and asked for po- lice protection and a squad of officers from the Thirty-fifth street station were to the park. bad nothing to do, however. Thestnk c.'-inmittee convinced the new men th-t it was to interest to quit and the fifteen men the union roll. All work on tbe Brotheihoid park is stopped. __________________ Cotton Protests. NEW YORK, April members of the Cotton Exchange, with President J. H. Pnrker in the chair. to protect against the f.f thr- hill hy Mr. B'ltterwnrth of '-opt-on--" nnd "future'" and   city, was marrifd yester- day to John Wiley, roprcaf ntative in fr the Uullalo. N. Y distri -t. ThecL'iemony as p-Korin "1 at TJ.'MV- uacle Presbyterian church at o'cljc-k yesterday afternoon. Rev. J. Albert Rond- thaler ofTii-i Lator in evening a wedding iiinrer was served at homo of the bri followed by a reception. The marriage of Mr. Wiley is the consum- mation of a romance which began in when Mr. Wilty ahd Miss Coopc-r in-it at Saratoga. They were mads acquainted with each other by Mrs. Thomas A. whose husband was for many years a warm friend of Mr Wiley. The wedding was the most brilliant affair of the Indianapolis social season. It brouap'.it from Buffalo, from Chicago and from Wash- ington a host of Mr. Wiley's friends. Among the distinguished guests were E. H. Butler, J. A. Butler, Norman E. Mack. Mr. and Mr--. Wilson S. Bissell, C. M. Bushnell, Hon. O. W. Cutler and Mrs. Cutler, Walter H. Dun- ham, Col. C. E. Walker, Mr. and Mrs. C W. Cushman of Buffalo; C. E. Dunkleburcy: of Loekport, N. Y.: Mr. and Mm Stranahan of Boston, Mass.; L. L. Smith and Judge W. Coth'-an of Chicago; Henry H. Adams of Brooklvn and several of Mr. Wiley's Most of these arriv. d Monday evening and Monday nicr'at arrangements -.rere made for a bachelor's breakfast to be tendered by Mr. Wiley to a few of his old friends. The break- fast was at the Bates house yesterday morning and these who sat down to it were: W. H. Durtli i-i. J. Ambrose Butler. Clar- ence M. Bu cure'l, C. E. Walker, Robert RtranKli-.M. T-. L. Prnith, C. E. Dunkleburg. E H. Butler and Henry H. Adams. There were fifteen courses with appropriate wines and it took several hours under these condi- ditions for Mr. Wiley to tear himself away from his bachelor Five o'do'-'c hour set for the cere- mony, an that hour the Tabcr- nacle wa.  of j sohn's rifnn'li. The oongregatioi again and remained standing as the party left the church. i The me.-iiU.-rs of party nd few friends were driven from th" churc L to j the resideiu-e of Mr. on street v.uere Mrs. Wiiej gave an uifomiiil rwpption. The little cc'in; any then to the dining room where a Ixmiiti- ful was served, the wedding cake was ut and all drank to the bride's health in champazne. >ir. and Wiley took the train for C where they will several davs. afterward going to Washington. Tha t.- were numerous and beautifuL REPUBLICAN COMMITTEES. XMl and DUcuw Silver Bill. April joint meeting of the senate and house Republican canna committees was held to discu'-s tha silver quc-tion aud endeavor to effect coiupro- mise nipasure that would bouses and thp approval of the pro i'i< The senate committee urgnd the of the senate silver hill, viliile 'ro.sf of tlr- ttifiibers of the hou-e favorer' t'n bill as being more conserx live. The conserva- tive members of hoi. e comn.ittpe, when the disputed question redemp- tion of bullion v. brought for- ward, tliar bill be amerrl- ed by providing that certifleates shall rflecnnl'k' in lawful or in coin at the option of tha secretory of tbe treasury. This the ultra-silver men strenuously op- posed on the ground that tlif secretary was given txn much power by it3 Iso agreement on point v.ri; there was a disposition on the part of the conservatives to accept tb 3 proposition of the silver men that the secrctajy should redeem the'bullion in lawful money only. It was agreed to leave the preparation of a com- mea ure to sub-committees of the senate and house committees, and the meet- ing adjourned. Messrs. Aldrich, Allison, Sherman, Jones and Teller were appointed the sub-committee on the part of the nn'i Messrs. Con- ger, McKinley, Bayne, McICenaa axid Bar- tine on the part of the The sub-committee held a meeting in the afternoon, and after a long conference suc- ceeded in practically harmonizing the main points of disagreement, and it is expected that at the meeting which will beheld to-day an agreement will be reached on the redemp- tion feature- of the bill, which will permit bullion certificates to be redeemed in lawful money. The amount of coinage per mosfh will probably be The Ohio Miners' Convention. COLUMBUS, O., April joint OOE- rention of tha miners of Ohio continued its session yesterday. It was resolve-I to form one organization instead of the five district It will be known as District 5 of the Unite.l Mine Workers of America. The objects of the union ere to unite the mine employes of Ohio a1.'-! their condition Ly methods -.filiation, arbi- tration or strikes. uuk-n will have jurisdiction overall locals of the Progressive union and Knights of in this district. The joint conference of mine ovrnei-s and mine workers yesterday did cofe agree upon a scale of wages. Th-y "ill mwt again to- day. if vernlotbarweSSem are present in this Honors for an Ex-Vice ComaL BALTIMORE, April James Carey Coale, of tbe well-known firm of James Carey Coale Cunningham, has received from Messrs. Carlo F. Serrc. Italian consul. Richard M. i-'heny, counsel for that COE- sulate, the brevet and insignia of the Order of the Crown of Italy. This honor was con- ferred on Mr. Coate by ths King of Italy in recognition of bis services as acting consul of thit government at this port for several Among others receiving sim- ilar decorations in this country are Thomas A. Edison and George M. Pullman. Three Persons Drowned. NEW ORLEANS, April Tunes-Dem- ocrat's Helena. Ark., special says: Informa- tion is received here of tha drowning of three persons of OUto -.n Lake by tbeupsstting of a canoe late Monday evening. Ther were Ed Bush, Matilda Jackson and a whose name is unknown. During the pr.st twenty- four hours tbe rainfall hero was 30.53 inches. The river rose two inches, due largely to tbe rainfall. The killing of two negroes by guards en tbe line of the Lima county levees in Mississippi occurred Monday. They were believed to be levee A TnloTetl Confrtwion MiN'in VM. Ala.. April Ben Elsley, who Friday for the mtirlT of J. W a ajro Janunrv. thai and another nngro npj'- nn Italian peddler in 1 to ttif- Ixf-n i" 1't'Si- of kiHinjr wv' -ol He i rnurderfd an and his fe in yar- and n in Atlanta airl killed iwo in tbif A Catherine- NEW YORK, April 16 special meeting of tbe Chamber of Commerce, called to se- cure the report of the finance committee on the subject of silver legislation in conzress. drew a pood attendance yestor 'av. The re- port of the committee was rporived. and after a genera] discussion the TCRS postpoivd until a special t--- f by Chairman of the in Wasbincton whHt a'-tk'n to take on tbe silver KHs now conjrcss. r- a. .ii.n.vi'lTy in n T of {be "f Threatened. April %perial (rriev- of ilroad -i ii- i n f. ar t r --i 1 h r 1 had M- t hm "i r f (r'r, I r.] NEWSPAPER! lEWSPAPKKt   

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