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Olean Democrat: Thursday, March 6, 1890 - Page 1

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   Olean Democrat, The (Newspaper) - March 6, 1890, Olean, New York                               T-" -T T T-r- SIXTEEN PAGES. PACES 1 The Olean Democrat VOL. XI. OLEAN, CATTARAUGUS CO. NEW YORK, THURSDAY, MARCH 6, I 890. NO. 15 WEEKLT TRADE REVIEW REPORTS ARE LESS FAVORABLE IN ALL QUARTERS. The Mopes of Were Jfot Fal filled, Although Transactions Wer  ady, "ith lower abroad, tin hac lx-cn declining, and lead fairly strong level of all prices is about 1] -4 pr-r be- low that of Feb "In Hi" market the has t'lward further depression, as i- nitunj wjtb morif-v more clfwlv, and tbe in 4f> V-p 11 ii1" "nM li 'i'-- 1 I- 7TI'" 1 t f- I i in I 'M I I li t v '.i has n 1 i v 1 i' n 2on h..- r n fi in 4 -41- i H'ji n h'f'' 1 t' i 1 i iX" -II. f] X "Ihe failures during the last seven days number for the United Ktates and for Canada 1501, as compared with last wpck, and SO'J the vi previous to the last For tho week last year tlic figures were 2oJ, representing 188 in tbe United States and 44 in Canada. Denouncing Uuflxiiin Cruelty. NEW YORK, Maich 1 mass meeting was held at the Cooper Union last night to protest ugeinst the Russian government's treatment of political prisoners. V. A. Stole nesnikoff presided and spoke, and ad- derouncniK the ueie also de- liverelbi liev Plugh Pentecost, Piofessor De Le in-uu 1 others. Resolutions requesting the intervention   wit- nesses in the investigation which has been in progress for some time. Senator Teller offered as a substitute for Mr. Dolph's resolution the resolution hereto- fore offered by him and now pending before the committee on rules, providing for the con- sideration of nominations in open executive session. He said that the senate was making itself ridiculous in its efforts to run down the betrayers of executive secrets. He said that senators knew perfectly well that most of the information of a confidential character was betrayed by members of the senate. He did not think it would be possi- ble to accomplish the end which Mr. Dolph desired by throwing two or three newspaper men into jail. Instead of preserving the dig nity of the senate they would make that body a common laughing stock. The debate was continued at great length, the matter being under discussion f ot; nearly five hours. A vote will be reached probably to-day. The indications are that the Dolph resolution will not be agreed to. THE HOUSE AND SENATE. Debate on the Featherstone-Cate Con- tested Election Case. WASHINGTON, March of the Featherstone-Cate Arkansas contested election v. as resumed soon after the house met yesterday, and Mr. Dalzell of Pennsyl- vania took the floor in support of the claims of the contestant. Winchester rifles, revol- vers and bowie knives, he said, had played an important part in this congressional elec- tion. He charged intimidation and fraud. Mr. Crisp of Georgia argued in favor of the contestee. Mr. Rowell of Illinois charged that the conjestee's majority was procured by crime of the highest character. Mr. Norton of Missouri thought Mr. Gate entitledjto his seat. Mr Buckalew of Pennsylvania argued that on the merits of tbe case the sitting member was entitled to ict-u.- his beat. Mr. Breckii. i Aikansas said that gentlemen in the question had wand i ii i i.j tut evidence in the case now Tinder -i alip.i. Nobody had adduced a syllable of to show that any wrongs in Crittenden county had not been repi obated by the great mass of the people of the After lurtl.er debate the house adjourned. Lester B Fauls.---r had several T oes during his earhei career, but for ears prowling his death he w as ir voted in Mis Bro-.vn. Bv bc-r he had tv. o is- It -.b> lit] hrr t-no o in thf -ill Tbey are TTfivMlt rc-'v> {r We and FT f' r "ic'i! tJip pi, via'-" of IN THK SEXATK. WASHINGTON-. March the senate yes- terday the resolution offered Monday by Mr. Voorhpes in regard to the lease of the fur seal islands in Alaska to tbe North American Commercial company was reported back from the finance committee by Mr. Morn 11. adversely, on the ground that" the trea-urr had ah eady made the lease and ILjt thf committee had no power to intorfeio in the matter. Mr. Vfiorhe-s said that there nothivs furibf-r from his jntention in offering tin resolution than to make anv miputiiti' n n co'iihu-t of the srcretary of thV trc The having decided that ter wa> n-. adjudicata he acquiesced in The resolution was indfrinjK1; p'K'; v B'iLs fur imblii buildings in mvl Nashua. N h.iath aj tlOO.O'V. j-'.a m tlu> calendar Tl" s.' t' -n v.< lit irrt -i- id -t nir.i pi, pi a iu f< ]r .11 i ,blo m in' 1 tint Pie Part of Pntr. Y-IHK. March 1 V i11 Vi'.-iMi- s-rv.-, ,1-.- I -_. 11 ,a -i i 1hin i. s J 1] jWe (Vi.Ti- i f t.j. n' t' mo -n. '1 r i th-it th- 1-it.jl a T :r.'. ...1 4 'f 1'ms -h i i I 1 11< )1< -_- s s i I j 1i ".a- p "-in T-. tt 1) r M. 11 i  i. 3 1 TT ha- HARD FIGHTING. An Invitation to the Fan-Americans. WASHINGTON, March E. Curtis, executive officer of the pan-American con- gress, has addressed the following note to the members of the conference as the initial step toward carrying out the proposed trip through the South: "The secretary of state desires me to present his compliments and to say the citizens of the southern states are very anxious that the delegates should visit that section before returning to their homes, and have forwarded through him many cor- dial invitations. He also earnestly desires that the trip shall be made, and has directed me to invite you to participate in an excur- sion similar to that given in October and No- vember last; to leave "Washington imme- diately upon the final adjournment, and to return here two or three weeks thereafter. As considerable time will be required to make the necessary arrangements, I beg the favor of an early acceptance." Mr. iishbnrn Not an Alien. WASHINGTON, March Win- dom has sent to Postmaster General Wana- maker the following letter in regard to the employment of the Canadian minister. Fish burn, at Lewisburg, Pa., in violation, as it was at first thought, to the alien contract labor law: have the honor to acknowifoga there ceipt of your letter of the 28th uit. referring tt the letter of Rev. 31 H. Fishburn. and requesting that it may receive my attention. In reply. 1 ain pleased to find from the latest information received that neither Mr Fistiburn nor his father became citizens of Canada, but retain citizenship in the country where they were born Consequently there is nothing in the alien con- tract labor law to prevent Mr Fisburn returning to Pennsylvania under contra.a serve as a minister of the gospel Re-Klected. DES Mon.F's. la March iam B. v.as re-elected to the s.-nat" by tb" ture ho.is" separately In the vnate the vote- William B Allison (P.ep.1. 31.. L i. W William Larrabe? (Fanners' Alliance i, 2 In thp house Allison 50 Bt-stoe. End ti This gave Allison a oKir majority and obtiated the of a second vote taken in joint rirr in 1 ork. Nr.'A YORK. Mirt-b. 5 Fire .it in.1 Bio, I hrl t as f 1 io-u.. X unit .v -i in i vis s-jiM.Mi. M A. C. r n i-l Wil'iam HT Co, s> T-" m '.Kit's r. an 1 it :i "i: mm. A ;ii 1 ,11 i S 1 1 a f.il'inj itfll r. ar.ii p n. liV i it j CfiTirmir to tlir )'X "i .r h n TI r i> -i .1. .1 _ i 'j i- r -i -i i I i ur 1 i i 1 in r i iil-' i I'lir r< i J 11 1-07 1 nh 1 1 1 H sft I 1 11- i' "i A FAITH CURE HOSPITAL A Boxing Inhibition lu Which the Itrook- Jvn I'olirfi Hud to Interfere. NEW YOIIK. Marcli rmk in Brooklyn the went- of a peculiar boxing exhibition last night. The well-known col- ored pugilistic star, Jackson, the champion of Australia, together w ith Jack Ashton of Providence and Jack Fallon, the btrong boy of Brooklyn, were the principal participants. Over fifteen hundred people assembled before 10 o'clock to v, itness the contest between this trio of aspiring pugilists who have an envious eye on the position now held by John L. Sullivan Previous to the loiiff-looked-for contest, piclimmary bouts between lesser pu- gilistic lights were held and were appreciat- ed by the audience, in which were Police Inspector McLaughlin and Capt. Short, to- gether with city officials, politicians and sporting men from neighboring cities. After George Dixon, the clever colored featherweight of Boston, who lately fought one of the hardest battles on record with the celebrated "Cal" McCarthy of Jersey City, had been introduced, Jack Ashtonand Jack Fallon were intoduced and donned the mits. At the call of time both made easy play at each other, but before the first round was ended they v. armed to their work and a little slugging had been indulged in. In the second round Fallon made an effort to land his right on. Ashton's jaw, but the wiley Providence lad was too quick for him and the result was that they clinched, and in close in-fighting Fallon deliberately threw Ashton to the floor. Amid great excitement the police jumped to the ring and forced the pugilists apart and off the stage. After a short interval, during which some of the local talent appeared, Peter Jackson j and Fallon were announced. The first round was very tame, although Fallon was bent on slugging the antipodean, who smiled to him- self as he took his chair. At the call of time the Australian sent his left out in such a manner that Fallon well understood that he would have to do his best. The round was fast and furious, but Fallon was clearly over- matched. The contest, however, became so heated that the police were obliged to again assert their authority, and together with Fitzpatrick, Jackson's inseparable trainer, jumped between the contestants and put a stop to further hostilities. The "go" between Ashton and Jackson, the wind-up of the evening, was a beautiful ex- hibition set-to of two rounds. Charles E. Davies of Chicago and Frank Stevenson of this city managed the affair. IT IS ESTABLISHED BY COLORED MEN IN BALTIMORE. The Attention of the Health Authorities Attracted hj the Death ot a Patient, and an Investigation will be Made. Startling Expected Hod Carriers on Trial for Conspiracy. BALTIMORE, March 5 health depart- ment will investigate one of the most re- markable institutions whHb has ever been established in Baltimoi It is, a faith-cure hospital called 'Christ's, Institute1" and is run by colored men It is located on Ster- ling street near Eager. Its existence was discovered Monday by the death of a woman from consumption. The chief officer of the establishment is -'Dr Keimard. A reporter called on him for an interview as to the methods he employed. He said: "I am the proprietor of Christ's institute, which has been established to cure people by the help of God. I use homeopathic medi- cines and cure any kind of disease that flesh is heir to. During the year 1883 I became convinced that God desired through me to raise peculiar people, and on Feb. I opened this place] Since that time I have had at least or patients, many of them white persons, and all are cured except the woman whose certificate was sent to the health office. She had the consumption, and was dying when they sent for me." Up stairs were found a number of white and colored people who had been, they said, afflicted with palpitation of the heart, dys- pepsia, etc., and were all cured by Kennard. Health Commissioner Rohe and his assistants will make a rigid examination of the place. It is believed that the consumptive patient, who died Monday, is but one of many deaths resulting from faith in the "institute." A CASE OF BOYCOTT. NATIONAL LEAGUE MEETING. The Million Dollar Offer Humored CLEVELAND. Maifh 0 the National league meeting yesterday afternoon the mil- lion dollar offer was the first matter to come up and it vi immediately laid on the table. Then a communication from Secretary Brunell of the brotherhood w as read It re- ferred to the an angement ot Players' league dates and contained a request that the league repeal the resolution to boycott all clubs playing against the brotherhood. The com- munication was tabled -.ithout discussion. The schedule committee tuen presented a recommendation in legaiti to the mileage costs of each club to be computed by toe league. It was adopted. After brief disens- sion of the general features of the schedule, the meeting adjourned until to-day. It is rumored that Washington is to aeU out to Detroit, but all league men who haye been approached say there is absolutely no foundation for such a story. Ralph Cohen of the Columbus club and President Day of New York had a long coa- ference with regard to the Lehane case. Day says he intends to let the board of arbitra- tion settle the matter. Hod Carriers Charged With Conspiracy Against a Fellow Laborer. WASHINGTON, March first proceed- ings to test the legality of the boycott or whether a boss mechanic has the right to employ such persons as he may wish without consulting the requirements and restrictions imposed by trade unions was instituted in the the criminal court Monday, founded on a strike of the hod carriers. In October last five hod carriers working for Howard Yates declined to work with a man belonging to a union which did not affiliate with the union to which they be- longed. The man was discharged. Shortly afterward the five hod carriers were indicted for conspiracy and Monday the case came to trial. Howard Yates were bondsmen for the men while they were under indictment and gave testimony in their favor. In order that the law might be fully discussed and a ruling had under it from the court in bane, a verdict of guilty pro forma was taken and the defendants released upon their personal recognizance. The case will now go to the general term. A RECEIVER IN TROUBLE. The Chase Mill of Fall River Attached. Liabilities S80O.OOO. PKOVTDEXCE, R. I., March special to The Journal says: Adoniram J. Chase of VaU River, proprietor of the August Chase Ly- coming mill, is in trouble and attachments have been placed on the property. He man- aged the estate of the late August Chase, worth at his death and the milk made carpet warps and cotton twine. Buck- ingham Paulsen of New York are selling agents. Mr. Chase secured a mortgage on the mills of obtained more on real estate and is otherwise indebted to a total amount of Valuable mill prop- erty is reported to have been sacrificed to make a payment of to a divorced wife. The attachments were placed by Fall River factories which had been supplying him with cotton waste. They could make no terms for a settlement with Mr. Chaae and attached to bring matters to a head. The assets will cover the liabilities. The mflls are in charge of a sheriff. the Benefit of Science. PHILADELPHIA, March 5. Magistrate Eisenbrown has discharged from custody Dr. Shimwell who had been arrested on a charge of unnecessary cruelty to a dog. Dr. Shim- well is demonstrator of surgery in the Medico Chirurgical college and had recently, in the course of bis lectures, made an abdominal demonstration of vivisection upon an ether- ized dog. The warrant for the doctor's ar- rest was sworn out by officers for the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to ATPma'k The magistrate, after hearing the evidence, dismissed the case. Defense claimed that the operation was made for the benefit of science. A Military Park at Chickamauga. WASHIXGTON, March house com- mittee on military affairs ordered a favor- able report on Mr. Grosvenor's bill to estab- lish a national military park at the battle field at Chicakamauga. The bill provides for the cession of the ground on which the battle was fought to the United States by the of Georgia and Tennessee and permits the present occupants of the land to occupy and cultivate their present holdings, provided they preserve the present building and other things cf historic interest. The park is placed under the control of the secretary of war. v, ho is directed to appoint three com- missioners to have immediate charge of it. j Two of these are to be civilians. The sum ot is appropriated for necessary ex- i penses. j to Inspect Siberian Pritons. WASHINGTON-, March Perry S. Heath, the well-known correspondent, and author of -A Hoosier in has received an invitation from the Russian government, i and the oflVn- of a -'royal to visit Russia and and accompany Duke Alexis, the commander of tho Russian armv, and hoir to tbe throne, ona tour through Siberia s-ummer. The imitation ex- t'li'i'nl t-i Col Heath, soas hira an ojijM rtui ity of inspecting and to tue pc rt TTI, je fN'innjitt-v -1 TV graivl rrc i i II 11.1 T li 1 I >n s.cnatp. _' W bitb lt .-.MIC H> Th i Tl Ml-'s V 'T r.'ii'p'7lt of ,17 t 17) i !.i> ______________ n of n.i-.a y s i', Mr !hr inplTin. 11-   -s M-, l'f r.t A t i. i T o. I Pn' v', i ij 1 I I i. i r..-l- LWSPAPLRl ai :WSPAPLRI   

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