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New York Times Newspaper Archive: January 30, 1909 - Page 9

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   New York Times (Newspaper) - January 30, 1909, New York, New York                                 mm  mm  мж.  ТШ NEW* YORK: TIMES. SATURDAY. JANUARY 30. 190».  * *  =ar  .#t  T  ■¿sil  $500 Instrument Offered Hardman, Peck & Co, for the Best Composition.  by  h *■  NO SCHOOL CHILD 4  BARRED  Even Those Under 10 Years May Compete If They Qualify — Private Schools Entering the Contest.  sidered unless the age of the pupil is certified to by his or her teacher. The name, grade, and address of the pupil must also appear on the composition, cer-tlfifed to by the teacher.  , Next week the present term will end in the public schools, and most of the pupils will" be promoted to a higher grade. This appears to have led to doubt in the minds of many pupils as to how they shall get their compositions certified. The best way would be to have them certified by the teacher from whose class they have just been promoted, although, if they-pre-fer, they may get the certification of the teacher of the class they are just entering. No Compositions may be submitted before Feb. 7, and they may be submitted from that date until and including Feb. 1,5, so that there will be time enough for the new teachers to get acquainted with their pupils if the pupils prefer that course. A certificate from the former teacher, however, would probably be more satisfactory and more easily obtainable.  There will be an increased demand all next week for The New York Times containing Mr. Hill’s articles. As the newsstand supply will be exhausted early, it will be necessary to place your order with your newsdealer to-day.  DR. BULL GOES TO GEORGIA.  A $500 piano has been added to the list of f*izes to be given in the competition where He Hopes to    Benefit    by Open-  lor 'the best compositions on Abraham ,     A , r    Life _ 8tands start of Trip  Well.  Lincoln, now being conducted by ihk •  New York Times. This offer is made by j    Dr.    William T. Bull,    who has    been des-  Hardman, Peck & Co., in the following! perately ill of cancer at the Plaza for letter:    j    several months, started- for Tomberly,  To the Editor of The New T4rk. Times:    j    Ga., yesterday, where it is hoped that  A superb Hardman piano—one of the finest. j the ravages of the disease ma> be of our $tyies-rwill be given by us as a prize, j checked.  The R?v. Anna Shaw Speaks to Equal Franchise Society at Mrs. Mackay’s Home.  EXPERIENCES IN THE WEST  Conditions In the States Where Women Vote Lead to Good Comradeship Between Men and Women, She Says.  to the pupil who writes the best compcsi tion in your eontest cn the career of Abraham Lincoln.  The association with the Hardman piano in its use or indorsement, or both, of such great names m musical art as lltose of Caruso, Tetrazzini. Campanini, and many others, lends an additional value to the prize which we are so glad to offer, and will, we trust, add to the inspiration of the great number of young people \yho will strive for it. Yours truly.  HARDMAN. PECK & CO.  The offer of this firm is accepted by The New York Times, and the judges appointed to consider the compositions turned in by the public, private, parochial, and Sabbath school pupils of the city will be instructed to make provision for it in their awards. The original intention was to have them, decide simply upon the best 250 compositions written by pupns in each of the four classifications arranged by The Times, to each of whom a Tiffany silver souvenir medal should go; the best twenty-five compositions in each classification each to receive a $5 ca^sli prize, and the best ten of which ate to be printed in The New York Times.  Now, in addition to these awards, the judges will be asked to decide upon the best composition of all those submitted,  dr. Bull was taken from the Plaza in an ambulance to Jersey City. With him were Drs. Joseph B. Blake, Nathaniel B. Potter, John B. Walker, and Eipanuel Baruch. The patient stood the drive in good ■ lape, and when transferred to his private car in Jersey City declared that he felt no ill effects whatever from the first stage of his long journey.  Drs. Blake and Potter corroborated this* and declared that the strength dis-  The recently organized Equal Franchise Society held an imitation meetingr at the house of Its President, Mrs y  Clarence Mackay, 244 Madison Avenue, with the Rev. Anna Shaw, President of the National Woman Suffrage Association, as speaker yesterday afternoon. Many prominent society women, as well as women who have been prominent in the suffrage work for many years, were present.  Among the society women were Mrs. John Jacob Astor, Mrs. O. H. P. Belmont, Miss Gwendolyn Burden, Miss Natalie de Castro, Miss Duer, Miss Norah Godwin, Mrs. George Gould, Mrs. Philip Lydig, Mrs. Howard .Mansfield, Mrs. Paul Morton, Mr^s. W. Forbes Morgan, Mrs. Stephen H. Pell. Mrs. Rudolph Schirmer, Mrs. Charles H. Sherrill, Mrs. J. Hopkins Smith, Mrs. Egerton Win-  best for them. The most ignorant, the" ‘ coarsest, the drunken woman wants her children to be better - than she is. Motherhood does a great deal Says Reardon Met Him in the Street  for women. I think the judgment of Jane  McATEE DENIES IT ALL.  Ig  Addams can be trusted, and she has said that cut off all the voters except the poor people of the districts in Chicago, where  and Grappled with Him.  Thomas McAtee, the young man from'£ U rns on money* invested  on the Williamsburg Bridge and that It would involve the purchase of additional cars at great expense. The receivers also stated that since the commission’s orders of Jan. 10 relative to the operation of the Eighth Street line that line has not been paying operating expenses, taxes, and re-  she lives, and the Government would be I Mahoney Plane, Penn., who has been on ! cleaner than it is now. It is not from  trial before Judge  Rosalsky in General  the mass of the people that the grafters i    “___ .    w lirtr _  xi/nri*' hut n mnntr    snH    tn tepis- Sessions on a chafge of attempted burg  lary preferred by Edward J. Reardon# the  The company expects to submit statistics  to Judge Lacombe, in the United States Circuit Court, in a few weeks, and eak instructions as to whether or not w company m'ay ‘ be allbwed to cease to operate the Eighth .Street line when the lease expires, on April 1. The operaup* of the Eighth Street line will then be turned back upon the Central Crosstewn Railway Company, its original proprietor.  work, but among officials and in legis lative bodies.!’  She told of ari interview with ** Billy  roon ^ lno^ov* rtf the    HIctrir*ts  _    ,,    . ..    ,    ,    ,    .    .    .    .    former    county detective, toox tne witness  Green/’ leader of the tenderloin districts ,  st d  yesterday in his own defense.  AM 1/1 iM p aIaaHam Jnil    n    An    DMA I   V    . ....    •    •  H. Macy & Co.'s Attractions Are Their Low Prices.  of Denver last election, day, when she  Rea rdon testified that when he went to asked him how the women, were> voting.  hls home on the fourth f i oor 0 f 146 Wav-Billy wore a sash lettered Honest Vot-     pia    e on the night of Dec .  16f h e  ers’ League,” of which he said he' was the only member.  " Nothing doin’ ” said Billy, referring to the women of his district voting.  I went different times during the day  found McAtee fumbling with the lock. McAtee said that he had made a mistake and started down stairs, but was arrested by Reardon before leaving the premises. Thomas J. Brazier, who assisted in the  to. the different poling places in that dis- j  arrest>  corroborated Reardon. William J.  Kal aml’i iu i Koch, a private detective in an agency of  trict, early in the morn  ».id 6:30 P. M.. with Mlss _ Shaw, and I did    Reirdon    was    "once    Vice    President;  not see a single woman going to vote.     flcaiuuu -     vva - 3     -    --    -    ■  They told me twenty or thirty had voted.  * They say they vote in hoards,’ I said to Billy Green.  “ *. Nothin’ in it,’ he answered. * Before they caught on they did vote. Put a pin there,’ (Billy’s own words.) They never live long enough in one place, and they  played bv the patient was surprising. --    -rhor*  Drs. Baruch ana Walker accompanied throp, and Miss Dorothy^ ^ ^  Which will receive the ready been made.  Dr. and Mrs. Bull and their retinue of nurses and maids and Dr. Bull’s valet on tne journey South.  Dr. Bull has leased*'a cottage just outside Savannah, where he thinks he will be benefited by the balmy ocean air and where he will be able to spend as much time out of doors as he wishes. It is said that the patient has fretted greatly under the confinement he has undergone since his removal from Newport last Summer.  Mrs. Bull." who had a nervous breakdown recently, was much better yesterday and said that she was confident that the change of air and scene would benefit both her husband and herself. She and Dr. Bull spoke confidently of their return to New York, plans for which have al-  were several men. Mrs. Mackay introduced Miss Shaw, who began her address by telling of , the conditions in the States where women vote. She spoke of the good comradeship between men and wo-  mcn.  the Writer of piano.  The leading private schools of the city are taking no less interest in the competition than the public schools. The Principal of Spence’s Boarding and Day School for Girls, at 30 West Fifty-fifth Street, one of the best-known private schools in this city, announces her intention of laying the matter before the school, with her approval. Miss Spence said yesterday:  •* I ’consider’ the Lincoln competition a most desirable one, .and I shall lay the matter before the school at the first favorable opportunity. Coming from The New York Times, a paper that stands for something, this competition needs no indorsement by me.  “ We think so much of Lincoln Day ir. our school that we allow no holiday on that day, but devote the time to appropriate exercises so that our pupils will be indelibly impressed with just w'hat Lincoln’s birthday means. It is my desire to have all my pupils compete/’  At the Eastman School, 123d Street and Lenox Avenue, of which Henry V. Gaines is Principal, the announcement of the Lincoln composition contest has been  on ** the school  posted conspicuously bulletin.  At JtJie Wtigl)t. Qral. Sqfiaol.. 1 fmd Д Mount Morris Park West, Dr, John Dutton Wright, the Principal, sal 1 :   44 1 shall try to arrange so that the pupils in my school can enter The Times’s competition. I cannot see how any educator can possibly be opposed to such a laudable plan. The Time3 is one of a very few newspapers that can be found on my library table. If all newspapers would conduct their enterprises in the same clean way" as The Times, the newspaper world would be on a firmer and more praiseworthy foundation.”  Among the communications received by The Times on this subject is one inquiring why children under the age of 10 are barred from the contest. The reason is that the compositions must all be based on the seven articles by Frederick Trevor Hill, the first of which will appear in The Times on Monday, and that The Times did not believe such young children would be capable of the sustained effort of making the necessary study of these articles. Nevertheless, if pupils under the age of 10 submit compositions based on these articles, they will receive consideration.  It is not the purpose of The Times to bar any school child out, and a pupil under 10 who has the ability and concentration to make a study of these seven articles and produce a composition on the subject will certainly not receive any less consideration than older ones, It is necessary, however, for competitors to bear in mind that, no composition will be con-  MRS. OAKES SUES FOR $5,000.  Says Her Household Effects Were Wrongly Given to Husband.  An echo of the marital troubles of the Oakeses was hoard yesterday when trial of an action brought by Mrs. Adelene Estelle Sullivan Oakes against the firm of W. & J. Sloane for conversion of household effects valued at $8,000 was begun before Supreme Court Justice Dayton and a jury.  The plaintiff is the wife of Francis J. Oakes, paint manufacturer of Steinway, L. I., w'ho, early in 1902, sued his wife for a divorce. After a seven weeks’ trial the jury found in favor of Mrs. Oakes, whose counsel was A. H. Hummel.  Mrs. Oakes retaliated by bringing suit for a separation from her husband. It was successful, and the court awarded to her $50 a week alimony.  The present suit is based on the fact that on their separation the Oakes’s valuable household effects were sent to the storage warehouse of the Sloanes. Mrs. Oakes alleges that the goods belonged to her, and that the Sloane firm delivered the goods to Mr. Oakes on their own responsibility.  Mr. Oakes, who testified yesterday for the defense, declared that the property belonged to him. !  Mrs. Oakes, in her own behalf, denied this, and fcald she h'iad bought some of the property with her own money.  The case w r as given to the jury, who were ordered to return a sealed verdict, which will be opened this morning.  Prison for Goslln’s Associate.  Christopher Cosmides, a former associate of Alfred R. Goslin, now a fugitive from justice in Paris, was sentenced yesterday by Judge Foster in General Sessions to serve a term of not more than  four years and nine months in Sing Sing Prison. Cosmides was convicted of the conversion of a certificate for 100 shares of United States Steel stock, then valued at $9,500, which was stolen from the brokerage firm of De Coppet & Doremus by one of Goslinls confederates.  Moving Picture Ordinance In Force.  Mayor McClellan signed yesterday the resolution passed by the Aldermen last Tuesday, prohibiting children under the age of sixteen from visiting moving picture shows. The ordinance goes into .effect at once.-The ordinance provides that any owner, manager, or employe who admits a child under sixteen, unless the child be accompanied by parent, relative or friend of parents, violates the law and is subject to a fine of from $10 to $50.  j have never, seen anything of the kind,” she said, “ in the States where women do not vote. For one thing , she continued,. “ there was no slavish listening to the tvisdom of men. The women there knew that the men were not made with special trapdoors in their heads through which the Lord poured wisdom any more than the women. They knew that the men got their wisdom by study and experience the same as the women. They have said that women would alw’ays vote as their husbands do, but I did not find that the case. Some women voted as their husbands did because their husbands sometimes voted right.-” !    -  She explained the election of Judge Lindsey, against whom the men were bitter and' whom the Tvomen favored..  “ I jvoiild have felt- very much like the husband?, there/’ she said. > “ Judgp Lindsey had bolted his party at a critical moment, And the Democratic men were very bitter against him, and so were the Democratic women at first. But the women and the workingmen who had children who would be most affected elected him because he would make a good Judge of the Children’s,’ Court, and .: none of the other candidates was satisfactory. It has beqn said that such disagreement would make discords, but I did not see any. I know a great deal of family life. I have been an itinerant school teacher, who boarded around; I have been an itinerant Methodist minister, who boarded around, and now I am an itinerant suffrage speaker, who boards around, and I know something of families. I know that when husbands and wives want to quarrel they do not wait for a political question to do it/’ [Laughter.]    >  She gave an illustration of the power the ballot gave women.  “ In Colorado, the Federation of Women’s Clubs decided one year tepon ten laws it wished passed. The same year the New York. Federation of Women’s Clubs decided upon three laws it wished passed. Both took their demands to the Legislature. Nine of the ten Colorado women’s laws were passed, but not one of the three New York women’s, Thp.t ig not because!! the Colorado men? are -superior to the New York men; there is some other reason. It is what women get with their  4  silent ’ influence.” [Laughter.]   44  Mrs. Annie Nathan Meyer said the other day that women who wish the, ballot do not understand how much of a burden they are taking Upon themselves. That it was not merely casting the ballot, but they must prepare themselves carefully/ That was at the beginning of her address and at the end she said that women did not need the ballot because their duty was to thoroughly inform tliemselvea -upon all matters  Q i gtate to Jead theirH'usb&nds and teach their children.” [Laughter and applause.]  44 1  cou 1 d nоt Bee'tl)at it would take any.more  ‘:n  time to study td caàt the ballot for themselves.”  In reply to questions as to the vote of ignorant and bad women, she said.   44  It may be possible that people whom we consider ignorant in some things may know better than we do what is  are compelled to swear to#.their names and families, and they won’t do it unlesh  they are forced to by the police. They just want to keep out of sight/ said Billy Green ”  Miss Dorothy Whitney asked if women were not emotional, and would not advocate unwise laws. She referred to the  testified that he overheard McAtee attempt to bribe Reardon in the Night Court to drop the case against him.  When McAtee took the stand the court was filled with his friends, including a number of Roman Catholic priests, who have taken an interest in the defendant. McAtee testified that he had come to this city from South Lakewood, where he had  fone after spending two weeks with his ianc6e, Miss Katherine McLaughlin, at Van Hisevill'e, N. J. Shortly before midnight, he said, he started for the Mills Hotel in Bleeker Street, but lost his way.  Irt Waverley Place. McAtee testified, he met Reardon, who followed him and finally     ......  “There is a difference of opinion about ’ pappled, with him. Reardon he said, ini’' nnsw#»rAri Miss Shaw.  44  fipn Miles . held a blackjack in his hand, but put it  away and drew a revolver. McAtee de-  that,” answered Miss Shaw.  44  Gen. Miles tnd other army officers have said that it was the best thing that was ever done. But it was not the women’s work. They asked for it, but it was a political measure to keep Indiana and Illinois Republican.   44  And women are not to be mentioned in the same day with men in regard to emotionalism. Did you ever hear of women shouting for forty-five consecutive minutes as they did at the Republican Convention? Or for ninety-five minutes as they did for Bryan * in the Democratic Convention? I have seen men at the conventions Jump up on the chairs, grab their hats off, and throw them in the air, jump down, and trample on them. I have seen* them embrace each other.”  34th to 35th Sb  RABBI AGAINST SUFFRAGETTES  Dr.  Silverman Tell* Women Their Place Is in the Home.  The Rev. Dr. Joseph Silverman told the National League for the Civic Education of Women at the Berkeley Theatre yesterday afternoon that women, in asking equal suffrage, were abrogating a natural law. Dr. Silverman’s subject was " The Natural Place for Women in the World’s Progress.” Her natural place is the home, Dr. Silverman went on to explain, and by taking an artificial position she will narrow her natural sphere.   44  Woman to-day exerts more influence than man/.’ said Dr. Silverman.  44  She is practically without limit in her own sphere. Woman is free to-day, and no suffrage can make her any more free. In considering this question we must not forget that by reason of sex, physical and mental makeup, woman is fitted for certain functions and man for others. Man is essentially the provider and protector, woman the home-maker and the mother and the educator of youth. The advance of civilization has always tended to fit more strongly each for their own  ” Equal suffrage is pot in keeping with these natural functions, and, furthermore, if it ever comes, must mean equal service —that is, a responsibility for military or police service irrespective of sex. But through the fundamental workings of nature special zones or action have been established, in some of which women must be supreme, and in others, men. Woman’s natural place is found in marriage and the home, not in politics.”  nled any attempt to bribe Reardon and • said that he had waived examination in i the Night Court by Reardon’s advice.  Miss McLaughlin w r as called and corroborated McAtee’s testimony as l£> his stay at her home in Van Hiseville.  The last witnesses called were several of McAtee’s townsmen, all of whom gave him the highest character.  Commissioner Bingham was subpoenaed yesterday by the defense, but according to McAtee’s attorney, will not be called.  “HUMPTY” JAGKSON TO PRISON  East Side Gang Leader Gets Four and a Half Years for Larceny.  Thomas Jackson, alias ” Humpty ” Jackson, the east side gang leader, who pleaded guilty last week to grand larceny in the second degree, was sentenced yesterday by Judge Mulqueen m General Sessions to serve four years and six months in Sing Sing. Jackson was Indicted as a fourth offender, and if he had gone to trial as such might have spent the remainder of his life in jail. -  The crime to which he pleaded guilty w r as a systematic robbery of thq Adams »^Express Company last year. His arrest followed the confession of a driver for the company named Harry Lee, who admitted that he was in thè habit of dropping bundles from his, w*agon In designated places, where they were later collected by Jackson and members of hi3 gang.  When Jackson has served his term the District Attorney’s office plans to hold the former offenses over his head in order to keep him straight. Jackson is one of the last of the  44  terrors ” of the east side.  NEW CARS TOO COSTLY  Cjlty Railway Receivers Tell the Utilities Board—May Quit 8th St. Line.  The receivers for the New York City Railway Company addressed a letter to the Public Service Commission yesterday in which they said that to comply with recent orders of the commission would cost the company an extra capital expenditure of at least $525,000 and additional annual charges of $175,000.  The commission notified the company  last Wednesday that at least thirty cars  in  in each direction must be kept going on the Fourteenth Street and Williamsburg Bridge line.  In yesterday’s letter the company replied that this could not be done without putting In additional feeder cable facilities  The New Books  Jno. Spargo’s New . . Book on Socialism, *rtC  Dixon’s “Comrades,”  David Graham Phillips’s “ Fashionable Adventures of Jo-siah Craig ”......  B’way at 6 th Av *  Our fight with the Book Trust—a fight ior the right to sell books as cheaply as we choose—is a single-handed affair.  We continue to sell late copyrighted fiction at 98c. against the $1.08 or more demanded in all other stores.  That underpricing of 10% on late books is indicative of a greater  underpricing on other books—Standard Sets, etc.—in greatest demand for holiday gifts. On such books you will find Macy prices fully 25% lower than the prices . prevailing elsewhere for similar publications. Abundant proof of our underselling supremacy in the crowds that throng this Book Store hourly.  98c  98c   same anc U rt  many  instances much larger price-differences in favor of Macy’s will be found on hundreds of other things throughout the store.  It is not uncommon for some dealers to charge double what we do for Fine Art Wares,  c/re/ze  //e  Piano-Player  The player that astounds critics. Artistic expression unapproached.  No pumping.  Demonstrations any flay. Write for illustrated book.  Electrelle Company, 2 West Thirty-third St., New York.  Don't Miss the Vain Camp  Free Milk Coupon  Those who present the coupon we will publish in next Sunday’s papers at their grocer’s can have a ten-cent can of Van Camp’s milk free—exact size of can as shown below.  We pay the grocer ten cents for each of the coupons redeemed. He makes his full profit-—so he is glad to give you the milk for the coupons.  We are making this offer because we want you to know what Van Camp’s Milk means. We buy the first can for you rather than that you should go without this milk. There will be one can for every family.  Get this free can—learn what Van Camp’s Milk adds to your cooking—see what it saves on coffee and on cereals.  The coupon appears next Sunday in the New York Herald, American, Sun, Times, Tribune, World and Press. Also in the Revue, Morgen Journal, Staats-Zeitung and in the Brooklyn Eagle, Newark Call, New Haven Register and Union, Rochester Democrat and Chronicle and Syracuse Herald.  This is Not “Condensed Milk”  Be Careful  “Condensed milk” is half sugar. You can*t use it for cooking. Please don’t think that Van Camp’s is like thdt.  And cjpn’t think that all “evaporated” milks are alike.  For milk less rich, with more water left in, may still be called “evaporated.”  If you’ll compare Van Camp's with other brands, you will see what a difference there is. Yet others cost as much as Van Camp’s.  Get the coupon on Sunday and hand It or send it to your grocer.  No Disease Germs  The bane of raw milk is diseaso germs. For any germ in milk breeds with frightful rapidity.  There may be germs of consumption from tubercular cows, which are common. Infections may come from diseased milkmen or from dirty dairies.  These germs make raw milk the most terrible foe of humanity. For one thing, two-thirds our infant mortality is due to them.  Van Camp’s milk is germless.  Our cows are inspected; so are the men who milk them. Our dairies are sanitary. Our buildings are built without wood. We make a business of cleanliness.  Then Van Camps is sterilized after the cans are sealed. Not a germ of any kind can remain in it.  Nothing But Milk  Van Camp’s is simply rich, pure milk, with two-thirds the water evapo  rated. Nothing whatever is added. Nothing is subtracted save water.  Our cows are the finest breed. Our dairies are in the best dairying sections. Our milk is evaporated while it is fresh.  That slight almond flavor is due to sterilization. It indicates simple purity.  When you heat the milk—as in cooking or coffee—the almond flavor disappears.  Van Camp’s is as thick as thick cream—so thick that you add one part water for coffee.  Add two parts water and you have rich milk.  Then you have no waste—no milk left over. That saving, in itself, is enormous.  So you have rich milk or cream whenever you want it, for less than you are paying your milkman.  s'  Matchless Milk Dishes  This is tbe Exact Size of the Can Yon Ara to Get.  Just make one milk dish with Van Camp’s. Note the wonderful flavor and richness. Then you’ll forever use it.  Yet that flavor is not artificial. It comes solely from the whole, rich milk.  You are used to cooking with half- * milk—you who buy from the milkman. For milkman's milk separates, before and after you get it.  The butter fat rises; the solids fall. You get so you don’t know what whole milk means.  You get all the milk in Van Camp’s.  To All Grocers  As above announced, we will pay you 10c in cash for each coupon redeemed—so you will get your full profit on every can of milk given out. We'repay you the postage you use in sending us the coupons.  Over 3,000,000 coupons will be printed to be clipped from the papers—a can for every family—so don’t be  caught without stock. Each coupon redeemed means not only a sale for you, but means hundreds of repeat orders—a trade you will never lose if you get it at th# start. Be ready to meet this opportunity.  If you run low ori^tock your jobber can supply jfOta immediately. .  N. Y. Office  The Van Camp Packing Company  Hpifmeral Office». IndianaooKa^ftlA  Telephone  ¿(¡I Frenkha  ÉÉHMiiMÜi   

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