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New York Times Newspaper Archive: January 30, 1909 - Page 9

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   New York Times, The (Newspaper) - January 30, 1909, New York, New York                               THE NEW vYOEK vTIMES. SATUKpl; 1909.' u .and the kangaroo. -According to Mr, Stringer's theory, I- must bo the vampire Mr. Woolf the kangaroo, because! ho got away with it. Mr. Stringer makes Borne remarks about the cave man part of the play. 1 know- that that came to Mr. Woolf spon- taneously, and the fact that both he and Mr. Stringer, conceived the same, thins seems to rue to b.e a compliment Mr. Stringer. Raeie nt "Mr. Stringer -was invited to nuuior oays trie Basis or tne nay inge at my suggestion, ana u Is Contained in His Book, The Silver Poppy." A PEPPERY REJOINDER "The Vampire" Authors Dub the Charges Absurd and Wax Sarcastic Over Them. Did George Sylvester Viereck uncl Allan Woolf steal from Arthur Stringer the story of The the psycho- logic drama which is running at the Hackett Theatre? Mr. Stringer says Mr. Viereck and-Mr. Woolf did at least pilfer tile story from a novel he once wrote if they did not exactly absoVb his mentality, in much the same manner as does the his charges are correct I certainly had a nerve to invite him to see a production ot' his own play. His charges are absolutely fulse. lind-I challenge him to produce the evidence he speaks of." Mr. Woolf said: "The whole thing appears to me to be pathetically childish.' Of course, there is no truth in the charges whatever. Jn fact, they are stupid and inane, anil, to tell the truth, I neve.r heard of Mr. Stringer until I was introduced to his at yesterday's matinee. Mr, Stringer's remarks are unkind, impertinent, and unprofessional. If work has been stolen he has his remedy in the I Actors at the New German Theatre DINNER VAUDEVILLE FOR MARJORIE GOULD Mrs. Benjamin Nicof! Entertains in Honor of Covers Laid for 40 Guests. Post, C, :A. M'jinn, BIklcolm Sloane, Munscy, SzepheiyT.J-andort, .Craig "Wtt EUlot' Cross. Perry Gsboni, .J. i W. Barney, Aahbel Barney. .T. 3, Eeatty, Bookman Hoppln, -Barclay Fnrr. Ellft Bobbins, Carroll I-adrt, "William Wilson, Orrne Wilson, .Jr.. Peter' Joy. A.-'J. Drexel, Jr., Thom'aa B. .Clarke. Jr., Allen G. Jay Gould, Cecil St. George, Sheldon Whlte'nouse, Willing Spencer. Russell Sard, Harrison Rhodes, Joseph Pulitzer, Jr., Fred-jrick Cruder, and Frederick H. Ealiwln. MISS ROOSEVELT PRESENT President's Daughter Up from Go Later to Mrs. .C. B. Alexander's Dance. PAY 'LAST HONORS TO DEAD COQUELIN French Art, Science, Literature i Mourn Beside Great Player's Bier i in Actors' Home. MRS. McALPIN ENTERTAINS. Gives a Dance and Supper for Her Daughter at Mr. ana Mrs. William W. McAlpin enr tertained last .night at the Plaza with a. ..iance lor their daughter, Miss.Gladys Mc- Alpin. 'The guests, were'received at the marble ballroom entrance by Mrs. Me- j Alpin, gowned in silver-embroidered white net, and Miss McAlpin, in white char- Declares Jean Coquelln Shall Decide ROSTAND IS INCONSOLABLE mettse with silver abid blue trimmings. There was general dancing till 'mid- 'higlit, when a buffet supper was served, the older guests, numbering being seated at small tables in the loyer. Danc- ing followed till ii io'cloek, Elliott's Or- Mrs. Benjamin Nicoll gave a dinner of playing. What Is to be the Destiny of Chanticler." I PARIS, Jan. men and women best known in French art, science, and j forty covers last night a Utrich vjn Rudenz............._. Werner Stauftacher......'...... Jost von Weiler....'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'......Fritz Kahle red roses. at two long with Burtbn. Giadro Brown. Marlon Graham. Bea- body of the great French player lay the retreat for aged, actors founded The vaudeville began at 10 o'clock, the as one of the honored guests at the -waiter 'poets' matinee1 of a melodrama called Rudolf der Harras.. The an effort toward which 1 stuessl feel I already sufficiently contrib- uted. This protest Is leased not alone on it based nothing- co by her slater, wearing Witto the shopgirl's uniform of one Krug Qeorge .Ade'e shopgirl monologues, The ___________________ An elaborate ar.d artistic production ot' Farmer Kathryne." The next number was the fact that any author who elects to Sohmer-s classic drama, Wilhelm a song and dance, V Has Any One Seen a follow his calling in his own quiet way is tho German done' by Miss Grace naturally averse to participating iu sensa- Tel., was gnen last niglit at tne new Hoyti (jre51ged as a German Immigrant, and spectacular advertising Gentian Tiieatre. Madison Avenue and and the last number wag the fan. song, in s" even more on the fact that Fifty-ninth Street. >uld induce me to sit tliroush a Ferdinand Rteil'i which before fan. Miss Frances t ana lay in bi" "scotVft-ler Norman Tuckeiv George JBrokw, his munificence and beneath the shadow of a, statue of Moliere. Special'trains -were run from Paris for tlie accommodation of the mourners. BcJ- mond Rostand plunged in pro- found melancholy, a saddened group of the actors and the actresses Kith whom Coquelin. had won his triumphs; M. Claretie of the Theatre Franqais, who had seen M Coqueltn grow into greatness; Paul Coquelin'B inseparable friend, and a score or more of aged actors who had been Coquelin's comrades In the home where ha died. From the laltfn the was borne Into the garden, where, in the presence immense gathering, the men! who. had known Coqueltn best in life toad of Jils career, his character, and his achieve- ments." The speakers were M. Dujardln- Beaumetz, Under Secretary of State tor ON THE ATLANTIC HIGHWAY. Five Onera to Sail for Europe with Many The transatlantic liners sailing to-day ..uu.i......-.......- i performance of fell Hoyt, dressed 'as a mandarin, and her si3- second' performance oC a.book adaptation adclr 1 to his already wide popularity, ter as a geisha girl, danced and sang. so abortive and banp.l and stupid. And ..v! Mr. Und as Gessler, Mr. Groesser I Among those present were: since its theme is the ubsorptivo pow.'i- a.; Mclchtlia'.. a-.id Miss Reicher's Arm- The'jMisses Elsie McCall, Elinor Lee. Ellza- of true Remus, J. tnmk its :ihoul time to ijv.arcl- were war'nly i-pceiveu. the actors hc.th Ptnvei. Janetta and Harriet, point, out. reluctant as I am to claim even iiein? called before the .curtain many remote -'o Ftio'li an ni'lort. thai times. The niijienoe was a large one. of those booked to depart on them are: KOXIG Mr. ana Mrs.. L. S. .Baker, Mrs. Austin -Ballard, Gerand and" Mrs "Arthur Boucher. Very CfiWce Corner Apartments IN THE. Warwick" Arms .101 WEST 80TH STREET. FINEST IN XKW BETWEEN CEXTKAI, PAKK AXfl BIVEBSIDE DRIVE. One 7-roora apartment, 2 baths, all out- rooms. One ground-floor apartment, 0 2 baths, suitable for doctor or -dentist. _________ PASSENGER SERVICE ELEVATORS. Apply to Superintendent, on premiees. who represented the Gov- rt Deflers of the Society of the Fine Arts, ernment; Rober Authors, -M. of the ThSatre Frangais. M. I.aroche. one of M. Ilri's colleagues nt the Theatre' Porte St. Martin, and M. Gailhard of the Associa- -Miss Schnitzer the Soioist. For benem ot tlle Southern Indus- asto n ?oIS a 'threw' lt IMS own pra-ercen lisht of psychi- I bnHion of the- Mendelssohn centenary, in yat of Omar Khayya this of which the first; George Riddl The Philharmonic Soctety Joins the ccle- trial Educational Association the Rubai- "dpnfr Fas- SERVANTS SERVE. Sfy new cook is a said Mrs. Prim Particular. and as faithful as Her Perfect! A Times want ad. brought me the prize." Telephone lOtJO Bryant. Adv. de Cordova, ar.d Mrs. Edwin S. Brickner., The funeral will take place .to-morrow. JOHN T. LINDABERRT, 68 years old. -died at his hnr.ie In Whitehouie; N. J., of Bright's disease. He was a veteran of the civil war, and spent many months in Libby Prison. Ke leaves a widow. Assistant CHARLES G. ALDER- MAN. U. S. N., died from pulmonary trouble at Lebanon, Penn., yesterday. LElANOER .REMINGTON' PECK of Prnvi- donee; H'. .1.. a wool merchant and PreBtdent i ot tho Asa Peek Company, died on Thursday at the Parade Street Hospital, that city, to which he had been taken last Saturday for an operation for appendicitis. He leaves a wife and two children. Frederick S. Peek: and Mrs. Frank N. Phillips of Providence. Mr. -Peck was 66 years old. JAMES M. ED-WARDS dead in To- ledo, Ohio. He was 94 yean old. Hit ft- ther, Ebenezer Edwards, was or.e of the Acton minute men in the Battle of Concord Bridge, and served all through the Revolution. Miss LYDIA M. MORGAN, one of the pro- prfetors of the Hotel Brunswick, at Asbury Park. X. J., died In Philadelphia on Thursdav, after several months' Illness. Her father was Lewis M. ilorffan, .the original proprietor or the hotel. SILVESTRB E. SPEAR of tlie National Meter Company died at his home. Halsev Street, Brooklyn, on Thursday, of In his seventieth year. He leaves a and a daughter. LEWIS' W. SEAMAN, a buIlattiK' contractor, died on Thursday at his home, 147 Park Ave- nue. Rockvllle Centre. L. I., in his sixty- fourth year. Amonff. buildinus constructed by him was Bedford Avenue Young Men's Christian Association Building. THOMAS P. an examiner of accounts In the Brooklyn Fire Department. Is dead of heart failure Jn his home. Ott Qulncy Brooklyn, in his sixty-third year. HORATIO ROOT WILCOX. one ot.tlie and best-known residents of Mlddletown, N. Y., died at his home in that city on Thursday after a short illness. He was one of .the first wool hat manufacturers, in Mlddletown. ITn was one of the organizers and later become President of the Middletown Gas Company. cutlonal Association the Rubal- Tt J bcium R A Miwr jr Percy TCllb- 'the overwhelming honor or conse Dmar Khayyam was read by born.' Dr. William N.- Davis. Miss E. Vaughn your, last joys, these f  AIIICL. o. of the Retsof Mining.Com- Tcork lawyer. i pany, Empire Limestone and a Director-of the Western Railroad Mining Social Notes. Company; He was a member of the pCraJVically pur" Ca. UJi J7CU. o cii.. t Turncffn-n TUFn rTla nrl TTnnrnnfl the ballroom. Mr. and Mrs. Ernrsto G. brde d chased the Western Maryland Railroad for J. Gould. DANCE AT MRS. ALEXANDER'S. Entertains in Honor of Her Daughter, Miss Harriet Alexander. Mrs. C. B. 'Alexander gave a cotillion last night at her residence. 4 West Fifty- eighth Street. Mrs. Alexander, in while net wjth silver embroidery; Miss Harriet Alexander, In pink, and Hiss Janetta Alexander, in white, received tlie guests at the entrance of the b'allroom. At n ..o'clock the cotillion; led by Worth- ing-ton Whitehouse, was started. Franco's Orcehstra played. The favors were opera gla-sses, quill pens, fancy candy boxen, hatpins, picture frames, match boxes, and i fans. At o'clock there was a seaterl i s.upper in the Louis XV. room, the tables 1 being decorated -with 'American yBeauty and white roses. There were, sixty couples. General dancing followed until '2 o'clock, when breakfast -was served in the dining room. Among the guests Invited were: alias Ethel 'Roosevelt, who came up from Washington; Lady Evelyn Gray, who is visit- ing Mrs. John J. McCoolc; Lady Paget and her son, Albert Paget; Lord Anglesey, Count Torok, Prince Graetz, Mr.' Von Stumm, Mr. and Mrs. Harry .Payne Whitney, Frederick Townsend .Martin, Mr. and Mrs. Julian Ripley. Mr. and Mi-a. Harry P. Robbina, Mr. and Mrs. William H. Crocker, Mr. and Mra. Malcolm Wnitney, Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Douglas, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Goelet, Mr. and Mra. L. Gerry. Mr. and Mrs, John Cross, Mrs. Varider- bilt, Mrs. William K. Vanderbilt, Jr., Mr.'and Mrs. Arthtir Iselln. Mr. and Mrs. Reginald Ronalds, the Misses Martha McCopk and Martha Bacon of Mabel Gerry, Pauline Riggs, Evelyn Marshall. Eleanor Whitrlqge, Gwendolyn Burden, Eleanor Ripley, Helen Coster, Eleanor Alexander, Jean Delano, t.'ary Louise Ellen Carol Har- rlmun, Maude Shepherd. Cornelia Landon; Marv Curtis. Dorothy Whitney, Ruth Twomb'.y, Elizabeth -Latlmer, and Edith Kane. Edmund Rogers, Kenneth. Budd, William dinner to-night their 11 East Sixty-second: Lui-eet. Mrs. Philip r.ydig, at SS East Fifty-sec- ond Street, will also give a large dinner this evening.." Merritt Wyatt will give a theatre party to-nig-ht followed by supper and danc- msrior Miss Emily Dearborn Ayres. MrsT' George G. Heye will Sive a lunch- eoii of thirty-six covers to-day at 687 Mad- ison Avenue. Mrs. Chnrles Dickey gave a dinner last night at her homo, 37 East Fifty-first Street, for twenty young people. Tills was the last of a series of dinners wmcn Mrs. Dickey has been giving. Miss Ethel Roosevelt is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Alexander, and will remain in New York until Tuesday. Mrs. W. T. Floyd ot 15 East. Tenth Street will give a card.party on Feb. 4 at. the Plaza. A Columbia University dance and-supper for ROO guests given.on Feb. 5 at the Plaza. Mrs. William DonRlas Sloane din- ,.UUIM.I lul u, last night .at her resiaonce, 1' West QUOKIIS. died on Thursday of-heart failure FiltvVsecond Street, followed by music, I.lt his home. 06 Quincy Street. Brooklyn. He for whirl! .a few additional guests were in- I W.R in Manhattan, .Aug. 5, 1845. He leaves a widow and two daughtej-s. GEORGE E. the .nine-year-old son of ex-.Uongressman Waldo of the.Fifth District. Brooklyn, filed at the home-of his parents, 220 East .Eighteenth Street, day of paralysis. Mrs. ELLEN- WELLES, -widow of Henry William Johnson, died at her home, 154 Deca- tur Street. Brooklyn, on Thursday. She was -an active member of Dorcas Society on the Heights. Mrs. EUSTACE DE CORDOVA died Tester-, clay at 1 o'clock In her apartments' at the A.n- ponia, aged 05 years. She born in Henderson Cremeans Dies at 115. AVITEELING, West Va... Jan. Hen- derson Cremeana, known to be the oldest man in West Virginia, died to-day at the home of his grandson, Clark Cre'means, near Point Pleasant, aged 115 years. Death was caused by a fall on his way home from the grocery store. His motiier died at 120, 'his wife at 101., Obituary Notes. Mrs. AXXA RUTH33HFURD, wife- of the Rev. William Walton Rutherfunl, died sud- denly .of pneumonia at her residence, 14 Sast Seventy-fourth Street, early yesterday morning-, Mrs. Rutherfurd was born in New York, and was the daughter of the late Dr. "WillJam H. Jackson. She was a. member, of the Colony Club and the Colonial Dames of America. Her husband and her mother survive her. ALICE GORDON MILLS, wife of Benjamin R. Morriso.n. died -at the of her father, William J. Mills, a former Supervisor of Kings County., at Brooklyn, on. Thursday. She was-bnrn in 1S70.' Her husband. two daughters, her parents, and two brothers survive her. THOMAS P. KG AN. an miner of ac- :oun-ts for the Fir-e Department in Brooklyn Mine. Se'nfbrich. sang. Mr and Mrs: Franklin Remington 'and Miss' Ruth Willets are at 36 West Fifty- for the'Winter. Mrs. James Ditmas Eemsen have taken an apartment ft Hatfield House 103 East Twenty-ninth Street, for the rest of the Winter. Mrs. Samuel -Mi Jarvis, who has heen" spending some time in France, sailed on Jan. on the Navarre irom Havre for Havana. She will ylsit her daughter, Mrs, ____.............. Edmund G. VaUghan, and attend the car- Jamaica, west. she leaves a hus- nival festivities. band and children. Cyril, and Arthur V.M- stands for better health the world over. For more than 30 years it has stood the test of millions of people. Every ounce of it improves the general conditions, creases the strength, re- vitalizes and builds up the whole body. If you have never it, try it now. ALL. DRUGGISTS. Send this ad., four cents for port- age, mentioning this piper, and wn will eend yon Complete Atlas ot the World." KJIOTT BOVNE, 409 St., N. Y. FEBRUARY Twenty-two Important Lincoln Letters from Lincoln to his friend, Senator Lyman fnimbull Of great interest and importance, unpub- lished.., Lincoln the Leader A comprehensive and appreda-. tion of Lincoln's per- sonality and qualities, by Richard Watson Gilder. Lincoln Reading Law A drawing by Blendon Campbell. I Sold Everywhere LINCOLN CENTENARY NUMBER Twenty-two Splendid Lincoln including A NEW POR- TRAIT OF LINCOLN IN the first Lincoln por- trait ever printed in color in a magazine. Lincoln at the Helm 'A revelation of Lincoln in the White House in a Setter from John Hay to his co-secretary, John G. Nicolay. Nancy Hankc "Who gave us Lincoln and never knew." A poem by Harriet Mon- roe. Price 35 Cents IN announcing the dissolution of the corporation heretofore known as Kohn Decker, I take this means of thanking the public for its liberal patronage in the past and to solicit the continuance of the same jti.the future. The business will be conducted hereafter under my personal supervision, which expert attention and superior service. My line of footwear will always be of that individual Smart appearance produced only by hand craft. ALFREDS. KOHN SMART SHOES Broadway at 30th Street, ....Formerly 'In a year which has been singularly detioid of really original and 'vital fiction Mr. H. G. Wells' new novel, BUN6AY comes as a surprise and manifest compen- sation. Tribfine. 3d edition. At all BOOK sellers, or from Ono wjeni lioth anfl remltt SYRUP OF FIGS ----AND---- HMXIK OK S3NNA a-ulna. To Ret beneficial, effec-ta buy the f MANUFACTURED BT THB CALil'OHMA FIG SYRUP CO. 18 TRAINS TO BUFFALO "An Unanswer- able Argument" Phone 6310 Madiicm J B11S1XESS NOTICES. I lompkuii, Xompklni. Attornfj-r, Times EQuare (100 43th St.) JiarrifH. CATTT-GATFORoJ-Jan 2S. Margaret M. Gayford to Hugh D. Catty. j 27. Elizabeth V. I Towey to J. Joseph Farrell. j 27. Katherine Cm-belt to Michael Hajrgerty. -28, Sadie Wolfe tu j Bertram M. Manne. 28. Jersey City, Flor- ence McCo-v to William E. Petrick. IS, Habel E. to Georce Rawak. fifed. on Wednesday, Jan. i 27, at his residence-, .in Jjarohmont Manor, I N. Y..' Lawrence beloved hus-! fcand of Elizabeth Aekerman. Funeral aer-' vlc.e will be held at hfs late resMence. i Beach 'Av.. Larchmont Manor, N, T.. on 1 Saturday. Jan. BO. upon the arrival of the j train leaving- Grand Central Station at j P. M.. (Lexington Av. terminal.) Car- riages -in waiting at Larchmont. Interment at convenience of the family. j Brimrvme. X. T., Jan. 28. f Joanna N.r wife of Jacob TV, Bergen, aged j  Tcw Durham, N. .Ian. -Sfc Teresina feclre. funeral 1st St.. Jersey Cily. Jan. Patrick Clancy, 44. New York Av., Jersey City. Jnn. 28. Martin Clarli. N Amboy, N. Jan. St, AKHC-S 11. Coryoll. osics Av., Brooklyn, Jan. 2T. Martha H. C'oylc. I.IMS Tavlnr Van Nest. Jan. 27. Vo3ney O. Cronk. Kast. 7'5tli St.. Jan. 23. A'nnlo (.'urtln. Funeral 10 A. M. Oil-it: St.. .Ian. 2S, Marcella Daly. Funeral, Feb. 1. Cottaffc City, Jan. 28. James Degi-.an. DE Vest' 7M-. St.. Jan. 2S. Leonora Ue Perales. Funeral. to-Jay, 11 A.M. DE Houston SI Xewark, N. Jan. 2R, John De Yore, jix :v' 42. Caniusie, L. I., Jah. 28. Henrietta. Dort. Doyle. Funeral l.o-ijay. MontRomery St.. Jersey City, 29, James Durkcu. East 137th St.. Jan. 26, Henry ICgacrt. aged FLETCHEIl.j-Plnlnfteld. N. J., -Jan. 28. T.aura.- B. Fletcr.er. to-day, P. M. Puiiham Av., .Tan. 27, Anr.a L.- Flood. Fijiicral to-dayl 02 Mardouual St.. Jan. 2S. Bambini'1 Florto. Funeral to-day. i GBAnT.-334 Urgraw St.. Brooklyn, Jan. Jklorgaret aged 91. Be-lfoixl Av.. Brooklvn. Jan.' 20, C'.neorJia Gerdfp. Funeral to-day. N. J., Jan. 2S, Samuel Goodwin, aged 75. East 111 til St., Jan. 2S.I Hill. N. J.. Jan. X'.'.'i Knft' St., Jan. JJnnry uged 77. Grace. St.. Jersey City. Jan.. 28.-Robert Hamilton. West llth St., Cathcvlno Hauck. East 37th St., Jan. 2S, T. Haverty. Hocpil.nl. Jan. 27. Bmili Helaer. Funeral to-morrow. 27. Flora Herbst.- Funeral. 131) East 103th St. N. J.. Jan. 2S. EUen.-. M. Hopper. Funeral to-morrow, 2 P. M. Home, Jan. aged 02-. 27. Mary J. Trvlny. Funeral 17t. Rtli Av.. to-day. 8 A. a.- 28, Ellen Johnson, agoa 72.- _ neral to-day. St. ar.fi Lexington Av. Kllen W. Jolinson. W.inmoiith St.. Jersey City, 2S. 51ary A. Kellv. ------_ Av Jan CharlOB Lamne. asred 70. East 4th Brooklyn. Jan, 2g. Susan M. Leonard. Morton St., Jan. 27. Edward 0, MeHrien. West End Av., Jan. 27. J. MeEvilly. aged JO. MEJSEX.nArHER.-3fl Gable St.. Xewark. N. J.. Jan. Anna Mcisenbaoher. Rired in Eatt 40th St.. Jan. 2S. Frederick J. Mimlek. Funeral to-dav, A. M 10th St.. Broolil; n, Jau. 27. GiJIet. widow of Franklin Butler Lord and daughter of the late. Joseph Gillet, all of this city. Funeral- services will held at StTrhomas's Church'on Sunday afternoon at clock, TJbureday, Jan. 2S. 1009, John ,Morrison, Jn: of his ago. Fu- neral services from Ms late residence. "West S2d St., on Sunday, Jan. 81, at 2 P. M. Interment Virginia Beach, on Thurs- day, Jan. 28. Cornelia Moray, daugh- ter of the John and Sarah A. Kandall. Funeral from the Church of the Holy Com- munion. 0th Av. and 20th St.. on Saturday, the anth ct A. M. of pneumonia, at her residence 14 East T4th St., on 'Friday morning. Jan. 29, Anna, wife of the Rev. William Walton Rutherfurd and daughter of Katharine Robert and the late Dr. Will- iam H. Jackson. Funeral services at Trln- Ity Church, Wall St, on Monday, Feb. 1, at 10 n'cloct. THURMAN.-On Jan. 23, Henry- Philip Thur- ir.an fiervlcf-n at the Funeral Church. 241 23d St.. Satur- day 12 .o'clock. her late .residence. 83 West 119th St.. Sarah White Walters, beloved wife of Charles F. Walters. Notice of fu- neral hereafter. Suddenly, on Frldi y, Jan. 20, 3900, Marparetta M. Ward, daughter of the late Dr. "Thomas and Margaretta Lorillard Ward. Funeral services at Trln Ity Chapel. 25th St.. near Broadway, on Monday. Feb. 1, at 10 A. M. Interment 'at Woodlawn. Jan. 28. at. his late home 191 Maple St.. Richmond Hill, L. I., in his 63d year. Funeral services at his late residence Saturday evening. Jan. SO, P. M. Interment private. 28. 1900, at his home at Mld- dletown, N. Y.. Horatio Root Wllcox. -in the 90th year of age. Funeral prlvate..-- Wood, on the 25th tnst.. at his late residence at Ktneitpn-. N. J., beloved husband of Martha, W. B, Wood. BushwJck AY., Brooklyn, Jan. 29. John J, Adelmaim. Punaral to- morrow. Weat 113th St., Jan.. 28, Charles H. Albright. Funeral tomorrow, 10 A. M. Chester. N. Y., Jan. 2T, Lavina .Aucer, aged 86. Funeral to-day. N. Y., Jan, 27, Marjaret Bronian, aged 22. Mill Road, Jersey City, Jan. 29, Jennio Butler. 2d Broohlrn. Jan. 20. ST. arjrfi 72. Avenue IA. .Tan. 2S. KUzabcth, Nosoo. T-'unTal to'-niorvow, 1 p. Xf PARTRIDGE.-3i9 Logan St.. Brooklyn. 27, Partridge, affed 75. Stamford St.. Jan. Johr, i C. Roberts. Eastern Partway, Brooklyn, 28. N. J., Jan. Ctiarles H. Sandford. 55. Rocltvllle Centre. L. I., Jan. W- Lewia W. Seaman, aced 65. 908 Gates Av., Brooklyn. Jan. Z9. Mary A. Senior. West tS4th St.. Jan. 27. Irdtlc M. Sheerln. Warren St., Brooklyn. Jan. Julia V. Smith. l.Ofll! Halsey St., Brooklyn, Jan. CS, SilvanUK E. Pppar. .Hlphlanrt Av.. Xewail N J.. .Tun. 28. Mary J. Su'.llvan. Lafayetti- Av.. KlnKEton. N.. T.. Jan. 28. MarKaret TompUInp. Falrmount Av., Newark, X. ,T., Jnn. ?n. Joneoh P. Trny. West 120th Bt.. Jan. 27, .C. ISth St.. Brooklyn. George K. Wai tin. ftred n. Ocijen St.; Newark. N J. Jan. 20. John X. Grnvp St.. N. J.. 20. James S. Willett. ;J2. Stt fHrmnrUim. John J. Harrlnston.. St. John Ohrysojitom'a Cburch. 'to-duy. A. If. nrldiret O'Connrr, Ciiurrh o; Thn Holy Rosary, to-tlay; 10 A. St. Agnes Donahue, St. James's rhurrh. Newark. K. J.. In-'lav. S A. II. Johanna Church of St. Francis-cla Sales, to-day, 9 A. M. THE WOODLAWN CEMETERY ftccesvtblv. tor Plarlem ffonV' Gritnd Central Station. Webster and Avenue trollert. unit by carriage, up. Telephone OramRrcy) for of Vfewi. or zd WAST ft.. N. v. CTTT. Stephen Merritt Burial Co., 8TH AV. AND ISTH ST. TeltpboM PRrVATK FREE. STKPHEH HBRBITT.' Prertdeht. MIL RAnCMFI'E. MANAOER.   

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