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New York Times Newspaper Archive: January 22, 1909 - Page 1

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   New York Times, The (Newspaper) - January 22, 1909, New York, New York                               Tells Congressmen No Other Pending Matter Approaches It in Importance. STRAUS DEFENDS FIGURES Certain Number of Japanese Here Is Staff of Army Urges Fortification of San Pedro. Special to Tits York Times. WASHINGTON, Jan. ..21. President Roosevelt had several conferences on the Japanese situation to-day with members of .the Senate and House. He told some of his callers that in nis judgment no .Question now before Congress, whether of legislation or of controversy with him- eclf. is of anything like the importance of thjs question. Among the ultra-anti-Roosevelt men of both Senate and House there was a no- ticeable disposition this afternoon to sug- gest that the sudden and .serious re- crudesance of the Japanese question syn- chronized very aptly with the coming up of the Naval bill for action, arid the ef- forts ot the Administration to secure Lyric Theatre Purchased by Interests Connected with Metropolitan. Interests associated with the Metropoli- tan Opera Company have, purchased the Lyric Theatre in Baltimore and will refit it as. a home for .opera. This move was taken .last night to mean that the Metropolitan Opera Company will liave the sole use of .the theatre, as far as opera is concerned. Mr. Hammer- stein's company had previously played several engagements at the house, and- it was rumored 'that he was negotiating for its purchase. Bernard Ulrich, manager of the Lyric Theatre, said last night at the Metropoli- tan Opera House that the theatre would be entirely remodeled, and that -the Met- ropolitan Company would probably sing weekly at the house next season. The sale was completed said Mr. Ulrich. Baltimore needs a home for opera, and when the house Is re- modeled It will admirably fill this pur- pose. The Metropolitan Company plays an engagement there in. February and two in March, but.next season opera will probably oe given once a week. The house will'be used during the rest of the week for regular dramatic performances. I cannot tell said Mr. Ulrica, "the amount paid for the theatre, nor the names of the purchasers, except to say that they are associated with the Metropolitan Opera Company." Andreas Dippel of the Metropolitan Opera Company confirmed Mr.. Ulrica's statement. YERKES ESTATE IN DEBT? least two more bii{ bartle.ships this year. pr0perty in this City May Be Friends of tile President scout such an insinuation, and point to the fact tliat the i afritation had its origin in Japan. Under the Liabilities. Louis S. pwsley of Chicago, who Is an The President has received advices in executor of the will of Charles T. Yerkes, the traction magnate, applied to Surro- gate Cohalan, through'his attorneys', yes- terday for ancillary letters testamentary in this State Yerkes's will. The reason for. the 'application is to enable Mr. Owsley to administer .the estate in N'ew York, the .value of which .Is esti- mated to be in personal property. The of the estate here are placed at about The value of Mr. Yerkes's personal property here, Although .estimated at the former figure, seems to be doubtful, ac- cording to Mr. Owsley, who is of opin- ion that not more than about will come into his .possession. The dif- ference is accounted for by him due to the fact that all the securities owned by Yerkes are pledged to Secure collateral loans, and the sale of a large part of them will be necessary to pay off the loans made upon them. The papers filed 'yesterday, after set- ting forth the fact of death, and that lie was a resident of Chicago, say his widow, on Jan. 30, 1008, became the wife of Wilson Miener. They put the value of the property owned by Yerkes in Illinois at personal, and 000 real estate. A list of the creditors of the estate In New York is. given, but the amounts due stated. The credlforS'ln'clude dry 1he last few days that the anti-Japanese feeling in California is not confined to the labor agitators and politicians. He lias been informed (hat it is, in fact, wide-' spread and prevalent among the people of the State generally. Under such circum- stances he recognizes the difficulty of the position of Gov. Gillett, in attempting to prevent the objectionable Legislation, and for that reason is doing everything In his power to support the. Governor. Among ills callers to-day were several members of the California delegation, as well as members of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations and the House Com- mittee on Foreign Affairs. Senator Flint is doing ali he can to co-operate with jlthe President and Gov. Gillett, and he has great deal of influence in California. Californians here have told' the Presi- dent that they are inclined to agree.with the feeling" expressed in- California that the figures on Japanese immigration and emigration given out by the Department of Commerce and Labor are inaccurate. The Californians think that more Jap- anese are coming in than are going out, and they base their belief on" what they call the evidence of" their own eyes. When this statement was called to the attention ot Secretary Straus this even- ing he declared most emphatically that the department figures are absolutely ac- curate. I have given a great deal of personal attention and care to that he agencies, milkmen, restaurateurs, law- ______......_____ __ _ _ yers, florists, and jewelers. Mrs. Yerkes, said, 7 know "that" liiie'7fgur'e's are who also claims to be a creditor, is not included. The petition makes no reference to the provisions of the bequest to the University of Chicago or the gift to this city of the paintings, tapestry, and -bric- a-brac, to be known as the Yerkes Gal- leries, in his mansion at Sixty-eighth Street and Fifth Avenue. THE YEAR ONE IN CHINATOWN. entirely'correct. We have a boarding of- ficer on every ship tliat comes or goes, and wo kno'w absolutely what Japane.se arrive and depart. We have the records" in the department showing the occupation and tile destination of every one. it is impossible for us to.be mistaken in tnis. It !s possible! of course, that Japanese might straggle over the bordeTsr. but. we have taken precaution's against that1, and if any do cbnie in in that way .their number is infinitesimal compared with those who come in in the regular way. It Japanese can walk across the Pacific Ocean, it is possible for them lo .onie in without our knowing it, but not otherwise It is not the inaccuracy of the figures to which the Californlan agitators ob- jf.-ct, but to their accuracy. The figures show a condition that is not pleasing to these trouble-makers, and that is why they call them inaccurate. I challenge, the Californians, singly, or collectively, to i Was Also the First Day of ,-the First Year of Sin Huong. Chinatown got back to first principles yesterday. They are going back to the beginning and do It all over-again. Yes- terday was not only the first day of the year, but it was as well the first day of the first year. The new year began at midnight of Wednesday. But as Chinese time is reck- "itv't'lie" figures oned..from the date of the Emperor's ac- Department of Commerce and Labor. It i cession and this is the first year of Sin any of them will come to Washington I i it tvm VOOT- nun will gladly show them proof that will! Huorie' becomes the year one. absolutely convince even the most skepti-' Usually, the only excitement to be seen cal of them. B'rom the point of view of the Depart-: ment of Commerce and Labor it is very singular if the largu numbers of Jap; aneso suggested by tlie Californians are really coming across the borders that practically all of them go at once to Cali- fornia. Senator Fulton ot Oregon said t-o-day that the feeling as to the Japanese In his State was not as ucute as in California. Ke expressed the opinion that the )resent situation would be cleared up and trouble avoided. in Chinatown is that provided by Cau- casifin visitors. The Chinese themselves stand about the little quarter stolidly enough, but yesterday their demeanor seeme.d altered for the more impulsive Newsboys have found that the Chines believe -any little coin bestowed .upon one giving a New Year's greeting will return a hundredfold, having .been accepted as lucky money." So yesterday the news boys tried, their new year's greeting, and occasionally got a coin. Every Chinaman who could had paic his debts on the previous day, 'that thi first day Of the year one might not find him owing any one. Th'e celebration will continue quietly fb ;vera1 days. It will last In all abou fifteen days. During Its latter days th Tongs will hold their annual conclaves Yesterday the residents paid calls am wished one another the compliments o the season. TO FORTIFY SAN PEDRO. General Staff Urges Its Protection Againsi Possible Enemy. WASHINGTON, Jan. fact that there was recently sent to Congress by President Roosevelt .a report by the Gen- eral Staff of the Army, which became public to-day, recommending fortifications for San Pedro Harbor, in California, was made the basis, for suggestions that such decision had just been reached in view of a possibility of trouble with Japan. At the War Department this inference was most explicitly denied. There It was said that the general subject of. the im- provement of San Pedro Harbor had been under consideration more than'two years, beginning before there was thought of any dispute between the United States and Japan. It was taken' up as a nat- ural military problem involving the neces- sary protection of the Southern California Coast from foreign invasion and without reference, to any particular country or enemy. The defense of San Pedro was considered-just as that of other harbors on the Pacific or on the Atlantic Coast would be. The report was accompanied by esti- mates of the cost of the site and forti- fications, aggregating" for big, puns, submarine mines, land, and acces- men who do not know 'some of the de- General Staff's argument assumes I thai come from the pri- who thua was thrown into contact with most of the citizens. Cooper, Sr., top, has been in politics for years. TWO MORE COOPER JURORS. Hard to Find Men in Tennessee to-Si In Carmack Murder Case. NASHVILLE, Ter.n., Jan-. sec ond day effort to obtain a .jury i- the trial of Col. Duncan B. Cooper, hi eon, Robin Cooper, and former Sherlf John D. Sharpe, charged with the murde of former SenatofTEdward W, Carmack closed'with only six men in the box, gain of only two over the day before. Most of those examined to-day wer residents of Nashville or vicinity, wher the case has been fully discussed, an where most of the people have take sides. Besides, few men are willing t serve upon a jury in ..a case in which th SLAIN IN THE STREET ihot Down by Unknown Assail- ant, Who Escapes by 25-Foot Leap from oTenenient Roof. RIENDS VOW VENGEANCE leut. Petroslnl Identifies Him as Pas- quail Miami, Whose Picture Is In the Rogues'.Gallery. An announcement of great interest tp pupils in the public .and private schools pf New York and to'their parents and teachers ap- pears on Page 8 of this issue of The Times. Pasgualt Miami, a barber, who lived at 8 -Roosevelt was shot last'night front of 439 East Fifteenth Street by n Italian who sprang from the doorway, liami died in Bellevue Hospital half- an our afterward.. While, Miami, who It afterward was :arned 'was from Messina and had lost elatlyes there in the eartnquake, lay ylrig' upon the sidewalk Sergeant Woer- er of the Bast Twenty-second Street olice Station gave chase to. the slayer, ifho had run to the entrance of 413 East 'ifteenth Street, tossing his revolver upon le sidewalk as he fled. In the doorway stood Mrs. Emma Gold- mn, a tenant, and she tried to stop the lurderer, but he pushed by her and alned the roof. Running across tho oofs of the intervening houses to the oof of 405, he-leaped to the roof djoinlng dro.D of twenty-five disappeared down t.he scuttle ole in the roof and escaped. In the meantime Miami had been iden- Ified by of 421 East ighteenth Street, who told the police riat he and Miami had formerly served n the Italian Arnjy and had come to this ountry three years ago. Giarrofa also asserted .that Miami had een mixed up in an Italian feud during he last six months. Before Miami's body was. removed from he hospital to the Morgue. Lieut. Petro- inl of the Central Office identified him s a notorious leader of the Black land" In-this city.. whose picture is in he Rogues' Gallery at Police Headquar- 3rs. The.police did not say that Miami was he real name of the dead man, but from Petroslnl said It 'was learned that Vtlami liad been feared by many In tlfe tallan colony as a desperate Italian rook. 'The police advanced two theories after he shooting. One .was that Miami had been killed by some one he had attempted o blackmail and the other was that a member of the Black Hand had killed him, fearing he would divulge some of the secrets of .the clique. Twenty-five Italians called at the Morgue last .night to- .view the body .of NO LIQUOR FOR TENNESSEE. House Passes Bill to Prohibit .Its Man- ufacture After This Year, Special lo The New York Times. NASHVILLE, Tenn., Jan. a heated battle which lasted through the entire session the House of jBepresenta- tlves this afternoon by a- vote of 60 to 8B passed.'on the final reading) the bill to prohibit the manufacture of Intoxicants' in Tennessee after'Jan. 1, The con- sideration of the bill precipitated a debate which began at noon and lasted until nearly-8 debate so.stinging that even the Speaker of the House, Hilfcman Taylor, saw proper to take the floor in behalf of his position. Frank S. Garden and W. B. Cleage, .Representatives from Hamilton vigorously arraigned the State-wide i leaders. Mr. Garden made an eloquent1 appeal for fairness and justice, and took occasion to eulogize Governor for his manly stand and to pay his respects to the new-born converts to prohibition and J the Democratic-Republican coalition. 60ST OF PRESIDENT THIS YEAR, i Congressional Appropriations for Fiscar'Year Endirig -June 30, 1909, Aggregate That Amount. AT HIS DISCRETION Total Covers Maintenance of White House Executive i for Clerks' Hire. COST OF OLD-AGE PENNONS. Those Already Granted in Britain Will Make Outlay Special Cablo to THB NEW. YORK TIMES. LONDON, Jan. .official fig- ures on the old-age pensions granted up to Dec. 31 last show that .the total number of pensions granted was 038, C9Sting per annum. To this must be added Chan- cellor Lloyd-George's estimate of the cost of, administration. i Thus the total outlay for the first year will be at least even if no additional pensions are granted. Premier Asquith's first estimate was Coat Maintaining; a President. President's salary Clerk hire..... Contingent fund President's travellne expenses.... -Maintenance White House, horses, vehicles, etc White House grounds. PU.1 v Care of Repair 'of greenhouses. Printing Lighting grounds.. 25.000 510 Total.................... Special to Tin New York Timls. Speaker Taylor declared that i he''was'.' WASHINGTON, Jan. 21.-The debate la perfectly satisfied with his Democracy, he Senate on thp proposed increase In the Tien: tossed" "-naiKts-''ln-the .air aha vowed they ..would ;be "avenged for his death. Tliat nearly all of these men rec- ognized the d.ead man and were his 'riends was evident from their actions. The police have the assassin's hat and the revolver. But the only :hey have of him is that he is a short, dark, bow-legged man with a black mus- and maintained, in opposition to Mr. Car- den, that the measure was not confis- catory. During his speech he was frequently applauded, but it Is to his credit that the conduct of the galleries during the entire ..proceedings was highly respectful, and, with the. exception of applause, which was rarely ever excessive, excel- lent order was maintained; An amendment, offered "by Mr. Garden, providing for the appointment of a 'com- mission the Governor, the Treasurer, and the Controller, whose duty it would bo to appraise the confis- cated property and assess the damages that would accrue to the distillers and brewers by reason of the passage of the bill, was voted down by practically the same vote .recorded on the final passage of the bill. "An amendment offered by Mr. Wisemen; extending the time until Jan. 1, 1911, was also tabled. Every member of 'the House who voted for the State-wide saloon measure voted with the State-wlders on the manufactur- ing bill with the exception of two. Three members of the House were Worley, Dr. Home, and Mr, Hannah, who have not qualified. LIQUOR FOR WASHINGTON. House Committee Kills a Bill for Pro- hibition- in the District. alaries of the President and other execu- ve ..officers and the Federal Judges has urned the attention of both branches of ongress to the of money ut at. the disposal of-the President for is personal or official expenses. Senator Borah for the Republicans laid stress on he fact that this amount 18 far in excess f the salary of. voted each year, hlle Senator. Bailey, for the Democrats eclared that a sum of was appro- bated" each year subject entirely to the 'resident's discretion. The House has been following the de- sites closely, especially after Borah's mendmerit was adopted holding the .peaker's salary down to Tha Ircumstance that Representative Madden was quoted In the Senate as having estl- the total cost to the country of maintaining a President for one year at 3831000 gave a new turn to the question. Mr.'Madden admitted that he had made he estimate referrad to, but refused to .evelop the subject further. The figures n which he had gone, he said, were sev- ral years old, and he had made no at- empt to follow the year-to-year changes Ince that time. The estimate he had made Included the care of the White louse and the upkeep of the executive of- ice force. In refusing to discuss the mat- er further Mr. Madden seemed to think hat It might in some way seem a dis- lourtepvis- reference to the Republican President. j for the District of Columbia received Its I deatli blow m-'tlie District, of Columbia Committee to-day when Representative Sims' s' bill putting the District in the dry column was tabled by -a vote. of 11 to 2. Mr. Sims said that -he had introduced the bill at the request of local temperance societies.. MISS SCHEFF ILL ON STAGE. Actress Faints in the First Act Un- derstudy Takes Her Part. Frit'zi Scheff had a serious fainting spell in "the first act of The .Prima Don- at the Knickerbocker Theatre last night and the curtain stayed down for nearly three-quarters of an hour before ler understudy was able to .appear and continue in her part. Miss Scheff fainted first-before. the per- formance began, but she insisted on play- ing, despite the efforts of her manager, Charles Diilingham, to send her home. During the first act, showing the Po.mmo d'Or Cafe, Miss Scheff performs .on a miniature stage. Without any when the, act was half- dyer, the actress re any one could catch her, in full view of the au- suddenly fell to the floor befo dience. The miniature curtain was rung down first, and_when it was seen that she was not going to recover speedily, the regular curtain was lowered. It- stayed down forty-flve'mlnutes while Miss Scheff was being revived In her dressing room. Finally, as she appeared to be too weak to proceed with, the per- formance, her -understudy, Blanche Mor- rison. went on In her place, and Miss Scheff was taken home Jn her carriage. GUN SCARED CURB BROKERS. They Had Man Arrested Whose- Pistol Showed Under His -Coat. Curb brokers trading In the. roped In- closure in Broad Street had a mild scare yesterday when word went round .that a large and shiny revolver barrel was plain- ly to be seen protruding from the torn coat pocket o'f an onlooker. The Curb's nerves have been shaky since one of the brokers was shot to death by a client last month In his office overlooking the Curb market. The stranger was roughly dressed and seemed .to be watching1 the crowd inside the ropes with closer Interest than the' usual curiosity of the dally fringe of sightseers. The traders gave. the man with the grim a wide berth until Policeman Angus Bea- ton of the Traffic Squad came by. The gun was pointed out to him and he went up behind the stranger slipping the weapon out of his pocket before he could turn around. It was a loaded 3S-calibre re- volver of heavy pattern. The man ex- plained that he was a stranger in town. and did not know that he had to. have a license to carry a gun. Beaton took him to the TomBs. Court, where he said lie -was Austin Allison of Pittsburg. He said he SIX BOSSES IN SENATE. La Foilette's Magazine Names Them, and Denounces the System. Special to The New York Times. Jan. Less than .a dozen bosses dominate legislation in the -Unitid States says this week's Issue of La Foilette's Magazine. "Who are these It goes on. In the order of their control one ac- quainted with the business of the Senate would name them as Aldrich, Hale, Elklns, Cullom, Gallinger, For? aker. Do they, rule because of their superior mental endowment? Far from it: They are not great men. In the main they are-quite.-an. ordinary lot. They are the product of a bad system. Legislation in the United States Sen- ate is "controlled by committees. The appointment of 1 be committees is con- trolled .by party caucus. The .caucus is composed of .a few bosses, with a few Independents and many cowards and folr lowers. When the -committees are bosses are found upon the committees -.vhlch control appropriations; tinance, transportation, tariff, commerce foreign relations, military naval they have not overlooked the Judiciary Committee nor the Committee on Rules." feeling is -so intense. It is difficult toi-ind was employed by the Company. He was held in ball .m for trial at Special. Sessions. nt, and the statement Is" .made that so r.ir sis' location .is concerned San Pedro would be a good base from which to op- ngalrst our Pacific coast. Speaking of the Los Angeles country, the report sn When one thir.ks of the great extent of this country and its immense wealth, and takes into consideration its climate, making It one of the most attractive dwelling ploces in the world, no effort of the; Imagination Is needed to realize 'e temptation it offers to those Oriental the report suys that recent study dis- closes the fact that, assuming there were ao effective naval opposition, a certain Continued on Paste 2. FROM AtrrOMOBH-BS TO AJHSHIP8. After seeing .everything new im ,autos, why the a! the New YotS Hip- podrortte? There's speefljttg mfflia ASat- S0 In SUIets. S0 In SUIets. tsaB. gor stria aJso Jn spite of the bitter feeling between the two factions, there is apparently-the bebt of feeling between-the attorneys. There has not been the simplest dispute so far, and durintr recesses 'or between sessions counsel on both 'sides have mingled freely. Unlike the 'night rider trials at Union City, only 150 miles away, there has been no display of weapons. Even the Deputy Sheriffs on duty are unarmed at talk of trouble. When court adjourned .the State had used seven of its eighteen" peremptory challenges and the defense eleven of -its seventy-two. President of Cuba, January 38th, 39Q9. Tho best, quickest. most comfortable route to the capital Havana, Cuba, Is. the Over Sea Limited, operating direct from New York to Knight's Key, with through Pull- man Sleeping and Drawing Room Cars; dally service with a steamship connection to only nine daylight hours on sea. For particu- lars, reoervatiBUD, MJth RUSSIAN JOURNALS FINED. Punished for Saying Police Agents Took Part In ST. PETERSBURG, Jan. ranging from to have been posed upon St. Petersburg journals for publishing articles to the effect that agents of the Russian police had partic- ipated in terroristic crimes. A semi-official statement has been Is- sued declaring that the stories that agents of the Russian police participated in the murders of Grand Duke Sergius, M. Von Plehve. Minister of the Interior, and others, ara complete fabrications. Six full in Sicily, stands. Adv. l pages, in Col new pictures of tha earthquake llier's. January 23d. All news- GET CARLOAD OF BABIES. New Orleans People Delighted with Orphans from New York. Special to The Ne-j) York Times. NEW ORLEANS, Jan. "children from the New York Foundllnj and Orphan Asylum arrived from tha city over the Illinois Central to-day, and were almost all placed in the hands o delighted foster parents. Half of the number were girlE and half boys. They were in charge of Joseph C. Butler. Each baby had come to fill an order the foster parents having arranged In ad- vance for a child of a certain color, hair and eyes, and a certain, temperament and disposition. So carefully liad the choices been made that not one of the persons who came for children was disappointed with'his or her new-baby." By noon forty-eight of the sixty-six children had been disposed of, many of those who were at the train being disappointed because Mr. Butler could leave- only forty-eigh here. The other eighteen had been prom ised for places out on -the Southern iPa cific In this State.. Mr. Butler .was almost overwhelme with requests for more babies. The nex bunch will be between two and thfe years of age and will come on order in tlie-same manner as those already here Mr. Butler -was accompanied by thre nurses and two sisters of charity, ana .en party left New York Tuesday night a o'clock. They traveled ail the waj In the: New-York Central day coach, com ing by way of Cincinnati and Louisvill on the Big Four and the Illinois Central. Wants No Tariff Commission. At the twenty-fourth annual meeting o the American Protective Tariff League held yesterday at Its National head quarters, 339 Broadway, resolutions wer adopted unanimously condemning the pro posed establishment of a permanent taril commission and complimenting COngres on Its reported Intention to correct Executive tariff agreements. HAAN-S BKSTAtrnANT, Cferb Row B'l For ladles downtown. Luncheon, Dinner. M JURY DISAGREES IR SHELLAUD CAS1 Justice Crane, Before ft. Holds a Girl Witness in Bail for Perjury. CONFESSED ON THE BRITISH TRADE LOST MOST. Shows Largest Decrease; in Exports and Imports in 1908. Special CaWe to THE NEW. YORK. TIMES. LONDON, Jan. comparison of the. statistics now available on the trade losses during 1008 of the four chief countries of the world shows that Great Britain suffered more than any other. Following are the- figures of the de- crease in Imports during 1908 from 1907: United Kingdom, Germany, United States, France, Following are the figures on the de- crease In exports: United Kingdom, Germany, United States, France, The total loss Jn Imports and ex- ports, therefore, was: United Kingdom, United States, 000; Germany, 'France, Sadie Lee Acknowledged at the That Her Evidence Before Grand Jury Was False. The trial of David S. Sheliard, the fOiV. mer Doliceman of the J-Iambure Station, for the murder of Barbara the factory girl, In the .shelter house Irving Square Park last July, came to sensational end last nluht before Crane in the Criminal' Branch of the SUi preme Court In Brooklyn. The jury hwl" entered the courtroom and had announced'? that It was Impossible for them to Before Justice Crane discharged called Sadie Lee, a witness in the who admitted that she testified before the Grand Jury, before him. scathing denunciation of her conduct; testifying falsely, Justice Crane to the Raymond Street Ja'l in await the action of the Grand Jury. j "I did not commit you when you. on the said Justice Crane, cause I did not think It would bo NO AUTOS FOR TAFT. Senate Committee Strikes Out Appropriation for Presidential Cars. Special to Tha-Neat York Titnas. WASHINGTON, Jan. Taft will have to walk, stick to the saddle, or be conveyed from place to place to street cars or In horse-drawn vehicles. The Senate Committee on Approprla- :ions to-day ran across an item In the Urgent. Deficiency bill granting- :or the purchase and care of automobiles for the use of .the executive office. The automobile has not made many .friends In the Senate; as was. .disclosed in the de- bate of' the last few days on- the pro- posed purchase of such vehicles for'Gov- ernment officials, and the committed struck the item out. the current fiscal year ending June 567 1009, Congress appropriated in two eparate bills a total of con- ribiitlng directly or Indirectly to the sup- lort of the President and his Immediate personal attendants and otfice cjerks. 7hls. sum does not include such occasional letalls of .clerks from executive .depart- ments as he might need from time to :ime when the 'rush of preparing mes- ages has -overcrowded his regular force. The-most Interesting .of these allow- ,nces come in the Sundry Civil Appro- priation bill, which is: by the. Appropriation Committee, of which James Tawney Is Ch'alrman. The lump sums for salary and clerk hire come in the Legis- atlve. Executive, and Judicial bill. They are ifor the President's salary, for salaries of the 'executive office force, and for the executive office con- ingent fund, payable at the discretion of the President for telegraph and tele- phone service, furniture, horses, and har- ness, The Improvement 'and maintenance of the White House grounds, a few. acres within the high Iron fence, makes the first item on the. Sundry Civil bill Torses and vehicles, their purchase and maintenance or hire, and the ordinary care, repair, and maintenance of the White House add to this the sum of which, again is to be- expended at the President's discretion. Next comes for fuel for the man- greenhouses, and stables, while the sum of was appropriated tor the maintenance and care of the greenhouses attached to the White House. An addi- tional provides for repairing the greenhouses. Another appropriation .'put solely 'at the President's discretion, and accounted for on his certificate only, is S25.000 for traveling expenses. for A bagatelle of keeps six arc lights burning on the. ;Whlte House grounds The last Item is for printing from the executive office. The expenditure of this last sum depends largely upon the number of special messages written by the President. The items that attract the greatest at- tention in Congress are those .subject 'to the. discretion of the President. They make a total, besides his salary, pi The care of the White House and grounds 'and the purchase of. horses and FRANKLIN BARTLETT ILL Confined to His .Room by art Attack of Jaiindieer-Better ;Yesterday. Through.; tne absence of Franklin and fair to- the defendant. But when. yo.tr calmly and deliberately tell ma and this [ury that you -have willfully and testified in connection with this making mere laughter of our judicial i tern, I must hold you. Certainly, In case, wo have had perjury In the courtroom awaiting the ver were the relatives of the accused man and Barbara Reig. Sheliard talned the same composure he has ehbxiji throughout the trial, and even when thV: jury announced that it could not acd he was sent baclc to tho Street Jail to await another trial, he outwardly unmoved. Before he was frqna the courtroom, his wife mat him Tflssed him, telling him to keep up courage. Ho was then taken' back Jail by the Deputy Sheriffs, who- had charge of him since his trial -I four days ago. Mrs. Shellarfl, the prisoner's mo was deeply affected by the results o trial. She almost collapsed, and be assisted out of the .courtroom. Lee, the mother of Sadie Lee, terly when she saw her daughter 1 to jail after' she was arrested Jury. This was an unexpected. the trial, and neither the nor her mother expected It as In the courtroom awaiting tbe ve the Supreme Court of -walcS" he was interested as counsel yesterday, it was learned that he is seriously 111 at his home, 26 West Twentieth Street. Col. Bartlett has been compelled to keep to his room for the .last six weeks with a sevene attack of jaundice. Inquiries last night showed that while he a very sick man, his condition Improved. somewhat TRIPS OF ASTRAL BODY Woman Says She Visited Wales Three Times, Also Remaining in Si. Louis. Special to The Wra York Tims. ST. LOUIS, Jan. Jordan W. Lambert, wife of millionaire chemi- cal manufacturer, relates one of the most remarkable stories of psychic phenomena ever told. She says she journeyed to Wales from her own home three times to bind up the injured arm of a boy hurt In the slate mines there. She also gave him money for the relief of his needs. This was In United States coin, and the boy .exchanged It at the steamship offices In London for English coin; Tha exchange was proved In London later. All of this time :Mrs. Lambert was In he'r own and she thinks entirely conscious throughout. She herself relates the experience, prefaced by spirit commu- nication between Joa Wentworth, Han- negan's spirit guide, and herself. AUTO RUNS-DOWN Archibald Foss In Car Which Hits Con; necttout Preacher. DARIEN, Conn., Jan. Rev Herbert S. Brown, pastor of the local Con- gregational Church, was run down in this city this afternoon by the motorcar or Archibald C. real estats broker of. New York. The pastor was riding a bicycle at the time. Besides a fractured, skull the pastor received a broken leg and bad bruises. Mr. Foss, who had a friend In the car with him, picked up Mr. Brown anc rushed him to Stamford Hospital in the car. He Is in a critical, condition to- night, Oliver Haglen of 219 West Forty- second Street, New York, the chauffeur was arrested. Mr. Foss give a bond of vehicles, take up at this dis- ftRRESJ MACREYNOLDS AGAIN eretlonary appropriation, the rest Is Tor contingent expenses, wlilch may never arise. .The money, however, is subject at all! times to the Presidents order. Even more, .however, thafc in these formally appropriated amounts the discussion cen- tres in the use made by the President. of the detailed Dolphin, Mayflower, at his command like pleasure yachts. Mrs. Roosevelt is said to have cruised down the Potomac on the Mayflower on a pleasure trip and to have used it for shopping pur- poses on many trips from "Oyster Bay to Friends of the President point out, how- ever that not all of the appropriations mentioned in the bills are payments to the President personally. The official es- tablishment to. is maintained froml this amount. Besides Private Secretary jLoeb, with his salary of 000. and -two ant secretaries, with salaries of each there are about a score of clerks, stenographers, and messengers. Some of these .clerks perform the work of tele- graph op'erators and some attend to the telephoaes connecting the office witti the "The general attitude in the House is. to hold out 'on the proposed increase of the President's salary to long enough to force tbe -Senate to increase the Speak- er's salary. There Is little doubt felt among the House leadeqs that In the end there will be general increases in salary, EA3T COAST OF CXOBXDA, OVer Sea LJmltea from New York t Hearst Agent Charged with. Attempt to Conspire Against Haskeil. Oklahoma, MacReynoldsvthe personal representative of Clarence Shearn of New York, who is defending WHllam R. Hearst In the libel suit brought against the editor by Gov. Haskell, was arrested here to-day To-day's arrest was made on Information received yesterday the Sheriff of Pawnee County, who charged MacReyn- :olds with attempting to conspire with R. L. Lunsford of Cleveland, Oklahoma to procure information defamatory to tha character of Gov. Haskell. Mr. MacReyno'.ds denied absolutely hav- ing offered money to Lunsford, who Is an Oklahoma oil inspector, for evidence against the Governor. MacReynoIds was released on bond. Ao he is to appear in the Guthrie courts en Monday next, when the cause of his firs arrest will be brought up, the   H dpnted to convict his client. Qrane denied the motion, but added that- he would not allow the to convict the prisoner, of murder in., first degree. 'i I see no evidence showing he said. I will leave it to jury to decide if It bo murder In the ond degree or manslaughter in degree." Both Sheliard and' his wife appeareB.- elated over this ruling. Mr. Ridgway then began his final for Shellard's acquittal. He declared that., the prosecution had depended solely upon the circumstantial evidence to convict the defendant, and In this it had failed to show that a crime had been committed You are asked to adjudge a man, guilty against whom there, is nothing but a chain of circumstantial evidence many missing and more broken he said. You can't convict a man oij suspicion, alone." Mr.'Rldgway brought out tho fact that, two physicians had testified that Barbara Reig could have shot herself wltfe two fingers which were not effectea by" the injury which she had reoelvod to her hand early In life. He insisted that ilg who pursued ttwT ner presence it was Barbara Rei prisoner, and referred to her pri on the streets at 1 o'clock In the motiv- ing, and that, too, when, the defendant tl was on his post. He then referred to the testimony of the policemen Jn. the trial and declared ear- casttcally that if. a policeman whan he i was put on the stand remembered all trtuc were the body of Barbara Reig was discovered in the Bhalter houw vi he and If he did not he untruthful. The implication is." continued Itr. Ridgway, "that because he is.a poUtM- 4 man and the other man was a pollcedltn the witness is withholding something and i not doing his duty to the public. Should i. you then convict a man because you think a policeman-witness lo withholding the truth? In fairness you can convict ofl what Is'said, not on .what Is unsaid." Assistant District-Attorney Roy blttcrij> scored the police connected with the ciiee. V From f various circumstances this assumed great he said; "Ifc J Is not the usual one of the People on side ancrthe defendant on the other, but c' of the People on one side and an orgnnlf zation on another. I want here to cept some men on the police this category. Don't think all pollcemS are dishonest and liars. It is not a question of this defenda.it 'i being convicted of killing Barbara BalE. but of the community befog exposed .to a reign of terror from the uniformed men charged with the duty of preventing such J crimes as these. The caso offers .you a. t! grand opportunity tor the performance ot 1 your sworn duty. Men have gone on thu t stand and been sworn.: and as soton fti J their testimony approached the i point 1 where It was to throw light and truth on i the case their memories have been 01 ,1 ple'd by some insidious Men. were at the- shelter house that morninfc who knew the-dead- girl and said they did f> not, and lied In saying so. Isn't! It re- j markable that such a condition of affaiti J should i j Justice Crane began his charge after 2 o'clock, and1, the jury-retires stS o'clock to consider a verdict. became evident at 6 o'clock that a vcrdrct j could not be reached, Justice Crane riUa. m th at he would return in three-quarters flf an hour, during which time tho JurOl' could be serx-ed with dinner. At THJS SEABOARD FE.OBIDA LIMITED. All Pullmans, electric lighted, compartmen and standard sleepers, club and observation elf -to Jacksonville. St. Augustine. Palm .Bcasfc, Mi4mt, KniBhta Key. Quickest train via short- eat Pa. R. R. or Adv. o'clock the jury filed Into the courtroom and informed Justice Crane that -taty i could not come to a' conclusion. He tow them to adjourn to the juryroojn. uno make another attempt. At o'clock the jury filed into court room, and after the foreman an- nounced that a verdict could not reached Justice Crane discharged -them and remanded Shellard back to Raymond Street Jail. -As far as could be learnw the jury took two ballots, and each the result was 6 to 6. Peter' B, Hanson, who was conm with James W. Ridgway In Sheliard, announced, after the motion would be made in a tho prisoner relj i C'jr fL   

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