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New York Times: Wednesday, December 11, 1907 - Page 1

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   New York Times (Newspaper) - December 11, 1907, New York, New York                                 .»d  V  rr*  **АЯ theftews Tttìt^s Fît to Print"  .У№. LTn..Jfa 18,2U.  • * •  NEW tobe; WEDNBSDAT, E0$0E11EÍ№ ’ n, 1Ш.—JEOmSlÉi, PAC^SE.  Л  ONE CENT  BOffiNCE ВШ WA1LST.FEBRÏB0ÂT  Fall River Liner Hite the Ba№e When Going Up tiie. East* Mver in a Fog.  FASSENGER8 IN A PANIC  3  fi^omen and Chtlcfran Trampled On on Ferryboat—Woman and Man Jump Into thn River, but Are Saved.  The steamboat Frovidanoe of the БШ1 $Uver Line,    up    the Bast River In  n dense tog fust after 0 o’clock last night, crashed bow on into the side of the fer* Yyboat Baltio of the Wall Street Perry Bne, causing a panio aboard the ferry* boat and leaving« large bole in her port aide. Part of the ferryboat’s cabin was also carried away. The ferryboat’s pas-eengers. ntnnbering about вОО, fled to the atern eabine seized life preservers, and fought their way back to the decks.  ' In the generaP-scramble for life f>re-tervers women and children were kno<^ed down and trampled on by excited men Kany of the women fainted. One Jumped cverboard. but was rescued by a negro,  Sho dived Into the river after her. While lie couple struggled in the water a man fell overboard, but he, too, was rescued. bThere were reports that two of the fеггут beat’s passengers were drowned, but these teports could not bo verified last night.  With 430 passengers on board the Prov-Mence left her pier at the foot of War-ten Street, North River, at 5 o’clock. As the rounded the Battery and started up the East River a heavy fog was settUng ever the Lower Bay. The fog overtook ^e steamboat a minute Ikter, and Capt. Oeorge Chase, who was in the pilot bouse, says he sounded hla Yog sisals gt frequent intenrala  The ferryboat Baltic with Capt. John W. Baulsir at the wheel left her slip at the foot of Wall Street soon after 5 •’clock on her way to the foot of Montague Street in Brooklj^Q- In leaving the •Up he blew a long whistle, and sounded a fog sUpial. and the ferryboat was about two lengths from the New York shore when the Captain saw the white light|i of the steamboat approaching on his starboard bow. He stoi>ped and reversed his •ngines,: and the Captain of the Providence, did the same thing. The boats came together with a crash, and amid the  HEAVY GALI OFF THE HOOK.  Incoming Vessels Battle with Worst Bouthoastsr In Years.  the  All Ituxmilng steamers yastwdsy report« ed heavy weather outside BaadF Book. Coasting skipi>ers and pilots said this had been the worst southeast gale thqy had experienoed for the last twenty years. Tugs were sighted yesterday from Sandy Book towing dismasted sailtng vesrels Into safe^.  One of the fruit steamars from the West Indies rolled so heavily that her hatehes were under watesf' and'her eargo of hsr nanas nearly cafMdsed. lYie Captain said that another trip Шее that’ would make him bowlegged and cause him to oon-traet St. Vitus’s danea  The British steamer Puritan, from Co-y lombo, battled with the storm all day on Monday, when the water came over the side in such volumes that the Captain, on the upper , toidge, had his sea-boots filled by each sea, and Benbow, the ship’s cai was washed out of the galley, in cqmpany with the cook and a oopper of scalding her pea soup. What the cook said nearly stopped the action of the sea for a few'seconda The storm signais were flying at Sandy Hook all day. warning small craft not to put to sea. The (lovemment Weather Bureau reported the atom raging as far as Cape Race.  The powerful White Star liner Oceanic, which seldom falls to make this port on Wednesday, will not be in until to-morrow morning, ifFhile the Ryndam of the HoUand-AmeriCE Line, from Amsterdam, due last Sunday, will not arrive until this momfug.  The force of the gale was felt so severely at the Quarantine Station that a two-masted schooner dragged her an* ch<M*s and nearly got Into collision with the steamer Erika, JuM arrived from Lisbon.  In 'View of the prospects of a continuance of easterly gales. Captains of steamers are refusing to ship men who are  afflicted with whiskers, as it makes such a difference in going against tlm wind.  YOUNG NEW YOBKER IN PERIL.  Arrested In Brazil with Fiybusterg, Ho*g Under Sentence of Death.  ВШЕ COLLffîBS, ШтаИЕНВЕОМ  Half-Completed etructufar Òver Susquehanna Carried Down by Flood Water.  36 MEN IN RACING RIVER  Water Rose a Foot an Hour After a Bteady Rain—Mllle Were Foroad to Sutpond Operetione. ^  ^ It was deflhltely learned yesterday that at Jeast one more of the filibustering party arrested last week at Minas Qeraes, Brazil, by the Oovemment officials and sentenced to be shot is a New Yorker. He is Samuel Parker, 22 years old, of 150 East Thirty-ninth Street. He left home Nov. 5. saying that he was going to Brazil on a mining expedition. Re talked  •creeching of the alarm whistles of the boats couid be heard 11^ cries of the women and children on the ferryboat.  Decic Hauds Gave WamUag.  The three deck hands on the ferryboat irave the alarm half a minute before the crash came, and they hurried the pasaen-gera from the forward, end of the wo-•l^’s cabin la time p» SMre a hundred or snore m>SB.belng crittlied te death. It eras then that  passengers on the ferryboat believed the boat was sinking, and the noise made by the bow of the steamboat crushing its Isay into the ferryboat’s cal^ added to their alarm. A score of men climbed the gtationary ladders to the roofs of cabins or hurricane decx, and dung on to the Steel stays of the smokestack. Others made their way to the pilot house and begged the Captain to lower lifeboats. Some ran to the engine room.  Tcira to Che Rescae.  From the neighboring slips and from all directions came tugs, big and little, ferryboats, and launches. It was With much difficulty that they got close to the Baltic and Providence, for the fog had thickened until hai*bor lights were giracticaliy useless.  A tug which came alongside the fengr; boat made fast to the Baltic and took off a hundred or more passengers, who were landed at Pier 19, North River. In the meantime more than two hundred women and children who had managed to climb the ladders to the decks of the Prevldence, were taken from the steamboat by a Baltimore and Ohio R. R. tug, which landed them at the Atlantic Avenue ferry yards In Brooklyn.  It was immediately after the ferryboat’s ladders were raised to the decks of the steamboat that the woman Jumped overboard. She made an attempt to get on one of the ladders, but was pushed jMlde by a man who seemed to know her. She called him a coward and then  very little of the project to hla faxzdly, and did not mention any of the other members of the party.  Young Parker was said to bo steady and hard-working. He had a good place with William L. Perrin, an insurance broker of 45 Cedar Street. His older brother, George said lakf night that although the My talked Uttle to his famOy of his intended trip he di<l^ not ^ b^evo that he know that he was going on an unlawful yofttmv. '"The boy was IntrtUgent and honest. He was not reoldSM or tool* l 'cannot betiem Ybnt lie’  could be induced to go into a thing of this kind knowingly,” said Mr. Parker.  Mrs. Parker, the boy’s mother, has not yet been told of his psedicameot, and thln^ that he te probsbiyj^tOflPdfiair t& Bra^l. ’    ,  LONGWORTH SIDETRACKED.  Special to T%9 New York Timet, HARRISBURG, Doc. 10.—A half pom-pleied bridge which was being built by the; State across the north branch of the Susquehanna River in the eastern part of Columbia County collapsed at 5 o’clock this afternoon and fell into the raging waters, carrying with It thirty-six workmen. Of these twenty-five reached shore In safety by ecrambUng across the détnis. The remaining eleven were drowned. Four bodies were taken from the swollen river, but* seven have not jot been found.  The bridge was being oonstructed by The Tork Brilge Company of Yorii, Penn. The contract for it was 1st a oouple of years ago. The substructure waa entirely finished, and the flooring of the eupqnitnioture had been completed half way aerose the nver.  The accident was due to high watm Several Inches of enow feU over a eon-siderabte area of the watershed a ago, imarly all of which ’wae yet lying upon the ground when a steady tiria set In Sunday. The temperature rose and the ! rains continued, with the result that the North Branch rose at the rate of a footman hour this afternoon at Berwick, near where the bridge was being built^Aan almost unprecedented rise.  Thè flood ’«rater undermined the piers and èroakened them unUl they oould no longer withstand the pressure;  Thd Columbia and Montour Electrle Railway Company had a right of way facross tho viaduct, but had not yet laid any tracks. E. R. Sponsler of this city. President of the Electric Railway Company, received a message in this city to-night stating that tho workingmen noticed the bridge weakening, and at once took steps to strengthen it; ten minutes more would have be^ sufficient to save the etructure, but the water rose so rapidly that the fridge went down.  PJEHLADBLPHIA, Penn., Dec. l€i—Loss of life and great damage to property is reported from central and eastern points in the State by floods caused by the heavy rains of the last few days.  T^ Delaware, Susquehanna, and Schuylkill lUvers are rtsliig rapidly, and emaU streams throughout the coal legione have overflowed ^ their banka flooding  on  to the edge bf the deck, where a big ole had been cut by the collision, and  Jumped Into the river.' A negro who stood near Jumped oyer the rail and a minute  later was heard calling for help. A dozen Of the men passengers went to the negro’s assistance, throwing him the end of a vope and l<fwerlng a ladder over the side  of the crippled boat as they held lanterns to light the work of rescue.  Cannon Gives Place He Detired Waye and Meant to Kei^r.  Special to The New York Timet, WASHINGTON, Dec. lO.-Gen. J. Warren Keifer will represent Ohio- on the Ways and Means Committee of the House, succeeding Gen. Grosvenor.  ^ Representative Longworth, the President’s son-in,law, will succeed Gen. Keifer on the Appropriation Committee. Thus Speaker Cannon glides quietly out of an embarrassing situation which developed from the ambition of the President’s eon-In-law to become a member of the Ways and Means Committee. An Intimation was made’ to the Ohio delegation that the Speaker was Inclined to oompliment tho President by giving the place to Mr. Longworth, but the suggestion stirred up. a revolt among^ the Ohio men which has been giving Uncle Joe oonslderable womment.  Finally it occurred to the Speaker that  The negro bobbed up holding the woman Tinder the arms. Both were dragged up I after the n^o had fastened a line about 'the woman’s waist. A man who said he was a physician living on Brooklyn Heights, cared for the woman and' hired « cab to take her home when the ferryboat was later sent to the AtlanUc Avenue ferry slip. The woman refused to teve her name oy address.^ She said that The excitement had driven her mad for tho being, and that she did not know fTrhat she was doing when she Jumped ■Qto the river.  r It was while she was being rescued that man fell overboard. He was trying to climb one of the ladders to the deck ‘•f the Providence. A dozen life preserv-•rs were thrown to him when he went ¡•verboard. Seizing one of them, he managed to keep afloat until a line was thrown to him and he was hauled on deck. The collision occurred at 5:20 o’clock, fut it was almost 8 o’clock whAn non*  , .    .    ^almost 8 o’clock when Capt.  lulslr of the ferryboat Reported to Capt.  s^mboat that tho ferry-al s hull had not been penetratiMl. nant.  Baulsir said that he would be able to kwp her afloat wmio being towed to the ^dlMtic J^ib- Then with several tug-  boats MlUng the Baltic and half a dozen caring for the Provldenca, the ships were separated and towed away, tho Baltio  sparatea anq towed away. _    _  going to Brooklyn, where she landed the  zecit of_her passengers.  idence was towed back to her  bier at the foot of Warren Street ^Jority of the passeagei dence declared that tnei  The Prov    ^    ________  The  rers on the Pro-vl-    ______ Jiey knew nothing  about tho collision until they saw the torrybom’s passengers scrambling aboard the Sound boat The Providence was held at her pier until about 9 o’clock while a ogreful Jnspectlon was made of her hull. Tbs gfftoers of the Fall River Line re-cortod that she was undamaged, and ahe loft on her trip for Fall l^ver.  Capt Chase of the Prdvidence made a statement to the effect that he did not ses^the torry^t untU he hit her. Ba said the Providence was going under re-  Gen. Keifer is an ex-Speaker of the House. Be then mcplalned to the Ohio delegation and the President’s son-in-law that in recognition of previous services Oon. Keifer should have the prize. This left a place open for the President’s son-in-law on the Appropriation Committee. It is not as desirable as the Ways and Means appointment, but it is a substantial advancement for Mr. Longworth.  mlnss, causing cave-lns, and doing great 4amags ts nilUoad aa4 otfaur (woparcy.  At Rttdaea, a anmog town a short dlstaaco from WlUcasbarre. thq súrtaos ovv an abandoned mino of the Dslawa» and Pine Brook ColUary began to oavs in and, irater rushed into tho workings tn torrents. Operations in another seotSoft ot the mine were su^Mnded. and tisarlT 300 men and boys were hurried out ot tbs minea  The settling of the ground ooeurred along the line of the Delaware & Hudson and New Jersey Central Railroads, and 200 men were put to work changing the stream In order to psotect  of  GOLOPtELORHHÎÔTER KILLED  Edttor-nviio AdvoeatMl HI*'P.lna Run Out S flMl HhA  оошпяых Sc    и    Bw  toa il«s Shot Éiid kl^ to«diqr gt 1^^  S. BoltçM ВШс, eativ Aw j^pHotmr of Tbs Wmtmm Horada H^ir. /Baak ptinua Itt Ш    an    mmaé .áeeortíok  &at    ba4    been    fun o# tbo  town o( ВаягШёо by a штШзт лай oowisenin# th* bamo to’oatbwnt by tho mtlseas of 1ШЯ. Bqvtofi tboit Bttek io task aad la tbo g or was killed  gttaml laiRsiab fliolbfia«  FUNSTOir FOR áOLDFIELiL  Trouble ExfMMtod TbtifMbqr When «be MtoeeiReoiinie  BAit VRÂItCmCO, X>ML    FOll-  ston salá to-alKkt timi bo woatíá leave t^ morrow iirlth tg» or tines staff offioers tor Oeldftsld to liMe orsrfbssttuátioa. Ш ■aid bo was BOI going to take eofbmaad of tho troops tbsie. Hsttbsr will be order additional troops to tbs m&big rsgtons.  BOSTON BEFDBUGÁN BY mSST TOTES  Postnfiagter HHbbard Is Elected Mayor Over Fitzgerald by ' >№out 2,000.  LEAGUER* POLLS 18371  Ctty Qomt etrongly for ths Sale of  Liquori Rspabllcaas Win in  Locai School Rght.  PARUAMENT BUILDING^ BURN  New Zealand Loses Library Which Contained Many Valuable Books.  WBLLINaTON, New Zesiaad, Dea 10. -/The Parliament BuUdlngs, tho library which oontained a large aad valuable osBeetton of books, were destroyed by firs to-day.  ATTACK PORTUGAL’S KING.  Spedai to fkoF/m York fkm*.  OOLDFIELD. Deo. xa-^Oov. Zoba ^Muks arrived te*dày. AflÉr holding SB-tended ooaferesoss with tho miao owaera sad with CoL Alfred RsyasMs, ho gave out the statement tnat he gKpected troobio Thursday, when tbs miaeeand mills irimid be reopened ’with striktbcéaksrs.  The mine owners assert that they are fully prepared to tbs sdnss Thursday morning, whllo ths otflalals of the Miners* union seoff at saeb sssertlons. The union offlelels refuse to divulge their plans.  Oov. Sparks arrived biro at noon from Carson City. He dentei fbat an effort  bas been made to ladaes Ыт to ask for tho rsoan of tho ttoops, and stys they will remain here unttt фюо Is no furcber possibility of troubla  LEAN CHRISTMAS IN WALL ST.  Nevertheless ths Little Exehange'a Collection Fromlsee Well.  ;Chri8tmas anumg the brokerage houses in the finanoial distrlet thds season is expected to be even' a leaner year In  the matter of bomisee to employee than laat, which feU far below tits fat timea of 1004 and 190S.  For all that, however, the committee on the ConeoUdated ExOfaai^ which has In charge the matter of collecting the annual gratuity for employee haa been receiving more liberal returns than were generally expected. Since tee Bkohange  moved into Its new buUdtofc at ths oor-r er of Broad and Beaver Streets, the members have pcyMgwred.  The committee in charge of the Christmas fund allowed the news to get out yesterdajr that the psospeots point to btfger eolleotton than last year, when 18.^ was distritnited smong the em-  ployes of the SmiSuuige.  WESTON TO USH HIS AGENT.  etort. fw-Nmt V«rk АЦм-PMtwi, W6. AtUelMd BMíOlfÍM, '  ^    -----------------to ptot  the railroads and prevent the flooding the mines.  The Tmter is reported high In the mines at Hazleton, and at Jeansville the town  »* •  1« overflowed  at Sranton, and much damage has been jmlley from Carbondale T?«i?    Trains    on    the    Erie and  Delaware & Hudson Railroads north of Carbondale were abandoned for the day because of washouts.  At Mayfield the river has broken Its hanks and Is cutting a new channel through the low lands. So great was the ^nger of flooding that tee Glenwood Mtee <^ased cmeratlons and the men were ordered sut oj the workings  In Scranton two new bridges were badly damaged. The false work was washed  away, permitting the structures  washed’away"‘at ВШ^ with a locomotive on it. and a «iflm  at Chinchilla gave way.  Fishing Creek in Columbia County overflowed its banks, and fifteen bridges belonging to the Pennsylvania Lumber Com-  pany at Jamieson City were washed away, together with several hundred thousand  feet of lumber. The wdrks of the Union Tanning Company are flooded, and the  washed awayT*'    danger of being  THE MINNESOTA FOG-BOUND.  _ Jing U1  duced iq;>eed, and^ was soundixtg her fog eignalt when the ferryboat iSomed up  ahfad. He.Med to veer off, but It was too late, he eald.  Oii^ aaulslr of tee Baltic eald he was Botln^auy way to,Wame In tea matter, as iajimwic to th# ferryboat would show.  te# ferryi  ’ard part ot the fMTyboat’s been swept away, together and there  ^    erryboat’s    side  trwenty-fhre feet wide at the base of the «nide a^ranninf te a Mint in the side w ner hull twenty feet trom her guard  port ttfib. SiTj wite the hood of  s^ak Ç. Dtmttexbock of Highland Ave-Тошьпу. Vrho had been a paàigènger m Ы Pruvfiie&oe,jgot off the steamboat  Big Battleship It Foroad to yknchor Outaida of Virginia Capes.  Special to The New York Times.  NORFOLK, Dec. ld.--Tfae battleship Minnesota, one of the largest of thè fleet ot sixteen which will start next Monday for San Francisco, lay off Cape Henry all of to-day. She Is the last of the sizteen battleships to arrive near the rradesvous.  . There was a thick fog off the coast all day, and the wireless station at Cape Henry received word late this afternoon teat the Minnesota would not attempt to come in until to-morrow .morning,'when she will take her position with the other vassels.  The southwest storm of this morning kicked up a nasty sea, but the vessels were little affected. The weather Interfered, however, with the day’s exerciser and coating tee Illinois, tha Virginia,' and the Rhode Island difficult.  The Kentucky arrived at the anchorage this afternoon and saluted the flagship of Admiral Evana, the Conneotlctit ^^The transport ISumner arrived also to-day, with stores and ammunition for the fleet  Capt Murdock, commanding the battleship Rhode Island, was summoned to New York by the illness of his wife» who is sala to be ln*a very, serious condition. She is suffering from pneumonia. The offieers aboard the Rhode island are afraid It -will be neeoMMury for Capt Btur-dock to seek relief and that a new commander for the vessel will have to be appointed at ths elevsnth hour.  DELAWARE BOOMS GRAY.  Democratic State Committee indoroos Him for teo Pregldgnc^«  DOVER, DeL, Dee. la-The Démocratie state Committee to-day passed a resolution Indorsing Judge Geotge Gray for the Prisidenoy,  Bryan men will npke an active eàœ-  WILKESBARRB, Penn., Dec. la-A continued fall of rain throughout the Wyoming Valley for the past two days has caused the water In tee Susquehanna  River to rise nearly a foot an hour slnoe noon to-day. _ The situation to-night  is  alarming on the west bank of the river, тае fttoet car traffic between here and Nantlcoke was pra^oally cut off tor Some hours to-day, due to ths overfow of creeks outside of this City.  Silk mills and other plimts in ti^ south-  ' forced* to  em part Of the town pentd operations.  rere  8U8-  on the low lands, many housai were  Southwest of this city, Воой»  ed, in scerai instances the 'water almost " “ *    rthe  reaching the first floors of many огЖет.  FATHER HORRIGAN DEAD.  t  Benedictine Priest Expires at Homo ef Mother in Orange, N. J.  Special to The New York Time», ORANGE, N. J., Deo. lO.-The Rev. Father Michael Antoninus HOfTigan, a men^ her ot the Bi^nedictine priesthood, dlM last night at the home of his mother, Mra Catherine Horrlgan, 28 Central Plaqe« He had been at the head of the Benedictine Order la Hansfts City, and sustained a stroke of paralysis there about a montl^ ago.  He had a premonition that another attack would come soon and that he would  not survive, 80 JUS soon as he was able to travel he came Bast to spend his last days with bis mother.  Father Horrigan was bom in Ireland fifty years ago, and caixie to this country with his parents when he was 10 years old He was^educated in St. John’s Faro-chJal School. Orange, and thm went to St Benedict’s College, in Newark. He d tor the pri  was educated  _ __________ _    -    -___ priesthood at the  benedictine College of St Joseph, in Ohio,  took up his priestly work in the West The body wllf lie in state in St Antoninus’s phuroh, In Newark,.to-morrtfjr bight, and the m^ of requiem will be sung there on Thursday morning. The body will be interred in a plot espeolally mit aside for priests of his order.  Taft Ballg from Plymouth.  PLYMOUTH, Dec. Id-The ____  President Grant with Secretary Taft and  tlM members < of his party on board left here at 8:10 o^lock this morping for New York.  .......:    V    ’    ,    -  cmeÁ  BOGHfON, Dec. 10.—In the closest and hardest fought elsction contest which Poston has known tor many years, the qlte went Republican to<»day "by about AOOO votes, Postmaster George A. Hlb-bssd, Rspabliean, defeating Mayor John F. Fltzgmld, Democrat who was a candidate tor re-election. The revised returns  •how the foilowlfig vote cast for the M&y onitf таШлШ:  Jten Jl Conlthurst (Zndependenoe Leagee,) Iftm; Pltsgerald SdOMj Hib-baxd 98/m,  7be“«lly voted to license the sale of liquor by a large majority, somewhat smaller than In previous years, however.  due to a hard oampaign on the part of the clergy and others in an endeavor to keep the saloons out of the suburbs.  Two features contributed notably to the Tetum of f^R^ublican Mayor after six years of Democtetlo administration, one belpg the heavy vote given the Independence League candidate hy Dea^ocreta, and the other the thorough investigation made by a finance commission into the affairs at ths CSty HalF'lQ which evidence has bem brought forth alleging irregulartties In the pnrehasing department and in the grahtlng of contracts, through which it was asserted teat tee city had tost hundreds of thousands of dollars.  Whils the Ind^tondenoe League vote proved sufficient to transfer the power from <me of the leading parties to the other, it did not, however, come anywhere near the strength expected by those who based'their estinsates on tho vote in the recent State campaign, when the League polled a vote larger than the Democratic l^arty»  Conlthurst who was formerly Secretary of the Gemooratlo State Committee, extremely popular among tee younger Democracy, and it was from this source that he drew much of his strength and oontri|l>uted to tee defeat Of Fitzgerald.  campaign, was strenuous throughout Mayor - Fitzgerald delivering several hundred ipsechss in every, port of the «fty» and oniy closing his labors at a late hour last night Postmaster Hfhbord and Mr* Cootthuset'^srs hardly lete active, and addieeted tep lOteri day sj^night in  Numeroug Speaker» Talk Agatnat Him -^-Refoirm of House of Peers.  LISBON, Deo.    disposition to at*  tack the King -was the most noticeable feature of the speeches niade at numerous weil-attended political meetings htid here to-night in connection with the politioa elections.  Rnmots are current that the new Deputies win have constituent power» to remodel the House of Peers.  A SECOND SIMPLON TUNNEL  Bwltzertand Determines to Duplicate the Great Railroad Work.  \ BERNE, Switzerland, Dec. lO.-The State Council has approved a plan for the immediate constructloti of a second Simplon ttmnel by the administration of Ihe Federal railroada  The first Simplon' tunnel was opened May 19, 1906. It Is twelve and a quarter miles long, the Swiss temiinus being at Brieg, in the Rhone Valley, and the Ital ian terminus at Iselle. Its cost is estimated at 114,000.000.    \  SHOT FOR A RABBIT.  Son of a Connecticut Man Dpes Not Discriminate.  WINSTED, Conn.; Dec. lO.-C. H. Daniels of Southington, after running a rah bit into a wall yesterday, handed his gipi to his 12-year-old son, with Instructions to " shoot if he comes out."  The father pulled the rabbit out of tho hole, and it made a break tor liberty, whereupon the excited son pulled the trigger, shooting his father in the hand. The rabbit was not injured.  ’POSSUM FOR WHITE HOUSE.  Mrs. Longetreet le Now Fattening . on a Persimmon Diet.  It  , Dec. Id.—Edward Payson    itiuiigiy    Demoetatie^    wRh    the    Al-  Westfm, the pedestrian, who recently com pitesd the walk frosa Portland, Me., to this city, started east to-<|ay Fite tha avowed purpose" of horsewhlpplhg Dana  R. Patten, hie former advance agent.  "I’H lash his face,’’ declared the old BBsn. "I’ll whip him in Broadway, and Pm taking along enough money to pay my fine.  Weston will lecture In Buffalo Saturday night, and will be In New York next Tuea-day. Weston's grtevanoe against Patten is the action of the latter in trying to tie up all the money the aged pedestrian had earned in bis long walk across the country. The old man finished his walk praotioally " broke," and Patten’s action  added mwOi lo bis embarrasarnent.  Wckton received |400 here yssterday as the proceeds of a benefit given him at the Goniok Theatre Sunday afternoon.  $КШЮ DAMAGES FOR A LEG.  Another Jury Thinks л Death Worth Only 9800.  Damages amounting b 110,000 were considered adequate by the Jury in the 8u preme Court presided over by Justice 0*0orman yesterday In the case of Arthur dementa, a ton-year-<dd boy, against the New York Xnterborough Rapid Transit Company. The boy was run ove^ by one of the cars of tee defendant SepL 21, 1906, and lost his leg, and claimed tiiat the aootoent was due to negUgence-on the part of the motorman.  A Jury in Justice Qiegerich’s part of the Supreme Court satd that $800 was a  fair amount for John Murphy, a wealthy grqcer of  this city, with a country home at tttirogg's Neck, to pay John Sheehan, a bricklayer, for the oeath of the ust-  FORTUNE FOR BOY CRIPPLE  Porttgnd Millionaire to Make DlAnher> ited Boife Child His Heir.  Special to The New York Timee. »BUR<  PITTSBURG, Deo, 10.—Arthur Hepburn, aged 7. and minus a leg, which he loat under a street ear, will be a mUUonatre aome day. Several days ago the Pitta->urg police received a letter from W. W. Sepbum, a millionaire Tumbmnan of Portland, Oregon, in which he aaked them to locate Arthur, hla grandson. Re told the poitoe that ten yean ago hla only son. W. W. Hepburn, Jr., had eloped with a young woman andv had been dSainfaeilt-ed. Since then, Hepburn said, he had learned that his son had daserted bis wife aod teW eon, that the    had  bean injured in an accident, and that, as he had relent^ he wanted to care for  To-day tne ponoe fo  years ago Mrs. Hep' in a department store.  Hepburn and Arthur at dOOOaMand Avenue. Since her husband dteerted her three epburn has be  Elisabeth  been clerkb The elder Hep-s  bum is expected here to take charge of them, and Indicated to tee police that he  would make the boy his hèir. The wherp-abottts of tee lad’s father is unknown.  FINDS $ЗШ) IN «ROUND.  Teakettle Full of $20 Gold Pioeee on g OoYineotlout Farm.  NEW MHJPORD.Vtonn., Deo. la-Three thoniand dollars In . twenty-doUar gold pieces were dug up yesterday by T. J. Jonea, on his farm in the Mszrkll district while he «raa digging a trench.  Mr.. Jonee was tormsriy a New York husinMs man, and about a year ago bought the farm from Edgar Feet Tne goi^wma in a tea l^Ue, wmoh.Mr. Jonea Itatep had evkleiW been hTtee grOund  йятлш Board nmre cloaely divided.  The eootest for two placea on the School Ooautttttee aroused almost, as much inter-  est as the .Mayoralty fight 4t being main-talned<tlMt. an endeavor was beidg made to force thOsSohoQl .Committee into p<^ tics. The aarly returns pointed to the rieetioo of both Repnblioan candidates for the School Committee-James B. Ma-gania and Dr. D. D. SchanneL  WORCESTER IS TO BE DRY.  Repuolicaiig Elect Mayor and Eight of the Eleven Aldermen.  WORCESTER. Mass., Deci 10.-0n the heaviest vote ever polled at an election in Worcester, the Republicans swept the city, eleottog the Mayor, el^t of eleven Aldermen, Including the Alderman at larga and will have twenty-one Repub-Uoaaa and nine Democrats members of the of^ oouncil. The vote:  Jgmes Logan, (Rep.,) 11.022; John T. Duggan, (Dem.,) 9.840; Eliot White, (Boo.,) 2,041k  Worcester votes no license for the first tfmo in rixteen years. The majority for Ucsnse last year was 1,067. This year for no Boense it Is 962.  CHZCOPEB. MosSm Deo. 10,—Dr. J. O. Beau<teamp was elected Mayor to-day. running on Republloan nomination papers in a tour-oomered contest Dr. Beau-  champ's plurallty«wae iso in a total of  vote of 2,706. Dr. Beauchamp^teoeived 927 vote»; John P. Kirby, Democrat, 797; Will-iam J. Fuller, regular Republican nominee, 628, and Alderman John J. Kelley, Socialist 44&  The license vote stood: Yes, 1,4T0; no. 962.  LYNN, Masa, Deo. lO.-As a result of fa active no-license oampaign carried on jy the cieigyfflen of all denominations and hy tsmperanoe people generally, the olty deolared against the sale of liquor In the eleotlon voted tor lioense for eleven years, city has voted for license for eleven years, last year by 1,977 majority« Thomas F. porter, R^ubllean, 'was elected Mayor.  TWO REPUBLICAN MAYORS.  Victories in Elections in Portsmouth and Keene, N. H.  CONCORD, N. H., Deo. 10.—Two city oleotions were held In New Hampshire to-day. in Portsmouth Mayor Wallaoe Baoknt (Rep.) defeated Samuel W. Emery, Jr., L170 to 8(0. The entire Coun cii is Republican. .  Martin V. B. Clark (Rep.) was reelected Mayor of Keene over Albert E. Fish (Dem.) by 886 majority. The Olty Qovennnent is RepubUoan*  Special to The New York Timee. GAINESVILLE, Ga., Dec. 10.—A fat Georgia ’possum is to. be a part of the Christmas cheer at the White House. It -was caught some days ago, and Is being fed on persimmons Mrs. Helen Long-street. Post MIsteess of Gainesville. The ’possum is a big fellow, and the persimmon diet is adding fat at great rata Mra Longstreet is the widow ot Confederate Gen. Longstreet.  SPECIAL TRAIN FOR QUAIL  William Procter Speeds to Reach Hunt  ing Ground on TInie.  ; Spedfd to Th» Nm Yi  fheto ^ hoiuòa^p'gtoti^^ near Boravlllei, Tenn., oft tkae they'hsR planned, William ih-octer, the soap manufacturer olf Clnclzmati, accompanied by Mr. King, caused a qxicial engine and car to be made Up on the Southern to-day and hurried to the spot. They missed connection, having been delayed from Cincinnati here.  The sudden chsnge In high temperature to freezii^ and reports of abundance of quail induced them to pay the big expense,  SANTA FE SHIFTS COURTS.  Transfers Cases from State to Federal to Evade Legislation.  Special to The New York Timee, " GUTHRIE, Okla., Dec. 10.—John Deve-reaux, as special counsel for the Atchison, Topeka St Santa Fe Railroad, to-day transferred seventeen cases in which the Santa Fe is a party from the State to the Federal Courts, thus anticipating the passage of a bill by tee State Leerislature annulling the charter of any foreign corporation that 80 transfers a case.  Bight of the cases transferred by Dev-ereaux were In the Key County Court at Newkirk and nine in the Noble County Ctoiirt at'Perry. It is understood the Santa Fe will quickly as possible transfer all its oases in tee State.  SUICIDE FOR COLD SUPPER.  Husband of Two Months Dives Down Dumbwaiter Shaft After a Quarrel.  After quarreling with his wife because she did not keep his supper warm till his return home at 8 o'clock last night, Jacob Victor of 377 Hamburg Avenue, Williamsburg, committed suicide by di-ring down the dumbwaiter shaft from the fifth floor of his home.  The Victors had been married only two months, and it was their first quarrel, according to Mrs. Victor, ‘who Was prostrated J>y her young husband’s act.  FOUND JAPANESE SPYING.  /  ONE ИОВЕ SUNDAY UNDER BLUE Щ  Aldermen Postpone' EnactitiZré Compromise Plan Until NexL Week's Meeting. -.f  THE VOTE STANDS 35 TO 36  New Ordinance Fermlte Concerto, gn9 Poeeibty One>Act Fiaye, but |g Btffl' Stringent—An Alderman PunebedL  New York Is to have at least one blue Sunday. The Board of Aldermsci wa decided, in effeot, yesterday by a vote of 85 to 34. If BO many Tammany men hadn’t been absent from the meetin#  Alderman Reginald DouU’i ordinance bet* mittlng a more liberal Sunday tban tha last would have passed. But New Yori| won’t have more than one Taarw^twfiif blue Sunday unless all signs faA*  Not in years has the Aldermanio Chem^ ber been so crowds The Aldermanio Laws Committee^ kb-which was referred the liberalizing ordi-nance, will hold a public hearing at the Hall Friday morning at 11 o’dodk, when all sides -will be heard op the mattef of the Sunday law.  The theatrical and opera bouas maa-agers, who had been opening their dooM on Sunday, will hold another xneeting at' the Hotel Astor to-morrow afternoon at F o’clock. Last week they passed a resdln-tion not to try to open last Sunday. Tomorrow they will probably pass a similar resolution relating to nqxt Sunday. 7%» several lawydrs for these toterests ¿d*. mitted last night that they were surprised by the failure of the Alderman tO relieve the situation immediately. They said they did not knoW how to get around, the law as laid down in the O’Gorman decision.  Soon after the ordinance was offwed Alderman Meyers, Republican leader, moved that the ordinwce be referred' to the Committee on Laws and lAgislattoll, which was to give a public hearing airil report at next Tuesday’s meeting of the Board. It was on this dilatory move thbi the fight was made.  With a few exceptions the battle resolved itself Into a fight between the ’Tammany Democrats on the one side aad the allied Republicans aad M. O.' L.  on the other. And it *was a stirring  battle. " Little Tim ” Sullivan spoke four or^five times. Ho and his men labored to get a majority. The atmosphere -was thick with oratory.    ^  Board President McGowan had. lo go away to attend a wedding. Alderman  Ctonmllur Noonan, a M. Q. L. man, caxi|4 to -vote -with the Republtoank  in to  ■votef.’  a fist battle about that with an Innkeepec. That, hoareveac, was the only physical encounter actually within the City Hall.  The Doull ordinance offers no relief to moving picture shows, penny arf^ea, nickelodeons, and the ordinary five- and ten cent entertainment housea Thtee number at least 800 to Greater Near York,. and their owners form a large and powerful body of men. The lawyers tor ZLOSt of these interests will meet to-day to decide upon a plan of battle of their own.  The board was due to meet yesterday about noon. Long before that the corridors were filled with representatives of labor unions, clezgymen, press agents, representatives from the German sori^ ties,rand curiosity seekers. The board wOs  called to order at 1:30 o’clock, with President McGowan in the chair. The gallery was packed. The committee room, ad-oining the Aldermanio Chamber, was filled with union men.  A number of communications frcun Christian societies and Individuals were  received, but their reading was postponed. Quiet came when, finally, Alderman Doull, " Little Tim " Sullivan's right-hattd man, got up with his ordinance, which follows:  Teeth .of the Bine Law Drawn.  Be it ordained by the Board of Aldermen ot the City of New York as followi:    ^  Section l.'-^’Xt shall not be lawftU to exhibit so the first day of üie we^ commonly called 8ua-day. to the pubUo, In any building, gmrdeo, grounds, concert room, or other romn or plaot within the <21ty of Now York, tho perfonnaiiM of any tragedy, comedy, opera, ballet, fszea negro minstrelsy, negro or other dancing, wrestling, boxing with or without gloves, sparring oontest. trial of strength, or any part et parts therein, or any circus, equestrian, or dramatic performance or exercise, or any pericna-alco or ozerelas of Jtqrglsrs, acrobat^ riuh performances or ropo danoers. Provtdsd, hosr-; that nothing herMn oontained lAan bs deemed to prohibit at any such place or pIsflMS on tho first day of Che week, commonly coSSd Sunday, saered or educational, vocal or InstrO» mental concerts, lectures, addresses, reettattooa and singing, provided that'sate above-mate tloned entertainments shall bo gl'veii In manner as not to disturb the pubUo  HUGHES SENTIMENT GROWS.  Reme Republlosfi Club Indorsee Him for Njomination*  ROME, N, Y*, Deo. lO.*rAt a meeting of The Rome RepnbUeaa Club last evening a vesdiutlon was unanimously adopted in-  dotsing Gev. Hughes as a oandldate for the Rspnbtioan nomination for the Presi-dtney.  ALBANY, N. Yn Dea;i(l.--Col. Miohael  J. Dady and Barry Rglstoa of Brooklyn salted Oft Gtotc Huglies to-day to pay their rsipeote. Col Dady informed Seoretary Fuller tkai the eenttiaent for <3ov. Hugbes < dr ше l^totÊdmoy aras toereaeing.  Imgestewt дчмА-КШв.  The aoost Woiteat artielo of food la тЦк; uppfy. № itei^s^ttîte.iae^^  ®oeing as a Duck Hunter, the Stranger Sketched Fort Monroe.  special to The New York Timee.  HAMPTON, Va., Dec. lO.-Joseph Daly, 'Treasurer of Phoebus, who owns a house on Phoebus Bay, overlooking Fort Monroe, this morning caught a Japanese sketchily the fort from the river bank. He had noticed a man acting strangely for several days. The Japanese carried a double-barreled shotgun and said he was hunting birds, but as this region is not frequented by quail Daly decided to watch him,  Daly reported the facts to the authorities at the fort The matter has created considerable Interest. It is thought that thb man is here to procure the plan ol Fort Monroe as well as. to observe the ships of the Atlantic Fleet  AMORY WINS LIBEL SUIT.  Supreme Court Awards Him $10,000 Agalnet H. H. Vreeland.  After two previous trials had. resulted to disagnreements, a Jury before BOpreme Court Justloe Xtocliean awarded yest^-day $10,000 to Col. William N. Armory against Herbert Vreeland, former President of the Metropolitan Street Railway Company, as damages for libeL • Amory, who was formerly Secretary of the Third Avenue Railway Company, held tho$ he had been libeled by 'Vreeland, whd to a published article ^ferred to him as a **,notorioiM character," and d that Aftiory haa been engaged In ^ЪЩЫщр statemento in regard to  amount to a serious InterrapUoa of the repose and religious liberty of the oonmnmtty* Asy  рмеоп willfully offending against tire provfslolft  dngly alte  of this section, and svetr parson knowingly i ing In such exhibitions, except as herein ptO-vlded. by advertisements or othttWlsA and every owner or lessee, of any building, past ef a bnllding, grounds, garden, or concert fo<Ha, or other room or place, who shall lease or let out the same for the purpMe of any ante ex* hibiticm or perlormanoe, e:toept as hereto provided, or assent that the same be used for any such purpose, shall be subject to a penalty of $500^ which penalty the OMixiration Counsel of said city is hereby authorized. In the name of the Clty'of New York, to prosecute, sue for, and recover; and on the recovery of a Jutemeot tat the penalty, hereto provided for against any manager, proprietor, owner, or lessee consent-  MetropoUtan Street Railway Com-Fraaklln Bartlett, on. behali og  ing to or causing or allowing, or lettiiig any part of the building for the purpose of any exhibition or performance prohibited by this ordinance. the license white shall have been previously obtained by sute manager, proprietor, owner, or lessee is of itgelf vacated and ah* nulled.  '"’fieotlon Zi This ordinance shall take effeot Immediately.    •    .  Mr. Doull said hs had workM caPefuUjr over the preparation of this ordinances that he had conferred with the Mayor* who had approved of it; with Corpoxatlon Counsel Pendleton, who had said it was legal, and with a Supreme Court Justloe, who had believed that it would stand the fire of the eourts.  He explained that he had not tried to  frame up on ordtoance that would tir give a wide-open Sunday. He didn’t want '~M  that He didn’t believe the board 'wanted It. He^dliellsve, however, teat suck a Sunday, as hod bteft brought about by the O’Ctorman deeislon deprived the pub-, Uo ot legitimate and hmrmless entertainment    "    •    ,    %  Aldeainaa Htrem moved that (hi aaaoa be referred to' the   

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