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New York Times Newspaper Archive: July 2, 1907 - Page 1

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   New York Times, The (Newspaper) - July 2, 1907, New York, New York                                "All the News That's Fit to Print." YOL. LVI...NO. CHICAGO OPERATORS THINKSTRIKE SURE Telegraph Companies Will Not Receive Union Com- mittee. FILL 'FRISCO VACANCIES Strikebreakers at Work In Both Postal and Western Union Offices. Special to The Nito York Ti'ntt. CHICAGO, 111., July most men- acing stage yet reached in the telegraph developed to-day in Chicago. West- ern Union officials flatly r 'used to con- sider the reinstatement, of operator Will- lam Main, who was Discharged last Fri- day as a wire spy of tho union, Sub- nequently preparations actively be- gun for a walkout of union men in the Chicago offices. General Secretary Wesley Russell of the Commercial Telegraphers' Union to-nlffht would not say when a strike order may be expoctod. He said, however, that he prac- tically has abandoned hope of preventing trouble in Chicago. For several honirs he was in communication by wire with Presi- dent Small, In San Francisco, and with tho Executive Board of tho union.in New York. Meanwhile arrangements were made to securs a camp site on the Michi- gan shore. It is proposed to transport strikers thero In the event of trouble. Feeling among the .operators ran J Igh In the afternoon, when it became n that General Superintendent Cook of the West- ern Union had Ignored a union commit- tee delegated to plead Main's ca  found eventually. Ur. Cadwalfider shocked Philadelphia's exclusive society a few years ago by mar- rying his housekeeper, Bridget Mary Bynn. Soon after that episode the Cad- wnladers took up their residence In Lon- don. __________ WILL EXHIBIT "THE BATH." R. C. Hall, Who Has Bought It, Will Let PUtsburg Have, a Look at !t. Special to The New York Times. PITTSBURO. July painting The Bath." by La Toucho, which was rejected by the Carnegie Art Gallery com- though It had won first prlzo in the International Art Exhibit, was to-day removed from the Carnegie Art Gallery by R. C. Hall, the stock broker, who has purchased the painting. Mr. Hall sent it to nn art studio to have It framed. Tho news thnt tho painting wan being removed from the gallery caused excite- ment, and hundreds who had never en- tered the gnllery stood In the street and saw the picture removed to the van. Mr. Hull announced this evening that, owing to tha great interest shown In Tho Bath" by the people of Plttsburg, he would place It on public exhibition In one of the city windows for a week bcforo taking it to his office. _____ MACHINE BEHIND WETMORE. Republican Committee of Rhode Island Indorses Him for Senator, PROVIDENCE, R. I., July a vote Of IS to 0 a meeting of the Republican Stato Committee to-day passed this reso-- httlon: We favor the re-election of George Peabody Wetmore as United States Sena- tor nnd recommend that tho Republicans elected to the next General. Assembly vote for him for that office." .A three-cornered contest among Senator Wetmore and Col. S. P. Colt, Republicans, and Col. R. II. I. Goddnrd, Democrat and Independent Republican, threw jthe last Rhode Island Legislature Into a deadlock and eighty-one ballots woro token without result. Col. Colt ojn June 2O announced his withdrawal from the contest. MAN HUNT IN ADIRONDACKS. Two Policemen Shot and Their Assail- ant Surrounded In Woods. Special to Tkt Ntw York Times. NEWMAN, N. Y., July Surrounded by an armed .posse George Delcour, who late this afternoon shot Frederick Cutler and John Arnold, policemen of this vil- lage, is to-night, hiding in tho thick for- near the village of Blpomlngdale, fifteen miles from this place. Delcour, who was wanted by the offi- cers for reckless driving, was found in a local barber shop. When Cutler attempt- ed to arrest him he drew a revolver and uhot the officer in the breast Just tho heart! In a fusillade that followed Arnold was struck In tho left arm and a bystander in the hand. Delcour reached lils buggy outside and drove away, and later abandoned the vehicle and took to the woods afoot. Leaders of the posse are certain they have their man surrounded, and will wait until mornlngr before closing In upon him. MEXICAN REBEL KIDNAPPED. Believed to Have Been Delivered to Mexico by American DOUGLAS, Arlrona, July Sa- one of the leading spirits In the former St. Louis Junta, known here as Samuel Moret, was arrested yesterday and lodged In Jail at the Instance, It is of the Mexican Government. Late last night an automobile occupied by two Americans was driven to Jail. Tho prisoner, was delivered to thorn and was forcibly placed in the vehicle.. The automobile and Its occupants wero seen a little later passing- through tho streets and several say that the pris- oner was choked Into This was the last seen of the automobile, but there seems little doubt that Satabia was delivered to Mexican officers at SPECIAL TRAIN H.KTURJTING FROM ATLANTIC CITY FOURTH OF To Ycjak vln Pennsylvania Railroad. Leaves Atlantic City 6: JO P. M. July 4. .stop- pliix at Trenton, ElUabeth and Newark. Par- lor cars, dining; car, and For Coolnewi Comfort. The amber depths of a oparkling-highball are delightful jrhen It's Vernon liw no to this -V CASH FOR THIEVES BY SPECIAL TRAIN Marietta Banker Lost Here arid Hurried Home for More. WAS TO BEAT FARO BANK Plttsburg Men Are Said to Have Been Swindled Out of by the Same Scheme. Special to The New York Times. PITTSBURG, July C. Davis, mill- ionaire banker and oil operator of Mari- etta, Ohio, lost In a clever little bunko in New York some time ago, and in Alderjnan Toole'a court to-day he told the story of how he was victimized into not only losing his money, but, after had been dropped, how he char- tered a special train to go back to Mari- etta after more. During the hearing- Davis, who Is a Di- rector in the G'erman National Bank of Marietta, stated that he knew It to be a fact that .many Pittsburgers liave been swindled by the same scheme. He gave It as his opinion that the trio of alleged con- fidence men whom he accuses have cleaned up more thaii In the past two years. Davis told his story at the hearing's of W. J. (Jake) Adams and Frank B. Ranger of Plttsburg and Frank Thompson of New York. These are the men who Davis alleges defrauded him of the. 000. At the conclusion of the hearing Al- derman Toole stated that while he would reserve his decision for a week he -would no doubt dlaJnlss the complaints because of lack of Jurisdiction. Former Mayor W. E. Sykes of Marietta, counsel for Davis, was nrrested at the conclusion of the hearing on a warrant sworn out by Ranger, charging- him with conspiracy to indict. He at once gave bail. l Davis said that" he was first approached by Ranger and John E. Curry of Marietta last September. .They told him that Thompson was the dealer in a faro game In New York, and wanted to. get even with the syndicate which employed him.'! Davis was Induced .to take to New York, and was to play In the same with j the money. Thompson, it was agreed, would deal the cards so that Davis would win SIOO.OOO. After arriving in New York, Davis was taken to the Imperial Hotel, and from there to a house Just off Columbus Ave- nue, three blocks from the Majestic Hotel. The first night Davis lost his the gamblers explained that a mistake had been made, ond on Oct. 20 Davis went against the game again with and lost the m.iney. The next morning- he chartered a train from New York to Marietta and. securing more, hustled back to New York, determined to win .it any cost. Again he lost. Curry, the witness testified, then took pity on him and told him that he was bc-Ing swindled. Unable to get his money buck, Davis sued the trio. When Davis had finished, Curry was placed on the stand R.nd corroborated his testimony. Curry declared that RanRer and Thompson had told him that Davis wne the biggest sucker ever born. CALLS FOR MONEY. Holders of Jamestown Exposition Common Stock Asked to Pay. NORFOLK, Va., July a. meeting of thcj Board of Directors of the James- town Exposition Company to-night it was decided to a call for every dollar due. dn common stock. It is estimated that it will net the company Whan the Exposition company was or- ganized only 28 per cent, of the common stock called for. At that time the fair had n'ot assumed its International scope. The balance due Is 72 per cent, of The resolution adopted provides that ne- gotiable notes can be accepted, 10 per cent, monthly. A commission of twenty Directors was voted to pernonally wait on stockholders. CARNEGIE GIVES College the Beneflclary-r-Two fiew Professorships Coming. Va.. July J. A. Morehead of Hoanoko College, Salem, Va.-, {o-day announced the receipt of a check) for from Andrew Carnegie in fulfillment of his promlso to give that amount to the endowment fund when had been raised. Thi.J addition of has enabled the Trustees to establish two new chairs at the college In which professors will he installed by tho beginning of the next sessloh.______ GIRL SWIMMER NEAR DEATH. College Athlete Saves Miss Wallace In riddle of Lake Hopatcong. ,___ Jennie Wallace, years old, of Jersey] City, who holds a record for swim- ming across Lake Hopatcong, had a nar- row eslcape from drowning yesterday while endeavoring to repeat her performance. She wjas rescued by Raymond Purdy of New York City, a 22-year-old athlete of Georgetown College. Miss' Wallace went into tho lake near Woodport In the afternoon, and when half way across was taken with cramps and thWw up her hands. Her action was noticed by the crowd on shore, nnd young Purdyl put out In a boat. Fearing- that he wouid not be in time, he divpd from the boat, and. catching the bathing blouse of unconscious'woman in his teeth, he swam back to the boat, retrained It, and rowed ashore. Miss! Wallace soon recovered. Pur, record of hfivlngr savrd four persons has a in the lake last Summer. SPLIT OVER H. M. WHITNEY. MacFarland LeayesV Massachusetts Democratic State committee. BOSTON, July S. Mae- Farlnnd, Chairman of the Executive Com- mittee of the Democratic State Commit- tee, tendered his resignation to-night "to John P. Feeney. Chairman of tho State Committee. Mr. MacFarland also re- signed his membership in the State Com- mittee. Tho principal reason given for his actions Is the candidacy of Henry M. Whitney for the Democratic nomination for 'Governor. Mr. MacFarland says he cannot Biipport Mr. Whitney on tho ground that the latter represents corpo- ration Interests and opposes true Demo- cratic principles by favoring the proposed New York. New Haven ton Maine -merger. Mr. MncFtirland, who is Chairman of the Executive. Committee of tho Inde- pendence League, will work In the inter- ests of that organization In this year's campaign. ___ WHITMAN WARNS POLICEMEN. Magistrate" Tells Them There Have Been Graft Excise Arrests. Declaring that he w.ould not stand for any moro fake and grafting" arrests In pxclso cases during the ten days In which ho Is to preside over the Harlem Court, Magistrate Whitman read the po- licemen in the courtroom yesterday such a lecture that they will probably not soon forget it. The case of a bartender named Van Aken, charged with selling liquor, had just terminated by the dismissal the prisoner for lack of evidence, whefi the Magistrate said: I know all about these arrests, and I do riot Intend to have any more of them. I am not a reformer, far from it, but I do intend that, when cases are brought before me there must be the urooer kind of evidence on which to try them If you policemen cannot furnish the evidence I will take a trip around the district and show you how it should be done You can give this information to your Captain, and he can give it to the Inspector.1'___________________ SIMPLE LIFE FOR HANNA. Will Spend Hie Honeymoon Training Fast Horses. Special to The New York Timtt. RAVENNA. Ohio, July R.1 Han- na has settled down to the simple life at his Summer home, Cottage Hill, near Ravenna. He announces that he will de- vote most of his time to stock raising and training fast horses. With the latter ob- ject in view, he Is building a covered half- mile race track on his farm, so he can train his horses regardless of the weather. Mr, Hanna expects to give considerable, attention to the raising of fancy cattle of the shorthorn breed, of which his stables contain some of the finest speci- mens in the world. His honeymoon will bo spent on tho farm. Mrs. Hanna'8 seven-year-old daughter is living with them. Over Henrlng-HaH-Marvln are now In use. Must be a, reason- Bales- rooms, 400 Broadway, cor. Walker St., N. Y. Burnett's VnnllU Extract by the best every where. Try It. DRdWNED IN HARLEM MERE. Five-jVear-Old Boy, After Lost Ball, Caught In Mud. Trying to recover a ball with which he and 69me companions hnd been playinp on the sbjore of the Harlem Mere, In Contra! near Iiot'h Street and Fifth Ave- nue, five-year-old Raymond Halfirty of 114 East Street, fell into the water and vfas drowned yesterday afternoon. He had been playing on a slope which runs jdown to the water. One of his companions threw him tho ball; It missed him and rolled Into the water. The boys tried to recover It with sticks. Hal- firty ifell into the water, which at that point jls nbout two feet deep. His j feet sank into the ooze, and he could gain, no foothold. His comrades called for assistance, and a. crowd of children and women gathered, Julius Schultz of 1.4oO First Avenue saw the body Ij-ing- in the wuter and wad- ed out to It. I Then he found his own feet stuck In the mud. He finally reached the shore with tne assistance of Patrolman Samuel Love of tne 104th Street Station, where tho body was car- ried. I BREWIN STARTS FOR HOME. Four iYears' Victim of Aphasia Ner- vous at Return of Memory. PLAJNFIELD, N. J., July P. Brewin, who recovered his memory after four years of aphasia, lo'ft here to-day !n company with his son, Frank, nnd Edward Erewih, a relative, of Burlington. .Mr. Brewin worked here for four years as Charles Johnson nnd recognized his rel- atives! as soon Is they arrived and wel- comed them. to-day he did not seem to be to ferasp the fact that more than a few daj's since ho left his tailor's shop In Burlington. The of his memory caused him to be nervous, but under tho care of Dr Buchanan, son of an old friend, and pastor of Mr. Brewin, he became more normal and appeared in fine spirits when Brewin and hi? companions will not go to Burlington at but will stay a dav or: so at Canidon, with which city Mr. Brewin is familiar. The physician's idea is to make tho return to Burlington grad- ually. SElEK A MILE OF CENTS. Kansas Methodiets Raise a Mort- gage in That Way. to The .Vcttr ForA- Times. July Ladles' of the Methodist Church tit. LakinJ Kan., have completed a novel plan of raiiiing money with which to liquidate a mortgage. The object Is to gather a mile qf cents, and to do this there was given to each member a narrow strip of length. Each foot will hold jiust sixteen cents. It Is calculated that when the- mllo of cents is received the SU'TH of will have raised, the exact amount of the interest and prin- cipal (if the mortgage at this time.: The iLakin women have, figured out that It tukcs Just cents to make a mile if are laid In a row._____ Street Car. Leonard, a city employe, was run over and killed by a northbound Sec- ond Avenue car at 1 o'clock this morning betwr4n 127th and 128th Streets. It is said that Leonard was trying to cross the tracks! when the car struck him. Before the cir could bo brought to a stop he underneath it. An fffort to release him was unsuc- cessful, and tho wrecking crew was sent for They succcedd In lifting the car about Ithree feet from the track, but be- fore Leonard could ho got out something 'slipped and the fell back on him. Motrirman Michael Gannon and Conduc- tor Thomas Scanlon were arrested and locked] up in' the East, 123th Street Police Station. _____________ Horse Mackerel Caught. Special to The New York Times. AMA'GANSETT, L. i...July by telephone from Promised Land to-day from Ithe American Fisheries Company brought the news that an Immense horse mackerel had been caught In their nets, to tip the scales at halt a ton, and would be shipped to the Fulton fish market, New York, to-day. The steamer Ranger captured the prize. POIiAND WATER. NATCRE'8 CUKE. Purest Spring Water In world. Park A TllforS Morrs.ll A Condlt Co., Poland Broadway, N, I STRIKE CAllLEDOFF, CITYTOBECLEANED Drivers of Refuse Carts Agree with Mayor to Return to Work This Morning. HE MAKES NO PROMISES Will Consider Any, Disorder jStrike's Fireworks "Bombs" Thrown. TheNrlvers of Cleaning De- partment who have i been on strike for six days, sent word to the Mayor yester- day that they would j return to work this morning. This action was taken after an announcement by the Mayor that It always his custom to consider any griev- ances presented by city employes, but that he could not deal with the drivers no long as they were not at work. Then, on the advice of of the Stato Department of Labor, the State Board of Mediation and-Arbitration, and the local Federated Union, the strike called off. The leaders of the strikers went around the city last night in automobiles, notify- ing all the men to report at their stables at o'clock this morning. The men hired by the Health Department will also continue the work-'of cleaning the strtcts, and the regulars will work overtime. But -with every effort which can be made. It is not thought probable that the garbage can be completely removed until Thursday or Friday. There is an accumu- lation of a week, to be got rid of. It has become sodden with rain and has been trampled under foot. It is no longer in barrels, but Is piled in irregular he.ips, in which every description of refuse and dirt is mingled. The worst spots will be nttscked first, and every effort will' be made to clean up the crowded streets of tho tenement district. Chemicals will also be used wherever it appears necessary. Somo disorder marked the last dov of the strike. Bricks w.sre thrown at strike- breakers in a few districts, and in others what the police call -Italian bombs" were thrown. Thesa arc explosive fire- works usi-d toy the Italians In their feast celebrations. One of them injured a po- liceman. City's Health Xot Affected Physicians soy thfe danger to health f-.om conditions caused by the strike is not yet over. At the jsame time, the mor- tality iigures collected by the Health De- partment for last week show a surprising result. j There was actually ;a decrease last week of about half in the deaths from diar- rhea, as compared with those of the cor- respondme week of last year. Dr. W. H. Gullfoy, the Registrar of the Health De- partment, said yesterday: In tho whole city last week there were IS deaths from diarrhen.. and in Manhattan 38; In tht corresponding week of last year there, wr-rc in the whole city and To in Manhattan. Last week there was not a single death from this cause in the Bronx, a most unusual oc- currence. "I don't know how.to account for it ex- cept throusli the improvement of the niiJk supply. I havc not iyet had any returns for the present week, and1 perhaps they will show the effect of the garbage situa- tion. But at present I hav-o not heard of any outbreak of diarrhea! diseases." Tried to Get Brooklyn Men Out. Before the strikers1, decided to give up the 'fiRht they hart ;ir.aue'on effort to bring out the Brooklyn force. On Sunday walking deleg-Rtt-s were busy among tha men across the bridge. V.'hen the roll was called at Stable B, Butler Street, i Brooklyn, yesterday morning-, a. number of men did not answer.'. Deputy Commis- sioner Owen Murphy: went In search oi them and managed to pet most of them back. He was not; absolutely certain that all the absentees wore away on ac- count of this strike, jas it possible some had merely taken a holiday. How- ever, the attitude of jthe Brooklyn forca was glvius the authorities a good deal of anxiety the strike wajs declared off. The Park Department, men refused yes- terday morning to help iireak the srrlke. Supt. Joyce read them Commissioner Ilerr- man's order to report i at Stable A, Severi- teenth Street and Avenue C. and they re- ceived it in eilence. Then they-consulted together and announced that they -would disregard It. The Superintendent com- municated with the j Commissioner, and. about noon he directed that the men should be sent out to thoir ordinary tasks about the Pa'rk, Hejsald afterward that he had no .'intention i discharging his' men, as Dn D.irllngtlon did fifty-five of the. Health 'Department's employes for a parallel disobedience jof orders. He has at this time of year peed of all the men he has. Brep.klngr ilhe Strlfcc. At Stable A, Instead of the 24 carts which pottered around on Sunday. 120 were sent out yesterday. Usually 200 carts start from this centre. A few of the old men wero back at work, but th-3 majority of the men -were sent to Dr. Bcnsel by contractors or applied for jobs on their own responsibility. The same police protection was pro- vided for the men asS on Sunday. Tinder Inspector Sums and Capt. McDvrmott 400 patrolmen were massed In tho district, and every cart had a policeman .marching with swinging night stick on either side. There was no disorder of any importance, and Sixteenth, Seven- teenth, and Eighteenth Streets, east of First Avenue, were fairly well el. aned. At Stable D, 503 East 110th Stveet, SO carts wc-nt out in place of the normal 62. Dr. Eensel was himself In in this district, and found the conditions very bad. Refuse P'les blocked'the thorough- fares. A misunderstanding- with the Po- lice Department resulted in some delay, and it was not until 9 o'clock that n suf- ficiently largo force j of patrolmen was on har.d to act as guards. Than there were no shovels ready, and they had to- be brought from First Avenue and For- ty-seventh Street. Crowds assembled as the carts moved out, but the police drove them alonpr and for timcHho work waa not disturbed. Thrown In Harlem, In the afternoon, howevar, a number ol the Italian ordinarily used for harmless fireworks display; were thrown at the street cleaners. Ono came from   

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