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New York Times Newspaper Archive: October 02, 1906 - Page 1

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   New York Times, The (Newspaper) - October 2, 1906, New York, New York                                p..   limited "through the borough, is undi-. rdinished. Each day a policeman with a stop x-atch takes the time, of'the limited as it goes, through town. The matter probably will be fought pu't in the courts. It is understood .that just .before reach- ing Wilkinsburg the fireman and the en- gineer exchange places in the cab, and the charge will be made that the wrong man has been fined. CRUISER SAVED SANTIAGO. Hungry Cuban -Revolutionists Had the City Almost at Their Mercy. SANTIAGO, Cuba, Oct. arirval here this afternoon of- the American cnilser Des. Moines relieved a serious sit- uation. Fully armed revolutionists were encircling the city within throe miles. They were undisciplined, badly or- ganized, without .shelter, and hungry. There had been constant rains, discontent was rife, and the; insurgents were threat- ening to raid the city. The Government forces concentrated inside Santiago were not sufficient to drive the besiegers away. All the official Cuban flags had been lowered when the Des .Molhes entered the harbor. Commander Culver "says he lias no instructions to change'the present-gov- ernment, and that his mission here ,ia solely for the preservation .of torder. De- metrio Castillo is expected -here to-night. He will proceed at once, with the work of disarming'the revolutionists.-'. VERACITYTF JR. Erroneous Report Makes It a Subject of Comment in Lcfndon. Special Cable to THB .NEW YORK TIMES. Copyright. 1900. J LONDON, Oct. Thus does his- tory repeat remarks The Lon- don Globs, referring, to the reported dictum of the American magistrate that Theodore Roosevelt's; son coulcl not tell- a lie. The globe's meaning is that we have Washing- ton in waiting for him many days. The Globe's reference to Theodore Roosevelt, Jr., doubtless grows out of tho judicial inquiry into the attackVby Harv- ard students on Boston .polieeihen on Fri- clayj Young Roosevelt was supposed to have some knowledge of the'affair, but declined to impart it to the authorities. A dispatch- from Boston last: night said that the magistrate had made no com- ment on the veracity of the President's eon. NEW RATE LAW RULING. in Commission Construing the Law Advance, of .Complaints. WASHINGTON, O6t. Inter-State Commerce- Commission has "reached a most important conclusion with respect to the railway rate law, .which it has embodied in a general order made public to-day. It holds that, where State ;rate forms ;a part of an inter-State rate the State, rate should be filed with the commission. This is an entirely new feature with the operation of the Inter-State Com- merce Commission. The further announcement was macle that the commission .intends wherever possible to. construe the law in advance without waiting for any particular com- plaint to be made upon which to base its decision. In this way it is. expected, that a -large number of complaints will be an- ticipated and the work of the commission correspondingly lessened. ?50.QO TO TO PACIFIC COAST. via Missouri Pacific and Denver Rlq Granda Rys. Scenic Ltlne" .through Rocky Moun- tains. Tickets on sale dally until October 80th. Through tourist sleeping cars. Particulars 335 Burnett's EJxtmct of Vanilla la the by bast They Are Said to Have Agreed That the Nominators' Ticket IVlust Be Accepted. Charles; E. Hughes, the candidate for Governor, had a talk lasting more than an a train with Presl-1 dent Roosevelt yesterday morning. Re- turning to town, Mr. Hughes had a con- :.'fereuce lasting several- hours' with County Chairman Parsons and Timothy L. Wood- ruff at-State headcimlrters. For 'more than an hotir after hie -re- turn from his talk with the President; Mr.' Hughes. discussed, judiciary. Bituation with the leadera. Woodruff said that In spite of. the protestB of some Republican district leaders in Brooklyh, he had urged that the Republicans of Kings County should indorse the picket offered by the .Committed of dred. Mr. _Woodruff said that the nominees of the Committee of One Hundred represents the best Judgment of the best lawyers of Kings County ;arid formes a judiciary ticket which and probably will, get the approval; of the' majority of citi- zens of Kings .County: Chairman. Woodruff took the earne ground with reference to. the situation-.in this apunty and it waa practically deter- mined at the conference to targe the. Re- publican Judiciary indorse the action of the Judiciary Nominators. In- this view Mr. Woodruff had the hearty assent of Mr, Hughes, who is himself one of the Judiciary Congfessman was disposed also to accord with their views, although. ;he expressed the.opinion that' in some-Tre-. spects ticket was .open to criticism and did not enUreJIy meet: the wishes of the Republicans of. New York County. It is expectccl, therefore, that the action of the Judlicary Nominators will be indorsed by: the ,It is known President Roosevelt strong-iy xirges this action; -At the conference it was determined that the Republican campaign will, so far, as possible, proceed alon-g- lines free personal ftbuee of Mr. Hearst. known that Mr. Hughes .will .not refer to his opponent in his speech, of accept- ance to-morrow He. will refer to the convention of and he will describe tt: as having been riot- ous und. f nil of QiBorderly elements. -He will; however, make aome 'reference to the' Hearst propaganda, Mr. Hughea is determined ,fo conduct his ft dignified plane. Arrangements have been made by the Republican State Committee for the cir- culation of tho speeches of. ex-Senator George; Raines of Rochester and John B. Btanchfield of Klmira, which were de- livered at the Buffalo land which strongly attacked Hearst and MUJN phy. Mr. Woodruff also made-arrange- ment1? for coriferenjces. .tliift Jn-r dependent pemocrats ilodking. to aome action to .solidify and organize the inde- pendent Democratic sentiment -which is favorable-to Mr. As each, ber .of the Republican Club is entitled to bvirig a guest to the meeting to-morrow night, Mr." Woodruff is" very anxious that the shall select Democrats rather than Republicans, Mr. :Hughes got to see the President as Mr; Roosevelt was ori the way to .Wash- ington with his 'family from Oyster, Bay. As the President wais waiting in: Jersey City for his private car, the Mayflower, to be attached, to the Washingtcfn train; Mr. Hughes arrived. It was evident that the meeting had been carefully planned. Mr. Hughes had only: expected to talk -with the President up to the time for the de- parture of his train at in the morning. The eonyersation wias so inter- esting, however, that Mr. Hughes ac- cepted the President's invitation to ac- company him as far as Trenton. A large crowd gathered in. the Jersey City station to greet the and he was heartily cheered. as he went to his car. v Mr. him, and the cheers of the crowd were redoubled when they saw the President -and the candidate for the Governorship .walking arm in arm. President Roosevelt came :out on the platform of. his car with- Mrs; Roosevelt several times and bowed. He greeted persons whom, h'e recognizecl In the and he said that he had- thor- enjoyed his "vacation, and .was "ready .for hard work. Mr Hughes took the ne.xt train back from Trenton after President, and at 4 o'clock' in the afternoon he ;.went to the new Republican heaclquarters at 12 East Thirtieth Street, where he had a conference with Mr; A mes- saffe was sent to County Chairman Par- sons asking; him to. join the confereivce. Mr. Parsons had returned to the County Committee headquarters yfrorn juenox. but a short time before, and ho hurried1 .up to Thirtieth Street. Secretary -GleaB.on joined them there. In. an .hiterval of the conference Mr. Hughes, .said: "The President and I had a very, in- teresting talk: it is ciulte natirral he should be much interestea in the State campaign, and in our hour's talk we. went over mlny things.; It would be obviously improper for-me ;to reveal what was said, but I can "that we: talked politics. Yes we certtwnly talked .politics. .We couldn't "Very nvell get away from that at this time. We will start the ball rolling here ;on Wednesday night when tho notification ceremonies will ;be held. will -not be. much let-up froni that-time on until election day. So far it has been arranged that I shall speka on Friday, night .in Carnegie Hall. with Bruce and torney General- Mayer. On Saturday I have two engagements in Brooklyn, and I shall probably start on my first ,trip 'up the State on Monday; The details have yet .to be arranged." At this point Mr. Woodruff broke in with-a statement in regard -to the way contributions were coming' in in; response to the appeal he had sent out, and; Mr, Hughes took up the need the sinewe :of he said, and we need a lot of them for the legiti- mate of the campaign. I .would like to make it nifl clear as possiblie that no one need .be ashawe.d to send what he can. We have cut out any contributions from corporations; and so we shall jhave to rely on the support of the We want to popularize; the subscription, and we ho'pe that any :one. who has the fare of the party at heart and can afforfl to contribute to its expenses will do so. Every one can be assured the money will go for proper purtsoBes. I am told that tho responses, so far. have been very satisfactory." said Mr. we; have every reason to be satisfied-.with.the. the funds are corning in. The amounts bepn small for but they have been many, and this shows the wide interest that is being taken in the campaign. The first check I got Was from a Democrat, whb .saicl; he had always voted the other that in.a Crisis like this'he thoiaglit. that he should riot only vote for Mr. but heljrr to defray thfe expenses of his Mr. Hughes said that he would like to iexpresR .through the newspapers his .ap- preciation of the: many letters and tele- crams of congratulation he has. received, both from Democrats and "I have been swamped with lie said, "and while under ordinary circum- 'stances I .would make it a point to ac- knowledge -these communicationo person- ally, the .press of business has been so great and the time to do things in. is" so short. that 1 must make a general, ac- knowledgment through the press-." Mr. Parsons said: "The first thing, to look out .for is the registration. TIMES pointed that, out very clearly this morning, and It wili not do to go -on the supposition, that weMiaye a walkover. Next Monday and Tuesday are the first two registration days, and I am very anxious to have a large num- ber of Republicaii and anti-Hearst voters NO SKIBO. Baseless Report' That'- Carnegie Was to Make a Gigantic Gift. Special Cable .'to THH NEW YORK TIMES, Copyright, 1000. LONDON, Oct. very pretty story that was soon to be distributed by Andrew Carnegie for the benefit of humanity proves to .foe a canard. i_ According: to The Yorkshire Herald, which put the story In circulation, Mr. Carnegie had called upon the School Boards and other pttblic bojiies of Soot- land to advise him as. to hie dispensa- tions; and It was gravely stated that Mr. Carnegie did not care rhuch: where the money intent go, so long1 as he shoiild -.-get rid of it, and that he made only one stipulation, namely, that no preacher get a penny of tfce He was yrtlling1 to any number of chvirch; organs, but preach- ers must look elsewhere than to him for their support. the whole; story has been denied from' Skibo and the preacher Is no worse off than anybody else. GEORGE TtrRNURE HURT, thrown from His Horse, Which Was Frightened by an AutOr Special to The Ntv> York Oct. George Evans Turnvire, -a backer '-.at 50 Wall Btreei, New York, was hurt, tills morning by being1 from a. .saddle .horse on Main The horse frightened; by an Auto- bucked, and: pi tchod off ltd rider. His shoulder was badly 1p4. Ajged After Routing Robbers, Testifies Against Prisoner. N. !YV.Oet. Mary of Brockport, 104 years old, ap- beforo the CJfatid Jury here to-day and testified; against Roxy Halstead, who is acouSed of planning robbery of the agred complainant' H home, i She drove the robbers from her premises by hurling 0 lighted laitnpjat; their :heads, Mrs. .Dean came Brochport tended .''and valked.Upi fptir long fllghtn of stairs In the Court House rather than trust herself In elevator. TO GOVERN BY Gov. Stokes Says He Can Rule That Way While Hunting In Pennsylvania Special to Tiie New York Times TKE3NTON, OpC For the first time in the history Of telephones in New Jer- sey, tlie State; is to be govermjcl by long diptfince telephorie f rohi BloOmlng Grbye, '.'where Goy. Stokeja goes to-mor- row: for the shooting. Under the State in the absences of the i: the President of the Seriate is sworn in. ao executive, btit Qov, Stpjkes says he is going: to be gone so short a tirn6 it would not be to. swear in Seriate President Bradley to apt in his absence. Hte also said, that while long distance 'telephones; are in existence he can be iri iouch. with affairs ih the. State at any time? TO KILt :Demand for Made on Mrs. Rich arci T> Robinson of Racine; RACINE, Oct. Mrs; Richard T. Robinson, .wife of the Secretary of the J. i. Case Thrcshirigr: Comp.ariy, has cei ved a letter purporting to be from two men.' who live either; iii Milwaukee: or Racine, demanding T.hey threaten i t .the money, is not paid over all of the Robinson family will be KILLED IN AiUTO SMASH, Daughter of Joseph M. Phillips of dehver the Victim. DENVER, Oct.. A large automobile in vyhich Joseph M, Phillips, his two; small daughters, and Thomas a brother-- in-law, were riding-, hit: a tramway car near the Central Loop this afternoon While at high The, entire party to the street, and Nor- ma, the fiyeryear-bld daughter of Mr. Philltps, crushed to death. '..a younger sister, escaped with feliight inju- ries. Close i was badly .hurt and wds nloved to his home in an junbulanGe. Philttps escaped in jury. CHURCH. Canon Bryatv to Lay the Corherfitone of the Roslyn L, Oct. aCno H. Bryan of Garden City will lay the cor- nerstone for the chiirch, whloli is being: built by Mrs. C. H. Mackay, on Thursday .at: 3 o'clock' in the after- The 'church is to be a. 'gfft to TrJriity.? Parish -of Rosijrn as a memoriai to -Mrs. ilackay-s mother, and is being erected bhU architectural lines similar "to those of the .pariah, hquso, which was opened a week -Mackay .has IhySted some of her friends to be presentvtp witness the mony. The Qhuroh will be one of: the most pretentious on Long Island, out- side or and will be constructed of clinker brifefc. It will be about 100 feet long and 70 feet; wide. A: will be. placed in it. Colutnbla iVIen Rescue Tenants at Blaze in HarSem Apartment House. Fire started on the second floor bf the seven-story iTairmbunt apartment house .at the southeast corner of Amsterdam 'Avenue -iarid 11.6th Street at 5 o'clock yes .terday morning. The, flames started in a suite .'.of rooms that engaged by Mrs. Ijorena Guthrie, who had been be cupySng.apa.rtineritsxon u floor, higher up Part of her belongings were in the new apartment. There are forty families, in the buil.ding, at, Columbia. A .elevatdr art engineer, and several of the -students helped others la- the -house to reaeh the street without injury. The flames to the third floor before they; were put out by the fire- men. The damage, was perhaps Adirondacks Deer Hunting On. :N. Y., Oct. l.-The deer hunting season opened at midnight, rand to-day many hunters were in the Adi- ronctacks; Jpeer are saifl'tp be plentiful. HE IS NOT FOR MURPHY i This After Demanding ilhe Lion's Share of the Judicial Ticket SPEECHES FULL OF ATTACKS He Says Parker, Sheehan, and Others Are Corpora- tion of Their Opposition. William Randolph Hearst repudiated diaries -p. Murphy of Tammany Hall agraih last night. He came Out unex- lOte'dAy, and with statement, that IUD matter whether 1 phy was for him or not, he was not for Murphy. The BtatementTwaB due to an intense- tioh offered by Roirie one in the gallery tit oiie :bf the HiVe places in Brooklyn ifc wf.hlch Mr, Hearst and ure from his written his re- pudiation of the man said to be responsi- ble for nomination at Buffalo caused somewhat of a stir among: the aiiflieiiop. Mr. Hearst's campialgn managers earlfer In the 'day had given, it out that he demanded the privilege of namfcrtg1 Supremo Court on tho York' County judicial In his. 1 lieader Murphy Mr. had asked for only four of these places... All of the five meetings well attended, and hi a reception iri livery1 cafle was enthusiastic. His speech ft domparatively short one, with only minor exceptions, he epoko by the In every Instance- The interruption ciirred at the. Brooklyn Casino. 17 Sdigall Street, the second meeting visitod, Tjjr the candidate. i Mr. Hearst was speaking- off be had to thank opposition. He; had mentioned the agents of tlpxis. ono tip- in tha said to be ah adherent of Pat whose district Hearst was out in a loud, clear tone: "How about Charlie There were cries of Put him No; don't put him said. Mr.. Hearst after a tnoment'a pause. "1 fiott't pay any more attention to him than 5 pay to Murphy." Chairman; Frederick Adams, who hod introduced Mr; Hearst Interrupted tho ap- plause. will let that young; man. epoalt-at some other said. eaid Mr. Hearnt, hhst speak this time. It does not matter er'Murphy is for me or not, I-am not for Murphy. It does not matter how much Murphy is for me, h am not for Murphy." I-iongr rous applause greejfedi: this statement, ancL the young man in (the gullery subsided, Mr. inoment, then up ;his speech, going- on to say that diation of tho corporation at Bufqlo was only thing that made possible for him to run on the Democratic Later in the evening- at the last meet- inff, when Mr. Hearst was addressing ft gathering at Prospect Hall, he had passed down tho line of those whom he had to thank the opposition to him, when some one shouted but: "And how about Pat McCarren, Wil- he'-s.'.another, retorted Mr. Hearst; Immeiaiately. Mr. Hearst started from his home at the corner o.f Twenty-seventh Street and ingtop Avenue at a quarter past 8 o'clock to siJBak at five different-places, in Brook- lyn Borough. He traveled in a big Pope- Toledo car, and there were two autoitno- iiiies for the newepaper men, who liad a hard time keeping up with the candidate; It is a safe assertion that the speed limit was'broken fully a dozen times during the evening- by every automobile in the lot. The party traveled down Second Avo- nue, through hordes of children who had to jump clear of the fast-traveling Cars. across the bridge was '.made'at a speed severity-five miles an hour. At the further end. there waa a blaze of red. fire-in honor of the candi- date, arid at the Palace Rink, 01 Grand Street, Mr. Hearst's agents had also been at _ Tho crowd in the rink numbered not than- people, and there-was not a ;woman ta be seen. In. the smoky, low cpiliriged hall, Mr. Hearst looked very big indeed in his long frock coat. His.voice .'was .---excellent. ..'There' were cheers when he canie in', arid prolonged cheers When- ever he made-a point in his speech. Once the crowd.-gave three vociferous cheers fpr "Buster at the itt- stigatlon of some one iri tho audience. At mention of Mr. Jerome Mr. Hearst was. called upon to "Give it to him. Bill; dreaniln'.1' The Chairman at this meet- ing was Register Bolton. The speech delivered by Mr. Hoarst here and at the other meetinKfi was as follows: My'friends, I think the :llneS in this popular rights, between those who are In KJ favor of governmerit by corporations for campaign should be clearly drawn be-u tweeri those who. ia.re In -favor 'of privilege and who'are in favor of their private profit and- those.who are In favor of government by the_ people xdi? the public benefit. 4 "The Independence League.was fo the purpose of freeing the Gdv.ei'h- ment from the corrupt and contaminating: control of corporations and liberating the people from such unequal un- American conditions. The Democratic Convention at Buffa- lo openly arid scornfully repudiated the corporation agents who Were there to in- vest their masters' money in the purch.afio of detegateis, and that repudiation waa one thing that made it possible for the nominees of. the Independence to accept the Detoocratic indorsement. 4< The corporation forces are now united behind, the corporation attorney of tho corporation party, and the line I have so long, labored to have clearly drawn is clearly drawn'at last. In all my Bpeeches and In all the acts of my life I have endeavored to mako my .position celar on this important ter, but I wish- to politely, acknowledge the assistance 1 from qthera. I -wislV to thank Alton B. Parker, Wfll- iam F. Sh.eehan, Edward M. Shepftrd, Paul -D. Cravath, District Attorney Je- rome, and other corporation attorneys and paid political agents of.-corrupt interests. "Alton B. Parker is a typical Corpora- tion lawyer.' He can be feed to hold any opinion: on any subject, and argue any a case. 'He is. the attorney who appeared in the election case on the sidO :bf election orlmihals in very he had formerly graced, and argued against the very opinion he him- self had formerly rendered, and there 'ceed'ed- in securing a reversal of hJs own 201'H CENTUBIT TO CHICAGO IN 18 HOURS. Leaves New, P. M., arrives Chicago nejct night's ride by the YOtlK CE3NTRAL L.INBS, Americft'e Great- Batlroad." A other fast trains to Chtcago, St. oad the Adv. It is possible that the arguments of Judgo. Parker were not as as the arguments of the employers of Judge but. nevertheless it cannot be denied that Parker argued to reversal of Parker, and to deny tho peo- ple their political rights, "And he did this because the corpora- tions who employ him as their tion attorney wanted .him to do AU, wlSi publiclyk to thank Judso for hJls opposition to me,   

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