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New York Times Newspaper Archive: September 10, 1906 - Page 1

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   New York Times, The (Newspaper) - September 10, 1906, New York, New York                                THE WEATHER. Fair and continued .warm to-day and to-morrow; light to fresh .west VOL. LV...NO. Then Along Came a Tramp to Pick Up interpreter. A BLUE WATER RESCUE YARN Which Proves, the Carpathia's Officers Say, that Paul Seidier Won't Get Lost Anywhere. BEEF SCANDAL DIDN'T HURT, The Cunarder Carpathta, in froni Mediterranean yesterday-, brought to port a story of a rescue at sea which, they said, is without parallel in the history of ocean navigation, and everybody who heard it "readily with them. Here is the as the purser told it; The Carpathia sailed from New York for Naples, Trieste, Flume last Aug. 1. A few hours before sailing time a neatly dressed young the Cunard pier. He that he wanted a job man appeared at told the gaternan on the Carpathia, and asked how to go ajbout getting it. Go and see Mr. Hojdgson, the Purser. Ho hires fellows like you when they ai-e the gateman told hlrn. The man went. I speak English, Italian, and Hun- garian he told the Purser, and as I knew that this vessel carries great numbers Of people of the last two nation- alities I thought I might get a chance to work my way home as an interpreter. My. namo is Paul Seidier aind my home, is In Flume, Hungary. A year ago I left there a youhgr wife and two little children, Thres weeks ago I heard that they were in straits, and that my wife had had .to close.our little home. jNo.w-I want to go back and set things right, but if you don't give me a Job so that ij can work-my pas- -I don't see how jl can possibly get there." i Mr. Hodgson liked the young man's looks and hired him. Two hours later the Carpathia sailed for the Mediterra- nean, and the happiest man on board, ap- parently, waa young Seidier. Ke went about his work with a cheerfulness that attracted. the stewards con- gratulated themselves that Purser Hodg- son bad been able to pick up so talented and accommodating an interpreter. But when the Carpathia was a little un?   York Times. Sept. Carnegie is said to have furnished the cash which was so lavishly spent in the defense of- Mrs. Mary Scott Hartje'ih her husband's suit for divorce. It Is said that Mr. Car- negie first became interested by 'reading of the arrest of-Clifford Hooe, the negro in .the case. Hooe ia to tried next Thursday for perjury. It was the publication of Hooe's part In the case which aroused.'Mr. Carnegie, and he wrote to his friend Thomas M. Miller, here, to ask John Scott that he might be permitted to contribute toward the de- fense of American womanhood." Thomas A. Scott, grandfather of the ac- cused woman, was President of the Penn- sylvania Railroad, much to aid Andrew Carnegie.- He gave hint his first job on the Pennsylvania Railroad, and made him Superintendent of-the plttsburg Division. John Scott, Thomas Scott's and Mr, Carnegie Iiaye always been friendly. John Scott interested himself in one of Carnegie's old workmen. He asked Thomas M. Miller, who was at one time Mr. Carnegie's partner, and a frequent visitor to Sklbo, to write to Carnegie in behalf of the workingmah so as to ob- tain for him a pension. In... reply to letter Mr. Carnegie not only pensioned the man Scott pleaded for, but also requested the privilege of contributing toward the defense of'Mrs. Hartje; PAGES In Greater New Jersey City. and Blue where, CENTS. sledlee In Revolt In Transcau- casia Becoming More Serious Than Ever. SIISDL.CB, Russian Poland, Sept. A massacre of police .and soldiers began at o'clock last night. Immediately after- vard the troops attacked the Jews. All to-day the soldiers have attacked ivilians, Christians and Jews alike, rob- ing and murdering' them without dls- riminution. Hundreds of persons .have een killed or wounded. Three streets lave been devastated. It is reported that drunken reservists tarted the massacre. Troops have surrounded the city and re- use access to it. WARSAW, Sept. Terrorists last evening shot and killed two soldiers uardlng a alcohol store at Sledlce. A detachment pf infantry rushed up and fired a volley Into, the crowd, killing two persons and wounding wo. This morning the terrorists retaliated by beginning a massacre of policemen and soldiers patrolling the streets, and at noon he infuriated troops attacked the Jew- ah. quarter of Sledlce, destroying the houses and shops. It is reported that over 100 persons were killed or and that the town is n flames. A regiment of infantry has been sent from Delia to Sledlce -to restore order. The Jews hero are panic-stricken. Alarming reports are being circulated in the city. ST. PETERSBURG, Sept. A dis- latch from Tiflis says that the insurrec- tionary movement In Transcaucasia Is suddenly gathering great force. The military and "civil authorities are t loggerheads, Georgia, I.merltla, and Mingrella are absolutely terrorized, being dominated by revolutionists and brigands, and the Viceroy has asked to be replaced. The sentence of death imposed upon. Zenaide Konoplianikovo, the girl who as- sassinated Gen. MIn on Aug. 26 at Peter- hof, and who was condemned yesterday by a court-martial to be hanged, will be car- ried out to-morrow night. In the course of an interview at Moscow to-day Alexander Guchkpff, the Octobrist leader, expressed his approval of the gen- eral tone of the Ministerial declarations, adding that courts-martial were a cruel necessity when a State of civil war existed In at least some parts of the country. M, ushkoff .compared the conditions GIRL'S RECORD SWIM. Fitzgerald Crosses the Hudson in Minutes. "The record for swimming the Hudson Rivor was reduced by -and' a half minutes yesterday afternoon by iils Alice Fitzgerald of Bt? Nicholas Ave- n-Rnssiawith those at San Francisco the recent earthquake there, when looters were killed without the formality of a trial. He said the pl.llagirig here was oh a similar basis, having ceased to be revolu- tionary and became mere ruffianism. "I must sajV said M. Guchkoff, that I have the greatest confidence in Premier Stolypln, There never was such a capable and talented man In power in Russia fore. I believe in the honesty of his In- tentions! and hope hk will be able to- execute his programme) in spite of the op- position close to the Throne." nue. The swim began at on the Jersey shore opposite Rlverdaie station, and 'ended on the New York shore about 150 yards south of the station. The. river at that point is "one .mile and three-quarters wide, and Miss Fitzeror- ald swam -it in fifty-seven minutes and. a half. She was accompanied by several members of the Manhattan Boat Club, 152d Street and Hudson River, In a launch and rowboats. The feat was -'performed at P. M., when the 'tide was ebb. The previous record was made a month by Miss Ruth --Franklin, of Washington Heights., who swam the distance in one Jjdur and thirteen minutes. Miss .Alice Fitzgerald, the new record holder, IB; 18 years old and about 5- feet 10 Inchea in height, GUITEAU'S SISTER'S PLAN. Woman Who Stirred Country Over Garfield's Assassin in New Role. to The Nfw York Times. CHICAGO, Sept.. Frances M. Norton, the aged Chicago, woman who has evoked considerable criticism by-her plans to regenerate the ghetto by the establishment of a Utoplar tenement house, was Identified to-day as the sister of Charles J. Guiteau, the assassin of President. Garfield. She was Mrs. George Scoville before she married Norton. At the time of the trial of her brother Mrs. Scoville was extremely active. in his behalf. She stirred up the country with newspaper an d _ p a m p h le 1; attacks on the prosecutors of ly crowned her efforts In the publication of a novel, in which she sought to prove that Guiteau was riot the assassin. Afterward she waa tried for her sanity at the instance of her first husband. George Scoville, who .had been the attor- ney defending Guiteau. She afterward obtained, a divorce from Scoville. Mrs. Norton's plan for a model tene- ment, which is to be a block square, has the enthusiastic indorsement of J" Commissioner Bartsen'1 and of wealthy Chicagoans. SENATOR HEYB-UBN. SUED. Exchange National Bank of Spokane Wants Payment on Note, Spttlal to.The New York Washington, Sept. ure to pay a'note of at the tlme; of his election to the United States Senate from Idaho, ia alleged in a Buit filed against W. B. peybuni by the Exchange National Bank In the Superloi Court yesterday. A promissory note dated Jan. 17, 1008 in-which it is stipulated' that If .not paid the maker wiil pay for attorney fees in addition to the costs of suit, is forth in the complaint; it Is stated that but has been paid on the note, and that the Senator has failed and refused to pay any more. 'Senator. Heyburn 'is .at- tending the irrigation congress. at Boisfl Idaho. An attempt was made to-.inter- view him at that place last night on the subject of suit. "I decline to make a statement concern Ingr he "It is simply .a, law There. are always two aides to ;a case, but I prefer-to present my side in court." Senator Heyburn was elected to hi present position Jan. 18, 1903, four days prior to the issuance of the note, after a strongly- contested campaign, many WORKERS, All Kinds, of Help Needed for Gould Lines, Special to The Now York Times. PITTSBURG, Penn., Sept. F, Kelly, having- In the Wabash .city ticket office, to-day placetf a large siga in the office window which read: Want- men for railroad work." The-men are needed on the Western Pacific Railroad, which is being built between Salt- Lake City and San .Frun- by Mr. Kelly explained. Labor is verj' scarce in the. West We need engineers, surveyors, firemen, ma- chinists, blacksmiths, foremen, laborers, timekeepers, and, in fact, all sorts of labor. It Is that number can be-got here, owing to the amount of busi- ness being clone in this B. A. Worthih'gton; General Manager of the. Wabash lint1? centring in PHtsburg, said: We are short of laborers on our junction work arid need many railroad find track men, but we do not need 5.000. Tho Western Pacific, now building, will prob- ably put all the men to work It can se- cure, f Governor Summons Party: to De- feat Them in Fight for Control, SILENT ON RENOMINATION The Bosses, He Says, Unable to Rule, Have Turned in Anger on Him and Roosevelt. Special to Tht New-York Sept. Goy. Higfcins broke silence to-night by giving out a brief but pointed statement attackinff in this State whom he does .not mention by and warne the Repub- Icanis of thfe State danger of a return-to the bid system of bosg con- trol. Ho arrays President Rooseyelt oil his side in the present factional The; statement givers no intimation of the Governor's attitude on the subject of a renominaWoni but says' there is an abundatice of capable, honest meti, who, if nominated, will carry the State by plurality agaihat frothy demon- strations of superior virtue and insincere promises of impossible' reforms." The Btatement In full follows i. "This is a critical period in the histpry of the Republican Party in 'the State. A struggle ior the control of the party or- ganization" and tho party nbmlnationa is on between the bosess, tvhp turn angrily upon the President and the Governor; Whom they have been unable i to iise for their selfish and the who believe that to win success the .party must .serve the people; "I am a firm believer in party organ- ization and party but I have no faith in the boss w'hbse to the people's representatives ;.is rneasured by their personal allegiance to him. Such a one serves his pftrty only when he can compel his party to: nerve him; Last: Winter the Governor and the Legislature administered affairs without the assistance of bbss. .The general welfare was riot subordinated to the welfare of th.e party yorganizatlph, Legislation wars not a system of personal rewards and revenges. The; result waa creditable, but it caused a slump in the GQV. STOKES ILL Taken from a Train to His Apartments Wai Overworked. Special to The Netv York Times. TK13NTON; N.' J., Sept.. 9.-Oov. Stokes became severely 111 white on. a train xjom- irijg: from Miri.yilla'- to-night. He was taken to his apartments and Norton was summoned. Thtt Governor" responded to .treatment, but his physician has ordered the patient to give up all work for- a few days at lerist. Overwork is the cause of his ill- ness.'.' The Governor gets down to .the Statd House at 7 o'clock in the morning, at his bank fet 0, then" at the State tioxtse again at 11, the bank at 1, the State HOUSQ a.t 4, and- often he works until 1 or o'clock in .the morning, T (TGOAST. Yorkers Reach San Francisco in a Littic Over 24 Days. Sept. 9.-JR. D. Lit- tle and C. D. Hagerty, who cdmpany with three .expert chauffeurs left'1 Nexv York Augv 16 in an seeking to- reduce the transcontinental tourist B' car record of 33- days, arrived here tc- AND MONKEY SHOW The Rev. Dr. MacArthur Thinks the Exhibition Degrading. COLORED MINISTERS TO ACT The trip occupied 24 days, 8 hours, 45 including. all thus .low- ering: the record by nearly nine days. ANGLER Makes a Startling Catch While. Planing -..from a Thinkirigr that he had eattght a, fish, off :Pier 60, North HIver, yesterday afternoon, Samuel Youner of rjO- Bedford Street pulled line 'and -found that he; hud tjhp of his Gus- tay Jbhnsbft; 45 old; of 70'J Green- wich ;Street; Johnson, who was a cook on a, tugboat was reported mfsslng' to -th.e police of the Charles Street Station: bn Saturday. His f rJends did not; -susipect that he had be.eii drowned. The PyQrny Has an Orahg-Outang a Companion Now and Their Antics Delight the Bronx Crowds. .Several thousand persons took the Sub- way, the elevated, and the surface cars to the New-York Zoological Park, in the Bronx, yesterday, and there watched Ota Bushman, who has been put by. th> management on exhibition there in the monkey cage. The Bushman didn't eeem to mind It, and the sight plainly pleased the crowcf. F'ew expressed audi- ble objection to the sight of a human being In a cago with, monkeys as eom- panibns, and there could be no doubt that to the the Joint man-and-moii- the most interesting sight in All.'the; same, a storm exhibi- tion was preparing'last night. 'News'of what the. managers of the Zoological Park were permitting reached the Rev. Dr; -R. S: MacArthur of Calvary Baptist Church last night, and .he nnnquncod his inten- tion .of communicating with the clergymen In the. city and starting an agitation to have the show stopped. person responsible for this exhibi- tion degrades himself as much as hV does the said Dr. MacArthur. 'Mnstead'of making.a beast of this llttla fellow, he should-be.-, put In school for the" development of- such powers as God gave to hini. It Is too bad that there not some society like, that for the Pre- vention of- Cruelty to Children. We send When drew In his. line "and saw j Pur missionaries to. Africa to Christianize the face of his friend he almost fainted. Coroner Acritelli made an As she was -returning from bhurch to-day John.- son seized her, forced her. into buggy', and .headed; for the: Florida; line. The girl's brotners and other relatives learned of the abduction and gave-chase, .jom son was overtaken in a fevv hours. jd opened fire on his pursuers, .who -were afraid Jest they kill Miss She threw herself and. screamed for the to shoot.: A volley three bullets; striking Johnson and inflicting fatal woundls, Johnson fell forward: on' the crouching girl- pSWEGO Anti-Hearst Men Polht-4o the texts of the TWO Resolu'tiohs. Special to The New York Times. PSWEGO, N. Y.i Sept.; dispute jstill conthiues' the. followers of W. R. Hearst opposed to his candidacy as to Just how far. the dele- gates -elected at the Dembcratio County Converition are to adhere, to hirn in his raco the nomination for governor. The Hears.t men insiBt that the are explicitly instructed. The others sniile and point to the differehce in the iivgs of the resolution ;which was killed antf in the that was adopted; The resolution, was killed, read as f61- Resolved, "That .the deiesratea to Convention: are hereby InatrUcied to vots- tor R. Hearst for -Goyeriibr, so Ibhg he rginatns ft. candidate the conyentSOn. The resolution adopted -says': JElesolvedl, By. this thati.-'-otir- gates to the-State Convention1 be: and: they are hereby requestetl and Inatructodt'pUBO.their :in- f-luence and ibost endeavor to .bring, about th'e Tiotninfttion by the Stato Convention of Hearst, for Governor. TROUT. He Fished for Three Weeke for Two Before Them. York Times. Special to The 9ept; King- do h Qouid, son George J. Gould, has spent part of the Summer at Furlough Lodge, Delaware County. one of first fishing: trips he two eripr.- mous trout- in aTdeep for three weeks he. persistently for With .the greatest ".angled C. K. Presfdeht of Chicago Gas and Coke Company. Special :io The Netv York CHICAGO, Hept.. Clarence Woos- :VIce President of thp People's Gns I Ight and Coke pompany, committed: sui- cide torday at his home, Sills Ave- by cutting his'; throat with yibotit three weeks ago Mr< Wodgtcr suffered from heat; prostratipm and dur- in .the last few days he had been under special !care of Ills physic iaria. This- morning he entered ihe bathroom, and a inbment later hte who In-1' strueted to keep watch hini, heard htm fall. When the valet .opened th.e bathroom door he found Mr. wooster lying oh the tibor Mr. Wooster waia. a nativp of Essex, Connir where he .was born about fifty the people, :and then we brlnj? one here, to brutalize --'.him.'.. V Our Christian missionary societies' Trtust matter .up at onoe. I shall, comniunicate with- JDr. Gilbert of the Mount Olivet Baptist Church and other of colored that wo may work together In this .matter. They have my. active assistance." Colored Ministers Will Protest. Dr. Gilbert said he had already decided that the exhibition was an outrage and that he and other pastor.s would join with Dr. MacArthur, In seeing to it that Bushman was released from the key cage and put elsewhere. Any suspicion that the exhibition was the result of error was contradicted by Benga wa.s the chimpanzees' cage to the crescent-shaped construction in the, Prlinate and on the was posted years ago A[ brother, W.oster, is Treasurer of tile Essex Savings Bank. HELD AS PAUL jKELLY. Man Who Caused Elevated Road Dis- aster May Be Captured. SAP? man giving name as; James Macauley ;Was arrested to-day on suspicion" of being Paul who ...is "wanted in New Tork for waa a motorman on an elevated rail road -.car ori. iMinth Avenue. On Sept; 5, 1905, he ran Into an open throw- Ing the train to the street, ;a-nd catising many deaths. -The police are not con- vinced that the man they have is; Kelly, but will hoid him until information is .re- ceived from New York. Agitators Urging Them to Drive the British from the Country. LONDON, Monday, The cor- reBpondeht at Simla of The Daily Mail re- ports that; recently deliyored at-tAsarisoI, iierigalj in_ which a Bengali mob was openly incited to violence against the British, the oil the races of an'd drive them out of the The dispatch adds that an Important na- jqtirhal declares that the Hindus ahn to India free of British control, PRETENDS TO COPY LORENZ. Ij Police Are Asked to Catch Bloodless ;Surgery" Practitioner. 'Special to Tht New York Times. TBENTQN, N. J., police Tho African Pla-my. "Ota ______ Ago, 28. years. Helerht, 4 feet 11 1O3 'pounds. Brought from ilie Kasai River, Congo Free South-Cen- tral Africa, by. Dr. Samuel P: Ebt- hlbitftd. each afternoon during: September. To increaee the picturesquenesfs of the exhibition, moreover, an orang-outanar named Bohong, wh'ich has been widely "de- acrlbed as showing almost human intellf--.'' gence, was put In the cage with the Bushman, and with them the parrot whtch Dr. Verner brought from Africa with Benga. The Bushmah and orang-outang frolicked most of the afternoon.. The frequently locked in each other1 8 arms, and crowd waa llghted, There waa always a crowd before the cage, most of time roaring with laughter, and from almost of the garden could bo :heard ..the 'question is the pygniy? ''tne answer was, "Jn the monkey. house." Perhaps as a concession to the fa.pt. that ft was Sunday, a pair of ca-'nvas shoes had been given to the Bushman to wear. He was' "barefooted on'. He seemed to- like the shoes voty mvich. Over and vor_ again the crowfl laughed at. him as admiration of them on his stool In the monkey cage. But jie didn't mind He has .grown .uSed to the have been asked by Mrs. Shuts of 80 North Broad street to look for a Cuban who has been working1 In this city as a disciple, of Dr. Iiorenz aiid practicing: surgery. He' called at Mrs. Shuta's house to aee her little dau.ght'ei-, who has been afflicted wltii fingers since birth, and got from the the promise or more. He then bent the': fingers back, left medicine, supposed now io be witch, hazelv and promised to. come back. He did; not return. Other complaints :are reaching the Called for a Settled ;H Is Estate, and Had His Father Summoned. _ f Special to The New York Times. ISTv Bfakeman .James J. -Travis of Philadelphia, who; al- with his left-foot crushed his ribs- brokeri, rode twenty; miles, yesterday in ar train with- out -a called a priest for, the last rites -of the Church and calmly gave directions for sending; his body 'to his father .In PhiladelphlnL. He died t wo. hours afterward in the Mercer Hospital In thiia Travis was coupling cnrs at Torresdale, Penn., when his train backed vdpwii on him crushfed hlnri. He was Imme- diately picked: up, and special '.train rushed him to Travis was told at the hospital that he could not live. He aisked those around him to pack the things in: his boarding house giving the most minute diree- T r 1 JllFUOC; T vvj vm. dally for :the big fish, the. last tiona as to his property inventory day of the1 fishing season has discovered that they laugh at everythihg: he does. If he won- ders. why he. does not show it. Properties Ready for-the The exhibition of man and monkey was scheduled by the park management .for the afternoon. Even: before that there were Inquiries i the curious, but according to the sign put up the hibltlon Is to .be a matinee. Some time' before 2 o'clock little   September Pennsylvania Spe- ciar Puliman. train. Only round trip York; ill expenses goliier, tlonrcturrilng.. Consult C. Studde, B3. P. A., 203 ITifth Av.. York, or tlckot Acly, children, ard they laughed uproariously. Next they did Individual tricks the raon- key swung on ropes, the pigmy shot his Occasionally the pigmy mimicked the laughter of the crowd. In one in- stance a boy yelled, Shaot." "Shoot! Shoot! ".aped the little Bush- man. Soda for a- Ruffled Temper. Froni time to time It looked as though the little .Bushman was growing out of patience. Then his' keeper led him to, tho soda-water fountain. The money.? a mercennry per- fion alrfTady. tie has learned that money buy 'soda.- aftctnocn handis were often thrust' between the bars, to the nionkey peanuts and to give the BiiBhrnan coins. By eventng he had a littio Many 'bf those in the crowd watched Benga' s antics doubteiX   

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