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New York Times Newspaper Archive: February 1, 1904 - Page 1

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   New York Times, The (Newspaper) - February 1, 1904, New York, New York                             "All the NewsThat's, Fit to Print" THE WEATHER. Light snow; colder; fresh northwest -winds. f VOL. LIII..-NO. NEW YORK, MONDAY. FEBRUARY 1. PAGES. ONE CENT In Greater New York. I Bl Jrrmry City and Newark, j TWO AGAINST SUBWAY STRIKE Union Delegates After Stormy De- bate Decide for Peace. Labor Bodies, Now in the Employers' Agreement, Carry the Day in Spite of the More Radical of the Leaders. After a- stormy discussion, lusting for nearly an hour at yesterday's meeting oL the Central Federated Union over the tu j- trouble, the conclusion was practical reached that nothing could bo done in tne way of strikes to change the present situa- tion. During thj discussion the fact veloped that tho unions now miller tlie arbitration agreement of the Employers Association Ir.-tend to by that asree- ment. Some of the many sub-way tractors, whose numbers have inc sions of. which will'be: Length, 200 feet; height; 70 feet: width, 60 feet. It will be the largest.bird cage in the world, and -will, be stocked with, more than a thousand birds of different varieties.. The cage at the National. Zoo has been of as the largest in the world, and Is slightly larger than .the well-known Horna- cage ot Zoological Garden, New but the new receptacle will be at least 40 feet lonKcr and about ItO feet wider. ABUSES OF PEONAGE SYSTEM. MRS. HOWARD GOULD TO RACE AUTOMOBILES. Will Have a Number of .Fast Cars for Next Season More Records Ex- pected to be Established on the Florida Beach. Special fa The New York Times. ORMOND, Fla.. Jim. '.announce- ment hsis just been" made here that Mrs. Howard Gould will next season- for the.third annual automobile Derby with some of the fastest racing cars to be se- reased cured in the country. Mrs. Gould has been con- sociatinn. and this, fact'had its bearing on the action of the central body yesterday. Chairman James E. JMlland of 'the Cen- tral Federated Union Rapid Transit Com- mittee brought the matter up in the form of a report on the emifc-renccs which tool; Cm-ins? last week nr. the subject. lie sni-i that the AHis-rhaimers .Company pive the machinists no satisfaction at .'ill regarding thi-ir of non- limo'n men at tho Fifty-ninth Street power house." By an arrany'Tiie-nt with the general i-ontr.'ictor. he the painters had come to a si'itli-mr-nt. railroad iron rke-rs wi-ro not sented j in the original asroemi-.it br.twecr. the ci'n- tral hody. mid the rapid transit contractors j li.ui grievances, but as Wf-rc not in- j fused to consider their -grievances. James Wilson. -tKlegate of the machinists, Mr- said. The it could unless Mr. McDonald..can go fur- ther. As far us J p.m concerned, I believe that it Mr. McDor.ald told the Allis-Ohal- mers Company ;o straighten out m. ner.s they would be straightenrrt out. I am at a. loss myself as to to Co." .1 tunes. Fitzgerald of the marble workers j o :isked Wilson il the Allis-Chalmers Company i-mployc-d any union meii. Wilson replied that they employed botli union and non- union men in other contracts; but did not employ any ur.ion machinists at the power house. said Fitzgerald, "why the Ir.temational Association Machinists eall.ItK men out on the jobs of the Allis- Chalmers. Company in other uitics. this matter uffecled the marble workers, you bet bebts' that the workers would have every man pulled out in the unions final h'eata of the H. Bowden-S. B. Stevens match race for a trophy, the one-mile class, in which Stevens ami Bowden will also contest, and in which the mile competitive record may be lowered, arid a consolation .race for. cups-yet to be I offered. There ire many reasons for believing that Bo'wden or Stevens may lower Old- field's competitive record. In the first place, .Bowden averaged for fif- teen' miles in his match race with Stevens, bnt on the other hand, in the shorter races. Stevens has beaten Bowden several times. With a five-mile start either may eet" easily inside ot for. the mile. Kither may also touch W. K. -Vanderbllt.. Jr.'s. record of The mile arfl kilo- metre record trials have yet to be ..run, the conditions are perfect these may i bring about some surprises. During trie last twenty-four hours there have been a number of departures, but j there remain a number of prominent mo- torists. i When Mr. Vandcrbilt left last night he said lie was confident that he could do on the course.- It is reported that he did do In training-, He is not.satis- fled with, the record' of M. Charley Paris believes ihat'lbe limit' of the THIRTY DIE IN A DESERT j Brutality to Children Revealed In a Re- j 'j port an a. Georgia Case. Their Bodies Found Near Dead Stlciat Th, Nnt Yark ATLANTA, Ga., "Jan. ot cruelty to children have been made In-a Government agent's report .in the Pittman peonage case. United States District At- torney Camp, who conducted the prelim- inary proceedings against Pittman, says: When we first heard of the case we Immediately sent, a special Government agent down to Pittmah's farm to investi- gate, and the. evidence we have gained Man's Well" in Nevada. Had Attempted -to Cross a Barren Stretch Eighty Miles Wide Without Sufficient Food and Water. Special to The New York Times. LAS VEGAS, NeV., Jan. 31.-Thlrty bodies of men who perished in the Nevada Desert from thirst and hunger have been fount! by a body of surveyors who are an advance party of the new San Pedro, Los Angeles ana Sail Lake Railroad. THe victims met death within a few weeks; according to all the evidence obtainable and the condition of the corpses when discovered. They died while attempting cross the waste that stretches a distance of eighty miles from Las Vegas to the Califor- nia line. Many others have lost their lives while trying to make this journey without adequate supplies 'of food and water, but apparently the desert has claimed many more tlvea during the past month than, ever before. The survivors tell of many gruesome sights. The bodies were found in groups of four or half a dozen, lying in proximity. In most instances they had been torn and half eaten by coyotes and buzzards to such an extent as to be beyond recogni- tion.. One body was found partly burled In a shallow grave, evidently having been found by another wanderer, who buried the. unfortunate as best he coulrt and then himself fell.a victim. The thirty bodies were all found within a radius'of a quarter of" a mile around Dead Man's Well." the only water in the 'interior of the entire desert. One hundred feet from this well the surveying party came Across six bodies lying a few yards apart. Man's Well" Is about half way across the bar- ren territory that divides the little settle- ments of Southern Nevada from the hills of California. shows cruelty and treatment Jiardly credible. Children slept on a cot consisting ft a plank, which was covered with cotton bagging, another strip ot the material serving as a cover. it is remembered that -this bag- ging Is made of cords nearly as large as one's i with large spaces between, you can fimagine what protection it afford- ed when the thermometer was well below freezing. Most of the children showed ugly scars on their ears' which came from the .fact that the bosses, or whoever was in charge of them, beat.them on the ears with stones held in each -hand. On one occasion a large stone was thrown at one of the boys, strikr ing him the elbow. The blow-shattered the arm, and now the boy's hand Is with- ered and paralyzed." SEGREGATION OF SEXES. Experiment in the University of Chicago It Pronounced.a Success by the Instructors. to a re- .El Vln- J CHICAGO. Jan. port submitted by Dean George cent to President Harper of the University of Chicago, the experiment of segregating j the sexes in the junior cillege work during the last year has been a success: Dean j Vincent says: i Unofficially various instructors who have taught the classes exclusively for men. or women have told me that from their experience they believe segregation is, going to work out .as an educational, and INSIKFJDIWIE Three More, Including Battalion Chief, Not Expected to Survive, Rescuers Grope in Jute Fumes at -Brooklyn Blaze for Tbtir Uncon- scious Loss Only Two firemen were killed and fourteen others were overcome by .smoke at a fire last night in a three-story jute storage building at the foot of Noble Street, Green- point. Chris. Dressel, twenty-four, years old, of Engine Company No. 138, died soon after he had been taken from the burning, building and carried to the engine room of the rope factory next door. Arthur Rink, thirty-five years old., of Engine Company No. 138, died In St. Catharlne'ja Hospital at midnight. Three other firemen who were taken to St. Catharine's Hospital were reported late last night to stand little chance of surviv- ing. .They are Battalion Chief William McCarthy oi' the Twenty-sixth District, Michael Mahohey of Engine Company No. 115, and John McAllister of Engine. Com- f pany No. 121.. i Smoke pouring hi volumes front the sec- ond floor of the storage owned by the American Manufacturing Company, at- WARNER QUINLAN LOSE ASPHALT LAKE. High Court .of Venezuela Pronounces Their Claim Mine Was Bought Without Receiv- ing Prtper Title. CARACAS, Jan. Federal High Court, sitting in full with ten. Judges oh the bench, has finally handed down a decision in the long-drawn-out as- phalt case. The court gives as Its unani- mous-Judgment the opinion tliat the claim of Messrs! Warner Quinlan of Syracuse, N. Y., to possession of the Felicidad As- phalt Mine, a portion of the asphalt .lake in .the State of.. Bermudez, claimed also by the New York-and Bermudez Asphalt Com- which holds a concession to work tHe lake, is null and void. The Felicidad Mine was bought In 1808 by Messrs. Warner Quinla'h. The court bases its opinion on the argu- ment that while tfce concession of the Bcr- mudez Company was valid, no claim to tho Felicidad Mine could be granted. The de- bates revealed the fact that Messrs. War- ner Quinlan had bought the Felicidad Mine without receiving proper- title from the vendors. Americans here are gratified at this find- Ins-of the high court, which is considered to be just. STEAIRSIIIP mm m mm m _________ i Wilson Liner Nearly Sunjci Three Miles from Sandy Hook. MAIN SHIP CHANNEL BLOCKED American Liner St. Louis One Of the Vessels Compelled to Stand Sailor Lad Saved His Parrot- Part of the Crew Left on Board the Wreck. ._.... social success. One' Interesting feature of A majority -of the victims were tramps situation is that several-of the instruc- and "railroad laborers, who attempted to t cross from the railroad camps in Nevada. to the more agreeable climate of Califor- nia.. course is far off. He says that this will MUCH UNREST IN RUSSIA. i.peans wiir come-here to drive fast and. be pate. A course on which no of Conditions in the Caucasus Almost Ap driving, even at eighty-eight and one-half -I miles ah hour. will, hoat tires Is ideal, according to M. Charley. The reason for the failure to heat the tires and so cause danger is due to the moisture in the i surprise over -the f-ailure of tlie suction to- retard speed has been expressed bv the visitors f-rom Europe. They also point out the safety lying in a course_where tors Who were radically opposed to segre- gation now say that their experience leads them to favor it heartily." iftiHatPd "with- thi-m." iu- Entwistle of the Steam Fitters said" t'hac there were nonritpion steam lit- ters employed in the subway, but that the organizatiuii was helpless in the matter. "Why don't you'pull out the union men thi.-n? demand'c-d Fitzgerald. We arc- bound -hand and foot. said EntwUllu Ono contractor has signed an agreement with us. and another contractor employs only non-union men.. If it was one contract, 'wo coil Id do Fitzseralii became indignant. J-.e i on the one side is soft sand to retard a machine breaking away, ami on the other side water to check it with -no onstriic- tioi s The removal next year of the long wharves at Daytona will make the course absblutelv safe. These wharves caused- Bowden some trouble; for he avoided one of the posts nt a speed by but six inches. Another thing which will be done will be the abolition at the turns- at the end ot each leg in long races. .Controls will be established, and the cars.will come in at speed, turn slowly, and then go out at- speed; thus -giving correct for driving. The accident to Anarchy. LONDON YORK TIMES Special Cablegram. LONDON, Feb. Is no sign of improvement in conditions in the Cau- casus, says the Moscow correspondent of HtJIY1 i' HZ id Lll.'filllJ'J Jji.- ll'tl u wartVd to "know what the Ehrlich yesterday caused this decision Bo-ird of Walking Di-Josales was ever; At the Ormond tourney Mr. ypnderbilt good for or what the.Central Federated i won six first prizes and one second prize T-nlSn ws-s meotir.fr every week for. j Knd broke every record from .one ,mile to lie said verv bitto'rly: Things an; gointr fifty miles. Bowden won four iirst and to the bad. 'ihorc are more non-unlnn men j five second _ prizes, and in Alarihottan than there v.'ere five first years ago, and this applies to every trade I Stanton of the Electrical "Work- I ers said that matters wiire in the way of settlement, but some of 1hc dole-Rate's in i thi- Central Union evidently i a rule-or-ruin policy." I "When my union continued j Stanton. T am going to try tn get a mo- tior through fur the members of my Inter- i national. Union to boycott the-work of the Company in other citii-s ml- j less they can come to an agreement with iis That "is the way to set about it. original -agreement with the Rapid Transit Contractors' Association did not Stevens won two and four second prizes.- Oldfield "ained a first, Laroche two seconds, and Tracy one second. G. H. Curtis won two firsts in motorcycle races. Not one of the competitors claimfe to have had any trouble from grit entering the machinery. said that he did-not think or expect that his or- ring for matters that lie 'had foremen lie admitted that tho original agreement had nothing to do with the of "the delegates became very anprry niu1 ivnnted drderc-d right and li-lt. At one point it looked as.if a gor.orai .strike, which couid not possibly inconvenience the contractors against whom tlie linions had triuv-inccs. was soing to .be ordered. iser prevailed, hqwevor, and tjie report of the committee 'was simply adopted, with the- understanding that every possible means would be taken to end the tangle. -amicably. "COLORADO FLIER" WRECKED. One Person Killed and Thirteen Injured Near Miller, Kan., on the Missouri Pacific Road. KANSAS CITY, Mo.. Jan. Col- orado Flyer'" on the Missouri .Pacific that Ifft Denver Saturday afternoon -for Kansas j City was 'derailed near Miller, Kan., to- i day while running' at the rate -o: forty miles .in hour. Tl'C engine and rear car, a Pullman, alone remained on the- track. The baggage car, smOKer, and a chair car were thrown into a ditch, upset, and shattered. persor.--W. I.. Krown of Ransom, was killed and thirteen injured, one rionsly. t the tlm two hours' DOUBLE ESCAPE_AT NIAGARA. Himself in Peril on a Detached Ice Floe, 'a Man Rescues a Boy and Both Are Saved. NIAGARA FALLS, Jan. after- noon, -while hundreds .were on the ice bridge below the falls, a large cake.broke not j away from the bridge near the ice mount- ain. On -it was John Morrison of this city, i While the crowds were staring in fear at the man's pred'icament, from the ice mountain, and'a'.lad, James Murty, slid down into the open water left by the detached floe. Morrison, in danger, himself on the de- tached cake, which at any moment might have been swept dowai the- gorge to the whirlpool, saw the boy's danger. Lying flat on the floating ice he. awaited the re- appearance of the boy. As the .lad came gasping to the surface of the ice-cold water. The Times. The' news of an attack on the residence of the Governor at Tints is confirmed. -j- If. is reported that tne recent anti-CSov- e.rnment demonstrations have .alarmed j the authorities at St. Petersburg consid- erably in view of the positions occupied by the demonstrators. It appears true that fries of Down with the autocracy! were uttered in a hail where were assembled a large num- ber of industrialists and technical men. Russian Intellijrents" .all over the empire are .manifesting anti-Government tendencies with more than usual candor, alfiny say Russia will not dare go to war if tho Intelligents keep her.hands full al home. Recent dispatches from Russia state that conditions in the Caucasus almost approach anarchy. Bandits make frequent raids en banks and railway stations, and usually succeed in carrying off plunder. These brigands, it. Is stated, are excel- lently armed with costly rifles and revolv- ers of the newest make. The Novoe Vrem- ya of St. Petersburg complains that some one thoughtfully provides them with Eng- lish weapons, ammunition, arid powder. In bales and cases that are imported into the Caucasus under the of sewing .and technical CASHIER SHORT. But If Is Said That the Franklin Bank of Cincinnati Will Not Lose a Cent. CINCINNATI. Jan. report of the ixperts .who have completed their exam- nation of the books of the Franklin Bank of this city shows the Henry Burkhold. to. have been short in his accounts; K Burkhold was superseded as Cashier sev- i-al months ago, and has been so pros- trated'by his financial collapse that he Is not expected to recover. Johh'J. Kilgour, President of the Franklin. Bank, says there will be no pro.secuti'on, and that; the bank and the creditors will not .lose a cent. Burkhold has given Mr. Kilgour power of attorney to sell securities, and settle up his affairs, and out of the of hold's holdings it Is thought about will be for his estate.. Morrison grabbed him by .the hair- and hauled him on the floe. The crowds cheered Morrison to the echo; and soon ropes were got and cast to him. The floating ice was then slowly drawn to the ice bridge, and both Morrison and- Murty leaped to safety. there came a cry requisites are frequently- found splendid weapons such as might arouse the envy 'or a. good hunter." The raids, instead of being made by nieht, as was formerly the case, are now made in broad daylight. On Jan. 4, for instance, eight armed Brigands eaSly in the afternoon made their appearance qrl the premises of the Mutual Credit Bank at Ku- tais and carried off rubles, W-lT.KfO.) locking the doors of tho bank behind them. Three days before this five brigands raided the. railway station at Alexandropol. killing one employe and wounding several others. o[ tho accident the train was j late a ad making up time. It j nad -o orders to stop at Miller, went Sv -.t full bring derailed on the o-.it- of tho town. The front trucks of th" m-ul car jumped the track and crashed I ery turn. Call oiflo, 1.183 B'waj-. INCREASE IN CCAL PRICES. Government Report Shows That An- thracite Costs Over 39 Per Cent. More .Than" Five Years Ago. Special'll> The New Y.ork Tiirtts. WASHINGTON, Jan. facts con- cerning the production of coal that are of melancholy interest to the general public are brought out in Edward Parker's annual report in the volume of Mineral Re- sources for 1902, which Is soon to be issued by the United States Geological Survey. The first is the loss of .life incident to the Industry of coal mining.- The second Is the steady and considerable increase in the price of both anthracite and bituminous 'coal in the last five years. The total number of lives lost In the coal mines of the United States In 1002 was as compared with In ioOl. The total number of men injured was In 180.1 ana in 1902. The largest number of lives lost per employes in. 1902 was in. Tennessee, where 200 men were killed by'' the explosions in the Nelson and Frater-r liille mines. The average price at the mine for a ton" of anthracite of pounds through- out the United States was in 1808, J1.40 In 1S99, In 1900, in 1901, and' In 1902: This shows an Increase of over 30 per cent, within the last five years. lA still larger percentage of Increase Is in the price of bituminous coal throughout the country. A. short ton bituminous coal brought an average price, at the mine of 80 cents In 1896, 8T cents In! In 1000. jH.06 in 1901, and in an Increase of 40 DR. PARKS'S FAREWELL SERMOK. New Factor of St. Bartholbraetv'H l.en-ve of .Bonton. Special to The New York Times. BOSTON. Jan. Rev. flarks, who has served for twenty-five years as pastor of the Emanuel Church, preached his farewell this .morning! Dr. Parks will go to Ne.w York, where he is to fill the St. Bartholomew's Church pul- pit left vacant ,by '-he resignation of Dr. Greer. Every seat in the church was filled and hundreds stood in the aisles, all eager to hear the pastor's departing words. Every said Dr. Parks. acknowledge the-nobility of men outside the church, and we must all under- stand that many men who never go to church lead blameless lives and have the highest Ideals. "But there is a decided difference be- tween the Christian and the non-Christian. Earthly idealism Is depressing to the mind, but Christian idealism Is elevating." was going out on the ebb tide1. Several i minutes later the officers on, the bridge' of the' Boston City sounded the dariper j signal by the rapid blowing of the whistle] several times. When the officers on both vessels saw that there would, be a collision they handled their ships that the Colorado struck the Boston-City on the port bow Just j abaft the forward rigging, at an angle of j no''degrees'. The Boston City was low in! the water, and when slie was struck the' held so firmly.in the water that the Colo-1 rado shoved her bow into the hold of the Bristol liner a distance of twenty ttet, while the prow of the Colorado smashed the bridge, carried away all of the port side of the pilothouse, and exposed Hie' ._ wheel in the wheelroom. When they struck, I the vessels were going at the rate of ab'iut three knots an hour. I The officers on the bridge of the Boston City before the collision jumped to the dftolt fifteen feet belo-.v, where they landed shaken up, but not Injured. At 'this point the greatest confusion pre- vailed on tmr Boston'City, and It wu only to the action of the officers of Colorado that lives were not lost. WluSH the collision occurred the engines of both vessels were still backing away, and alter] hanging together for a few seconds vessels again parted. When the bridge was carried away the signal wires from bridge td the engine room were cut und there was no means stopping the en- gines, which continued la back, finally car-, rying the Boston City on the mud of Southwest Spit. As the 'vessel grounded on the bar, boatswain of the Boston City, been below, MR. LITTLEFIELD TO RETIRE. Special to The New York Titr.es. WASHINGTON, Jan. Uttlefteld ot Maine, who took such a. prom- inent part In connection with efforts at anti-trust legislation in the 'last Congress, lias in- this Congress, until the debate on the mileage question came up In the House, observed an inconspicuous course. Being cne of the debaters In the House and a man of distinct ambition, this has caused much comment among hta admirers. It is now said on good authority that he has decided to retire from public life and accept a flattering offer to practice law in MrOIL.ittIefield speaks frankly, of his dis- appointment at the obstacles to be met In thelower house by any'sincere man', who attempts to work out any of the great problems of legislation now before the country. He regards the task leader who attempts to secure leglslatjftn for the people aa more a matter of ulatlon than fair dabftte Ik came rushin; who deck ihock of his jump and ordered over to take off the men if they choiild have to leave suddenly. When thn hnat was in the water It was seen that the had been left out of the bottom ami rushed in. filling herq-aickly. The engine room force stood by their Dosts to the last, never leaving them until ordered to do so by the Captain. The hole in the side of the vessel did not reach ths epgine room, missing tt by several feqt. EIGHT MEN LEFT ON BOARD. In the meantime the Colorado had backed for several lengths and then her boats' lowered to take the crew from tho injured steamship. The first of these to get away made for the swimming boatswain, whom it picked up. BO excited that he had swal- lowed quantities of salt water and was on, the point of sinking. For half an hour the boats hovered about the steamship, but their assistance WM not required at once. When Capt. Cartgr saw that his vessel would be proceed he ordered sixteen of o( twenty-four men to leave the with them he came up on confer with the of After the col forwirt put ;osYoV Cltv fUl.4 -fteSoTc of made Boston City, -Through the opening SOIM of the merchandise out, and either went to the bottom or floated away on Ilia i   

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