Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

New York Times Newspaper Archive: April 30, 1903 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: New York Times

Location: New York, New York

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   New York Times, The (Newspaper) - April 30, 1903, New York, New York                             "Ail the News That's Fit to Print" IT HE WEATHER. Fair and cooler; .variable winds. VOL. LII......NQ. NEW YORK, THUESDAY, APRIL 30, 1903.-SIXTEEN PAGES. ONE CENT In Greater New York. CKr and Newark. )TWO CENTS. ST, 1MB ALL READY TO DEDICATE THE FAIR FOREST FIRES IN NEW YORK Throng of Visitors, However, Not Up' to Expectations. greeted by President Francis, who had driven rapidly to the station, after greet-. President Roosevelt at Porsythe June- lion. The members of the committee crowd- I ed-around and Mr. Cleveland was-unable to; Done in the Cats- cleared, and with- President" Francis he1 walked through the aisles formed by the crowd, and. entering a carriage, was driven: lot he residence of President Francis. Oov. Odell of New York came in this kills and Adirondacks, 'i Ceremonies Will Be j guished Visitors and Brilliant Mili- tary Companies Are on Hand. moining attended .by his staff. Following j him came a special- train bearing a squad- on -of cavalry, a provisional division ot Naval Militia, and a provisional regi- j i V.'.v Vji-i' I ST. LOUIS. April the eve of the i three 'days celt-braiion. which will jointly 1 commemorate the Louisiana Purchase and j marl; -tht of the exposition to opened ;hi're a yuar from r.uw, this city j is not overwhelmed by a multitude ,6f vlsi- j tors..or laboring under any great strain of t. X'-iicm.-ni. j 1'riless there is a very marked change be- 'Iwwn the condition of to-night and the ;j. of celebration, so j. far as popular participation is''concerned, j is going to fall far short what was pre- j It was said that there would be -liXWiOO strangers in town, and enthusiasts j >till insist that there are, or will be, but j streets not a New pciint of are plenty of I-oonis to be had at nil the hotels except t-he ones, and tlie service, jyhich is woefully inadequate at all times, ias not broken clown. 'But tho fact that the- crowd of visitors that was expected hero has not materialized will not detraerfrom the interest of the cele-- bration, except from a' spectacular stand- point. Its features, 'such as parades, public j assemblages and pyrotechnic been planned with great prodigality. The President of the 1'nited Stales, and the only living exrPresidunt are Here to he1 seen and to be heard. The Governors.oi most ot' the States of -ilia "1'nited States, gorgeously attired staff of- ficers ami escorted by small and large bodies ot' militia, are on hand. Ddell of New. York being' most. conspicuous with his regiment of 1.-00" picked men. Tin'1 ma- jority of the members of President Koose- veil's Cabinet, nearly a-ll of the members nf the Diplomatic Corps', a scon? of Spe- cial Commissioners from foreign Govern- ments, and high' officers of the army nnd navy, with from both j branches of the service, make up-an offi- cial representation that in a measure com- pensates for tne ausence of the vast crowd that was NEED OF UETTER FACILITIES. One thing is made very clear to those who have sought good hotel accommoda- tion here to-day, and that is Ihat if Louis is going to take care of great expo- sition Crowds next year a large number of first-class hotels must be built. the small crowd -that is here now the desirable hotels are filled.; With an in- flux of people, accommodations 'would have to be sought .in .little hotels that "ordinarily well-to-do people would not .pare to patronize, or in the hundreds of private houses which announce their will- ingness .to take strangers in. Experience at Chicago and Buffalo has demonstrated that exposition visitors will not put up with such Inferior accommodations. Relief is in the con- struction of many large exposition ho- tels." .temporary in in the neighborhood of tlie exposition grounds. The wi.se visitor will patronize-one of these .simply for the reason that they will be near the exposition, which' is miles from the heart of the city, and ''which is to be reached at the present time only by transit facilities that are abominable. Infrequent' and overcrowded trolley, cars, and very much more InfreCiUeiH and less cleanly "local trains over two lines of railroad are what the people here for this celebration have to depend on. It is said that all this will be remedied, that new tracks are to be laid arid loops and licit lines to be built. Casual inquirlfiSr however, seem to develop the fact that the powers that control the transportation fa- cilities are going to do these things only when the authorities whose d-uty it is to protect the public interest gram demands that a. New York franchise grabber would blush to hint at. The scene at the exposition 'grounds, even as matters are to-day, is one to con'vince anybody that the show 'is go- ing to be a magnificent one. The grounds are on a wide plain. It is practically de- void or shade irees. but this condition is relieved by the. wooded hills of Forest Park close by. The grounds .'ire very extensive KB compared with those occupied at Cftffo and Buffalo, so much so that one is rather disheartened at the prospect of hav- ing to walk about them. This effect will be modified, though, when the great white city i.s built and the land-: scape gardeners have done their work: An army of men are employed there now. The work is not far enough advanced to warrant any detailed description or criti- cism of the exposition buildings'.as a whole, but what has'been accomplished gives full promise that this exposition will be superb.-- ly housed. RAIN MAY HAP. KXERCISES. It Is uncomfortably warm he.re to-day. Visitors from the East, who came in Win- ter flannels ancl wearing light -overcoats are casting the overcoats aside, and un- buttoning their vests. Straw hats arc al- ready being generally worn by the natives. St. Louis men say that this ii one of the coolest Summer cities in the country, but it does not seem so. Visitors listen wit.h interest when t.okt that at the. exposition next Summer there Is going to be a skating rink, with acres of artificial ice in it. and that there will be two artificial snow- storms each day there, it will surely be a centre of attraction1. The weather prophet declares to-night that to-morrow's great parade .and catory exercises will be marred by a down- pour of rain. He says he hopes his pre- diction will -not be fulfilled, but he is afraid It will. The arrival of the President late this afternoon and of ex-Presidem Cleveland shortly afterward were the features- of the day. They are both, 'guests at the home of ex-Gov. Franci-s. President of the ex- position, w Mr. Cleveland orrivc'a ever the Baltimore Ohio Southwestern at o'clock, and a large reception committee was waiting for him. The committee was not allowed ,to be Idle, however, for the train from WashlnK- ton bearing the members of the .Diplomatic Corps; which was not expected until o'clock, came in thirty" minutes before the committee had looked for it. The diplomats were promptly taken in h.-ind and escorted lo the quarters .-issigned to 'Lh'Mn. A portion of the .-'ommHtoc remained to greet Mr. Cleveland, whose train came in shortly after the diplomats mid driven away. As he alighted he was warmly .______....._. :il of Infantry, all from New York. In to the troops from New lork, these ti-Qops arrived during the day: One rit-.ivisioifcl regiment'and band. offi- cers from Ohio; four regiments from Missouri, officers .and men-; one and band from lo.wa, SO officers lind" men; one regiment and band from Illinois, -l.O'.HI officers and men; one bat- .lalion and band from Oklahoma. 1WO offi- cers and men; one battalion and Band from Louisiana. JtM) officers and Mien. Oen. Gomez of Cuba arrived at1 10 o'clock tiiis- morning. He heartily welcomed bv a Reception Committee, ut-id escorted to the Ploc'.ers' Hotel. Oov. Van Sara-of Minnesota, Gov. Cum- niins of' !ov.va. and Gov. Mickey of Ne- brasltji. amved eirly in the aiternoon. and "le Oov. Cummins, In, par-tir-ular. was attended l-ames. A by a stalt' sui'fici'ently numerous to make j which com uj> squadron of .cavalry iii itself. f.Iibbons, who Is to deliver the invocation at the dedications-ceremonies t.i-rnorrow. arrived late last night, and was driven to the residence of Archbishop Kain, whose jjutst be for. the remajndcr oi :he Chester W. Chapin's Estate, the Rock- efeller Estate, a-id the Loon Lake Prop'erty Burned i in Other States. _-, FOR TO-DAY. The order of exercises for to-morrow is as follows; Hi A. of lite will bo tenOorM PrcskU-i-'t J-jusevi-lt ill the Louis- Club by A. .military parade formed on j If A." M'--Grand 'Marshal Major On. Henry f "CVrl.in will- star: west on Llndcll 'Buulevaril I'l-oni (irand in advnneo ot the--pa- r.Ti-. will rt-a.-h Hi.- World's. Fair Onnmtls and. life-Pri'si.k-r.tiLd salut- will be- firM. ami Pres- cient Kiwi-veil will take Ills yluuc In Hie revlcw- sathirs ut P. Band ooncort as cr ie I.il.f-nd Arts Uulldiiis. H P. 1-iavUI R. Franc-is tii the orld'i! Fuir Company will -call meeting U> nl'-r for 1'orniii! O.'-'diealinr.. Tho in'Ogramme: irivui-iuiuii by riiT-dlnal Introduction of Thomas H: of ihc Na- H-.-av-.-ns the-liuildinii by r.-.-.s 111- kl.' Yc.- Vortals." Mr. Francis. i-hurus ulid band accompanS Hvii.lrlx. iishuli H-rK-y C. Potter. ViitvDliurl Sidutc HM1 KLiris. KlBht n'riui-ll. fiivw.jrks. The -city has" put forth every effort to en- tertain visitors and ail parts, of it have lavishly decorated with flags, stream- rs. and drapings ol' r-d, blue, and yellow bunting. Sfccia't !o The A'ra York Times. PORT JERVIS, N. Y., April forest fires are raging in Sullivan County', and have already caused thousands of dol- lars of darriaee. s A- big fire" is .burning in the forest and lake preserve at Chester. W. Chapin, the millionaire steamboat owner of New York City, and deer, antelope, and other animals irescrvc are running'to escape the About, two-thirds of the prises iio.OOO acres, have been i-burned over. It Is reported that -Mr. Chapin has offered a reward of for the conviction of the person who started the. fire. .Flames are sweeping over the McKenzle estate, a short distance west of here, and are being carried by the wind to the village of Glenspey, where the eight children of the late George B. McKenzie of New York City have fine Summer homes. Large forces of men are out back'firing to. sav.e the village from the scourge. Many miles of woodland have been swept by flames on the Shawdngunk Mountains east of this village... The force of firefighters .are: almost exhausted, and a number of houses of the .village were saved by a bucket brigade of women to-day. The i'lre having- crept all tME way d.own the mountainside, several large areas in 'Pike County, Penn.. have also-been burned. Late this afternoon a fire starled in the woods at Parker's Glen, fourteen miles west of here, and burned over an extensive area. The sclioolhouse was saved by a. large force of Erie trackmen, who formed a bucket brigade.. Social lo.Thi Ara York Times. N. April forest fires are. raging in the Adirondacks, and great damage is reported to the Loon Lake i Hotel property and the Rockefeller estate, which covers over 5U.OOO acres of land, and upon which a amount- of money has been expended in macadamized highways, artificial ponds, and camps. The Rocke- feller camps are located about Big .Bay Pond, but no damage has been done to the building. Crowds are -fighting the fires, "and it is believed they are under control. Since the .disappearance of snow tho grounds, have become thoroughly dried, scarcely any rain having- fallen in the Adirondacks this Spring.'. Many forest fires are expected if the present dry sea- sun continues. Never before have_ forest fires been reported so early. Had Been Paid on His Life by Order of the Supreme Court. :Q Iii: York limes. DALLAS, T-'xas April man giving the Iname of NVilhain A ;Hunf out life N Y., April insurance policies i-or Sl.j.fJW in Dallas, on Adirondacks Lack of rain: and a dry wind have made the w'oods very dry. and as the green leaves have not come out yet, a fire Is very easily started. The New York Oct. -21. ISM. from Capt. 'A: J. of the Fidelity Mutual Insurance Company of New York. Two months later Hunt was reported to have perished in quicksands in the Pecos River Valley, In Lov'lnc' County, Texas. The insurance compact' not satisfied with the showing on the..re- ported death and resisted .payment of ihe life insurance, A Mvs. Jennie Met.slcr of Dallas, claiming line of the Adirondack Railroad, the leaves to be a sister of Hum, sued the life insiir- and. underbrush In the Adirondack .woods ance company and got judgment. The case are burning-. -'The fire nas thus far been went 1 i ihe Supreme Cout-i of the" United'! kept In check by the labors of 175 men. as- ........sistlng the regular fire wardens. Chief Fire Warden1 Emrnons telegraphed to the commlss'loii to-day from Fulton Chain that the, fires there were tinder control, -and he was going on to -the'Tapper Central -Railroad has had its fire gangs at work along their line since last Satur- day-.- AI.EAKY, X. .Y., April is said at the office of the Forest, and Game that for'stxtr-t'lvu rnftea be- tween White Lake and Saranac Inn. on the States and was affirmed, the policies, dam- ages, and costs-assessed'against .the com- pany amounting to which-was paid. Two ago Capt.'Brown was notified that a man was under iirrVst at Birming- ham Ala. who the ofi'icn-s claimed, was Hint, the n.an accused bv the company ot bi-itig an insurance swindler, but 'declared bv relatices-and friends to be dead. 'Capt Brown wt-nt from Dallas yester- day to Birmingham to see., it he could identify the prisoner as the mttn whose life he insured in K'M.- telegraphed to M. K. Locke., the company's Dallas at- torney, that the identification was com- and that the prisoner will at once be brought -to Dallas. TO FOBFEIT RAILWAY CHARTER. Texna OommlHuIon AMUed to' Proceed n. Sonthern Puciflu Proin'riy. V Sffdal lo 1 ,.e fJetr York Tints. AVSTIX, Texas, April J. Storey, Chairman of the State Railroad Commis- sion, said to-day that a public hearing 'would probaoly be called on a petition ask- ing the commission to direct .the Attorney General to institute .suit to forfeit the charter of the Gulf, West Texas and Pacific Railroad Company, which Is a Southern Pacific property. The charges against the company are that it has not compiled with! the require- ments of its --charter granted in 1S71! by special act of the Legislature, which pro- vided that it should build a certain number, of miles of road each year until It had ex- tended'its lir.e to San Antonio. Austin, and i: FIRES IN MICHIGAN. Town of Onaway Threatened with De- and Life Endangered. ONAWAY. Mich., April fires threaten 'the destruction of the city. In every direction tne woods' are- ablaze, of citizens fought the flames last night to keep them from the lumber.yards and plant of the Lobdell, Bailey Manu- facturing Company. The lumber camps are sarrounded by fire, and it is .feared that there will-be loss of life. A high wind from the southwest prevails. Log trains were kept busy all night brmg- irg in people rescued from Ihe lire along the track. Residents of part of the city are moving for safety. The smoke is so dense as to be suffocating, and the sun's rays'glow dimly through it. cast- Ir-e a vellow shadow. Burned.cinders and i r-'rred embers fill the air. Unless rain fall's the-..result will be serious. G R E AIN El It Is Raging, in the Region Between Moose and Dead Rivers. 'Special !c The AVty Ycrk 7'itiies. Me., April enormous cloud of smoke: has been spreading like a pall over' the 'Upper Ker.hebec Valley, all :lay, and rapidly working soilth. The tem- decldedly all through Company. PRINCE HENRY'S BEAUTY WEDS. 'Milwaukee Olrl Whom Prince Millie Famous with HU 1'rulKe a Bride Special to Tiie- A'Vu> York Times. MflAVAUKEK, Wis., April Geneva Dolan, whom Prince Henry Is said to have considered the roost beautiful .wo- man he met in America, was married'at St. John's Cathedral to-day to Anthony J. Romadka, Rev. Father Keogh officiating; The bride entered the church on the arm o( her father.. Miss Klla'NV. Krilt was maid of honor, and Francis J. Romadka best The ceremony was followed by a recep- tldii the DeuWclrer Club. After the wedding trip Mr. and Mrs. Romadka will make their home at Thirty-fifth Place and I Grand Boulevard, Chicago. WEED DIVORCE TRIAL "Vnlitlity of Dnkotn Decree tloned in Connecticut. t'o 'Tim York Times. April 'the Su- perior Court, be-fore Judge William S. nit for divorce instituted by Samuel A, iri the immensity of Ihe smoke cloud Mid the direction in which it Is traveling it A cer-taln that a tremendous forest fire is r-iclng somewhere in the region between River and Dead River, probably In liolelj which devastated twenty-five years ago. From the top of found breathing difficult at times to-day to the smoke In the air, The smell of burning pine is-plainly de- tected and this indicates that, the fire is in a virgin forest. Lack -of telephone and telegraph facilities makes it impossible to exactly locate .the. tire to-night, but Irom all -that can be learned the flames are roK-ing over a tract 'about forty miles' souare. There has been-very little rain this I siring In any part of Maine, and the woods are as dry as in midsummer. BLIZZARD JW_ NORTHWEST. Heavy Snowstorms in Several States j and. a Big Drop in Temperature. DULUTH, Apcil Is ex- periencing a snowstorm, foUowir.g several days of warm Spring weather. It commenced raining last even- j to snow enrly this morning, j INDEX TO DEPARTMENTS. Commercial 11. Amusements.-Page Arrivals at Hotels and Out-of-Town Kuy- 7. business 7. Court 31. Insurance Legal Xotes.-Page in. Losses by Fir'.-.-Page Morlne Intelligence and Foreign Page 7. New 13. Real H. Society 'J. l-nlted 11. Weather 3. Yesterday's 2. Poland! PolnmlUt Bottled at the Famous Poland SprlnEa, Adv. ____________- "Tine 2OtU Century Limited" IP the Niw Vork Central's 2ti-hyur train between York auil Chicago. Saves a __ Samuel i In of a Dakota divorce. The defendant left; Mr. ISl'-l, obtained a decree in Da- kola, and married Charles Francis Bates. their tw.o children the couple now live I in Morrlstown. N. J. The only witness examined to-day was j Mr. He testified as to the date of his marriage with the defendant and told of household over the friendly calls of Mr. Bates He said that Mrs. Weed had left hlrn in December, 1804, and produced two letters which he had received after she had left him In which she stated her intention of never living with him again' and re- preached him for jealousy and cruelty.' Mr. I Weed testified-that he had been servtd I with papers In the Dakota suit, but had not j defended Ihe ettit. Poland! Natural Spring Water No Need for Anxiety. 'Tlis Pennsylvania Rallroad'n four-tracked line to PlttiiburK and. the West is amuly protected by the latest patiern automatic signal apd 1 WEST SUPERIOR, April 20.-The worst blizzard of the year has been raging since early morning. There is a strong gale of Wind, and snow lias been falling steadily. The1 temparalure this morning was 7 de- grees below the ..freezing point. HTTRON I S D.. April has' been i falling here since early morning, with tern-, i perature below'freezing. Fruit buds and in the western part of the State, with the temperature below freezing point. The tem- perature dropped Ki degrees In There is much danger oi fruit being.killed. Weather predictions .for to-night are rain, snow, and colder. LINCOLN Neb., April blizzard ex- tending over the entire western part of the State set inearly to-day and still continues. Trains on the Burlington to- the northwest are delayed. The snow west and north of Broken Bow .is two inches deep. CHEYENNE, Wyo., April snow- storm which began yesterday af-ternoon continued with undiminlshed fury to-day. The thercmometer has fallen almost to zero, and heavy, losses of sheep are ex- pected, as shearing has been going on for two weeks. TEXAS. Windstorm at Clarendon Does Consid- erable to Crops. -Special lo The Nra> York Times, DALLAS, Texas, April fell in many sections of the. Panhandle of- Texas to-day. The weather all over Nortliwe.5t Texas has suddenly turned unusually cold for this season and damage to crops, is ex-, pected-to result. More snow in the .Pati- 'handle Is predicted for to-night.. It isjcold as far south Antonio, and hail fell there -with rain. The unseasonably 'cold weather has alarmed the farmers, and it is the general opinion that crops of all kinds will be seriously injured unless-warm, weather comes soon. The fall of snow in Texas 'with May nearly at hand is regarded as a weather freak. A; windstorm at Clarendon at S o clock this morning wrecked stores and unroofed houses and serious oamage. There wen" no fatalities. The rain about Dallas -so fat' has done little- good. Tha farmers they heavy showei'9 and warm, sunny weather; after them. ROSE COGHUN_SEEKS DIVORCE Will File Siiit In District Court of He- lena, to Marry Again. Sftcial tu The Ynrk Times. HELENA, Mo'n... April Rosa- mond Marie Sullivan, known to the theat- rical .world as Rose Coghlan. will file a suit tor divorce in the district court here to- morrow. Her attorney is First Assistant Attorney General P. W. Metier. Miss Cdghlan.whq is playing here to-night, said flu. and her husband have not lived together for five years, and that she estab- lished n. residence here a year ago. Asked If she was going to marry again, Miss Coghlan said: Not with: me. I've had enough of it for one woman. When get my maiden name back again I am gclng lo keep it." MILLION? TO FIGHT TRUST. Pledge of for Packing- Houses Given by Stock Men in the Country. Sfecia! !o The York Times. DENVER. April .W. Springer President of. Live Stock Asso- ciation, said to-day that the leading- stock men of the: country have already pledged to a co-operative company that 1 will establish a chain of independent 'pack- ing plants In the. event that beef trust is formed. Mr. Springer, who has taken the lead -In the agitation of stockmen for combination to prevent control of the price of cattle by the packers, says that the stock inter- ests will have a working capital ot times that of.-the packers' com- it should come to a slruggie anoVtijat with available it to build 'independent packing plants at Omaha. Kansas Joseph, Denver, and Salt Lake, City, and possibly In Chicago. HARVARD STUDENTS PROTEST. Action Taken by the Bursar Leads to an. Indignation Meeting. .CAMBRIDGE. Mass.. April or three hundred Harvard men gathered in Sanders Theatre this afternoon in'response to a call for a mass meeting" to pro- test againsi the action of the college au-_ thprities in seizing a large number of signs which adorned the walls of college rooms, Some of the leaders in the movement made speeches which were brief but to the point denouncing the part taken by ihe Bursar as high handed." "outra- geous." and "Ihe most radical paternal- ism on record. It was filially voted to appoint a com- rrdttoe ol five to consider the matter at ler-p'th, ;ind report its recommendations, at a second mass-meeting which its members are authorized to call. The committee was appointed and'had a session at tlie close of the. tiu.eting. but did not come to any dc-linite decision. OBJECTION TO A-JiIONUMENT. It the SnpernUtlonH of Salem By. a Tlffer. Special '.o NwYork Tiir.es. SALEM, Mass., April fifty-thou- sand-dollar monument offered by Frederick P.- Aver of New York in honor of ancestors who'" were" banished from Salem because they were QuaRers has stirred up not a. lit- tle opposition among certain of the older residents. They admit that the. work Is beautiful Irom an artistic standpoint, but declare that, much as Mr. Ayer may wish to honor his ancestors, it is too much to expect them to allow him to present the ancient ru'.ers of Salem in the guise of a wild, beast. Tlif statue represents a man struggling v-ith a- tiper who has attacked .a woman, tiie using the tiger to impersonate i'e'S-rson is very 'mucli in favor of accenting the mouument as It is. and de- clared to-night that SO per cent, of the people of the city were also in favor of it. BIG COELOSTAT FOR ST. LOUIS. Antronoinii-Bl Inntrnment Conntrucled, tor SiuitlKoniiio to Go to tlie Fair. Spcciei -0 The York Times. PITTSBURG, Penn.. Jan. John Brashear of Allegheny last night an- nounced that the astronomical'instrument -uat completed for the Smithsonian Insti- tution, Washington, D. C., would in a few weeks be sent to St. Louis, where the United States Government will have it mounted for exnlbition at the big fair. The instrument, which Is built on a new basis of construction, Is technically known as a is the'largest and instru- ment' of its kind ever constructed and will primarily for the study of Solar nrienomena, such as sun storms, solar'spec-. trum work, and other phenomena. PEREZ 1. STEWART IS Mr. Cantor Dismisses Superin- tendent of Buildings. j Borough President Gives No Reason for S. Thompson Ap- pointed, but May Be Ineligible. odDugh frequent trouble -w-hich had occurred in his peraJure oe I nver the frlendK calls of Mr. I other grain-are believed to have been seriously Injured. TOPEKA. Knn., April 20.-Reports re- ceived at the government Weather Bureau here to-day .snow -was falling Bnrnet'n Extract of Vnnllla. pi-eparecj fr'om seli-cted Vanilla Beans, warranted, While the Pfnmujvanla limited otters cvi'ry convenience of office or club. A publlc: stenoirrapher, ttook reports, and comfortable Adv. Four million In bond ininre the unlfom 4ukllty of Adv, FIRE CHIEF CROKER'S CASE. It Was Argued Before the Court of .Appeals by His Counsel. ALBANY, case of ex-Fire Department Chief ;Edward F. Croker of Netv, York City, who was relieved-from duty last August by Fire Commissioner wns argued before the .Court of Appeals to-' day Croker Is appellant from, the reversal: by- the Appellate Division of an order of Special Term to compel his reinstatement.. The main contention of his counsel, John J. Delany is that he was- practically sus- pended from the. force without a hearing. Poland! eatest Natural Water Great Adv. __________ All the -Great Sound serve Frttnfc JoneB' Portsmouth. N. H., Ale and Si out Bock Harris, Agenti. 82 Cortlandt at.. N, Y.-Adv. Perez M. Stewart, Superintendent of Buildings in the Borough of Manhattan, was peremptorily removed Irom office yes- terday by Borough President Cantor. No charges were preferred against .Mr. Stew- and -he-asserts, that his removal was for political reasons. Up to'two days ago, he says, Mr. Cantor declared to-him'per- sonally that he was satisfied with' his of- ficial course. Some leaders of the Greater New York Democracy declared last night'that the re- moval of Mr. Stewart was made because during Ihe last three months'he has fried to cultivate the friendship of those pcjwer- ful in Tammany Hall. Secretary Ceorge Biake of the Bo, President's office appeared at the Avenue Hotel last evening and gave out such facts as Mr. Cantor desired to make public in'reference to the case. The-an- nouncement was made that Henry S. Thompson, formerly of the Thompson-Star- rett Construction Company, had beWi ap- pointed to succeed Mr. Stewart. The question arose at once as to whether Mr. Thqrnpaon was eligible. Section 403 of the- Greater New York charter gives the qualifications of the Superintendent of Buildings, saying the President of the Bor- ough of Manhattan is authorized to appoint such Superintendent, who shall be a com- petent architect or builder of at least ten years' experience." The assertion was made last night that Mr. Thompson would be ineligible to serve because he has had only -four years' ex- perience in building operations. His first is said, was" with the fl.-.-.i of. Thompson Adams, The partnership was terminated by the suicide of Mr. Adams. Subsequently Mr. Thomp- son became connected with the Thompson- Starrett Company. He served as Treasurer for two and a half .years, and during that time -had control of-the finances of the company, while the building operations were in charge of the other members of the concern, Secretary Blake, however. Insisted that Mr. Thompson has had eleven years' ex- perience, but could not at the time give specific Information concerning that feat- ure of his career. The first'sign' that there was any dis- agreement between Borou5h President Cantor and the Superintendent of Build- ings came at. tile meeting.of the Greater New- York Democracy, held less than a month ago. Charges were made then in the secret session that Superintendent Stewart had been partial to certain poli- ticians in Tammany Hall. There was a heated debate, and charges were made that Borough President Cantor was not treating- the member.-; of the Greater New York Democracy with the political considerations which they de- served: John C. Sheehan took a prom- inent part in this discussion.- It was said 'last evening that for more than six months Mr. .Sheehan has been trying to effect the removal of Superln- tendeiit Stewart because he would not favor friends of the leader of the1 Greater. New York Democracy. Soon after this meeting Mr. Stewart re- moved from offi'ce Chief Inspector Thomas O. McGill. No charges were made public against Mr. McGill, but for several months there was serious discord between the offi- cials of the Blinding Department in refer- ence to matters which they would not dis- cuss in public. One ot the reasons why Superintendent Stewart was removed from office was given last evening by'some friends of the deposed official. They .said that at a din- ner given in honor.of Chief Judge] Alton B. Parker, Superintendent Stewart Invited to the banquet Charles F. M-urphy, the'; leader of Tammany Hail, and Randolph i Guggenhelmer, ex-President of the Borough of Manhattan. Mr Stewart explained .to the leaders of the'Greater New York Democracy that his only Ideai In inviting these men was to have politicians of all shades of opinion present to show that it was a real harmony dinner, and make it a substantial indorse- I ment of Judge' Parker for President.' It j also was asserted that Mr. Stewart- invited Alderman -Timothy P. but he de- i nied having extended an invitation to the 1 nephew of the east side Congressman. Several members of tile. Greater New i York Democracy declared last evening'that there. was mere back, of the removal of i Stewart-than had-been made pablic. Mr. Stewart was seen in his apartments in. the Nevada, at Seventieth Streeet and Broadr way-. He was surrounded by many friends, o'f whom were-ready to tell why he had been removed.' All he would say for pub- lication was as follows: I saw Borough President Cantor o.n Tuesday morning nt hi.s huusoi just dropped in upon him wl.thout any invita- tion or appointment. Much to my surprise suggested, ot; account, he said, of out- side influences-which he could not" with- stand that I should resign. I asked him if he had any find with the depart- ment 1 control, and he said, 'None what- 1 said I have to consider his request for my resignation. due consideration, believing and kno-.ving thai thel Bureau nf Buildings had' been .administered to the benefit and wel- fare-of the'public. 1 made up my mind that i'would not resign. 1 talked to some ol my friends, and they told me to stick to my decision. 1 notified Mr. Cantor, and this afternoon I was afforded another uppor- turlty to resign- Secretary Blake of presi- otfice urged me to do .so, but I declined to retreat from my-posilion, and was removed. Thai's ail there is to It.'.' 11 What outside influences were working against asked :i reporler. I do' not care to discuss that matter. Perhaps whftt Borough President Cantor said is true and that hi- could not wilh- siand outKldt Iniluem-es." friends of -Mr. Siewart made many stTicments about the political Issues in- volved They declared lhat Mr. Stewart had refused to give advantages, which they called "graft." to the members .of the Greater New York Democracy. They said superintendent Stewart had treated all politicians alike. Another statement was made in reference to the filling of the vacancy In the office of Chief Inspector of the Department held bv Mr 'McGill. John C. Sheehan. It .was asserted, wanted one of his personal friends named for the place, because of the power It would glxtfSJriim In the supervision large building operations. Some of Mr. Stewart's friends said that his removal was due to a discussion which 'he had several months ago with Mr. Adams, law partner of Borough President Poland! Poland Wiitcr, first amung nature's Adv. All Western Health are on or reached via the Rock Inland Colorndc California, Hot Springs, Ark. Tickets and berths at uptown otfice, bl, ond Filth" AV.. also at 401 Cantor. Mr. Stewart was asked to do a ,i "certain favor, but he declined. Mr. Adams I .Is.'then reported to have said that it would not be long before Mr, Stewart would be looking a job Instead of giving jobs away. SOUGHT HIS RETENTION. It was learned last evening that the men who became interested in the Stewart" mat- ter and tried'to keep him In office were Street Cleaning Commissioner Woodbury, Commissioner De Forest of the Tenement House Commission, and-John B. McDonald of. the subway company. Oswald G, vil- lard, who was consulted in the matter, said last evening: Mr, Stewart's administration of the Building Department Has been thoroughly honest and competent, and the best which the city has had for many years." In talking over the matter with Mr. Cantor he .said. that he knew nothing which would -in any way reflect on Mr. Stewart's personal In- tegrity. Mr Cantor, if he wants to justify the removal of Mr. Stewart, will have to make public facts which will justify his action. Whether the fact that Mr. Cantor has been an independent Democrat and as such has attended a State Convention justified Mr. I Stewart's removal will have to be decided in the future." i President Robert E, Dowling of the Th- den Club, who was sponsor for Mr. Stewart when he was appointed Superintendent oi Buildings, said last evening that President Cantor was fully justified in the removal of the Superintendent. Mr. Dowling said: Since he h.as taken office Mr. Stewart's actions have not been such as to. satisfy his friends who placed him in of flee. There are many reasons .why Borough President Cantor should have taken the action he did to-day." In the 'statement given out last night by Secretary Blake, Mr. Thompson was de- clared to be one of the foremost builders and business men in the city, who until a j year ago wa.s the senior member of the i Thompson-Starrett Company, and who lives at the Hotel Marie Antoinette, Broad- way and Sixty-sixth Street, which building he constructed and owns. The statement says that Mr. Thompson's references were Moses Taylor Pyne. a Di- i rector of the National City Bank and of the Delaware, La.ckawa.nna a'nd "Western Kail- road; John K. Borne, President of the Co- i loiiial Trust Company; James W. Alex- ander. President of the Equitable LJte As- surance Society; Henry A. C. Taylor, I Itobert E. Dowling, President of the Tilden Club; c. .'C. Cuyler, -Juntas Morgan, Aymer Sands of the firm of Bowes Sands, George S. Victor, Bradlsh Johnson, President of the United Slates Realty and Construction Company; John D. Rockefeller, Jr., W, H. Russell of Clinton Russell, Anton Raven, President of the Atlantic'. Mutual Insurr and- D. S. Walton. William S. Sioane'ot'1 J. Sloane, Francis Burton Harrison, the Congressman, and others. Hie statement ended by saying that Mr. Thompson has erected many prominent buildings in this city, and some for Princ'e- ton University.; that he is a native Xew and belongs to, some of the .leading club.; ot' the city. Mr. Stewart.wa.s graduated from Colum- bia College In and has been engaged in business, as a contractor and builder for fifteen years. He .has been active in local politics, and always as an independent Democrat. In 1 SOU-ho supported the Gold Democracy and but in HiuU swung into line and voted for Kryrfn. His hardest political fight .was for the Assembly In when he defeated Robert .Mazet, Republican, and S. C. Tarn- many. Mr. Mazet had the- indorsement of i thp National and Henry.lieorge Democrats. After a bitter fight the" Republican candi- date was defeated and Mr. .Woill received tht certificate of. election from the district. Il'he contest was carried up to the Court of) Appeals, and it was there declared that Stewart had been elected. In "1SUS he a renomination. In ISO'J he was poriiinate'd "by the Citizens' Union and in- dorsed by Tammany, Robert Mazet was Hie Republican candidate, and Mr. Stew- art- v.-on easily. Soon after Mr. Stewart became Superin- tendent of Btdldings he began an inspec- tion 'of the theatres of New York. He de- clared that several of '.iierri were lire and that their eonstraetion nanee was In violation '.if the building laws. He found in .several of the theatres pahit shops and places tor the manufacture of things theatrieal. Mr. Stewart asserted that in case of fire and loss of life he would be held responsi- ble, and lie forced the theatrical manager? to make many charges In their houses. Anutiit-r crusade stalled by to place fire escapes on many public arid private buildings. TO 95 KILLED Disaster Visits a Mining Town in Alberta Province. Various Theories On th; Cause of Explosion. Whole Top of Mountain Slides Into the of Flood from Dam Formed by the Rock. Detention Stations to be Opened on the Canadian at Malone, N. Y. Sreeial :o The i'ors Tima. "WASHINGTON, -April de-. teiition stations for Chinamen will soon be Aliened an the Canadian-border. 'One of them at Malbnc, X. Y., will be opened with- in ten days. The others will be-lucated at Burlington. Portal. X. D., and Sumas, The upeiung of mark 'a th new stations will it- iournanizalion -Of the rhinese immigiation business. The Cana- dian Pacilii: Kailway will .-deliver direct.-10 immigration officials-at these-1'onr places all The Chinamen trying to come hi.-i'e through L'anada. The.railroad company has agreed that ;ill thosjr to be deported will be immediately returned to steamers for shipment to China. has a head tax o; on rhiua- men arriving and Lhere, bin a .period of about three months is'allowed in irynslt. It nan been the custom of thost.- in charge of ttie Chinamen to hnld them' al -Montreal long i-uuiigh to avoid .the head tax, but to coach the wily Orientals with siories to be told the .immigrant ufficiaLs that- they. ;irc luiiive-uorn American.- and to entrance as citizens. The China- men have beuii so inorqughly coached with these stories that hundreds of them have been admitted at Malone. Burlington, and elsewhere. During January. 1- ebruary, and March IWH Chinamen applied tor admission at Canadian border points on the ground' they won; "born in this country. Of ihis number wen.- admitted.-. The -Immigration ser-.'K-e has ordered u-iji outfits 01' the Bortilloi: sysi.-m of.physical. mcHSuremviit. and is to usi- them in the detection'.of Chinese. Hyery port ol entry thro-'gih -.vhleh Phlneft- come to the I'niled States will be supplied the ap- ''-ImmUirnlion officials intend to ask -Con- to ch.-iiise the Chinese exclusion laws Vs to niat-rV'Chinamen claim-ing admis- si'oii'to the raited Siivtes, on th.: ground of i-c'lupr citizens iirov'e their ckiinis :nsteau oi re. lirinK- the br.n.k-n of proof the coii- lo fail the Government. It Is "AV, 10 ailuw -the Government the Sfecic: to The -Via- Yjrk Tirr.ts. VANCOUVER, B. C., April M.-Frobably ninety-flve persons are dead as a. result oi a mysterious' explosion which tore off the top of Turtle Mountain, -overlooking the little town of Frank; in the Province of Al- berta, early this morning. Great masses of rock were hurled down Into the valley OL the "Old Man's Creek, sweeping away the works at the coal mines on the side ot' the mountain and demolishing houses- in the town below. Many ot the inhabitants were, killed In their b-ds. the men at the mir.o works were all killed, and fifteen o: the seventeen men in the mine escaped or.ly by cutting-their way oul through debris which choked an opening leading from the main shaft. There is danger to-night .that flood will add to the disaster. The rock lias forme'1, a great dam. behind which the waters OL the creek have been piling up. and it tht-y sh'ould be let loose it is not doubted that the" entire "town "would be swept away. A gang of men is working' on this dam, how- ever, and it is hoped thai before morning a new'channel will be oin.-ni.-d up for the creek and' that the town will be saveo. Frank Is a town ot" about inhabitants on the line of the branch of the Canadian Pacific Hallway uver (.'row's Xest Pass. It lies at the entrance to the canyon, and the French Canadian Coal Company has been operating- the coal deposits in Turtle Moun- tain-for abou.t i-ighteeii 'months. A dispatch; just received from Prank states that at. o'clock this mornins thi- town was sli'iiki-rr with terrific force ana was shocked Ly loud reports and natlons. Houses threatened to topple ovi-r In the rocking motion. Instantly the town was afoot, and soon the shouting "1' were running to. and fro. min- gled with wails of injured and showed that a catastrophe of mugr.ifj.i-- had taken place. i-'or a time nothing was seen but dense clouds of black smoke, with balls flre darting here and there across the dis- turbed section. As soon as the first smoke cleared away it was seen lhat the side and lop v-1' the mountain irr.Qn-diafly at 'tiie back of ihe town had off. An immense .upheaval of about on.? mn.3 by two miles long hud taken place, and what before .was a lonjj swarnp iws sud- denly transformed'into a huge mountain of The dir.-ctloi. the t-ntptjon from the mountain was north and northeasterly ami in' limestone as this of the country is all limestone. The side, of the mountain on which the mint? working i> nothing but faiiinv, rock. As to the cause or nature of tho explo- sion many theories ar- advanced, some a-. serlins it was due to gas, others lhat :t was slaking- of limestone, and stlil others declaring it- was a volcanic eruj.- lioii. The immonsv .-tn-tch of country roin- up by til- uiiheyvLil" would 10 len.i color to the idea that there was an lu-aval for a mile or so, but no explosion- till tin- of-thJ- niountairi was blown up. The mining company has cottages in which its eniiil'iyes and others "town live, one .whole row of thesi- lages. together with every them, was totally destroyed, remarkable iiov; sorn.- otlw-r wei-e directly in line "f the rot-k and Tlu- company's min.-s und plum ar-l lot-ally destroyf-'d, ihe. lighl plant being n'.sial'.ed i--. also A mil-; or so UK- Canadian Pacific tracks is also torn up. ar.dnhe rails are and "bent- in ail so'rf of fatitastli- The road could never be built u', frur.i there again. roar from the mo.un'-air. is s; at times ,-.lmosi deafening and the ro franti'-- and panic stricken lor o. vth'.r outbreak. Nearly .-very collage in tiio districi Is :iow vacant, the oe-'Up-Rts ilitirmore. a small have b. method. held I r.ot jiow ELECTRICITRIKETHREATENED Men at Westinghouse Works May j Go Out and Delay World's Fair. j Contracts. 'Sfecx: :c York I PiTTSjJL'P.G, April meeting will be J luld to-morrow night to decide whether pbattt men employed by the Westing- house Electric 'find Manufacturing Com- pany at their East Plttsburg plant shall 50 or, a Tne members of the Machln- I IMS' Union charge discrimination against t'hiir members by trix company. The offi- i-lals deny this. Should the strike lake i place II will be the- biggest that has.oc- clirred In Pittsburg since the steel strike and the'first labor dlsliirbaniv that the AVestinghouse Company has had In twelve ivears. The call for the meeting, was issued rto-day from the headquarters ot' the ma- I I Snould the employes of Ihe company de- cide unon a strike the entire electrical plant at East Pittsburg will probably be closed down. This will be a great set- back to many contracts, the most im- portant of which Is the electric apparatus fur tlie St. Louis .Exposition. The cst- i'njdiouse Company has contracis for all Ihe electrical "work 'in oil .the buildings, and. the bulk of the work is being done at tlie East Pittsburg plant. If the strike .comes the opening of the St. Liouls Ex- position may be delayed. For the Cuniiolttneur. Pall Mall London Cigarettes. miles distant. organized, and syarch and .res, i ried on, biu v.e iiiir any o-i' the missing. family of Sam innis a miraeuious escape. Their cottage was the second from the end where- th.- crash began. P.y superhuman effort he. manasi-d to dr-.s himself out of th- di-l-rls and afu.r UK- other the ciuire family. While thoy--.ire all shaken up and suffer- ins from bruises they are thankful to b-> alive. Another.remarkable escape was.that of two ilttlo, dausjhicrs of A. l.jjlich. wi-.a were taken out of the ruins almost unin- iured. Mr. and Sirs. I.eltch and tl'.e four- "sTiiis. were all dead. Many Scenes as other bodies ure takers out from tlie debris. -Adv. No Better Way to Buffalo than the L.ackawfuiim Kailroad. Klejjant new 'Pullman cars. Dining car service. Tickets aad LISo AUv DETAILS OF DISASTER.- Another Account from Vancouver. Tells of the Slide of -the Mountain Top. VAN'COl'VEP., B._i.C.. April '-'fl. -Over- whelmed by countless ions- i-f rock this morning shortly after 4 o'clock, and with probably of its inhabitants killed almost instantly, the little mining town of in Southwestern Alberta, is threatened with .complete destruction by flood to-night. Old Man's Creek, which flows through "the centre of the town, is danimeJ up by the-falleri rock to the height of nearly 100 feet, and the entire valh-y above the. .town is Hooded for miles. A big body of water is pressing wilh force upon the dam. the -only; protection the town uf Frank now has. less inn river shall find another channel. Should the Impromptu dam break tlie vli- luge would be swept :ovuy. A large force of men has been 'at work trying to create a new channel lhat the dammed up water oi the Old Man's Creek may be run off. The men will work Thrnne-hout the night, and it is hoped that   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication