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New York Times Newspaper Archive: March 20, 1903 - Page 1

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   New York Times, The (Newspaper) - March 20, 1903, New York, New York                             "All the News That's Fit to Print." VOL. LII......NO. MlYOR LOW REFUSES TO SEE LI8DOR MEN THE WEATHER. Fair; winds southwest, be- coming northwest NEW YOEK. FKIDAY, MAECH 20, 1903.-SIXTEEN PAGES. ONE CENT Requires Them First to Disprove Blackmail Fund Rumors. ANGRY DEALERS SEE JEROME Their Conferenea with the Dis- trict Attorney, Fritz Llndlnger Sends a Letter to the Mayor, Ask- ing for Fair Play. SJayor Low refused to see a delegation of liquor dealers at the City Hall yesterday and told them in a letler that he would make an appointment if they would tell the yearly fund which was being raised by an assessment of ?o a on every saloon keeper in the Greater New Tork. The Information which Mayor Low re- ceived -was that the assessment on th liquor dealers was being raised as a cor- ruption fund to prevent the passage of the bill In the Legislature increasing the liquor license, and also to pay the police Ptotectlon." A personal adviser of Mayor Z.OW said yesterday: "The situation is Just this: Mayor Low lisd Information about the corruption of the police by the raising of this fund. If police force, which is the right hand of tho Mayor In enforcing the law, Is being corrupted, any means which he may take to find out the exact facts are justifiable. Ifayor Low did not deny the liquor dealers bearing. He simply asked for informa- tion about the fund which he had been Informed was raised for corrupt purposes. Kiyor Low was Justified In asking every or set of men supposed to bo implicated in this matter what they were The letter which George F. Gmlnder of the National Retail Liquor Dealers' Asso- ciation to Mayor Low asking for a ttiuittf on the excise bill at Albany, wan aa-follows: A committee having been appointee! by the wins, liquor, and beer dealers of Greater York, of which I have the honor to he GMlrmui, to call on you In reference to the KzcUw bill now pwidlntr at Albany, I would say If to you, will call on you Thurs- Jfwch IB. A, M.. at your office, City Hall, New Tork: or. If not convenient to you. at any thereafter to suit your conve- nience. OCCASION OF THE TROUBLE. The reply of Mayor Low, which started the controversy, was as follows: nai'.Dt asking for an appfllntment to confer with me to-morrov.- fore- ifton at 11 o clock In reference to Excise now pending at Albany. I cannot see you named' for I have then an adver- hearing on a legislative bill. Before I fix another hour tor such an appoint- ment, nowftver. I am obliged to ask your atten- tion to an aspect of the question which seems to have been per- f SS T i "-t, a v'ry that the local Liquor Deal-rs' Association, J ?he the paster. that one of those visitors II, what did you do 3' asked gave him an equivocal re- F'vf'. faithful servant replied. But what did you persisted her master. answer, 'I am Just after axing him if his grandmother was a mon- key- And Mr. Jerome lauglx When asked what he had tolc. lllc ..quo, dealers, Mr. Jerome said hefcmd merely given them some fatherly advice." He said his sympathy was with them In the fullest measure. "This bill, it seems to he said, "is not one conducing to the public welfare or to public morality. There are men, women, and children In New Turk directly or indirectly Identified with the liquor busi- ness. They have invested a great deal of money in their business. They are paying such a high license now that In many cases they are only making bartenders' wages and sometimes not even that. Now it Is an afterlhought, as it were, ar.d entirely without notice and warning, to jump this license 50 per cent. If a measure of that nature was taken in an- other industry, it would precipitate a riot. That is the business side of this propo- sition, and you've got to look at it that way. In dealing with the liquor dealers and their business, you are dealing with a commer- cial business which, whilo you and I may not think very highly of it, J5 a perfectly legal way of earning a. live- lihood. And. another thing, most of these men are over thirty-five years old. They are men who have learned no trade and could not earn a livelihood In any other way. They are fighting for their very lives In fighting this measure." Mr. Jerome said it was a mistaken notion that this bill would strike a blow at the evil resorts. These, he oaid, could well afford to pay no, 100, or 200 per cent, higher license than they are paying. Those that would have to go fo the wall, said he, said Mr. MR. BOWEN IMPATIENT AT DELAY BY POWERS Sends Note to Ambassador Her- bert Asking Intentions. Rumors of a Disposition Not to Send Question of Preferential Treat- ment to The Hague. WASHINGTON, March m-Another Im- portant chapter in the Venezuelan contro- versy developed to-night. Impelled by the persistent reports which have been circu- lated tha.1 there might be a disposition on the pa'rt of the allied powers to settle di- rectly wlih President Castro the question of the payments o( the claims of their citizens ngalnst Venezuela, coupled with the exasporatlng delay In settling the addi- tional protocols, Herbert W. Bowen Vene- zuela's Plenipotentiary, has made an effort to obtain positive information from the allies as to their intentions in the premises. With this purpose in view, -to-night he addressed to Sir Michael Herbert, the Brit- ish Ambassador at Washington, a polite r.ote, calling attention to the delay of about a month and to the rumors that have been current that the powers are not disposed to send the question of preferential treatment to The Hague. Mr. Bowen urged It as de- sirable that some declarations should be mode by the allies as to what they will do. According to the terms of the protocol signed by Mr. Bowen with Germany, Great Mr j said that the liquor dealers' committee had come to him In a state of to mor? than 'n the question of blackmail. While they considered the Mavor had a perfect right to ask them in regard to the rumors which had reached hRn on this subject, they thought It exceedingly tact- less on his part to endeavor to make that matter a preliminary to their getting an opportunity to ascertain the Mayor's views on the proposed liquor tax legislation. ,.Wnat think will be the effect, wlitlcally, of Mayor Low's refusal to see he liquor dealers? Do you think It will i.ive as much effect ns his refusal to take part in the St. Patrick's Day Mr. Jerome was asked. 'Deponent sayeth not." was his reply. Mr. Jerome said if the committee had >nt a letter to Mayor Low regarding the situation, he knew Its contents. LINDINGER TO THE MAYOR. The following letter has been sent to the Mayor by Fritz Lindinger on behalf of the Wine, Liquor and Beer Dealers' Centra! Association: 'e or, If they Vmt BUEQ It uwd, pose in 13 When the members of the Liquor Dealers' (Association called at the City Hall yester- day It was with the understanding that they to be ushered in the Mayor's presence at once. The committee of liquor dealers was headed by Fritz Llndlnger. Prior to the hearing Mr. Linflinger had heard over the telephone that Mayor Low fcad written a letter. He learned the con- tents, and when he arrived with his cohorts at the Mayor's office they were vociferous and angry. "Letter or no shouted Lindinger In the corridors of the Mayor's office, we would have come here anyway. We came to see the Mayor on a matter of business and not to be interrogated about what our organization does with its funds. Why, it an outrage for the Mayor to send such a letter as that and we have been grossly in- sulted. It was all right when he was a were the small saloon keepers. "If this bill becomes a .law." Jerome, it will tend to 'develop speak- c.isies, places where liquor is sold In se- crf-t and without a license, all over town. Jhero is comparatively little selling of liquor without n license in this city now. Look at Philadelphia, and look at Maine. Why, Mayor Low and President Eliot of Harvard and J. C. Carter, were members of a sub-committee of the Committee of which bad the matter under investl- gallon ana reported that there were more Brltaln. Italy on Feb. 13. 30 per cent, licensed liquor saloons of the customs receipts of the ports of La j Guayra. and Puerto Cabello were to be paid over to ths representative of the Bank of the claims against Venezuela, pending the decision of The Hague tribunal, and the customs receipts were to be paid out in ac- accordance with the decision of that tri- bunal on ths question of preferential treat- ment. The first allotment of customs receipts was to be paid on April 1, covering the receipts for March. As this time is near at hand, and there does not seem to be any disposition on the part of the allies to pro- ceed with any dispatch with the prepara- tion of The Hague protocols, Mr. Bowen floes not think that Venezuela should be bound to pay the 30 per cent, provided for In the protocol of Feb. 13, if The Hague protocol Is not signed before April 1, and took that position in the note to Sir Mi- chael Herbert. Mr. Bowen feels there should be a def- inite understanding respecting the inten- tions of thf allies as to The Hague protocol before April 1, when the first installment of customs receipts of the two ports Is to be set aside as provided for. Venezuela has devised a means for meeting the issue In case of default by consenting that Bel- gian officials are to be placed in charge of the customs, and the purposes of the he should be stated definitely. If The Hague protocols were nol signed and Ihe allies determined hereafter to deal directly with Mr. Castro, then the'question would arise as to what should be done with the money paid to the representative of the Bank of England on April 1 from the cus- toms receipts of the two ports named. The suggestion Is made that that official being In the employ of the British Govern- ment! the money might be retained by hlrr. to satisfy the claims of Great Britain, and in this way they -would secure an advan- tage over other equally meritorious claim- ants. The note of Mr. Bowen, It Is believed here, will bring the whole question to an issue promptly and terminate the Indecision which now apparently obtains as to just what the intentions of the various allied Governments are In the matter of settling their "It seems to the committee that you must have misunderstood why we desire to have an interview with you. Permit me to make It a little clearof why desire to confer 'with you. Our committee! Represents over persons engaged in. the retail liquor business in Greater New York. Most "s are married men, of middle age, and the fathers of children. We and those em- JOURHEYED_FAR_ TO WED. PALMA'S ELOPEMENT Mlu Whitney of Plattaburg Went to the Klondike to Become a Bride. Sftcial In Tht Ntui Yerk Timtt. TACOMA, Washington, March Violet Rose Whitney, who is stated in the dispatches to be a niece of William G. Whitney, was married at Dawson City late in February to Walter H. B. Lyons, a son of Dr. Lyons of Plattsburg, N. Y. Mr. Lyons is the manager of a large saw- mill on the Klondike River owned by the Ladue Company, of which his brother-ln- of Plattsburg. Is the Miss Whitney Journeyed' alone from Plattsburg to Dawson to wed. The cere- mony was performed a few days after her Miss Mabel Jacobs of Harlem Weds the Cuban President's Son. Awaiting Message of Forgiveness from Havana After a Clandestine Mar- riage in January. While Jote Palma, son of T. Estrada i'alma, President of the new Republic of Cuba, was seeking a means of communica- tion with his father with a view to notify- latin the. Di .Ins the new courses In medicine. are looked for. wa-s mart Kerr, the Medical Secreiarv a member of the Infirmary Com 'hf-iirht iT. epidemic was at its hour! Fur- Secretary; to gain an exact UTICA, March A Pu-dlp T nrfl a Cornell University: who had I hls oiwTn Hled Masonlo Home in il 5EHJE (UTIFIES THE CUBAN TREAT? hls oiwn H u tills city to-dav. The vouna- man J" IRA D. SANKEY IS BLIND. .The couple had the choice of spending their honeymoon In their new Dawson home or of taking a two-hundred-mile sled- ding behind a d.og team over the Yukon ice MFfS. HULL IS NOT ILL Mrs. Burdick's Mother Only Suffering from the Shock of the Murder- Mr. Pennell's Will Filed. BUFFALO, March lO.-Albert A. Hart- zell of counsel for Mrs. Hull, mother of Mrs. Burdick, was seen to-day with refer- ence to the reported injury or illness o' Mrs. Hull. Mrs. Hull Is In her usual ho s.tld. has not been-ill or injured. Tnc man Allen, at the house, Is a clerk   Heyburn. Idalio.. Hnpklns. (Hep.. 111.) Kcan. (Rep., x. J.) Lalimer, I Dem., s. C.) (Rep.. Mass.) (Rep.. Kan.> MoComas. (Rep., Md.) M'TnMr-y. (Dem.. Uy M'-Cumber, (Hep.. N.U.) NclS'in. (Rpp.. Minn.) Dem., C.) 1'c-nt.ise. i Hop Henn Cal.) Simmons. (Dem., N. C.) (Rep.. Spooner, tUep.. Wis Stewart. (Rep.. Nev.) Stone. Mo.) Warren, (Rep.. Wyo.) Wetmore. iRep.. E. I.) Total-oO. Sankey realized "that" his eye- tllng he called in Dr. Kalish bS baek to back to him the family and friends It was admitted, however, by the famllv had slBht ot "L eyS since th falled two ago, and that ads of the ully realize tne seriousness of his condl- Inn. flnrf hotiu.mn Vln its request first has made, It doe? want some'visible exhtblVion of the Interest of the United states in this that might connect the united States Government with the enter- prise. It wants an American to be an- polntert an and stationed In- Caracas to manage redemption of the loan ana if necessary, lo collect a certain proportion of the customs receipts. It Is believed this proposition Is at- tractive to both England nnrl Germany, for If It were accepted Venezuela couid pay her creditors wiihln a few days, and the disagreeable necessity of adjusting the Payments would Secretary Hay being absent. It dannot be salrt that tr-r proposition hns been fairly Inlfl before this Government, but It has VaUAfngVon t'o-dav pectins to return In about two conditions are auspicious and tho officials after thinking the matter over are inclined favorably, he may put the proposition In concrete form. Mir. Bowen does not favor the as are unlimited In Washington, it is apparent that it ea-i come to nothing unless the principals finl some way to Induce President Castro at Caracas, to act in person. Mr Bowen made this pretty clear to-day to Mr. man when latter called on him. -The success of the undertaking might mean the advancement to Venezuela bv the syndicate of probably more than OOO. as the syndicate has figured out at th.- probable total amount at claims Vanexuela will have to pay the foreign creditors, and additional amount! must be allowed for expenses and for not less than 10 per cent, commissions to the Ex-Mayor Runkin's Condition Critical. ELIZABETH, N. J., March con- dition of ex-Mayor John C. Rankin Is very critical to-day, and It is feared he will not recover. He underwent an operation yea- terday for the removal of a part of the LUMBERMEN LEAVE WISCONSIN. Badicer Timber Intereita Mov- Ina; Weit and of Capital Gone. Special to Titc .Vftc York Times. j MILWAUKEE, Wis., March 19.-Wlscon- sln has lost her supremacy as queen of the pinn forests. To-day the formal announce- ment was. made that one of the largest timber operators In the Northern together with the last of the great lumber- men of Minnesota, had practically closed out his Interests in this State, to embark on new ventures tn the Far West. Other lumbermen had preceded, some to-the Pa- cific Coast, with its wealth of red wood and white pins, others to the as yet virgin forests of the South. E. L. McCormlck of Hayward, this State, whose holdings In Wisconsin pine lands and properties aggregate a value of to-day announced that with the close of this season he would leave Wisconsin for Seaitle. With him will go Frederick Wey- erhaeuser, whose Interests in Northern Wisconsin, Michigan, and Minnesota al- most equal those of all other lumbermen combined. The two men plan to reoeat their campaign of forestry fn Washington, Orejron, and California. Within the last two years it is esilmafi thai capital has left WisSns fore.-ts for the West or the South No I? than a dozen great lumbering companies have abandoned Wisconsin for the fresher fore.-.ts.. For many of these companies Mr McCorm'.ck will be the agent In the West and with Mr. Weyerhaeuser will establish a bank nt Seattle, from which as a centre C proved style. WASHINGTON, March the Cuban Legation to-night Senor Quesada said that Jose Palma had been his guest since Saturday, but had returned to New York to-day. The young man's visit, he said was a purely social one, made at the in- vitation of tho Minister, who desired him to be in ashington when the Cuban1 treaty was ratified. The young man. the Minis- ter understood, had informed his father of his marriage to Miss Jacobs, and in all probability would take his bride with him when he went home In June. BRYAN ATTACKS GORMAN. Says His Selection as Democratic Lead- er in the Senate It a Reactionary Victory. Special :o The Neat York Times. LINCOLN, March a long editorial, in to-morrow's Commoner W. J. Bryan will say: The Commoner chronicles with regret what may fairly be considered the most important victory scored by the reaction- ary element in the Democratic Party, namely, the selection, of Mr. Gorman as Democratic leader in the Senate. There is not a single reform for which Mr. Gorman stands, nor is there a single remedial meas- ure which can be said to have his earnest and hearty support. When the Wilson Tariff bill wa: before the Senate lie was one of the Senators who, by holding the balance of power, forced the emasculation of the bill In the interest of the manufac- turers. In the fight for the repeal of the Sherman law he acted with the Republi- cans, and is with them still on all phases of the money ciuestlon. Ho has never said or done anything to Indicate that he de- sires positive and effective anti-trust legis- lation. Friends of the Kansas City platform should be on the alert. Instead of retreat- ing, the party must go forward and meet tnem. Mr. Sankey is .now sixty-four years old ln cvangellstic work since In that year he met Dwight-L Moody at the convention of the Young Men s Christian Association in Indianapolis ed with 'ater became associat- TO CONTROL AUTOMOBILES. Connecticut Legislature Likely to Pass Measures Governing the Use of Motor Vehicles. Special la The New York Times. HARTFORD. Conn., March 19.-Repre- sentatlves from towns along the Connecti- cut shore came to this Legislature com- plaining that they had suffered much from automobilists from New York to Provi- dence, who went at a high rate of speed. Representative Warren of East Lyme In- troduced a bill imposing severe restrictions and limiting to eight miles an hour. After many hearings the Committee on Public Health and Safety has reported two substitute, bills, which are likely to pass. One bill provides that each owner of a motor vehicle must file with the State Sec- retary a full description of his machine and must obtain a. number, which shall be (Rep., N. H.I NAYS. Mallory, (Utm.. Fla.) Bard, (Rop.. Cnl.) Martin, i Va Bate. (Dem.. Tenn.) Money. (Dem.. Mtj-s.) Berry. iDein.. Ark.) (Morgan, (Dom.. Ala.l "h (Dem.. Xev.) Danld. (Dnm'.. Va.) Taimfeiro. (b'en'i (D.-m.. I.a.) I Tolal-16. McEnery. iDom.. La.) In making the pairs two Senators were paired for the treaty with one against it. The pair list was: Of en., Penn..) with McLaWlVi. IRcp-' an'1 Minn. with Tinman, (Dem., s. Kltlrldgo s' and Platt (Rop.. N. y..) Patterson (Dem., Plan (Rep., Conn..) and Han-ley (Rep., with Teller. (Dem.. (Rev. Ore..) and clay (Dem., Ga..) with Du- bota. (Dem., Quarles (Rep., with Colbertson, (Dpm., Texas.) Mr Hoa- (Rev wap absent and unpaired. Immediately after the doors of the Sen- ate were closed for the executive session a few minutes after 11 o'clock to-day Sen- ator Foster (Dem., took the floor lo moke a set speech in opposition to treaty. He spoke for about two and a half. In the main his speech was an appeal for the protection of the American sugar-pro- ducing industry. He spoke especially for the cane sugar interests of Louisiana, but said that while the sugar Interest was of paramount importance In his own State OH account of the cane produced there, tha beet industry had grown to such propor- tions that many other portions of the Union also were coming to have a very pro- nounced interest in the making of sugar. He drew a graphic picture of present con- ditions in Louisiana, and said that if the treaty should be ratified the result waa liable to be very disastrous to many of his constituents. He appealed to Senators from North and South alike to retrain from in- flicting this hardship upon his people. Mr. Foster also made the point that there was nothing to prevent the Introduction of Chinese coolie labor Into Cuba, and said that If such labor should be Introducer! American labor could not compete with it. Other speeches in opposition to the treaty were mads by Senators Berry and Car- mack, while Senator Simmons of North Carolina spoke In support of it. Senator Berry based his opposition on the amend- ment offered by the Committee on Foreign Relations providing against any further reduction by treaty of the duty on while the treaty remains in force. Senator CarmAck opposed the convention on gen- eral principles, declaring that It was con- trary to our theory of government. DEFENDED BY A DEMOCRAT. that are Pressing for the interests managed e of the lumbermen will be h4is 3aw', u ls left, side is paralysed. aald Dls whole AlMont atiwiirkt Mae. Tha Rath-pad li tie natural ihort way to CMCMO and Wut. tut traloi (or tad SL INVITATION ON GOLD PLATE. San Union League Induces the Prealdent to WASHINGTON, March 19. _ Preslfltnt Roorevelt to-day received an Invitation, engraved on a plate of solid gold 6 inches long and three-quarters of an Inch wide, to be the guest of the Uniqn League Cluh of San Francisco on the occasion of his visit to that city on his approaching West- ern 1rlp. The plate weighs 854 ounces. Th'i Invitation was presented by Col. George H. Plppy, President of the club and was accepted by the President with ex- Eresflons of cordial appreciation. He will e the guest of the club at a banauet Thursday evening, May 14. Col. Pfppy presented also the invitation to the Presi- dent Issued by the General Committee of San Francisco. This invitation was beau- tifully Inscribed on parchment. In addition to these Invitations Gov George C. Fardee of California has sent to the President a cordjal invitation to visit the Etate in the course of his Western trip. New Tobacco Concern. TRENTON, N..J., March 19.-The Hllson Company, capital was Incorporat- ed here to-day, to grow tobacco and to manufacture cigars and cigarettes. The in- corpcrators are Edward Hiison Leo W Mayer, and Josiah T. Wilcox, all of Jersey r. The I'ennnylvunlm Urakx) can are u Ktht in- M nirM u dnrlu daytlmt. Mov.il. luipi in comfort. solution. the reform element regains control of the Democratic organization in the Senate that body will not only not help but will actually hinder the party progress.' I nless there been a complete revolution In the views of several of the Democratic Senators, there will be a protest against Mr. Gorman s leadership, and the, sooner that protest is made the better for the party. There are the Senate a number o' strong and vigorous representatives of sound Democratic principles, and they will find it more am: more galling to march un- der the banner of one who stands for commercialism that Is corrupting politics and making the measure of all things." CORNELL MEDICAL FACULTY AND TRUSTEES AT ODDS. Dr. Coville Leaves the University Be- cause of Management of the In- Student Dead. Special to The New York 'Times. ITHACA. March evidence of the strained relations which have exist- ed for the last six weeks between the Fac- ulty of the Collage, of Medicine of Cornell and the University Board of Trustees was given to-day, when it was announced that Dr. Luzerne Coville of the Faculty of the Medical College had tendered his resigna- tion to the Trustees: His resignation was accepted Immediately, and his successor will enter upon his duties to-morrow. Dr. Coville resigned from the Faculty be- "cause of expressed differences concerning the management of the Infirmary between himself and the Infirmary Committee, made up of President Schurman, R. B. TVIlllams, and Emmons L. Williams. Dr. Coville is :i graduate of Cornell, and has been one of the lea dine spirits in build- ing up the College of Medicine. He was appointed the first Secretary of the Faculty at Ithaca, and had much to do with formu- wni' e oCT bill limits the speed to fifteen miles an hoiir outside city limits and to twelve miles Ins do city limits Vehicles must slow down and signal at all street corners and cross- Ings and on approaching horses, and if the horses are frightened they must stop. The penalty under the Is from S3 tl fine, and under the second or thir- ty days in prison, or both. OPEN GAMBLW6JO STOP. It Will Be Prohibited in Tacoma and Other Washington Towns After This Week. Sffdat lo Tht A'cra York Times. TACOMA. Washington, March Jft.-Open gambling will be stopped in this State after this week. For the first time In Tacoma's history Infractions of the Rambling law will bc prosecuted by the city .administration. Heretofore operators of games and nickel- in-the-siot machines have paid monthly fines. They were notified to-day that no more fines would bc collected, and that the Burnett's Cocostne kills dandruff, Irrita- tion and promotes the growth of the Acton and Slaffim use Piso'n Curt to itrencthen voice and prevent laken at Seattle. Olympla, Everett, What- com, and other towns. The announcement by the'police causes much surprise, as the act passed by tho Legislature two weeks ago making gam- bling a felony does not become operative until June. By stopping gambling now the city administration wilt receive credit for the reform before the Spring elections take place. Heretofore gambling has been car ried on ar the gambling fines. Tacoma will lose" from this MOIIT-CI; over yearly "um A great migration of gamblers has com- menced to California and Eastern cities? VETOES EQUAL SUFFBAGE BILL. Governor of Arlsonm It vio- lates the Territorial Organic Act. Special io The York Times. PHOENIX, Arizona, March lO.-Gov. Brodie to-night vetoed the Equal Suffrage bill, thereby going counter to all expecta- tions. An effort may be made to pass the bill over the veto, with, however little hope of success. The Governor states In explanation of his veto that a law of this kind would be In violation of the Territorial Organic act- otherwise, he states, he has no objection tii the measure. relations between the United State' and Cuba. He. said that he spoke, for the United States, and not for Cuba, declaring he did not accept tho theory tliRt the L'nited States is under any obligations to Cuba, as we had done all for the Cubans that any nation could IK expected to do for an- other. He believed, howejier, that with tha ratification of this convention Cuba's prus- perity would be materially enhanced, ttnd that.on account of the improved feeling on the part of the Cubans our exportation to Cuba, which now amount to about O.XI.OOO annually, would soon bc rio-ibled He refused to accept the theory thnt the American sngar-proriucing industrv would be Injured by adopting Ihe reciprocal rela- tions proposed, and contended that the only advantage Cuba would have over the fn.t- ed States in the production of supar vonld be found in the fact that the Cuban sol! is somewhat better adapted to tha't Industry Even after the reduction proposed the duty on Cuban sugar would amount to ner cent, ad valorem and he was satisfied that the rate would bc sufficient to malntiiin the industry In the United States On the conclusion' of Mr. speech voting began The Committee on Foreign Relations announced, through Sen- ator Cullom. its Chairro.-in. the acceptance of two amendments in addition to (hose al- ready recommended by the The first of these would increase the rate of reduction 30 per cent, on flour, oornmeal and corn imported into Cuba from the United States. Senator Nelson spoke yes- terday in support of ffn amendment alone these lines and Senator-Burton perfected It The other was suggested by Senator Bacon and fixed a uniform reduction of 30 per cent, on American cotton goods imported Into Cuba. The only yea and nay vote taken on the committee-amendments was- on that adopt- ed some time ago by the committee at the California. Tours including Grand Canon of Arizona, Cali- fornia. Toeemtte. Aluka. Yellowstone. Colorado tc. May 2. 12, 13, and uK all expenses included. Sena for circular. Raymond tc WWt- comb Co., 21 Union Tork.-Adv States for the next five years treaty remains in force. A division was called for on this amendment and it was sustained by a vote of 44 to 22. the nega- tive votes being cast by Democrats. The other committee amendments, includ- ing those accepted to-day, and the amend- ment making the approval of the entlra Congress necessary to render the treaty effective, were then adopted. xiie Democrats offered several amend- ments, but they were all defeated by a strict party vote. One offered by Senator McEnery was to strike out Article 0 of the treaty, which makes specific declaration against the granting of any concession to American tobacco imported into Cuba. An- other provided for the admission of Ameri- can rice into Cuba free of duty. Senator Foster presented one providing the treaty shall not go into effect until Cuba shall accept the Chinese exclusion laws of the United States. Senator Newlands withdrew his amend- ment authorizing the United States to issue an invitation to Cuba to enter the Union and become a State thereof, but gave notice that he would renew it when the Question of approving the treaty should come up in the next regular session After the various Democratic amendments had been defeated the vote was taken oa   

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