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New York Times Newspaper Archive: October 31, 1902 - Page 1

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   New York Times, The (Newspaper) - October 31, 1902, New York, New York                             t- THE "All the News That's Fit to Print" ___ Showers, 'followed by fair and warmer; winds southwest VOL. .LII......NO. Flames and Ashes Devastate the "Coffee Zone. SANTA MARIA IN ERUPTION cisro who went to Guatemala from South Ciu'olln.1 about twenty J ears ago, had u plantation in that section, tor which he w.ii- titlcred in gold a Ccw years ago n> a German firm; but ho refused the OJfei. anil, if report.-, are true, Iwen entirely ruined alons with tho others. It is unlortunate thlit UK- harvesting of tne coffee is just ending nt present time so that the crop lias undoubtedly been Kreatly injured by ashes lallms from the berries are very easily shaken from the trees when they are ripe and on the ground no attempt is made to pick them up. so that undoubtedly the loss in that regard will be Irretrievable. Just around the city of there Is little cotfee grown, as the eleva- lion is too sreai and it is too coid, out n Tr.mbador there is little else grown, nearls all the lands being coffee tineas, "tt-hat would make the situation worse is that coflee trees are extremely delicate, ana the presence of a foreign substance In quantities about them is B> Kin me Mountain Sending Forth Deadly and Eruptions Continue. <5uezaltenango, San Felipe, and Maza- tenango Likely to be One City Six Inches-Deep in Volcanic -Matter. YORK. FRIDAY. OCTOBER 31, PAGES. GUP smcTilTNAMED ONE CENT in OroHter Xcw York. Jc-r.fy City, nnd jTWO CESTS. Make-up of Yachtsmen Committee for New Defender Announced. N.Y.Y.C. MEETING HEARS PLANS, Skipper Ban- to Command New Craft, for Which Orders Already Have Been Placed. sense of the term. Its sold resources .are limited and it must at the best be a mat- ter of several years before a change can be satisfactorily etleeted. President Diaz has. for a long time had the matter under careful consideration, ami it is also true that- he has recently made inquiries in New York with reference to the best course to pursue in bringing about a change. Nothing of a definite character in this direction has been decided upon. MGR. FALCONIO TO BE PAPAL' x_ DELEGATE AT WASHINGTON. U ft. II L.H.ICO   ttroyed, as the cable seems to indie-ale, >nr-lliird of the crop is most likely In- v.-.lv.-d. vokano of Santa "Maria i" located iwM-n E'-talhulue and Quezaltenanso. '.Tin-, towns in-the neighborhood most likely r. just at the close of tie opportunity of saving their goods or personal belongings, -as it is al- most impossible to transport goods ex- cept on mule back, and little can be car- ried in that manner.- "The nearest port on the Pacific to Tumbador and'' Quezaltenango Ocos which is fifteen or twenty miles from the Mexican frontier. It is there that the Pa- cific Mall steamships touch going and com- ing about every ten days. This Is merely a little town on a sandspit, with WO or 000 and containing onl> a tew frame residences. The United States Con- sular Agent there is Samuel olford, and his wil> is a Philadelphia woman The town undoubtedly suffered severeb as it is located at the foot of the slope-of he mountain. Champerlco Is another port "of Guatemala, about twenty miles further down the coast. Much-coffee is shipped Agent at Quezalt- enantro Fleischmann, is one or tnj best-known foreign residents of Guatemala, and is interested in a large general store, which does-business throughout -y. If the reports are true giving: the col C1S1N SMI II As was stated in THE NEW YORK TIMES a fortnight ago, Vanderbilt .will be an active member of the syndicate that will build a new yacht to defend the Amer- ica's Cup against Sir T.homas Lipton s Shamrock III., and the boat will be man- aged by C. Oliver Iselln, with Capt-. Charles "Barr as skipper. The news was given out at the adjourned meeting at the New York Yacht Club held at'the clubhouse last even- ing. The composition of the syndicate is a de- cided surprise. No inkling of it save as to Mr Vanderbilt had leaked out, and none of its members' eicept Mr. Vanderbilt had been even thought of in this connection. None of them has been active in yachting heretofore, and they represent an alto- gether new element coming to the front In international racing. The syndicate con- sists of Elbert H. Gary. Clement A. Gris- com, James J, Hill.-Willlam B. Leeds. Will- iam -Rockefeller, Cornelius Vanderbilt. Henry-Walters, and P. A. B. Widener. Mr. Vanderbilt is a prominent Corinthian. He owns and successfully has sailed the seventy-rater Rainbow for two seasons and. recently has become the steam yacht Cherokee, formerly owned by -Will- iam Clark and' renamed by Mr. Vanderbilt the North Star. lie also owns the small Leeds tr- mill- t.. be destroyedare San Felipe, Maza- t. naiigo, and Quezaltenango. 'The volcano Vims been quiet for many years. 'I wusjn the district last April at ibe time when eartlmuakes coun- try. No volcanic eruptions accompanied the quakes, however." Oct._30.-A cable dis- patch from Guatemala was received at the State Department to-day from Consul Gen- cral McNally reporting that the eruption of the .volcano at Santa Maria, adjoining Quezaltenango, continues; that the city is "Covered with six inches of volcanic mat- ter; that rich coffee plantations on the -coast Bide are buried under s.even feet of sand end ashes from the volcano, and that de- tona'tions from eruption -were heard in the There have-been freciueut earthquakes, and another eruption is re- ported In the Department of Tumbador. Much excitement prevails. re'ct estimate of damage propertj. _- ions of dollars' worth must been de. otroyed. and the coffee received a set-back from which it wlll_taKO years tr> recover." _____ VOLCANOES IN GUATEMALA. Some of the Mountains Are Active, with Records of Destruction. Tlu-re are a great. number of volcanic summits in Guatemala. Those which are decidedly active are Pacaya, on tho south- ern shore ofj Lake Amatitlan; Volcan do Fuego K 'feet in height, near Old Guate- mala- Atitlan, feet in height: Quezal- tenango, feet, and Tajumu'.co. The last was observed in eruption by Bernoulli on the occasion of the great learthqual of 1SG3. Like Quezaltenango, ,it furnishes great supplies of sulphur. More famous, however, than any is the Volcan de Agua or Water volcano, _so called because it destroyed Old Guatemala in l.T-H by a deluge of wafer. For the foreign trade coffee is the most important product of the country. While In 18H9 the -whole export was only hundred weight, by 187G it had increased to ttpwarc. of hundred weight. In ISO'.) the value of coffee exported amounted to W0477 The coffee of Guatemala is held in while' pounds were i began in Representative of the Vatican Now at Ottawa Selected as Successor to Cardinal Martinelli. Special lo The New York Times. "OTTAWA, Falconio, Apos- tolic Delegate'to -Canada, this received official intimation by cable from Rome of his selection as successor to Car- dinal Martinelli as Apostolic Delegate to the tTnited States at Washington. Though no date .has been fixed for Mgr. Falconio's departure from it, is expected that it will not be long delayed. Repeated rumors had Indicated him as thd choice of the Pope .for the office, and dis- patches within recent months had given assurance that the appointment had been determined. These, however, were always met with the assurance that Mgr. Falconio knew'nothing of the matter beyond the re- ports In the press.' In certain circles it is believed that, the negotiations., for the settlement _of the Philippine friar, problem may have in- fluenced an early appointment of Cardinal Martmelli's successor. Mgr. Falconio ar- rived in the Canadian capital on Oct. 1-, 1809 and has made many in this country. His' departure will be deeply re- gretted. Archbishop Bruchesi of Montreal was, re- ceived yesterday in private by the Pope, as reported by special cable dis- patches, referred to the appointment John C, Lathrop and Mr. and Mrs, Quimby Indicted. the past CONDITIONS IN GUATEMALA. A Coffee Grower's Views of the Ex- tent of Affected. A coffee grower 'who recently returned from Guatemala last night said: The Department of Tumbador. which is mentioned in the dispatches as .being in the zone of the volcanic eruptions, gets Its name from a. peculiar rumbling in the earth, caused, ,U. is supposed, by a subterranean volcano. Tumbador means The Thunderer." The centre of the .department la about forty miles from the Pacific Ocean, in the mountains, as the tne eoiiuiuuiiw no great ambition' to make the most been out might be achieved. Tl nbSut the cultivation of about the_C' duel That has more so that the }UUL Hie en fnflf tne ilvlnv.v icing land than ever before so that n{ liamity struck the belt owners of yachts to :perlenclng the greatest Commodore tenango. which is about 100 miles from the coast Last Summer Quezaltenango Buffered a severe earthquake, -which par- lially destroyed, tho, town. The city is lo- calamity experlen In its history VISIT VOLCANOjOUFRIERE. Explorers Find the Crater Active Slight Eruption Oct. 28, and a 'Serious One Is Feared. KINGSTOWN, St. Vincent, B. W. I., Oct. 30-Henry-Powell, Curator of the Govern- ment Botanical Station here; J. P. Quinton of the British Botanical Station 111 Sierra Leone, West Africa, and E. W. Foster of the British Botanical Station at Lagos, west Africa, accompanied by guides, vis- ited the Souf Here volcano Oct. 28 and spent an hour and a half on the summit. The party found the crater to be active, it was emitting volumes of steam and from team Mirage, Wllliaijn B. 1 the steam yacht. Noma, 'that built for him last year and launched early this season. He- .is president of -the Chi- cago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad and a Director of the American Can Company, the 'Audit Company of New York, and the United States Mortgage and Trust Com- pany. He has been a member of the New York Yacht Club only since last March, James J. Hill was elected a .member of the New York Yacht Club in February, 1001. HP owns the '243-foot steam yacht W.acouta. He is President of the Great Northern Railway Company and the North- ern Securities Is one of thv foremost railroad men and financiers of the Clemcnl A. Grlscom i? the prominent Philadelphia financier and steamship build- er and owner, best known as the President of the International Navigation Company. He is the owner of the schooner Alert, -aiul has been a'member of the New York Yacht Club since Elbert H. Gary is best known to the public as the President of the Federal Steel Company and Chairman of thtf Executive Committee of the United States Steel Corporation. He is a new mem- ber and financier and renowned as an art connoisseur. He owns the big steam yacht Josephine. His. mem- bership in the New York Yacht Club da.te.3 from Feb-uary, 1S90- Henry Walters of Baltimore became a member of the club in May 1890 William Rockefeller has been a member of the club since 1800. Nortnon B Ream Is a new member.. In connection with the announcement of the syndicate it also was stated that the .contract for the new boat to be designed and built by the Herreshoffs has been signed.-Notice was given ot the purpose of the owners of the Columbia and ti.e Constitution to put those boats in commis- sion next season to compete with the nsw boat for the honor of defending the cup. The Constitution will be managed by E. D. Morgan .and her sailing master will-be Capt. Lemuel Miller, who -was mate of the in and who hap been sailing the Navahoe in European waters this sea- son The Constitution will be in the hands of August Belmont. He will have-on board with-him Capt. Urias JRhodes. who sailed the Constitution last Nor- man Terry, the well-known skipper of the famous Grayling. I 4.bout one hunored and fifty members the meeting, and forty iok part in the proceed- Lewis Cass Ledyard, having recovered from his recent illness, presided. The amendments to the measure- ment and racing rules that were adopted at the meeting of the club last week were adopted again after several minor amend- ments had been made-to them. _ The new rules now become the law of_the Club. Resolutions-of thanks to the East- ern Yacht Club of Massachusetts for courtesies extended during the cruise of the New York 1'acht Club last Summer adopted, The subject of a cruise, to the West Indies some time in the cominr Winter was brought up and.discussed will A committee was appointed "to take the matter under consideration and formulate a Plan The committee consists of Capt Anson Phelps Stokes of the Sea Fox. Capt Lloyd Phoenix of the Intrepid, and Capt Robert E Tod of the Thistle. The meet- ing was adjou.-ned to meet three weeks, from last night. his paces, Mgr. FTfccoBlo to Canada as proof of deep affectipn for the Canadian people. To-day's announcement of his -transfer to .Washington has therefore been received with astonishment. land' rises from.the sea as far as Quezal- -throwing up numerous, cones tfte fissures closeJjnder the southern wan to feet. During half hour of the explor- rs' stay the crater became violent. Mr. cated in what is supposed to be the crater of an extinct volcano, and Is at an eleva- tion of about or feet. Santa Maria, which Is reported as Ing been-in eruption, is not far away. Another volcano towers above the town (tself, but that has been extinct for many "years. It is probably 10.000 feet in height. The Departments of Quezaltenango and Tumbador are among the richest coffee- prowing sections in therState. The coffts Is said to grow, "best at an elevation of from to feet, so that those de- partments are admirably suited for the purpose of colfee growing, and Hie coffee- iToduced there is recognized in foreign -markets as being.some of.the finest In tile 1 world. "The Germans have invested heavily all through Guatemala, and particularly in the section reported to have been devastated by the eruption of the volcano. Mortgages are held by German firms on mostrof the plan- tations or 'tineas. Earthquakes in that tiart of the country are frequent, but until last- Summer they had not caused destruc- lion for many years. Some of the fine-as- uro owned by Americans who have gone_ tlown there, cleaned out the virgin forest, and planted the land with coffee. Two brbthers-in-law of Charlemagne 1 ower have or had a- plantation in the-Department of 'Jumbador. Alexander Noweli of San Fran- INDEX TO DEPARTMENTS. Commercial 11. 9. _ Arrivals at Hotels ;and Out-of-Town Buy- 7- Business 11. _ Ccurt 11. Insurance IX. Legal Losses bv 11. -Marine intelligence and Foreign Page 10. I f New 12. ,i 7. Real o- 9. tTnited 1... Weather 10. CI3 mv-J Powell who, from his frequent Is -well acquainted with the features of the mountain. Is satisfied that the new crater shows no signs of havlnglseen in eruption. The old-crater has become more funnel- shaped than formerly.-and is_now deepest In its centre. Volcanic ejecta, almost red hot and smok- ing profusely, has been heaped up around the interior walls of the crater to a height of several hundred feet. The rim of the rater is considerably wider than it was, nd the depression on the western rim, .iiu v-SlumeT-f steam" and ashes are emerge. rn wall. blown tJ the westward, thus giving tne looearance of having come from the new appearance The-party found no -lava. The c.on- J. HILL PROJECTS HUGE STEEL PLANT IN MONTANA. Establishment at Great Falls, it Is Said, Will Rival Any in the verting Did Silver Smelter. Special to. The A'ra> York Times. HELENA, Mont.. Oct. J. Hill, Westchester Grand Jury in a Presentment Also Condemns Practices of H ealers As Dangerous to the Community. WHITE PLAINS. N. Y., Oct. 30.-John Carroll Lathrop, John Quimby, and his wife, Georglana been indict- ed by the Grand Jury on the charge slaughter in the second degree. They 'have, not as yet been rearrested, and may not be taken into custody. until next as the bonds given for their appearance con- tinue to hold good until formally dismissed by the court. The indictment -which was handed in to- day charged that John Quimby, and Georglana Quimby-did maliciously and feloniously cause the death of Ethel Quimby, aged seven lecting to provide medical attendance." If convicted in the degree of manslaugh- ter charged, alQhree may be, sentenced ,td long terms' in. prison. The law does not. allow the sentencing Magistrate any lati- tude. It Imposes a prison term of fifteen years or a fine of or both. With the indictment the Grand Jury-de- livered to the court the following present- ment: The attention of tne Grand Jury has eallej to an evil existing'In the-County whlc-h .we deem a suun-e ol danger to the nealtl-. ot Our attention .hah been di- rected to the treatment ot infectious anil con- tagious diseases by persons who fcrt? not reKular- ty licensed physicians .and surgeons, where the i-i-.le.s ot the local and. State boards of health are vlolfttt'J. have Riven careful consideration to a com- plaint made to us concerning the death ofa. seven-year-old child from neglect. child .be- ing treated' -by a so-Milled Christian Science healer from the City or New vork, who .made many visits to the home of the-child and mingled with the Inhabitants .of the county, both-upon tne otreet and in public- conveyances. .InlK ctiuu wai allowed to: die without any of the remedies knowr to medical SflTOce belns used, anrt niedl-- llled iw testified that the life .of been saved had proper treat1- CHARGES AGAINST A BANKNOTE COMPANY, Circular to Stockholders Accuses the American's Directors. Charges of mismanagement UK being made against the present Board of Direct- ors of 'the American Bank Note Company In a circular which been sent to stockholders by. Louis Hi' Porter and W. T. Robertson. Mr. Porter is a lawyer with offices at 45 Broadway. The circular de- clares that the Directors who control the company represent -only shares, of stock, and that they, are not managing the affairs of the, company solely In the interest bJ.tho stockholders at large. .The circular intimates' that' several officials, are 'being overpaid, and that the best offices are held by friends and relatives of -E. C. Converse. the dominating power In the board. The circuiar declares that the stockholders can get no information about the business of the company, and that the statement of its conditions! given out at the last annual meeting is- unintelligible, except that it shows the assets of the company to be .only a share', when the.par value is S50. The men who sent oiitrthe circular claim to be stockholders of the company.. and they declare that there are. many other dls- satisfie'd stockholders., in -proof of which they show letters from various, parts of the MflEIEMIIBES The Matthews Business Since the Odell Transaction. cal men colled noQ lr, ident of the Great Northern Kanwaj j been nnd iiroper rcmedlp-s applied. ..._... and the Northern Securities Company, has begun the creation of a steel and iron in- dustry in the West, which will rival any- thing of the sort in the world. He arrived in Great Falls, Mont., to-day to arrange the first definite project in his great enter- prise. That Is the transformation of the old silver 'smelter-of the American Smelt- ing and Refining Company, which has not beer in operation for three years, into an iirirense iron' and steel mill. While no definite announcement was made to-night, It is believed the purchase of that plant has been effected, already, as only last week a party of the Smelter Trust officials fiom New'York visited the'Great plant. On his visit to the West last August, President Hill closed a deal through which he obtained a controlling interest in the largest iron deposits known in1 Montana, located about 100 miles from Great Fails, In territory reached by the Great Northern Railway. With that purchase it developed that President Hill had obtained extensive manganese deposits near .Boulder, also on 'the line qf the Great Northern Railway, which was one element necessary to flux and smelt his iron ore. Jt was given out at the time, on'good authority, that It was Mr. Hill's Intention to erect at Great Falls a .steel and Iron plant to rivaVthe great Eastern industries and, to use the words of Mr. Hill himself, to create an industrv that would employ more men than a rail- understood that plans for the new the old silver sm steel plant. The works are situated on the banks of the Missouri River, and an un- limited amount of power is available from the many falls -of water adjacent. President Hill has in the State of Wash- InKton about 100 men actively at 'work on a group of iron claims which he acquired in the early part of- the yealr. His experts also in the Neihart range of- mount- .Northern Montana. VETERAN'S VIEWS ON TARIFF; Ex-Senator Dawes, Eighty-six Years Old Yesterday, Favors a Middle Course in Policy of Revision. Special to Tae Niw York 'Itmts. BOSTON, Oct. Venerable ex-Senator Dawes, vigorous, to-day cele- brated the eighty-sixth anniversary of hi.- birth. In giving his views on present, po- litical conditions he said: "After the civil war_a_ condition obtained in the Republican Party very similar to MALLEABLE-IRON COMBINATION New Concern to Have Capital of Companies'Stay Out. Sftcial'io The A'fu; York Times. -SHARON. Penn., malleable iron combination has been completed. The deal had been pending since last July. The National Malleable Casting Company, own- ing plants at Sharon, Toledo. Cleveland, Indianapolis, and Chicago, refused to., ea- ter, as did two other concerns. The capital of the new concern is placed at The concerns'Involved are -Pratt Hepsworth. Buffalo, N. Y.; Michi- gan Malleable Iron Company, Detriot, Mich.; Whiteley Malleable. Iron Company, This 30-calltai Christian Sclenou treatmen.1 was used at the Instance' ami request of .the parents of the child, the -father daily atwnaln? ;to .misl- ness after nights spent In tho sick room, This child was allowed to "atter.d school while an older sister was sick In the house. The attention of the-local Board ot Health was not called to the ease until a few hours preceding tbe death of the We feel that rlugrrant violation of.the health laws In this respect ahould.be sought out ty the local Boards ol this, county and rcsiiecUully request that a copy.-j: this pre- sentment be sent- to the State Board' pt .Health and to the sevMi-.l Boards of Health In: this county, end-that .regula- tions OF more strictly unforced and tho dangor. or the spreading or Infectious and contagious diseases be lessened. The .bench-.warrant for" Lathrop. trusted to Deputy Sheriff Landorn, and the ones for Mr. and .Mrs: Quimby will be'in- trusted to a local constable, i The reason-that, the .three accused will not be called to plead-at once is that-the court term is practically over. Justice Gar- retson, who has been presiding here this month, has" considerable business to clear up before he leaves to-morrow, and a new- term of the County 'Court opens -next week. Coroner Banning, who has been leading in the movement against the healers in this county, and who took, up the Quimby case and pushed, it to :its present stage, looTTs upon the indictment'as a big victory for him. In.his crusade the Coroner has beenjjacked by the. medical The Coroner wanted- Mrs. Eddy's, writing ex- amined arid an effort.made.to connect hei with the case., but-District-Attorney Youngs and his assistant. Mr..Weekes, both advised the Grand Jury that there was'no possible way to bring Mrs. Eddy into the present Vt'is said that strong political pressure brought to bear -to have the case post- poned, but" that the District Attorney in- sisted that the Grand Jury, .which retlrei to-day for .the term, should take up the and either indict or throw the.case out of court. _L_ i It is thought unlikely that the accused ask a change of venue, but it Is likeb that no resident of White Plains will si on the trial jury. 'The matter is too much of a town affair; and in many quarters ?he-e is !a. strong prejudice against the Qui'mbvs for imperiling .the health of othe people's children, as it is charged was-the case prior to Health Officer Birch taking and to have already received proxies for 3.000 more, although they have as.yet sent circulars to 'only a- small part of the !WO stockholders, of which they now repre- sent about 100. When this circular was shown to Alfred Jaretski, oflthe firm of Sullivan Crom- well. counsel for thu- American Bank Note Company, he said that there was, not a more representative body of Directors to be found than that .of this company, anc the facl that the Directors owned overl.f.MW shares spoke in their favor as against most othe.-- companies. In which the percentage of stock held by Directors is much smaller He said that the company was well man- aged, that no excessive salaries were Being paid to his knowledge, and that his firm 01 Mr. Cromwell, personally, received no large -etalner, in no retainer -at all, .nnd hat they were paid only for the actual work fi'ev did for .the company. -Mr.'JaretsK Iso said that thero was no ..secrecy .about he management, which was very con- ervatlve. and that- stockholders vere not satisfied, he had not .heard o nv expression of dissatisfaction. He ex- pected, he that the management vould receive the same support at the next lection that it had in1'the past. The American 'Bank Note Company has a capital of divided Into hares of S.'O each. .The stock is quawd. at.f.T bid asked. The President is A D, Shepard. the Chairman of tho board s. J. McDonough. The other Directors are E C1 Converse, .T. R. de la Mar. William Nelson Cromwell. Felix Campbell, TJ. L. Green. -C. A. Moore, J. 'B. Ford. .T. H. freeland. .P. C. Lounsbury, J.-S. Stout, and Louis H. Porter.'who signed the circular, s a. son of the late Timothy H. Porter, who. at one time connected with the com- pany as one of Its chief proprietors -V.. T Robertson is a son of the late Touro Robertson, Vice Eresldent.of the company until 1900, and who held most :of the pat- ents used by the company. command at the house, the defense of "rhrlstlan the .Christian Scientists will be is not known. One mem ber of the sect advances, the claim, tha the people will have -to show there-is som law compelling persons to swallow medl cine. that which we now see. It was necessary to reduce the" war tariffs, and it not so certain just hew it should be done. There were then as now three parties within the Republican .who would have the tariff precisely as it -was. those who would reform it violently and a middle partv m favor of Moderate re a miQUlw I'rtiLV__ fiTTov, WHS Clltli-tcw, -nHll VIA irround was passed in 18.2.> That will fhe standard I think, namely thMr? sppke favorably of the new figuration ot the mountain has been con- mouth, but far inland it is running with fair volume in- the smairchannels. The journey from the seashore, at AH alli- bott to the first ridge leading to the Sou- Is exceedingly difficult, as there are cliffs and ravines to be passed. From tha first ridge onward, with few exceptions, the road is easier. It is now impossible to cross, from the leeward to the windward side of the Wand, over the mountains, because the southern rim Of the crater Is more sharplv defined -thin it was and the masses o( are almost red hot. There was a slight eruption-of the Sou- friere the nlghUof Oct. 28. -when, at loud groaning sounds were heard and a cloud of dark vapor was thrown out. These rtKturbances have continued and are caus- ing much excitement at Georgetown, where earth tremors are continually felt. "From the general appearance of the vol- cano another eruption of a serious nature an be expected. awe 'v of takinFaway the rations provided. for the Indians by ,the Government, a-ad ffnding work for them instead, so as to train them in self-dependence. Muncie, Ind.; Chicago- Malleable Casting BIG FIRE IN MINNEAPOLIS. MINNEAPOLIS, Oct. M.-Fire to-nigh destroyed'-the six-story building- occupiei the Minneapolis Paper Company ant owned by J. C. Oswald Co. The stocl 'of the paper company, known also a Figures Given at Prohibition Park, Purporting to Show Big Increase in Dealings with State Institutions. Before an audience filling the big audi- torium at prohibition Park, Staten Island, f TDavld B. Hill last evening returned to DEFOREST LIBRARY SOLD. About Volumes, Valued at 000, Editions and Fine Bindings. George B. De Forest of, 14 East Fiftieth Street has sold his library-regarded as one of the finest private collections in this George H. Richmond, a. dealer.'The value of the library has been estimated at about It has'not been purchased: for. a third party. "Mr. De Forest's books include.many Eng- lish and American first editions and other rarities, but the feature 'of the library -is the.-French books fine bindings. Many of these'are of extreme rarity, including early editions of Villon and other authors The bindings form the real strength of-tne. collection..They, include the finest specimens in existence -of-.the exe- cuted for Grolier: number of examples of the work of. Le- Gascon and. Derome, and four mosaic bindings executed by Tranke-Bancommet. Only twenty-two books bound by -the last-named craftsman ara known to be in_ existence and the four specimens that were owned- by Mr De Forest were worth, it is-said, about. collection which was described in Du Bois's Four Private Libraries of -sew York." is rich in books on art subjects and in volumes with original drawings ana water-color illustrations. H is. the result ot the' Matthews furnishing new. and detailed information concerning pur- chases made 'by State institutions from New'burg grocery concern since Gov. Odell became interested therein. Mr. Hill began his speech with references to the Repub- lican position in regard to home rule. abolition Assessors, the canal, and-the independence of the judiciary, fol- lowing in the main his arguments on subjects as, presented in previous -speeches during the present campaign. As he approached the subject of tha Matthews charges the large audience be- came visibly more interested, for a rumor had got about that he was going to add-, something new to vhat was already known, upon that subject.' The change In the man- agement' of the State charitable institutions under Gov., Odell, he said, had been made In answer to no public demand, and that at first it seemed to be only another lllusT tration of Republican desire to concentrate power'ln the hands of the State Executive, The Governor." said Mr. Hill, seemed disposed to want these places so that he -could have greater' control for some put-- pose not then discernible. So far as .the scheme affected the charitable institutions it failed The best people of the State up-against it. What did he do? He.finally" abandoned the plan because he was com- pelled to by public sentiment, mid he promised by providing-that a Fiscal Super- visor of Accounts should be appointed him, that the Fiscal. Supervisor should httvo ..gjjj the final auditing of these accounts, should be submitted to him first; that he should have something to say about those audits, and the bill was passed in that form. Thus was created an unnecessary officer. accounts had been audited here- tofore In the-Controller's .office, and th'e Controller of the State was an officer not obligated to -the Governor his position. Thtf salary of this new offl- cial was fixed at S4.000, but was because it was said that a mail ot. ;S the highest ability was desired. He ap-.jgT pointed to this1 .position an ordina politician the City of.. Albany, 1 been janitor of the Capitol at Albany, never had had anything to do with these Wrieht Barrows Stlllwell, was con- 1 that his resignation, wouw i Th. value of the contents is said rVeived with unaUoyed displeasure. sumed. The value of the c> RUMORS ABOUT C. M. SCHWAB. Persistent Reports That He May Retire as the Steel Trust's Head Denied. Grave rumors about the health of Charles M. Schwab, the President of the'United States Steel' Corporation, are again circu- lating in Wall Street, and .coupled with stories of extravagance sent from .abroad, have given rise again 'to reports of his early retirement as 'the head of the Steel Trust. One of the news agencies, has several times within the laat, few days printed stories about Mr. Schwab and his relations to the steel corporation, which generally began with praise of his efficiency and denials of his, illness, Jaiit which always wound up with some statement about.how well the work has been done in his ab- sence The latest "of. these stories appeared terdav, and follows: Many- that his resignation, would not be charitable institutions. The-purpose of all.- g- this was thought to be entirely Recently it has been dtecQgered_that motive was more than political. COMMERICALISM IN POLITICS. In other words, it 'has. been shown commercialism in politics, that ism in our-State Government was creeplng-.g! into these State institutions. The question ot commercialism in State Government is one that will down.' It can neither be ignored .pushed aside nor belittled. It involves theS issue-of common honesty in the tion oj public affairs. Its solution will "_ termlne whether public office is still regarded as ajublic trust or merely aa means of personal enrichment of the fieial who temporarily fills the place. "It is-an issue above that of politics; it is addressed to the of the their sense of to their inherent integrity. The evil commercialism in politics is a abuse; it is a wrong which must be rem-i, edie'd if our free institutions are-to be pre-; served in their purity. temptation to-use official position for-personal or business ends is .very great. ?ijt The higher the office and the greater tha power, the greater are the opportunities- 
                            

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