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New York Times Newspaper Archive: May 27, 1902 - Page 1

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   New York Times, The (Newspaper) - May 27, 1902, New York, New York                             the News That's Fit to Print" THE WEATHER. Fair; fresh northwest.winds. VOL. LI....NO. NEW YOKK. TUESDAY, MAT 27, PAGES. ONE CENT In Greater Neir Yorlr, Elsewhere, Jerner and Jfeirarlt. J TWO CENTS. CONFER IN CHICAGO ON IMF GOAL STRIKE President Mitchell_Meets Members of Civic Federation. He Consults with Officers of the Illinois Miners' to Call a General Special In The Niw York Timts.__ CHICAGO, 111., May John Mitchell of the United Mine .Workers reached Chicago last night to learn the sentiment of the Illinois men toward the strike In the anthracite fields. He met Secretary W. Dv Ryan of the Ization at McCoy's Hotel and-held a short conference with him to-day. R. Russell and several mem- bers of the Executive Committee left tho city in the morning, just missing the Na- tional President. Mr. Mitchell .Insisted that his visit was purely personal, he having come_ to Chi- cago to meet his wife, In j the Ofternoon_from their home in He declined to discuss the-possibility of a strike of the bituminous'.men. In: sympathy with tha anthracite workers or even to ad- mit that It would be considered. said Mr. there will be a National Convention called to dis- cuss the advisability of calling out all the members of the'National, organization. I am compelled by our constitution to Issue a call foi- a convention when five districts demand It. Four In Pennsyl- vania and one In sighed a request lor a call. I have no doubt they will be able to obtain 'after Issue the call'as.-promptly as possible, i I do not care to anything about the situation the East.  oen found evidence of one of the kind in Boston. The Corporation" Directory con- ains the following entry-: National Ward- -obe Co., (N. Y.) (Capital, Di- -e.ctors: 'W. Tf. Raynor, J., M. Shaw, E. L. Hunt; 'further inf. unattainable) no ad- dress. KILLED BY LIGHTNING. Electrical Around Newburg De- stroy Life and Property. Special to Tin N.c-ji York Times. NEWBURG, N. Y., May have >een a succession of elec.trical storms in this locality within twenty-four hours. Last venlng lightning struck a tree near the ity limits, killing four that had aken shelter from'the storm. At Florida, 'oily" Bigart, a Polish girl, seventeen years Id, was killed while seated in her room; The electric fluid ente'red a chimney hrough the stove pipe- into the room, triklng the girl onjme side of the body .nd killing her instantly. A companion in he room escaped. Lightning struck the cow sheds-of S. F. Barnes, near injuring Charles Par- leer, who was milking a cow. The parson- ge of the Associate Reformed''Church in his city was also struck. Mrs. wife f the pastor, had a narrow escape. The urrent 'passed down the lightning rod, eavlng it at a point midway from ntering the building, and tearing things ip generally. The barn of Gregory Brund- ge, at Salisbury, was struck -and burned" ast night. A COEPER, COMPANY KTTlffOJU FIGHT TO DEPOSE CARROLL Hostile .Circular Sent to Enrollei Democrats in His District. CHARGED WITH NIXON'S EX1 Manifesto Signed by J. D. Crimmlns, F. Daly, William F. Sheehan, and "Gambling Com- bine" Denounced. The fight to dejpose John F._CarroIl a -the Democratic leader of the TwentyrUjnth Assembly District' is on in earnest. A cif cular has been s'pread broadcast throng the district and was sent to every enrol.le Democratic voter, s'tating the political rec ord of John' F. Carroll, as viewed by hi political opponents in Tammany Hall. In the list of those who have signed the antl Carroll circular appear the names of--John D. .Crimmlns, Joseph.: F. Daly, Edgar" A, Levy, Alfred F. Sellgsberg, William F Sheehan, ThomaK C. Dunham, and Mye J. Stein, The circular opens with a statement o the condition of the. Democratic .Party in New York County and eaya: "The needs reorganiz ing. The that party is at pres ent in control of the combination' that run Tammany Hall. This clique Is referred tc by 'the public press as the Gambling Com bine.1 It consists of the limited circle o men who controlled the Police pDepartmen under the last administration. It regulated vice to the tune of millions. The Gambling Combine' Is on the top in Tammany-and means .to be while Tammany lasts. I forced Lewis Nixon out Croker and the Gambling Combine act.In perfect har mony. It was a characteristic piece strategy on Croker's part to make Nixon nominal leader of Tammany Hall. 1 Nixon was to be leader as long as he did nothing contrary to the wishes .of. the Gambling Combine.' But when he' op posed Van Wyck for the position of Gran< Sachem of the Tammany Society, he ha f whom Samuel the chief. Tho !elly and Henry e J. W. I >n a bee'line lor three walking delegates J.'. Parks Is looked .on as other two ar Roche. The three men started the various sections of ithc tunnel early yesterday morning and -ordered the iron- workers to quit. Host bf them did not know what the strike was for, but went out promptly like, disciplined soldiers. The Iron work was tied up in! the tunnel from .end to end ;by the strike.) The following jv re the .sections of the tun- nel Involved In the City. Hall: to Great -Jones Street; the Deffnon- McLean'. Company, Great Jones Street to Thirty-third Street. Hoi- brook. Cabot A: Daly, contractors. Thlrty-thinJ Street to Fnrty-second Street, Ira H. Shaler, contractor, Forty-secnm! Street to Fortv-slxth Street, the Depnan-McLear. Company, contractors. Forty-sixth Street to Forty-ninth Street, Naufrhtor. -Co., contractors Sixtieth Street, to One Hundred and Fourth Street, TVflliam: Bradley Sons, "contractors. One Hundred and Fourth .Street to end of tun- nel, John Shlc'da, contractor. Tha members the firm of Terry ft Tench said when interviewed on the sub- ject last -night that they did not know, what the strike was for. I have been .trying all day to find, out without -said Mr. Terry. Henry B. Seaman, chief engineer for Holbrook, Cabot Daly, said that no complaints were made and that union wages, had been paid :and union men 'em- ployed. He also said that We had ques- tioned a number of -the they could not tell why they quit work. Samuel J. Parks, the principal walking delegate, made the following- statement late' "We a year ago for union in. the tunnel arid won It. .At that time Terry Tench had only a small pro- portion of the Ironwork', but. afterward leased it all from the sub-contractors-. for the various sections. Terry Tench em- ployed uijion men and paid the union wages a cjay for eight hours' work: The price they received for doing the work was so low that they lost a great deal of and a few days ago were compelled-. to abandon all the contracts which they the sub-contractors for thMr'on work. We-thought It no more than right that as they stood by us we should stand They paid good wages to' our men should we not help them out of their difficulty? The sub-contractors were. bewildered over the situation last night. Some of them .said they 'could, see no' way out of -.the difficulty. The strikers themselves had caused a dead-lock and .the contractors were power- less to end. it. I "The only thing we can hope said one of them, is for the strikers to come to their senses after a night's sleep." BISHOP MCDONNELL SUED. Joyle Estate Action 'Attacks Brooklyn Cathedral Legacy. Blshop'McDonnell-" has been made .an individual defendant in nn action pfhlch: was begun .yesterday...'afternoon be- ore Justice Gaynor, in the Supreme Court, Jrooklyn, to declare Invalid the will of Catherine Coyle. The Bishop is thei ex- cutor of the will. 'The -'estate, which amounts to about was left to him, to-the exclusion of a arge number of rjelatlves of the testa- rlx, -with the provision that the money vas tojie used in the erection of a Roman Catholic cathedral in Brooklyn. .The laintlff In the'action is :Ellen.Keririey, a iece-of Mrs. Coyle, who desires to have he will set aside, and the estate .parti- icned. The. claim Is made that Mrs. Coyle was unduly influenced that she was mentaly Incapable of making a will when was executed, on the day of her death. Several witnesses, who were with Mrs. Coyle when she died, testified that one of hem read prayers to Mrs. Coyle and that he seemed to be rational. The case was ontinued._______ CUBAN CONGRESS VOTES MONEY. Allows President Palma for Current Insular Affairs. HAVANA, May the 'Senate and he-House have passed a .bill. granting Palma for current ex- enses in connection with insular affairs. The Senate consumed the entire afternoon f to-day- in discussing the best, method of ecornpensing 'municipal Judges, whether y -salaries or by fees: Discussion of the question granting am- esty to the Americans now in prison or waiting trial_in Cuba has been postponed ntll .to-morrow. Hudwra -Oliver Day Line begins to-morrow _rom New Tork. and-complete service, on'and tor May lath. Unrivalled for Decoration Day MR. GERRY'S SON ARRESTED. Charged with Driving an Unfit Horse Attached to the Coach Pioneer. YONKERS, -May coach Pioneer, which runs from New- York to Ardsley dally, was held up in Hastings this -after- by Agent Berbert of the Society for he Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. Driver Gerry .Was placed under arrest for driving a horse which had two sores under he collar. taken to a Justice and admitted.to Several of the men coach accom- panied him. to secure his Immediate re- lease, and while -this was being effected, others pcurried around looking for a horse to replace the one with -the sores. The ar- rest delayed the coach only about twenty minutes. Gerry arrested at Hastings while driving the Pioneer ia a son of. Commodore Gerry of this -city. ARREST IN HUMBERT CASE. Identity of Prisoner Locked Up In Jer- sey City Withheld Captures .Expected. It leaked out at Police Headquarters last night that Detective Sergeant Davis had arrested in Jersey City yesterday a man who is said to have been'the valet of'.one ..of the Humberts, the .French swindlers.. The officials at the Detective Bureau re- fused last night to give .the name of the man arrested iiv Jersey. Is understood'.that.the prisoner made a- partial confession, on the'strength of which the police expect to .make more .captures. Capt. Titus and fifty detectives were work- ing on the case last.night.'..The. prisoner, It was been living in Benson- I. of the Information-said'to .have been given, to Capt. Titus by the prisoner was that the swindlers when at Monte Carlo purchased a yacht.on which to ta'ke their IS THJIT PEflCE IS Daily Mail Expects It Will-Be Announced Friday. GEN. BROOKE FOR GOVERNOR It I Is Thought Senator Quay "May Sup- port Him for Pennsylvania's Executive. Specie'.-to Tke 'Neaijfork Times. WASHINGTON, May Quay to-day introduced In. the Senate a bill-, per- mitting the President to promote Major Gen. John R. Brooke to the rank of Lieu- tenant General and retire him. The Re- publican State Convention in Pennsylvania meets, on' June' 11, and the .politicians at once .saw in Mr. Quay's action an indica- tion1 -that Gen. Brooke might be the candi- date for Governor. Mr. Quay's candidate is supposed to be Judge supporters ot Attorney General Elkln have b'een making their fight strictly against that gentleman. A well-known Pennsylvania .Wash- ington said to-day, In discussing. Mr.-Quay's Brooke bill, that State Senator. Foulke, an Elkin man, yesterday offered to beta leader S5.000 that Judge -Pennypacker would not be Quay's candidate, and the Quay man refused to take the bet. Several Pennsylvania Congressmen are authority for the statement that the: President told them some time ago that he favored Gen.' Brooke for the'-T.bminatlon. Gen. Brooke would not .retire until July a month after .if the matter were left to the operation., of tha general retirement law. The Quay men are averse to, discussing- the matter, and their explanation of the Senator's action is that wants Gen; Brooke to have the rank of. Lieutenant- General when he retires.. Mr. Quay Has. done! one-or two things in connection with his bill that are rather, hard to explain unless, he Has a strong Interest in Gen. Brooke's position before the people. Most noticeable is his action In securing the-'printlng, as a mis- cellaneous document, of a .transcript of 'Gen. Brooke's military record. .The usual- course, when a "bill for .the retirement of .an officer is presented, print his rec- ord.' If Mr. Quay designed to nominate Brooke for Governor of Pennsylvania and. were: anxious to secure some effective campaign literature, he could not get a better docu- ment than the three pages of typewriting which he hasyhad' s'ent to tho Government Printing Office to be made into.a pam- phlet. Of course, this transcript of his record would -go before .the anyway: but :it is Senator Quay'.s unusual action in having it printed which arouses curiosity. But a Dispatch from Pretoria Says It Is by No Means-Cer- tain That the" Struggle Will Not Be Continued. NAVY COLLIER TO TAKE LUMBER TO ST No Duty Will Be Charged IE Needed VINCENT. oh It In This to Rebuild Been TURKISH TROOPS MASSACRED. A Whole Battalion Said to Have Been Annihilated by Rebels Near Mocha, Arabia. May dispatch to.-The 'Daily Express from Cairo says a'report has reached there that a whole battalion of'Turkish troops has been Annihilated by rebels -near the 'seaport of Mocha, i in Turkish. Vilayet of southwestern Arabia. The Governor of. Mocha- Is .said .to have been carried away by the rebels as a host- rebels, It is further reported, are be- ing joined by numbers of Turkish troops, who are deserting. WEST VIRGINIA LAND SAIE. Social to Tin Ne-jj York Times. West Va., -May George F. Miller, Judge Thomas H. Har- vey, Mrs. 'S. S. "Altizer, and Mrs. llallna Nlbert to-day sold to a Boston syndicate almost acres.of coal and timber lands in Logan County. The consideration was about The purchasers. Incorporated as the Isl- Creek Coal Company, will build .twen- ty miles of railway to connect with the Norfolk and Western at Dlngess, to give them an outlet, arid will then open exten- sive This same land.sold lass than a.dozen years, ago for S3 Explorer Peary's Vessel. NEWBTJRG, N. T., May Ex- plorer Peary's vessel, the Windward, is re- ceiving a new boiler and engine at the ship- yard here. Capt. Bartlett expects to sail for' Cape Sablne in July with Mrs. Peary aboard, to meet the explorer. I DEINK SPRING- WATER, .'bottled ,t the Spring, delivered fresh-dally at Home or Office. Tel. Office, Broad- and Has Given by Canada, WASHINGTON, May, Navy: De- partment has added one more to the "good offices which.it has been called on to per- form .on behalf of .the West .Indian .suf- ferers by undertaking to transport to the homeless people' of St. Vincent a large quantity of building lumber which the Can- dlan Government has donated.: The-lumber Is -coming by mil from Canada through to Norfolk, the -Treasury -officials author- izing its passage through the United States in bond, and without payment of At Norfolk' the lumber will be, loaded on the collier Leonidas and transported directly to St.'Vincent. Having relieved all present necessities of the inhabitant's of. Martinique'and-St: .Vin- cent, the Navy Department lias decided to further activity in that direction, and merely to "stand ready to re- spond to anv call for assistance. The little Potomac, which', under the .able direction of Lieut. McCormlck, lins such splendid service In the relief work, will not be sent again unless .new and worse1 She sailed to-day from St; Lucia lor Porto Rico, The-Dixie will probably finish, unloading at St. Vincent to-morrow, and she, too. w-111 .be.--withdrawn !In the. West Indies, returning ;to New York. Adjt. Gen. -Corbin- iias .received the fol- lowing cablegram from Capt. Hugh J. Gal- lagher, Commissary St: Vincent, May 1'4: i "Area or devastation, St.-.Vincent, about twelve square milesJn northern extremity. Population of this area was 8.UOU, of which their .lives. by 'flight to Kingstown and other places. No such overwhelming catastrophe as a't St. Pierre, yet many people' to be sus- tained by public because many escaped. Outside of. area devastated no age done, but people very apprehensive. This condition will not abate until volcano, is still active, subsides. Second eruption occurred 18th, but no additional damage wrougnt. Supplies of all kinds from Dixie most gratefully will with what was on hand, -provide fov pres'ent population for three months. Lum- ber for rebuilding is asked.1 Nothing is known of-any disturbance, outside of St. Vincent and Martinique. "Now that emergency has been met, would advise sending .supplies gradually and only after inquiry as to uctual needs, as a' great quantity bent at once might prb.ve more embarrassing- than.'.beneficial, Stores on Dixie well selected." Secretary of the Navy Moody received the following cablegram from Capf. Berry of the da ted. St, Lucia, May '25: Dixie discharging remainder stores at Kingstown, where most need. Provisions now on hand for several months. Lumber for houses needed. Volcano" active. ditional damage. Care of refugees and In- jured, approximately well in hand by local authorities." LONDON, May 27.-The Dally- morning says that the Cabinet Council to be held to-day will decide. .upon points of. detail, mostly of a financial nature, which have been' raised by the Boers in the peace .negotiations. Tha .British decisions will then be communicated to the Voreenlgine conference by the j delegates at Pretoria, and, being the'best obtainable terms, they. Will almost certainly, be. accepted. The re- "sults should-be announced officially either. on Thursday or Friday'of this week, prob- ably on Friday.. Peace is quite- certain, "says Tie Dilly Mail, and the delegates at Pretoria ara only engaged In endeavoring .to gild the pill for the Vereenlelngsconference to swallow. The Daily Mail says further: "pur dispatches from Pretoria that, numerous 'communications are pass- ing between Lqrds Kitchener and Milner, in South Africa, and London. Lord Kitchener, although he le still full, of energy, is much aged in appearance as a result of the severe and continuous strain which he has undergone.. .The con- sensus of opinion is that the. recent nego-. tlatlon's hare proved Lord Kitchener to be a great diplomatist as well as a great soldier. It is difficult to appreciate the magnitude of the difficulties Lord Kitchener, has Ihad to contend with. The Boer leaders are all deeply impressed with his personality, and jtrust.liim Implicitly. "It is understood that Lord Milner has gracefully admitted that the ultimate credit .for the accomplishment of tha great is due to Lord Kitchener." The Government, leader in the House of Commons, the Right- Hon. A. J. Balffcur, declined yesterday to "make any fore- cast" as to when the Government, wo.uld be able tr> sny anything definite regarding peace In South Africa.. Well informed peo- ple did not anticipate, that the Govern- ment would be in a p'ositlon yesterday ;to give'out-anything of Importance in this connection. I i Just before .Parliament rose after mid- night, a rumor reached the lobbies'that a hitch had occurred in.'the peace negotia- tions. Nothing official concerning this L'u- _ mor cnukl ascertained, but the dispatch to The Associated Press from Pretoria, Jin which it is said that the prevalence throughout South "Africa of optimistic feel- Ing is hardly based upon solid facts may bo regarded 'as an .indication that :suchS a hitch -has occurred.- i Little Information from' Pretoria has re- cently succeeded in passing the censor there. 'PRETORIA, .May prevalence throughput South Africa of optimistic feel-. Ing In regard to :the peace hardly based, upon, solid facts.. !j The protraction-of the conference at Ver-. eenlglng1 Is .not: necessarily a hopeful sign. -The-delegates at the, .conference, although they have abandoned their hopes of seciir- ing-Independence' still ..have many points of difference with the British while an oljstlnate minority continues jta) regard the resumption of hostilities as the 'best outcome of the present situation, and nt any moment, these points of difference may be accentuated Into a refusal to con- tinue the-negotiations. ;j It is most unlikely that those .who are-in fnvor of peace will..throw-up the sponge aa long as a decent minority is desirous ipf the struggle, and all these'dis- sonant elements must be taken into account before it Is possible to give.any sort of pre- diction, as to the' issue of the present nego- tiations, j Forty-six-Boers, with wagons and cattle, surrendered at Balmoral, Transvaal, yes- terday. '_____ .1 THE HAGUE, May, is said in Boer circles here .that the 'peace proposals made to the conference .at Vereenlging included the' condition .that the" Boers; in the. field be allowed to consult with, the Boer dele- gates In Europe before a definite settle- ment was reached. is declared'also, iipon the same au- thorlty, that the British Government re-- fused, on May 23, to accede to: this request. 1 ".The Prbphet'B Chamber." a wonderful story from the Four-Track News for May. i Sent free on receipt of by G. H. Daniels, Grand Central Station, New Adv. Pnre. Don't let your crocer oft a AiSv. GRAIN TAX MAY BE DROPPED. If the Boer It Is Believed the British Government Will'Gladly Withdraw-It. j LONDON, the Government yesterday fully a'ntldpated the speedy con- clusion of prace in South Africa Is believed to-be shown- by the.postponement from yes- terday until Friday or later of the Budget bill in the committee stage, ,-wlth the as frankly admitted on the.Govern- ment side of the TTousc; of enabling the re- casting of the btulget- in-' the-event-of peace, being .secured. j The.lax on grain lias proved so unpopular "throughout the 'country -'and has had such an unexpected effect in reuniting.the.Llb- crnl Party with a most effective election cry that there is liulc doubt that the-Goy- iTimient "would welcome an -excuse to rlrop U. I Another strong reason for the .desire to 'do away with the tnx is the effect It has had IM .the rolonk-s.. where it has been re- ganled airiopporuinlty to demand prefer- demand which will be strongly pressed ,-n the coming -conference of Colonial' Prennfrs :n Lonrlon-f-and as likely to cause the Government considera- ble-difficulty bjvemphaslzing'a. sharply de- divergence of opinion in the Cabinet. There the chamburliiin" party is advocating a policy and the. retention of ifrC'o'rp.in tax. while the 'Balfour party ad- vocates iust the' reverse. Sir Michael HIcks-lieach. tho. Chancellor of-'-the Ex- chequer, 4s said to be ijOIte willing W sur- render the tax on grain. The Dally News predicts-that, once peace secured, present Ministry will'go to pieces in twel've months. Iirthe meanwhile Lord Rosebery Is draw- ing the Liberals elosor together. He has consented to .'preside at a Liberal meeting to be held in London to protest against the Government's Education bill. This bill, has. fllso prove'l to be an-unpopular meas- ure so much-so that'many, of the Govern- ment's supporters'.arc. urg.fcig its modifica- tion. Long Island The Sprinc Schedule, with Important changes will .take effect May 28. The Shelter. Island and- Hamptons Express will leave 34th Street. E. B., at P. ,M. FiatbUsh. Brooklyn, at P. M.. except Decoration Dayv   

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