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New York Times Newspaper Archive: October 23, 1901 - Page 1

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   New York Times, The (Newspaper) - October 23, 1901, New York, New York                             11 All the News That's Fit to Print" Netar Jlorrk THE WEATHER'. Partly cloudy winds west to southwest. OOPTRIGHT, 1901. BY THE NEW TORK TIMES COMPANY VOL. LI...KO. NEW YORK. WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23, PAGES. BULLER LOSES HIS POST COMMERCIAL FUTURE, Is Relieved of His Command and Placed on Half Pay. RESULT OF HIS RECENT SPEECH Gen. French, When He Returns from South Africa, Will Command the ?irst Army Corps. LONDON. Oct. Redvers Buller has been relieved of the command of th First Army Corps in consequence of th speech he made on Oct. 10. He has been placed on half pay, and Gen. French has been appointed to succeed him. In the official announcement, the War Office says Commander in Chief after full consideration of all the circum- stances jand the explanations recommended that Gen. Buller be relieved which has been done. The appointment of Gen. French Is to take effect when his services are no longer required in South Africa." Pend- Jng Gen. French's return Gen.- j..aldyarc command at Aldershot. Gen. Buller's supersession was not unex- pected, ut the manner of it has caused a sensation. The morning papers all expres: sympathy over the unfortunate ending of a brilliant career, but they are unanimous in saying that no. other course was open after Gen. Bailer's Indiscreet speech. They express the greatest approval of the selec- tion of Gen. French to succeed him. The Daily Chronicle and The Dally News attack the Government for weakness and lack of courage in ever appointing Gen. Buller to the command of-an army corps. The speech which resulted in Gen. Bul- ler's compulsory retirement was delivered at a luncheon given by the Queen's West- minster Rifle Volunteers at their heaflquar- ters-In Westminster to those of their num- ber who took part in the war in South Africa, Ihe latter were attached! while on active service to the King's Royal Rifles. Gen. Buller spoke in reply to a toast by Col. Sir Howard Vincent, who proposed The King's Royal coupled with the same of Sir Redvers, who Is Colonel Commandant of the regiment. In what even such- a conservative paper as The Standard called in its headlines "'An Amazing Gen. Buller said: I know that there is a correspondent of The .Times here, and I want to send a. mes sage to that journal. I came home in No- vember last and took over the ATdershot command on Jan. 10. In February I got a. letter from a man. I admit he was not a respectable man. I had never seen him in my lite. I had heard of him, aed knew abott him. and he wrote to hie to the effect that I liad let him out of prison. If it was done ft was done in my name. He particu- larly wished to see me, and asked whether 1 would give him an appointment in Lon- don. The man was what I should call an international detective, or, possibly, a spy. He is an old man, and he has been at It all his life. 1 did not want to give nim an appointment. I was afraid of being put in a. hole, but I -wrote asking him to meet me at Aldershot. He came down and told me a lot of interesting stories about the Secret of the Transvaal, and how stupid we were and how we allowed ourselves to be deceived, and how he got his informa- tion through __ "I then saiS, 1 am really rather fcusy and very much interested in your but perhaps you have come down to tell me something else.' He said, I and continued, Well, the other day you published a paper about artillery, I eaiil. Yes, I Arid you -were told to withdraw I said 1 Yes. I was.' He said, Tou have got money to live. upon. Give up the Aldershot command.' I said, 'Thank you very much, but I do not know that I need.' I'said, He said, I will tell you; you Dave got enemies, not exactly enemies, but men who mean to get you out of the way. and they will do so. You had better get out quietly and happily.' I said, I do not know what you think. I am a fighting man, and what you have told me will make me much more likely to stay.' said he, as I stand before vou, l_came to tell you this as a favor.' Of course, I did not ask him for names. As he was eoins away I said, 'Of course, if It is Jiecessary for me to use this information J shall do so. and he said, You can.' So I tell the story to-day. "It is a curious thing that a fortnight ago a few of the. London papers brought on the same day articles against me. It might have been an accident. Probably it was. However, it was a coincidence. They were all on the same day, and they ail attacked me in the same, manner, The Times has attacked me by way of a letter from 'A who may" be, for all I know, a penny-a-liner or the man in the world: at any rate, he Is an anonymous scribe. The Times says I j am not fitted to be in command of the 1 First Army Corps, and I assert that there j Is nobody at this time in England junior to me who is as fit as I am. I challenge The Times to say who ia the man thev have in their eye more fit t an I am." Later on in his. speech Gen. Buller ad- mitted that he had advised Gen. White to surrender Ladysmith. An abstract of this R. B. Haldane, M. P., Speaks on the Necessity of Scientific and Technical Training. LONDON YORK TIMES Special Cablegram. LONDON', Oct. B. HaJ- dane, M. P., in a speech on education at Liverpool last eveningr safd the lack of educational spirit in the mid- dle classes, complained of by Matthew Arnold a quarter of a century ago, -would still exist the fact that those classes had suddenly found their posi- tion threatened by new commercial com- binations. been forced to real- ize that courage, energy, and enterprise, in these modern days, were of little more avail against the weapons science could in the hands of their commercial rivals than was the splendid fighting of the dervishes against the shrapnel and Maxims at Omdurman. It was not wonderful, said Mr. Hal- dane, that England had been beaten-in the manufacture of iron and steel by the United States, but it -n-as startling that she had also-been beaten by Ger- many. Clearly England w a under the necessity, in tnese early 'ays of the twentieth century, of making a resolute effort If she was to hold her own. She might not be able to continue to surpass the United States. Nature had handi- capped her in that race. But Great Britain must maintain the increase in the volume of her trade. Mr. Haldane went on to show how sci- entific training had improved the brew- ing trade of Germany, which country had applied science practical workings of the industrial world. The. manufacture of aniline dyes from coal tar, discovered In England, had lately shifted wholly to Germany. The speaker argued in favor of tech- nical training to help solve the problem. STONE'S CAPTURE HAS COST MANY LIYES In   associate members were received, the present membership 263 active, as" sociate, and 20 honorary. The election of officers will place to-morrow. CHICAGO EATLBOAD TAXIS. RUSSIAN-JAPANESE AGREEMENT. It Is Said that the Two Powers Will Re- apect Korea's Integrity. LONDON, Oct. On the authority of Count Lamsdorff I am able to says the St. Petersburg correspondent of The Daiiy Telegraph, that the relations between Russia and Japan are Quite amic- able, and that the rumors of a likelihood of war are quite unfounded. Certainly the Korean question will not cause a rupture, because Russia and Japan recently arrived at an agreement which makes Korea a sort of buffer State, both agreeing to respect her territorial Integ- rity." WOMAN KILLED 3Y A TRAIN. GERMAN COMMERCIAL TREATIES. LOXDOX TORK TIMES Sjjccial Cablegram. LONDON, Oct. to a communique in the North German Ga- zette declaring that the object of uie German Government is to effect new. arrangements with foreign countries in regard to commercial relations, and that the Government must hold Itself free to denounce the existing treaties at the proper time, the Berlin correspondent of The Times says all that the. declaration I really means is that the Government has not at -present made up its mind that it 'will, under all circumstances, refrain from denouncing treaties. Vanderveer Bond Terri- ble Death Kcar iVeivairlc. Special la The Near York Times. N. J., Oct. Van- flerveer Bond of Newark was instantly killed at the North Avenue station at 1C o'clock to-night by being struck by, fast west-bound freight train. Mr. and Mrs. Bond were about to take a train for their home, having been guests at the wedding of Alexander Bond and Miss Edith L. Pruden They took the -wrong side of the tracks and in attempting to cross they did not see the fence which divides. them. The train struck Mrs. Bond before her husband could drag her from the rails. She was Instantly killed, her head being torn from her body. Mr. Bond was also struck and severely In- jured, one arm being cut. He had a narrow escape from death. for the fmmt Tear Much Leaa than tor the Year Spttial to The York Times. SPRINGFIELD, 111., Oct. dif- ferences In the amounts of taxes paid railroad companies in Illinois were dis- closed .to-day by comparison of a report Just issued by State Auditor McCullouzh with the corresponding report for the year before. The new report shows the taxes charged for collection during the year IflUO and decreases of from 10 to 40 per cent. are shown In the case of almost every railroad as compared with taxes charred for collection in 1899. Copies of the Auditor's two reports were furnished to the State Board of Equaliza- tion to-day, and the totals will he tabu- lated for use by the officials. It Is on roads whose property lies mostly in Chi- cago that the greatest decreases are shown. In the casa of the Lake Shore and Nlckul Plate and the Terminal Transfer Railway the difference amounts to nearly 40 per cent, of the tax paid tn 1S99. The Alton's decrease is Burline- ton, St. Paul. Northwest- ern, Hock Island, Santa Fe Pennsylvania, IVabash. From all property in the State the total amount of the taxes paid amounts to for 1899 and for decrease of SM65.-146. TBOTTBLE OVER HEW POST OFFICE de Rensifo of this city were married to- 1 onrt Mr- Schurj arrived and ascended the ease l-o determined to accept the offices of j day in the ]iresenoe ,a COmpanv i Haven Putnam, re.iKion he would send for him, but he did j in the uhapcl'which is a part of-Cardinal j Hlp atar Spangled Banner." not hole, out much hope that he would re- j Martlnelii's nri'-ite residence aml tho entire audience arose. Tile cheer- nouncc the doctrines of anarchy. RICH GOLD VEIN FOUND. The marriage ceremony took place at j ine continued throughout the rendition i and was followed by a nuptial mass, l thc.'nutional anthem and was taken'up I the Cardinal officiating at both services, j witn renewed energy when the band had j There were no attendants beyond tho two i playing. Tile wits opened by Georg-a Accidental Discovery at the Famous witnesses required in an international at- i Elkton Mine in Cripple Creek, Col. Sfecia! to "lite York Times. CRIPPLE CREEK. Col., Oct. very rich vein of gold has been struck on the famous Elkton mine. On Feb. S of this year the machine men working on this, the seventh level south, put in a round of shots and opened a flow of water from an un- derground lake. This water has taxed the capacity of the immense pumps in the mine from that day to this. Last Monday, the 2tst, the water had gone down under the xmceasing.dra.in of the pumps until the niett couldMtet in on that level and go to work. They started to drift south, about HXt feet south of the shaft, and after getting in a few feet they cut a very rich vein. The vein Is now opened up fl-om four to five feet in width and con- trins numberless streaks of sylvanite fluor- ine laic and tiuarlz. Neither wall has been touched a.s yet. and there is no telling at this time how wide the vein is. This vein seems to radiate from an immense is the lake. The chimney seems to end at the top at. this level, feet below surface, and Is In the shape of a dome some H or feet in diameter. The formation in this chimney is or seems to be manganese Quartz and fluorine talc mixed with sylvanite, while the roof, which on ton and a little way down the sides, as disclosed, shows that the matter has been bumeci all the way from a yellow -to H black color, and the water which until to- day filled the cavity has evidently decom- posed a large portion of the burned mnt- ttr. thus freeing the sylvanite. There are In all probability five hundred of this ore In sight on the seventh tiancc, Pierre do JIareerle of the French Haven Putnam, who acted as the eltalr- i Embassy, acting for the groom, and Lieut, man. .Mr. Putnam denounced the kind of Joan S. Altwell of the Argentine Legation, acting for the brirte. The latter was es- corted by her brother, James F. Barbour, of this city. She worn a gown of white chiffon almost derous completely covered in point applique, with I touches of light blue panne velvet on a'i'- dle and collar. Her large hat was of white, cioth edged In sable, and trimmed in one. large white ostrich plume. A white Hound administration which Tammany Hall has given the city. His .statement that it in not whitewash, ''hut quicklime which needed I'm- Tammany Hull." tiiim- prayer book took the place ihe conven- tional bouquet. Assisting at the were Mon- aignor Hooker .of the Apu.stolic. Delegation and Rev. F. X. Fink. S. rector of St. 41ov- sius Church. -A weililiiifr breakfast fol- lowed the ceremony, tlu- company being entertained at the home of Chief linffirieer and Mrs. D. P. McCartney. Cardinal Mur- tinenli. M. and Madame de Jlargerif. the Viscount it.e Saint Phalta and Jules Eooutva of the Embassy, and Lieut, anil Mrs. A'll well and immediate relatives of the bride con- stituted the 'company at breakfast. Early in the afternoon >lr. Thiebaut and bride left for New York. They will make a short visit to Albany to .say gnod-byc. lo- Madame Thiebaut'.s sister, who Is a iueiu- ber of the community of the Ladies of the Sacred Heart. .They will sail from New York on Thursday on the Aquitaine. and propose spending most of the cumlne sea- son In Paris. Madame Thiebaut is the youngest daugh- ter of the late James L. Barbour ivf Uiis city ,ind at the time of her present mar- riage was the widow of Gi-n. Julio de Henglfo, formerly of the Colombian Lega- tion in this city. Shu has spent much of her life abroad. Mr. Thiebaut in very well known in Washington, where he resided for five years as. first secretary of the French Embassy during a great portion ur that time acting as Charge d'AHuires. Mr. Scl'Mira, v.-liii followed Mr." crrrctcil enthusiastically. UuriiiK tht course of- six-cell his remarks Uecaimf Imiudiblf. owing to 'the passing oi :i Ufa and drum At cjuiirmaii In- ,-vasef] speaking, remarking: If you ulwise, we will wait until Tammany ROCS by At itm lunclusinn. of his sin-t'i-h uml while !v> v. lifing hearlily Hi" -rt-il. Selli Low walk.-.t nver to wheiv J! r. Schurz had tnkeu his scat. grn.-qnM] Ms I, ami. .iud whispered him words of nmjrr.itulaihMi. Mr. '.fiu-oduVcd by iMiair- man Fulnam l ho ovation he lasif.I several minutes. Hi- lunied ire i-h.vriui: inln latiKhter finally by sjyiuu: can stand Ihis as lonir as Vim can, ev.or-y moans H vou-." Justice arrival was- annr.unccu tr> the uudifiice by a areal cuinni.iii.in Hiile or the hall. H..: nad to make his way In-- l ho stsism through a .wlhlly cli.-i-rhi.u: crowd. As ho ascvndi-d ilu- steps .lo iht- platform the whule audionco -iimsc ami .1 lieimihstraLkm followed wliii-li lastcii for st'veral rninules. lie said lie loai much of what ho to say ol" such :L character that the novvspa'pcrs c.uilil publish it. bill in- was d.'t.-riniiic'l those who uj> town should know the which tc: s on tho cast sid  HlP crowd ilisistdl Upon ills ,e: !i vi-1. and as soon as the water can be low- WAGES ADVANCED AfiAIM ercrt sufficiently in the shaft to allow of i HUVHIIUCLf HUHIIX. working on the right level it. will be opened out to tap this immense crater lot) feet be- i Iron Works Mi- at Fall River Raise hnve.. heard: a urnn MR. PUTNAM'S REMARKS. ,J In "petmifi- the meeting Oe  n-n. niiiTi: i lift l Tarn many I Ia i! i.-- a DcDnM-rjiti-r i-: nionV-D-Bardfin of Ncw ywk-withln a i This.'unexpected actjon it is -fenred may i %fi J" the Pay of Employes 5 Per Cent. FALL RTVER. M'ass., oA. have been posted in the Iron Works Cotton j -Wills Increasing wages 5 per cent., to take effect Nov. 4. This Is the second raise of per cent, in these mills, which are CANDIDATE HAS NO OPPONENT, RepnUlicHn in Will Win Avnonnt of Special- to Xr.v Tork Tinn's. FISHKJLL.LAXJDING, N. Y.. Get; John T. Smith, Republican ciimlitlute for member of Assembly from tho First Duleli- ess 'District, will -Via vo m> opponent for re- This will ho his fourth consecu- tive term in the Assembly, The call" far the Democrat ic Asyembiy r'onyontion was .regularly .made, find tho delegates gathered! at Matteawan. The day of tho convention Father-in-Law and Mother Arrange to j there- was no agreement on Contribute The convention adjourned afier. LONDON. Oct. to The I n committee of three to select MAY GET A SHORT ROAD. TO BUFFALO AKD BACK. T.ACKAWANNA RAILI1OAD tickets Oct -0 anu Good 3 days. 420, Poland! Polanit! Poland! The purest nat'ural spring water In the world A sui-ner at a bottle ot Saratoga I-Aror.ilai.-k the way to perfect con- tenement. Try Jt the next The Pennsylvania Figuring on Buying the West Virginia Central. Sfecifl lo The Ne-Jl York Times. BALTIMORE, Oct. Lorce and other officials of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad to-day started from Cumber- land. Md., on a tour of inspection of the West Virginia Central and Pittsburg Rail- way. There is believed to be a movement on foot by which the Pennsylvania will ac- quire the West Virginia Central. The own- ers of the roaa have been much exercised ever since the absorption of the Baltimore and Ohio by the Pennsylvania, as they have no outlet of their own and are at the mercy of the Pennsylvania. The latter It la stated, has demanded that the West Vir- ginia Central name a price at which It is prepared to sell. A sale will probably be forced. To Wuhincton In xri-re Hovra" from New York, Royal Blue five-hour leave toot of Liberty Street A. M., TOO f the Royal uao fwtt) P. M. Other fast iol.d trains at 10 00 A. M., P. M.. and 12 15 night. South Ferry minutes emrUvr. celled dtnioff and caft car IVorlc OB jSCir Brnncirlclc Strnctnre Slopped Suddenly. Special to Tlte York Times. NEW BRUNSWICK. N. J., Oct. 22.- Work on the Government's Post Office building here was stopped this morn- ing because of a disagreement between D. D. Williamson, the supervising; architect appointed by the and Charles AV. Noble, the representative of Griefen Co., the Chicago contractors, who have the job. Mr. Williamson says that the building Is not on a level. Mr. Noble agrees with him. but he says that this was no fault of Griefep Co., but the fault of the contractors who laid the foundation. The foundation, Mr. Noble says, was an inch and a half out of .evel. Mr. Williamson last night wrote to Mr Noble saying that a portion of the super- structure would have to be torn down In order to place the building on a level Mr Noble positively refused to do so, and wrote out his resignation to the Chicago firm Only a small part of the building Is fin- ished. Ex-Gov. PHIibury Died Intestate. MINNEAPOLIS, Oct. 22.-N6 will was left by John S. Plllsbury. ex-Governor of Minnesota. During life he gave to any institution or movement which he deemed worthy of aid, and .was also content to let the laws ot Minnesota determine the final disposition of his estate. He said so In as many words. His estate is estimated to be worth Take the Day str. er route to Buffalo the Hudson at the height o ita beauty. Adv. Daily Express, at ii family conference held it 45 Portland Square yesterday, which as attended by Eugene Zimmerman, it was arranged that he should pay f.'i.QOO'and. Consuelo, Duchess of Manchester, to liquidate the Duke of Manchester's debts. It was also announced that the preseul tenant of Kimbolton Castle, the principal country seat- of the Duke of .Manehesler... ha.d consented to determine the tenantcy in order to gratify the wish of the young- Duchess that her accouchement rmgut occur there. A..family party traveled to Kim- bolton "Castle last nig-lit. Duke de Arcos Going to Spain. Special to The. AVar York Times. WASHINGTON. Oct. 22.-The Spanish Minister, the Duke de Arcos. has applied for leave of absence, and, with the Duch- ess, will leave Washington early in Decem- ber for a long visit to Spain. candidate. After neglecting the matter some time, .the committee last night select- ed George 1. llttssell of Matteawan as a candidate. Yesterday one. of the. committee xvonl: lo nani i-oughkeepsle to file the nomination with sinu the County Clerk. There ne ritn aguinst a legal snug. He was told by County Clerfc j Bostwtck that the nomination hud been re- i eelveci too late. The'law looked upon the appointment of Mr. Russell ihe sutrie as an original -nomination of a convention; and thejlmit of time for filing such nomina- tion liad expired over a week a3-0. Regu- v.'ilhin metlM-ils nt" :hi.- riuii'nMus t'u- iiistrU'l t.j't'i, for I tetit-v filter. Hn, it yn'i iltni'l b'.'-'lieve v.'i'i tluin Gr-i.ui J'.n-y lias ,1 tile AhtTli'-y's WJIS'l'v rllii-t i II.ay llie Iir.iius, was not tn In- 11 v.-t-. -c. -V Jury MIS wilti II 1 myself thai W-M-C from tli, tri'.'t iii'lii-r 10 nun nci-'? in 'in- ition. Tin1 tliv viilice will] ill.- vt-inii lor -lie innirin li liiey were is 11 governiii''hl ot to rrime. that ai'i- iii-iiit- poured Iho tri'iisurv to the is tryins 1" th.-it it is not but iji'iieklimr Hint neeiii'd I'm Tammany 'i'he thing' tit rlo tiie fiy ti--( is to cut h'.s laii i lust? Iiehinil his', s tin- to for r- ni."  Ir. Srliurz. fiiairnian I'tit- x.i-il liis career as a suUlii r. MR. SCHURZ'S SPEECH. i-. Si-luirifK .H-h in full follow-: This is the jn-isl lar party nominations mti.st be filed twenty-five days before election. CEUISE OF THE MARGAKITA. Capt. Allaire to be an Inspector.' ALBANY, Oct. Court of Appeals without opinion to-day decided against" Capt. Anthony J. Allaire of the New York City police force. In his efforts to procure a promotion to the position of Inspector in the department. He was a veteran, and claimed preference under the Veterans'- act. He failed to pass the physical exam- ination, and. the Court of Appeals holds with the Appelate Division the Veter- ans' Preference act does not ripply to his case. ,T. Drexel ami Party Stnrt To- day on West Indinn Voyaee. Sfcct'a! to .YVic i'orJb Tiiiifs. riULADELFHTA, Oct. ance papers -were granted to-day to the sten.ni yacht Margarita to proceed on cruise of Ihe AVest Jnilies. The vp.ssc-i is I who. both honorable .mex I'e; s to aim at t-hc same 'if inunicin ;1 i juiniinistralitin. I may add that tbi-v -i-e j both my personai I't-iemis. and that, if I there any liifforenrr- tiftw-.-en thetn. thv eanclid.-ile i ojipos-e as a perttai.s somewliiil tieitrer lo mo than the i "To oppose Mr. Shepard .is. one of th f public, duties r l-.uve ev, r to perform. 1 know his his UK- lives, his .-iims: and, kuoxvins liivm. I him highly. must confess it upon when i heur liim spok-it 1 of with.a slur, i have to oppose him K-. J. B. Reagan Dangerously Ml. "DALLAS, Texas, Got. re- ceived here from Palestine, Texas, stale that Judge J. B. Reagan. Chairman of the Texas State Railway Commission, and the only surviving mpmher of the Confed- erate Cabinet of Jefferson Davis. Is danger- Francis tie Murietta. and B. Van Vocrhis Dimly ill at his home in Palestine. .Judge wllo were of the party that cam.- from Reagan ts eighty-five years of age. Kurope on yucht. will re.turn with it now lyins off Race Street; and at 11 o'clock !.cause he placed himsell in an to morrow will eet under -I in in spile .it l.is uiu eit unclel aj. he .js upl ,o 11111rp Anthony J. Drexcl, the owner of the j than But 1 wish it distinclly yacht, and Mrs. Drexel have invited seven- i (hut.. _in discussing his course 1 teen guests to make the cruise. The first scheduled port at. which the Margarita is I of'his character or ".tho pu'rity of to stop is Havana. The .bis steam v'aclit tiveu. arrived at this port from a Kuropean cruise I "The first fact that, in our efforts f after being turned out by a British ship- I government, stares us in tile is bui'-ling company, previous to the trial j the existence of an raeus between the Columbia and the t'on- Hall-whose very purpose it is to give i h-- stitution off Rhode Island, some. of whlcliVciiy the worst government it dares, tn she attended. end of. milking money out of ii. Anil tiv; After it was decided which boat, was to i organization has been for np-l 'X defend the cup the Margarita went to New I now, in full possession nf the York and there awaited the contests i iiower. To describe its eliai-.-n-ter I caiim.l tween the Columbia and Shamrock. i do better than qunto Mr. Shepsrd's 'own these were finished the Margarita came uttered in ;i Seth mass- here to prepare for her cruise. The mcelinsr. In the municiptil camptilcn of i.xir master is Capt; John A. R. Gushing. -I He siii.1: 'The most Inirninir and Alwyne; Compton. Lord Athlttmnev........ Chtcigo. 112.00; Buffalo. Cincinnati. Blum'i Tourist Agency, 457 13.50 by Tork Central ana on by the West Shore. New York to Buffalo ani return October 2rith and 30th. Good only In Lowest rates made lor the Pan-American The Margarita will remain several weeks In West Indian waters and then return to England.. Poland! Polar-d! I'olnnit! r-ainnd! The purest natural sprinic water in the worli. fni blot upon the municipal history of this country is the career of Tammnnv The bossism. prostitution of'power: a more and treatment n' citizens who were too poor and lo protect themselves, -a worse trt'atmem of a city, we have never known ,.i disgrace us with ourselves, to ili.ssrrai e us throtigiiout the i'nited States, to" g-race ns lirthe eyes ot the civilized world.' Thus spoke the wrath of au hou-   

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