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New York Times Newspaper Archive: September 3, 1901 - Page 1

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   New York Times, The (Newspaper) - September 3, 1901, New York, New York                             ".All the News That's-Fit to THE WEATHER. Fair, north to east winds. COFTRIQHT. 1901, ST THE NEW TORK TIMES COMPANT. VOL. L...NO. NEW XOEK. TUESDAY. SEPTEMBER 3, 1901.-FOURTEEN PAGES, ONE GENT In Greater V City. TWOCEST9, FRANCO-TURKISH CLASH IAYHAYE BIG RESULTS Diplomats Believe a New Concert Is: Necessary. FRANCE EXPELS MUNIR BEY The. Ambassador Went to Paris and Gave a that Warships Are .Going "to Turkey. LONDON TIMES-NEW YORK TIMES Special Cablegram. Sept. first {uU French Cabinet meeting for a" month be held to-day, according- to a dis- patch from Paris to The Times. The question of Franco-Turkish rela- tions will be discussed, tut well as the arrangements for the fPtes In connection with the visit of Emperor Nicholas.. M. Delcassfi. the dispatch proceeds, has been taking steps to secure harmony of opinion between France and Russia at Constantinople. There are signs that diplomatic circles everywhere are realizing the growing ne- cessity for a sort of moral concert of the Powers regarding Turkish affairs. No- body believes that Germany would con- sent to act as arbiter In the present dis- pute. If the story that'the Porte has re- quested such Intervention be true. There are reasons; for believing that Germany will give moral support to France In this typical case. In which France appears as the champion of Europe. Meanwhile, Turkey is endeavoring to deal directly with'the two hitherto dis- regarded creditors, MM. -Loranclo and Tu- blnl, but this will not put an end to the difficulty, for Ambassador Constans will not be permitted to return to Constanti- nople until the Sultan directly concedes all that France asks. By The Associated Press. PARIS, Sept. result of the actloii of Munlr the Turkish Ambassador. In coming to Paris, In eplte of the rupture or Franco-Turkish relations, and. hi open way, giving a fete at the Turkish Em- bassy on Sunday In honor of the anniver- sary of the Sultan's accession to the throne, has been that the French Government sent him, the same afternoon, a request to leave France Munlr Bey departed for Switzerland that evening. Munir Bey will only retttrn -to Paris against the wishes of the French Govern- ment unless the dispute Is settled. It Is rumored that ,a naval division will be ordered to Turkish waters to-day. M. Constans. the Ambassador to Turkey, had another conference with the Foreign Minister, M. Delcasse, yesterday. Tho Government is determined to "compel Tur- key to fulfill her entire obligations. Unless the Sultan yields shortly he will find tho bill against him increased by a number of other outstanding claims of Frenchmen which will makc'an appreciable addition to the sum now demanded. like the Mad Boy In "-Barbara Frletchle." The other .parts, however, are generally well played, the American actors in the' cast, like Neil O'Brien as Waddles> quite equaling their English THE CAPE CQLaNY SITUATION. Loyal Dutch Offer to Raise Corps to Hunt for How Lieut. CoU Died. LONDON TIMES-KFTW YORK TIMES Cable LONDON, Sept. A: dispatch i.rom MIddelbuFgr.to The Times says the ap- proach of mid-September haa-. had the effect of drawing a sharp line between the two, parties among the Cape .Colony Dutch. A feW of 'them have Joined the fighting burg-hers In consequence of ex-- asperation at Lord Kltcherier's latest proclamation, but others haye thrown in their lot with the British. Last week the British 'authorities- re-' ceived two offers on the part of. Dutch Inhabitants of Cape Colony to raise spe- cial corps to hunt'for Boer rebels. Scheeper's recent dash Into the., aout west corner of Cape Cojony as unimportant." His. three hundred lowers are .mostly boys, andf half his horses are in poor condition, -By Tho Associated Press. LOXpONJ Aug. TKe Pretoria: corre- spondent ot The Dally a dls- patch .describing the blowing up by Boers of a train between "Waterval and Hainan's Kraul last Saturday, when Lieut. Col. Van- delt-ur the Irish Guards was killed, says: The train carrlpcl several passengers, them two ladies .with bubes and a nurse. As It- tolled throu-gli a cutting a nc-gro was seen to raise, his hand.. InstajU-. ly-a Boer discharged two mines, derailing the train, while-a body ef Boera poured-In. a heavy rifle fire. luieut. Col. VanOeleur shouted to the women to .down, under the scats, and .ordered his mtfrivto retivfn the'fJre. As he proceudlng along the corridor a .Boer burst ,lnlo thf carriage' rind fjred, killing him.-after, It is his refusal to sur- render. Anothr-r Boer ftrr-d upon and wounded the nurse. Bulleta were in all the Botirs were awa.ro tlvs-t women and children were there." MR. KRUEGER AND THE CZAR. It !s Understood that HIa Majesty Has Refused to Recejye the-Boer Statesman. LONDON TIMKH-NEW YORK. TIMES- _ '_, Special LONDON, Sept. dispatch from Brussels to. Thfe Times says that'no cre- dence Is in that the rumor that Mi-. Kriiger will be received by the Czar in ihe course of his Majesty'.s visit to France, though the pro-Boer, organs consider such desirable. The leading--- papers understand that Emperor -Nicholas has-refused to receive the Br.ier ex-Pres.Ident, and that .this de- cision indicates the attitude .of -Kratice and Tlussia to be the "same as that ot Germany. It Is believed of the three powers :.will consider 1nteryen-r lion. CONSTANTINOPLE, Sept. re- port that the Sultan has appealed tn Ger- many to use her'good offices in order in settle the dispute wHh France is confirmed. Germany, it Is understood, will advise Porte to -settle with r'raiiro as KOHII possible. M. Bapst. Councillor of thc? French Em- bassy, .and the other members nf the em- bassy staff took the guardship Vatitour on an excursion on the Sea of Marmora in or- der to avoid dressing the vessel as. tho other warships in the harbor were in recognition of the anniversary of the Sultan's accession. The membrrs ,of the (7r.b35sy did not participate In .tho cnnjrr.-u- ulatinns of the Diplomatic Corps, nor way the embassy Illuminated. Turkish officials rr-poived only -JO to per cent, of ?alar" 3 on the anniver- sary of the Sultan's uci -sslon. PRECIOUS IVIANUSCRIPTS SOLD. tord Crawford's Collection, Including Many Very Early Specimens, Bought by Mrs. Rylan.ds. LONDON YOHK. TIMES GDP YACHTS RACE, BUT DO NOT FINISH Columbia and Constitution Fail to Sail.Within Time Limit, NEW BOAT A -GOOD, DRIFTER Defender Away from Consti- tution on First Leg and Ahead When Contest i LONDON', Sept. an- nounces that the coltrotion of iUti: linatod and other manuscripts tn tri" Earl of Crawford has been sold at Sothcran's to Mrs. Rylancla.- foundor of the John Kylanils Library .it-Manclic-X- ter. Is now limited in: H.iigh HalU jgan, with the rest of Lord Crawford's precious library. The collection Includes many modiarval Western manuscripts am] Easiern scripts of aU apes. It is superior to the recently dispersed Ashbu'rnham collec- tion In the early dates of of ,its treasures and the costly richness of many of the bindings in metnl and ivory of the twelfth and thirteenth One Letters of dates from the seventh century, N. C. GOODWIN IN LONDON. Tirenty-one n Snc- nt tUe Comedy Theatre. TIMES-NEW YOHK. TIMES Special rnblfKram. NEWPORT, R. I., Sept. second official trial race of the Columbia the Constitution to-day had practically, no re- sult. The yachts, for lack-of. wind, were unable to fipish-within; the time-limit ot five and one-half hours. At o'clock- thtff evenhig the contest came to at. ifiglo- .rlpua .conclusion, two ml lea to the eastward "oTBrenton's Reef Lightship. At that time the Columbia led by a good quarter of A mile. The course was triangular, ten nau- tical miles to a first being a beat to by south; the second reach, the wind about abeam, and the third a run before the hauled to make it another stretch; with the wind abeam, until the. race wag declared off. After crossing: the at exactly the same monlent, six seconds after Tvith the Constitution" In "the windward I'erthi the Columbia worked out, and, get- ting- her wind tfree, forged ahead. The Constitution tacked off shore and shortly after the Columbia followed, going up to windward and passing: her. From then _on to the windward mirk It was nothing but a steady gain for the :old boat, arid when" both had rounded It was found that the, Columbia had gained four minutes and fifty-five the worst beating .the ".Constitution had as yet received.7 On tho second: leg the wind fell very light, and the bringing" It up with her, gained slightly." After rounding the second mark, four minutes and thirty seconds behind, and starting for home, the Constitution carried up about all the wind there was. and passed rival. Then the t reeze came up again, and the Columbia once more shot ;ahead. Shortly after this the race was called off, with the: Columbia, well In'the lead. It will be resalled to-. afternoon, the start being at i o'clock. Off Bremen's Reef the wjnd was light at o'clock, when a postponement of the start was signaled from F. W. Vanderbilt's steam yacht which carried the lieeatta Committee. There was-a.light roll of sea setting: In from the northeast, the was and the air humid. The "Regatta Committee hoped'for a stiff so.uthweater, of which there were many signs that did not come-. true, the wind hovering between east-northeast and east- southearst 'until when the flags" were sent up denoting ihat a triangular course had been decided .on. A few minutes later the flags giving the courses were hoisted. They were-east by south ten mllesn-a beat .to -winxlW4rtt, southWest-half-west, ten rnllcs, a stretch with, the: wind on the port lioam, and north by ten miles, a run before the wind. OVEH -THE LIKE TOGETHER., Tho tug Coastwise mafks. The Unique carried club members', and eui'stw. Slr'Thorh.as LJpton, with George L. desiener of the Shamrock II., "William the famous yachting am- au-ur; R'atst'.y, the yallmaker, Capt. Sycamore, the skipper of the Shamrpck watched the with eager interest from the bridge of the' steam Erin. moddre Ledyard was. on the stoani yacht Coionla, and with him were ex-Cornmoclore KdwarU M. i'ummodore C." L. F. J. Malcolm Farbt-s..and-Secretary J. V. S. Oddie, mem- bers of-t lie C.hallejiBe Committee. -.-_, The signal fired at the lightship forming the weather end of -tlic--line anil the L'onqu.eror the lee extrem- ity. The warning ginr ;it found bbth boats Joggtng close down outside the. llnev 'with in Llie lend. Bnrr; flnd- that .ho'IVHS ahead ,of gunfire, worked ajid' killing, time. Mean white, the Constitution cohimg dovi-n on him in fine .style, and when a jnlnute and a half" before the starting -gun. both boats hcadrd for line, "Capt. Rhodes had the Constitution In the weather berth. -The Columbia, however, had ar good yard more, and -worked out tn get her wind clear. At 1 o'clock came the starting gun, and six seconds later the "two racers crossed the the same moment on the starboard trickr-a-ntf with the Constitu- tmii no't more fifty'feet on the weather n! the Columbia. (Jnce away, the old boat: In'.grin Co show her worth. Shs jumped iiht-'id, 'find was soon backwlnding the Con- Tv.-ominutes after crossing, the t.'onsiiiution put about'-.an -'the port tark. Colundbiu followed, liurr. witli -a scries of exporinionta characteristic pmartnesF. ga-ve his boat a BOER ARRESTED IN LONDON.: Dr. Krause, ex-GoyernQr .'of Johannes- burg, Charged with High LONDON. Si'i't- Dr. Krause, ex-Gov- crnnr of Johaiineslmrg and; a prumlncnt, of- ficial .of flu: ,Inte TrausvaaJ was -arrcsti-d Inst -night -on-H- i-hnrpo or' high treason." lie" will-be ur- to-nuy n'. For -past four rnnntlis.! >r. Knut.se has bi en Uvint? in thr Till toil Kingdom.' It IH alleged.. .-ift'i-r bis alU-" gl.-iiu'e t'.i1 the British crown, he secretly liorwardi'd int'or-mation to the BOOTH. Tho warrant, w.is 'issued some time tipo, birl. ih'.1- [JttlUV not abli? 'to. find- Krausy uiilil v.lu-n ihuy a-scortainod that lie from--Inverness his sjsier, Mrs, Dixon. who is said to be Uie 'wlffuf a Hrllish officer. It -was Krriiisi- v, im handed to Lord Knhnrts ,tlio Uf> s of Jtihannc-sburs' on -the SUPPORTS DR. KOCH'S THEORY-. Tuebingen Professor- Recalls the Re- stilts of Experiments Twenty, Years Ago. TlMRS-TvRW fcrpct-'lal Sept. BnumRarten pf says ft. -Rorlin dispatch to Thp supports Dr. Koch's, theory that bovine tuberculosis is not crirnmunl- I cable tt> tuiina LewU Cass Ledyard, where a dinner given In his honor. Besides Sir Thomas and his party from the Erin, there were present the Challenge Committee of the New York Yacht Club, the Regatta Com- mittee, and the owners of the Columbia and Constitution.. The affair was entirely Informal and there was no snecchmaklrg. The first formal welcome to Sir Thomas by the New York Yacht Club will be given at the new Clubhouse In New York at some later date. Immediately after the .dinner to-night the Erin, with Sir Thojnas and his party on board, started "for Sandy Hook- The present series of races will end Wednesday. Whether or not there will be other races after that the Regatta Com- mittee Is not yet able to announce It' Is said that another new suit of falls has been made for the Constitution at the Her-- reshoff works at Bristol- They, are nearly finished "and some of them may be tried to-morrow. MR. BRYAN'S LABOR DAY TALK, the Wealth' of the Country Are Not Receiving Fair Treatment. CITY, Sept. J. delivered the liibor Day oration here to-day. Taking for his text the Scriptural words, Muiile not the ox that treadeth out the he said: Each decade of our history shows great- er production of wealth, and the men who produce It have less to show for It." Is this. a good condition? A right condition? The solution of the problems that confront us Is in in. legislation for or against classes, but for equal justice before law. The strike Is to-day the only weapon the laborer has, but it is" weak and ineffi- cient. x If the-laboring men were half as act- ive on election dayas they are In enforce- ment of their strikes, they Would wield a force that would right the evils which be-.- sel them.- The greatest danger, of to-day Is pri- vate monopoly. Not that 'any one monop- oly Is worse others, but tho principle Is bad which tolerates any private monop- oly. "I havejveard that the true solution of the problem is for the laboring man to di- vide profits with the trusts. Tnat has been -given as an argument for the trusts. Such a thing would bo immoral-and Impolitic. It would be like dividing the spoils of the highwaymen: It would be man to rifle your pockets and then offer to di- vide the proceeds- with you. To-day, the only people who sympathize with you are the others who toil In other parfcs'of the Lord's- vineyard- In the pres- ent great steel strike, where did the first expressions of sympathy come from? From Texas. They' have no steel mills there. They They are tillers of She soil and laborers, like yourselves. I waiit to warn you to resist the overtures .of the trust. Beware when ask you to join them. The farmers ran stand the encroach- ments of the trusts longer than you can. The farmers live off their farms. When trust prices go so high that the farmers cannot buy- 'they will rat the products of their own industry. Their wives can even go back to the primitive method of mak- lirg clothes b'y wt-aving. But when the far- rrirr can no longrr pay the trust prlres thcti there will; be no more demand -for the products of your toll and you can tnuke no more The offer of the trusts to divide with the laboring man is a pltrall- Can you trust the corporations to divide honestly? No. How of you would like to try a law- suit, -when the Judge rm the bench Is the opposing party to the suit? made-' by" Dr. .ago. when patients suffering from incur- combat the other. Not a phifrlc patient.was tubercu-. losis. Dr." 'Baurngai-ten believes" that bovine .anil...human Uiberc'ulqsis are not essen- tially .that the bacilli suf- fer modification in the bodies tlrey In- LCJNDON. Sept. is no doubt .that Nat C. Goodw.in scored a genuine I -artistic and popular success .in. H. V. I likewise. Esmond's "When "We Were Twenty- produced at the Comedy Theatre this- evening. It is the first striking the- atrical success here since the early Spring. A brilliant audience demonstrat- ively testified its appreciation of the charm of the play 'and the rare merit of the acting. MT. Goodwin never acted before with FO much force, d.elicacy, humor, and teruler- ness, while Mrs. Ooodwin surpassed her American portrayal of Phyllis in spright- ly grace. Arnold Daly, ns the Imp. is too much hc'man? the able tumors were inoculated with bovine inevitable conacquencep. T- On port tack tlie yachts stood for tuberculosis serins in that one pcrhaps "three miles, the Columbia galnlitg. strrirtUyjnmi the. Constitution gliding to lee-7 ward. AtlfU." the, yachts wcat on the star- board there .being one-eighth of a nitle between them. The wlr.tl now came in variable and fluky. and the yachts in- dulged In frequfnt tiictes." At ;the-Co- himbla: crossed. 4he bows of the Constitu- tion a good quarter of a mile tot winrtward "and gaining ail the time. The wind fresh- ened at this stage, and the weather mark camn'lnto view, four miles east-southwest of Seaconnet River. In the short tacks -it was noticed that Coiumbla .shot to windward wonderfully In stsiys. while the Constitution at this work tvds rather alaggard. At :lkS the Colum- bia rounded- the m.'trk. "setting a righting jlbtopsail of symmetrical ahape and rare tugging capacity, and Steered for the sec- nnd mark with the wind 'abeam. The Constitution rounded at having been beaten 4 minutes and 55 seconds on the first leg. CONSTITUTION FORGES AHEAD. The Krln wns also -close by at the turn. and many glasses -were, leveled oil two vessels. The jlbtopsall of the Consti- tution was the same on Sat- and was of poor cut and ability when compared -with that of the Colum- bia, 'The wind fell and the tinn picked up a little at various the Balloon -foresails were and the Constitution, luffed out to the eastward In an unsuccessful -wind-hunt; At the Columbia set a topsail, the Constitution following hef ex- ample almost immediately. There are good Judges, good juries, yet do you want Judges and juries to try your cases when they are Interested In the out- come themselves'; When you permit pri- vate monopoly to dictate terma of-division, then you place yourselves wholly at their mercy. Ton allow them, to water their stock, then expect them to divide wllh labor .on1 a'Just basis. You -are witnessing a. battle between labor and .the great steel trust. This' trust willing to. unionize some of its mills, but would have others open' to non-irnion labor. Why? Because the trust wants some-mills--that- 'it: can depend on :ln the event of a strike. It Is an unerjual strug- gle, for the trust can phut flown its mills for a year, but laboring rrien canno.t live a year without, work. It is your duly to crush monopolies with the best resource at your ballot. "Government by Injunction is an In- iQuLtotJs system, and one of the questions demanding attention at ihe hands- of the American people. Tiie courts are the serv- ants of the'people, and for a court to rule by Injunction-Is for a court to dispense with n jury nnd.to condemn a'jnan fnr violating jr law that the court Itself made. i'ncler the process of government by In- junction, the Court rnnJUililti's itself the prm-er to makt: the laws, execute them, mid I pass judgment, oh the offender. The whoto tnir.r: is I'nder the system a num- ber of organize themselves, go into court aria set an order prohibiting others from organizing the same pur- pose. -'They ran get an order 'prohibiting workingmen from getting otter working- men to refrain from working. The .employ- ers can organize to crush laoor, bu't others nrr forbidden to organize. ,'M am opposed to Government by Injunc- tion; not that It Is directed- especially laboring that It does away with-trial by jury. It is a menace; not only to: one class, but tn all. It Is within the-power of the laboring man to do away-with the system." i.ater'Mr. -Bryan addressed a meeting-in Kans.as rity. Kan., srolnr over the samo ground its In this city. He raised a-laugh at the (nrt.cct when, taking a position rhe'tcrctl from the sun. he said: I have been .in the shade for several months now and .I'm ur-ed to It.'" Religious Orders: Not ,-I-ONUOX TlSinS-N'KW YOEK TIMES'. religious or- ders' arc quitting? France, accord- ins to a dlsphtoh to The Times from Paris, are finding a'les? cordial welcome abroad than- they anticipated. 'The Bel- gian Bishops are imposing restrictions almost amounting to a veto, and the ItaU i ian Goyernment talks of ta'kifig preeau- t .tions against the aspnciatlous1. Some of the -cantons prohibit -foreign com- and Germany threatens to do, INDEX TO DEPARTMENTS. Amusements. Page 7. Arrivals at. Hotels and Out-of-Town 'Buy- Page 3. losses by Page 3. Marine Intel licence and Foreign Page 10. Beal Page Page 10. leather j. 'esterday'a 3. Four Bays, NeTT York to California lir the Overland the .luxurious diy train via Chicago North-Wrstern, tnion Pacific, and Southern Pacific Railways.-, The beat of everythiBR. Particulars at Xorth- .WoEtern Line Office. 461 Villages In Morocco Raided. LONDON TIMES-NEW YORK TIMES SF'-ci'il Cablegram. LOXP-ON, Sept.. Tangier-corre- spondent of 'The Times says: disorders among the tribes are increasing. Last week the mountaineers piundeiecl 'yillases mrfes from liore. The suCfvrcrs did-riot complain be- f foiir minutes-and thirty seconds, show- rause the-officials require-bribes'for as- (''ing the Constitution flfteeji sisiance, which the villagers cannot 'othing noteworthy occurred until the second mark was 'rounded Columbia .at and ,by the Constitution ,at "the" difference between the two be- Rive. Curzon's Advice on Hindu Education. LONDON YORK TIMES Special Cablegram. LONDON, Sept; According -to: the Simla correspondent of The Ourzoh, the Viceroy, In speakinB.of edu- cation, condemned the slavish imitation of Enpltsh modfis and a. great; number of examinations. He also1 advocated re- Hsii-ius. Instruction, not .by the Govern- ment, but by private jnstltuUons. aided by Government Antediruvlnn Rye. Aristocratic', nnd Luytloa AcIV. econds. After rounding almost -a flat caj prevailed for nearly twenty minutes; fhe Constitution here showed marvelous abllltyr us a drifter. The set her spin- but, the w.lnd hauling, took It In again- -'after a few minutes. The Constitu- tion lowered her spinnaker pole, but did not set the sail. Under her balloon jibtop- -sail she up very -slowly, and at she passed Columbia and was the leatl- Inp1 boat. The wind came a "little fresher ancl the Constitution Increased her lead. It tresbened still more, when Columbia luffed cmt -and passed the Constitution at with singular rapfdlty. and was a quarter of a mile In the leivti when the tlme-TImlt was up. The offic'ial table follows: Firat Second Start. Mark. Mirk. Constitution Columtila' ____ yacht finished. Immediately after the race was; declared off the >Erln steamed back to the harbor' ami" Sir., Thomas Lipton came ashore v, as driven to the residence of Commodore MARYLAKB COAl TEADEi Sevrral Cararoex Slilpped to Ilcmrt of ScntlA Flrld. Special to AVyi York Times. BALTIMORE. Sept. Six .steamships have Just been chartcj-cd to load Maryland bltumirtoxii Pacific and -Mediter- ranean ports. -.Baltimore la 'now shipping: about tons of coal every month to different parts- of the.. world, and In In- vading: markets heretofore' held by the English. A fleet of vessels Is running coal between Baltimore and the West Indies and Central America. Italian, steamers and sailing vesseln load coal here for Italy. Coal Is being shipped to Mexico. Cuba. Italy, Japan. Porto Bloo, Portugal. iBrazll. the Argentine Kcpufcllc, Peru, and Newfoundland-.- Several vessels loaded with Maryland coal left here last week for Halifax, which Is In close proximity to a number of coal he principal being the Lou mines. A regular line of steamers carry fields, the pri being the Loulsburjf e of steamers carry oal from I.oulsburg to the manufacturing establishments. of New England In compe- tition -with the Cumberland coal trade out of Maryland. The Baltimore shipment was landed in the heart of the enemy's country. New Kngland manufacturers have been comptalnins of the quality of the Nova Scotia coal, and agents of one of the r'ov- ince railroads came South for the high- grade George's Creek fuel, which has no peer as a steam maker. A., pound of George's Creelc coal will evaporate ten pounds of water at M degrees into at degrees, while one pound of anthracite coal under the same conditions evaporates only seven pounds of water. REAR ADMIRAL SAMPSON GAINS. He Much Time and and J LAKE SUNAPEB, N. H.. Sept! 2.-Rear Admiral William T. Sampson is enjoying his stay at'Burke Haven and continues to gain strength daily. Reports have been cir- culated to the effect that his condition was a cause of nfuch anxiety to his friends, but those Maying at the village hotel with him declare that he Is just as well as he was six months ago. He spe.rids much of his time out and Is frequently seen smoking Cigars. He occasionally goes boa-ting and driving. Last week he took a long aln drive and overtaxed hla- strength, but had fully recovered the next 'day. -Rear Admiral Sampson was .on the lake the greater pirt of to-day, and chatted with his friends on thS hotel veranda after his return. He remains in his room but little. Bornrft'i hr Don't let j-our alt a tubatltuta. Adv. ANOTHER ARREST IN GOLF CLUB MURtiERXiASE Colored Caterer Held Mount Ver- non on Suspicion. Detective ilri, fjlew York After Two Burglar Theory -Scouted of the. Rev. Mr. Hunt, _. Sfeeial.lo The New York-Times. XIOUNT VERNON. N. Y., Sept; jfforts to solve the, murder of, John Stevens, the negro Steward and the head waiter of the Slwanoy Country Club, In the Chester HiU section of this city; led to'the arrest to-day in Yonkers of Peter Buckenhoff, a colored-caterer, and the departure of Detective Lynch to-night for New York, where It Is thought he wilF search for two colored waiters. These ment with were employed at the club as extra help on the occasion of a stag party days before -the; murder. Wana Slmms. the cook who first reported the murder to the poilce, and who placed under arrest yesterday morning, was arraigned before Magistrate Bennettr this morning and remanded In ther custody Coroner Banning. Frank DenaJngton. th? wal er who was detained as a witness yesti'. was al- io'wed to go free to-day, after telling a straight story of his whereabouts Saturday night and Sunday morning, c Flemings Van Fatten, arid Fowler, who performed the autopsies on the murdered men, reached the opinion 'that they were killed but would not discuss their conclusions until their re- port had been mad'c to the Coroner. Chief .of Police Foley, after thirty-six hours'-work on the case, said that the the- ory advanced by Simms, the cpok. that the' men had been killed by: burglars who en- tered the clubhouse'by forcing three rear, doors, aid not appear to be worth anything, don't thlnkV' fie that these .-men' were murdered by burglars. They wore done-to death by some one. in that club- house. The evidences .of ,burglarsK were fixed up by the murderer ,or murderers to cover up their tracks'. The broken doors and the broken Window through which the burglars were supposed to have .gained en- trance look as If they had been forced open from the Inside. Buckenhoff gave us his address as 11 Knglne Place, wltVre he said he slept Saturday night. The landlady of the lodgiitK house stated, however, that he was not there on that; night, and that she had not seen him since Friday night. We-know thfat he was In Mount 11 on Saturday night, because some one whom we know saw him at. the 'trolley station then. Buckenhoff told., this person that he was going up the road, that he was going to Yonkers, but he was not seen to board a car." _ The Slwanoy Country Club Is housed in Ui? old Corcoran an old-fashioned formfc dwelllngr wHInh nas been refitted fnr- the club's purposes. Its arrangement of "'rooms and winding stalr- thercfure. led many of the club members to say to-day that the murders rould hardly be the work of .persons unfa- miliar-'with'the Interior ot the house. The burglar theory was scouted. Treasurer Sipne called attention to the fact that the broken bolt In the back door was riot bent, "as "It would seem likely If the >loor had forced. Then a back window on therground -floor was open all niTht. He also said, that while late .Sat- urday night there was a heavy, rainfall, no of. the" mml tracks of any entering persons was found. He said that the -cltilv dealt with Scott, .the steward, and. the latter employed Ills own assistants, so that the club members kix-ew.rllttle of Us except that there was no appar- ent quarrel. In the early part ot July a German named Bungartz was steward, for a few days, .His services were dispensed with as unpallsfaptor.v. and colored help 'was decided :upon. Scott was then cm- Scott''s brolher-ln-law. the Rev, Granviiie Hunt of the Grace Chanel (colored) Baptist Church, of this city.-said to-night that he believed .Slmms Inno'ceni of the crime. One last Mr-. Hunt "Scott told Slmms that he could Ifetr three extra waiters for file club's stag party on the" following Saturday. Slmms went to New York and pngased one man, who was to bring two of his friends. I don't know tlie names of these men. One of them was Kept over Sunday, and It was understood that he should go to the club again last but' he disappointed Scott. A man was obtained for who I don't know. I don't know; that there was any difference of any kind. -The first S3 ,a  vlthout funds, or.d ciprncd a boarding house at Roland Park to support herself. This Is now denied by some of Mrs. Pow- ell's who. while not wealthy, she- br-ought'considerable money KnsX-with her. At: the, hearing here ttie motive '-grlven for Mr. Howard's In- terest-1 in the children was the strong friendship which had grown up betweer Mrp; Howard and Mrs. she having .lived with them- for'-some time. The moth- er, -who died New York.'-while with the Howards, left a will naming, Mr. Howard as guardian. The ease has' attracted much interest, owing to tire social prominence of the; Powell family.' Mr. Howjtrd Is at the head of a mining company. REFUSED TO SEE BRIDAL PAIR. Bodley Is Warned by Mr. Lawyer Not td Call'Again. ;ISLTP, TJ- 1-, Frederick Bodley, who married the daughter of Mrs. Head and 'ward of Millionaire Taylor last with "his bride were refused forgiveness by, the mother and the guard- ian of the bride, received, his check to-day for his services rendered to Mr.-Taylor. Mr. and Mrs. Bodley left Blue Point this morning to try and see Mrs.' Head and en- deavor to win her forgiveness. They drove to Mr. Taylor's place, but were sent to the house of Mr. Taylor's" coachman. There they found' George W. Weeks, Jr., Mr. Tay- lor's From Weeks Bodley re- ceived -the check.' Mr. Weeks also warned the couple on the part of Mrs. Head and Mr. Taylor'not to trespass again on Mr. Tas-'lor's property. Mr. and Mrs- Bodley returned to Blue Point. They will remain there a few and then will go probably to New York. Tork'H pprtect outings are the Day gram! HLthcrv. i .eic, OTYER-FOLEYFETES PASSJ INTO HISTORY What They Mean to the Second's Leader and His Foe. Those "On the Fence" Counted, Whilr the Thousands of Both Factions t Enjoy Themselves. IS was a :grcat day for Councilman Fofey and for Judge Divver. For the ol the Second Assembly District, dis- tinction as to. age, It .'was a tremendous occa'slon all around. 'For weelu they liavs- looked forward to. It. For days they talked about It. the con- stituents of the two men. who making a bitter- fight for the leadership at side district, drank ot the cup ot hlp- plness that comes to those who tar favored as to have poll teal affiliations that need expression In vigorous tashlon. No% all of them bids" tor the chowder. and dinner. If every man who has talked politics" In the district these tew past had done so even the two bis; boats and (he extra barges would begun to hold them. But the next best thing to teed was to see the start; They murht march in the parade, tha colors of their favorite proudly adorning; coat or 1C not that was there to Under them from standing on the sidewalk to> shout while the others passed byT Ir not. This Is a tree country, and lAbor. pay la an excuse'tor anything but labor. And shout they did lustily, without tear. or favor, each -tor the man et bis choice. Some had DO choice. But they Just shouted anyhow. For what's the use s> plcnlo It any one must keep quiet T A COUNT OF FACTIONS. But to the men who are to politics tor something more than fun the day1 meant more. Up to yesterday, though both sides made claims, nobody felt absolutely certain about numbers or.-leaders. Now Una- has been There was still some doubt In a tew minds aa to Just whom Mg Tim Sulltvan would support. That meant thai little Tim was a dark hone, too. So, when the portly form ot Councilman Foley aopcared moving to- ward the Roosevelt Street pier, with Sena- tor Sullivan and Sullivan the younger in nls train, there was tremendous cheering- on the part of the Councilman's friends. Tim's wid us." shouted a man In a white Fedora hat, with vigor. "Bow kin we lose? We can't." came the answer from a hundred throats, Faddy Divver won't be In the runnln'." Folcy smiled the smile of a man who Is satisfied with himself and with life In general. He had a showing that would ihar.e pleased any candidate. At least strong, his followers marched with him. and the cheers were deafening. Everywht-re there was-color. It was not onlv the Stars and Stripes that did honor to the day. The green flag, with the harp, fluttered from many windows, and banners and drapmKS of green hung from door posts and house- tops. But there were German flags.. too. and at one point the. yellow flag of the Chinese, with the big dragon, fluttered in -the breeze. "It's hard times, sure, when they've not to mupter in the was the observa- tion of a Dlvverlte nt sight of the emblem. As for the Italians, they seemed to bo pretty well divided. The name of Dlvvor -and of Foley alternated on Ihe lips of men whose dialect had a soft Sicilian flavor. The Dlvverites were especially rejoiced at the fact that they had :iOO Italians In thetr .parade, led- by Charlie Baclgnlupo. ..the Chinatown undertaker. He, too, has been a doubtful quantity, but he: .came nut squarely for the present leader yesterday, and there was unrestrained Joy In conse- quence. And If It needed anything more to make roseate the Iropes OL Ihe Divverltes there was the presence of Snator Ahearn. Sav, ain't we got the boys, said one of Judge Dlvver's friends. I guess yea: Look at that bunch. Humpty Han- over, the Mayor of Avenue C: Judge Senator Featherson, Larry' Delmourt There's lights.fer yer." Interrupted another enthusiast. and ain't I just been shakln' hands with Judge Josephs and Judge Hoffman? Go on, yer klddln me. They didn't .shake hands with expressed doubt almost caused a 'fight, but the dispute was patched up. The, Foley parly boarded the steamboat Magenta at Roosevelt Street and the over- flow crowd went In a barge. At about same time the. Dlvverltes were crowding, 2.5IX1 strong. Into the steamboat Isabella and a. barge at the foot of Market Street. Both sides carried Innumerable banners, and the line of march was punctuated with every kind 6f ear-splitting.- nolse-maklnar device. There was music of various kinds, from the fully-equipped band to the ear- piercing fife corps and the bagpipe. In front of Judge Dlvver's home there was a sign, This where Mr. Dlwer lives. To.th: Foley lives at 242 West One' Hundred and Thirty-sixth Street. If tha district 14 good enough to be leader In it ought to be good enough to live in." THE FOLEY DEVICES. The Foley party had Its own devices. One of the most conspicuous was a wagon with large paintings on each side. One of .these showed Judge Dlwer In a palm garden, with a bottle of wine on the table before which he sat. Underneath were the words: where Dlv- ver was In The reverse picture showed a cell In Sing Sing, with the Klectlon Inspectors sentenced in ISM. The accompanying words were: You, go I'll '-stick to you." Yet another picture showed the leader on a run for an express train la-beled the text, "Ha who quits and runs away will be beat on Prlmarv Day.'t? Tlie Foley party got under way a few minutes ahead, and passed within hailing" distance of the Isabella as she lay at her pier. Then., mutual Interchanges of wit floated over the the noise and tance making them sound.like this: i "j Divver, hurrah----to with Foley." On both boats there was free beer for everybody, but' there was little disorder. The big fellows soon left the deck, and fo'und diversion in poker. On board the Isabella a couple of sleek- .looking men tried to start a (rambling -game. Walk IMs way, grnts." began one of them, nnd there was a little scramble. A large man pushed his way through tha crowd. "None that, we'll have.none of that. Quick, now, be off with you." The gambler was about eto answer, but his partner pulled at his arm. "it's Judge Bolte." he whispered. "Chuck It." And the other stood not'on of going. Then the slr.ginB fever and a thousand voices Joined In the. chorus: Gooil-by. 3'ou rion- t'i, acatnst it. 4 muni rny. por 'tis Blvvpr, nn primary dny. And to the'eame air. Dolly other faction was slnRini? rih-yr, you mURt J'-nvc Wo made you sorf on I.nbor-Dajv W'- rnn KPP no one but Kot.'y. a thousnml nway. But the most popular ballad sung by the Foley faction went like Xow rn'My sres his "finish, and an informer would j 'He -tnil Nation are In the samp society; Around thf ward with ffoeglon he became a PpcjilnK l.'fit." For Juttsi? has It-and his ward Is .pood for thnL Then-' never was an honent man who to So Democrats beware nf him. he has KO! a. And when you inept him on the street turn and Anil listen to 't'hc voters aa they ahout their cry. The Foley partv had a beefsteak at' Schlmmel's Park, Whitestone. L. I.: When Ihe bout arrived there a scram- Lie for the dining room, and In the interval   

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