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New York Daily Times Newspaper Archive: January 10, 1855 - Page 1

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   New York Daily-Times (Newspaper) - January 10, 1855, New York, New York                                USOMT, ilH psr r------ TUB EVWT Cfsamia. Ssartu i ts to Isswi at I, aad tks other U 3 asat maO or told One P. M It ram u tte DAILY ajEm-VTBEKLY T1HKS _. 1ST TUESDAY and FVD A.Y. tt f3 pet TWi is mads up aadooataias all tk rea THB Gouwrav, mh- M tbe low pries of Two sopies -J7r- to beroae1 the time tor -ruca ,T TlMM, wnt by _____________FOB. CALIFORNIA, A WlwirAfO or EIOHT PAGES, or Forty-Ugtl QaiuM, stalls upoaifMly da omraUtinf ID ft irarff. tad containing omit oewi tt ta refctem Intfcose nictkmi of the country, if Pib- -M of Mail SUaaw Pries HABPCK t co, LATEST INTELLIGENCE By Tthpipa- to tke SfW-Tork Daily Times, MATIONAL AFFAIRS. Tie Sellers of 1812 ia the Senate. ARMY REORGANIZATION. on tbe Judiciary Reform Bill. A NEW FEATURE IN THE HOMESTEAD BILL. Author tf Steamers. inaed (kcipaUon Utah aod New-Mexico. Tae Caae Captain .HcCnllamga and Crew. DUpatofa to the H. T. Daily Times. WismNOToa, Tuesday, Jan. 9. The Pmiatat haa under consideration tbe case Captain McCtJLicwsH and crew, of tbe Ameri- O. Wbte, seized by the Cuban avtaontiaa, at Banooa, and it is expected he will iateriere for their release. B. TKITY-TBEB Seision, SENATE Jan. 9. Sundry bills ware received from the House THE SOLD1SH80F 1819. Mr. CASS a resolution that the offioersand sol- war of 1818, now sitting In Conventioa In elty, ka taftted to occupy seats on tae floor of the tauw dartag the aeeeion of toeir ConventioQ. Passed. aad Mouton appeared In tbe Sc- Mr. teuuw anaanlad a petluon from the of war araylag taat the oam tae Bouaty Laad att MW betoa taeaa. Laid on the table. CwrsR pNawrted a awmorlal from the Academy a.hi keaalfcfDr Eiplortng Ex- Ketbrred tke Committee oa Naval Affairs. Mr. have requested by Comraadore TKWAaT, aad etaer officers of the Halted frigate CsMftfirfMB to ask a reranoenuioo for tbe loos occur- laag la tacaa ftaaaian of the Levant ,n, tttu lOtH MU, M Fan M Praya, squadroa CsmmrUseoa Naval Mr. areataMd a bill in favor of the constnic- tfaa tae and collateral MaRnetio Magraao, BEOKbANUATlON. Mr. SBIILDR, from tbe on Military Affairs, aaek with amrndaients the 6UI for tbo reorgaai- fattw OH Ararr, and moved that It be pnntea. Japeadto. Mr. BIMMBAB a petition from tae eltienas ef CVBtoriaod Connry, Pa., praying tor an extension of (fee Bwuty Laad law. 1UK JODKI ay BKKJHM BILL. Tae Judicl ry Reform bill was then taken up Mr. GBI (a movid to amend the bill by sinking out toe trat aeeuon. Do luadentaadthlB to be a teatqueH- liou to wUitoer the Senate wut agree to the jodl ial of the Sopreme Court Judgen >i Yes Mr. Is settled OQ all hauJs that soiiKibinc 10 My jucgment m iti of tho reprc- stn.atlvf syhtem. and, ii pra.-t aMr, 10 allow ttie s 10 have thai Insure v Uu-h the biU Jt the senator DliDoiB conteii.p ales. It is the popular view of tyMt, that tae Judges shoUJ in some measure be made reytfeetrtat of the Tclinga of Different sections aae aoannpian will be settled upon, wherein the ol J re- pnatnt.ai.ive oi iht supreme Coun will be pre- ___a 'in propoalllon co strike out tie first ncrtion Is to test oi tte vwhuiln-r it t'avor iag with the Circuit services of ine L'mud stal -s or aot. Th' notion of th ti traveling a long cir- eatt and with tlji- jieople, a-t advocated by (he Senaioroi'niinols, is bcanufui in tti.ory but entirely delay artsinx irom th present sjs- hat ts a denial of Justice. He thought Sunr-m-, Court caxtuU ba n-lieved trom Circuit Mr The Judges are required to perform du- UCH with uolrfinit their circuits. Senators that in vbus country the Judges Imbihe popular no- ttons of jurisprudence. I tmicb prefer that ihey should ntihite in their libraries Ocnttenien may indulge, If they pit-am. In fancirnl tbomb, ui tins rc- 1 find their in IMC Si nate Thamhcr aro atachaiodlnpil frnm th. sc thrj i-.prcsi outtid Ii is veeesflary tlmt t'n ui. u-r husiiuMs of tlic i i-ntrit Apieltale t onrt uie who'e itt'-niion nf iho and XiierBforB thi y cannot ilo r'ir, mt ilutj Mr. The Increase of judicial Uunes caus 'd ky the eipaaaion ofthe country ilcinauil tuat Wl- should take meaaanc to provide for their performance Tin- rnuRt, taereforr, he rnudned to the teat of C-av- Mr I do not think necessities of the country 10 rsdu-ai a change that propouod It is too laie for to object that cannot cousiitutionally conipulled to perform circuit duties, the acquwateni-" ot earlier Judges dad settled Ihe quts- I wam ihe prt-seiu s> stem cnnilnued, it asearen mure ihan Jmlgwi. Still som.- wlnrli. perhaps, we may accomplish ie .urnvlimon to Circnita. a.r No !xrv nt will be rtiCived by Tuxan lAo piewnt bill. h nu t ,nuiu. 1 am in favor of M ,0 leave the Supreme nailrturtwl in th.-ir an ,n101, to th- app.-Hant jartaaieitaB at the seat of ram, nt i go ibr Ibe svhstrtateoftUe Senator from and rtliall vote striking out the Ural section oi the Mr OZTIB reviewed while Rround. an ihon -hi atadltlfailoiia might mado wolch would both Appellate aod Tirentt diuicM Mr DiixiKa opposed striking out the first oi-r-.ion, a i j fcvur ol dornr such plan sa that of thu Sunaiof from H mois The business of ihe Supreme Court hid Increased 10 nucti an evtent tUdt tn Circuit service with, or Apjic'late iluiirs at the seat ofGov- eranKni neglected CHASE thought that n the Circuit services abrrgateo. the number of Judges should be abridged, and itttd au ametrftueui ead Wr objecwd, n-marKing diffcreni suctions of tne eourt would be dissaiisllixl, ttod the retult nnxlit be that Most of toe Judges would be nlan irom som. one section oi i he Union i'' the the Senate adjoonu-d. HOt OF REPRESENTATIVES. v% Tuesday, Jan.1.'. pnsapnted the Memorial of the Compauy aud at ton potat, aotw VOL. IV....NO. 1034. NEW-YORK, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 1855. PRICE TWO CENTS. New-Jersey and Long Island, to proceed at a moment's notice to any point designated. Referred to the Com- mittee on Commerce. Mr. AIEKH asked leave to present the memorial of the Charleston Chamber or Commerce, suggesting that a tender of mediation be made by this Government la the European war. Mr WALSH objected. A resolution was passed, terminating the debate on the Pacific Railroad bill on tbe 16th inst. The House took up thr bill amendatory of the act of August last, and reducing and graduating the price of public lands to actual settlers and cultivators. THE KOMESTFAn BILL. Mr. DAWSON said that last session the Homestead bill was sent to the Senate, who evaded a direct vote there- on by adopting the substitute of Mr. HU.NTCB, which would Inure more to the bentflt of Slates, railroads, spe- culators and capitalists, than to cultivators. By offering the amendment pending, besought to restore the prin- ciples substantially ofthe Homestead bill, which passed this House by such large majority last session. In or- der to avoid constitutional objection, he designed to charge fourteen and one half cents per acre for lands, In place of free granta, the amount to cover the original cost of purchase, and extinguishment of Indian title to the land. The greatest evil which exists is the struggle to get posession of the snri Ins in the Troaanry. The true policy Is a rich people and a poor Treasury. At no time has the Homestead bill occupied a stronger position before the country than now. Ho described the benefi- cial effects which would flow from Its paseage, in a na- tional, individual and social condition. Mr ETHERIDOC gave notice of an amendment confin- ing the benefits of the bill 10 natives born and persons now nataralned Mr. CAMPBELL moved that the bill and amendment be laid on the table. Disagreed to 05 against 98. Before disposing of the subject the morning hour ex- pired. AStlKD OCCUPATION OF KCW-MK1ICO AND DTXH. On metion of Mr. JONES, of Tenn., the Committee on Military Affairs were instructed to Inquire Into the ex- peuiency of extending the armed occupation act to New- Mexico and Utah, with a view to the suppression of In- dian hostilities in those Territories. The House went Into Committee of thi Whole upon the State of the Union on the Pacific Railroad bill. A MEW OF STEAMERS. Mr LATHAM spoke in favor of establishing a Hue of mail iieutnern between San Francisco and Shanghai, touching at the Sandwich Islands. He argued to show that the colonization and 01 California by our own race wonld have a similar influ- ence on Asia, as the discovery and settlement o1" this eobUnent uad on Europe. The establishment of inch a line would add substantially to the wealth and powtr of this entire country. California and Oregon are to play a part like that played by ancient Egypt in the ckvlliuiuon of the world. San Francisco will become a modem Alexandria, through which the wealth and mag- nificence of Asia will be poured Into our lap. VVs will have an trade with Japan, Chlaa, and the la- dian Archipelago. Commerce la a greater civil ucr thaa war. Should this bill pass, u will go farther to effect thoae Important results than any other measure involv_ ing no greater appropriation of money. In glowing lan- guage he showed the effects ef trade with those nations, aad the geographical advantages which we for the establishment of snch a Hoe of Among them the important one of etoortoBing the distance be. tween China and the United States. He incidentally njuke ol the necessity of a railroad to the Pacific, and pressed the of the steamer bill on the ground Of humanity, civilization, commerce and navigation pre. dieting It largely contribute to the progress, power and grandeur of the American people The Committee rose, and the House adjourned. The vwirnrn at WASHmeTOK, Tuesday, Jan. 9. The old soldiers rnrt again 111 Convention to- tlay, according to the order of adjournment jcs- terduy. Several ol the ok) soldi rccuunieil Jie incidents 01' times past. Ex-Governor RITNEK made an eloqu' ni appea in behalf of the Pennsylvania troops. Sundry additional resolutions were then passed for the purpose of carrying out those adopted yes. tenlay, and provided for the appointment of a Standing Sab-Committee, of one or more from each State, to remain in tbii city, and press immediate action upon their claims by Congress Coinplimcn tary resolutions to General Coonns, the a'lthor o yesterday's resolutions, and to other nidividuils adopted. The Senali-'s rrsolutioi loailnni iliroii! on the lloor of UK- rli.iiu'n" v. .is ai'i'i-pii'd, and tlio Nfw-Yotk. llag nt their Kuad, lliey marched to the Capitol, and visited the Senate. The Convention then adjourned to meet again Ui- moriow, at 9 o'clock, when, in accordance with the resolution, its members will proceed in a body on :t visit to Mount ernon, thrru to disband and meet again at this place on the 8th of January next. The Washington Exchange Bank. WAS, u IMG TON, Tucidav, Jan. 9. The Gbbe this evening contains a communica- tion from a depositor in Lhe Exchange Bunk. Tl.c editorr.d coiliro'-ntv set the institution and tho pat- ties interested in it in nil unenviable huht, advising depositors to unite and com non caif-c tin: partners of liie tirm of WITIIEKS   Same i Pa'il Tucon No. 17. Sauie Leon   Circuit t or the of ColuniL'i.i Judge Dvsiii. t'lc opirion ff tlie Court, j .dgmmt o'1 il.i- snd Ciront Court in this cause. No. Alfred t, Ahraliain Garnsin. Chief Juatiee JjkNi.v the opinion of the Court overruling mou-ms oi Mr. BAXTLB m tbo cauae. No. (Original Tht Smtroi Florida, coniplairjaat, The State of Georgia. Argument on the motion to ialerrene in thifl cause m behalf of the United States was C4mtinued by Mr Dca- RIEN, counaelfbr respondent, in opposition thereto, and concluded by .a t of motion. STATE AFFAIRS. BRIBERY AT ELECTIONS. FUGITIVES FROM JUSTICE. OUR TREASURY TO BE PROTECTED. Consolidation of Brooklyn and Williamsburg. STRUGGLE BETWEEN THE NORTH AND SOUTH. THE KOETR TB1UMPHADT. A Bill Regulating the Police Depart- ment of the City of New-York. PRISON MANAGEMENT. Special Correspondence of N. T. Daily Times. ALBANY, Tuesday. Jan. The Senate was largely engaged to-day in dis- cussing the resolutions offered by Senator WM. CLARK, no to amend the Constitution aa to pontsh with greater severity guilty of bribing at elections. They were talked over In Commttteu of the Whole, but not finally acted upon. A noticeable feature in tbo proceedings waa the pre- sentation of a petition for the passage of a law to protect ftagitkYH from labor, similar to that enacted by the Ver- mont Legielainre. If Ibis is it la introduced by Senator WILLIAMS, who, I believe warnily sympa ibises witb the will Inevitably bring on a a rrnewal of the discussion of the Slavery question. Voting books is evidently done with, so for aa the pre- sent Legislature is concerned. To-day, a Senator moved that the Governor, members, and heads of Departments, etc., be supplied with a copy of a book called the New- York Civil List. Mr. PUTNAM moved to amend so aa to supply a copy to every male Inhabitant of bis dletr el- and another rider was pat on, that the expense be charged to the Individual stationery account of Senators. Final- ly the resolution waa lost, Ayes 4, Noes 19. Give Sena- tors credit for ibis evidence of good sense and consider- ate economy Mr. SPENCEH introduced a resolution directing the Committee on the Judiciary to inquire into the propriety of so amending the laws respecting fugitives from jus- tice as to protect the Treasury from the Increasing de- mands for arrests made under the laws now in force. Also another, that the Committee on the Internal Affairs of Towns and Counties Inquire whether the laws relating to assessments upon Incorporations do not operate In the iwnous injury of the revenue of'the State, and In what respect they should be revised a ad amended. Mr. BBOOK> offered a resolve instructing the Commit- tee on Banks to Inquire into the expediency of requiring a paid-in capital of before giving circulation to a Bank. Also, le limit circulation to 75 per cent, of the mar valve of toads and mortgages. In the Assembly. Mr. LEIGH gave aotice of the intro- duction of a bill to repeal the Act for the improvement 01' the of horses. lie denounced the Act upon its passage, Ian year, as designed to charter a race-course, and to legalize and countenance racing, and thinks toe eiperience ot'the past season entitles him to be received as a prophet. Mr. AITKEN-gave notice of a bill to legalize primary elections In the i Ity of rauch-talked-of proposition, but one that ban not bclnro any practical nnpport. Notice waa also given of a general bill to increase tae compensation of Jurors and Justices throughout tlie 1 VIU wan Introduced to amend the set for the coBsoi- Idationcf WillianiHburg and Brooklyn, and passed last session. It is additional, and joins (tie two Fin- Ilr- union that was not provided for in tbe original set. Mr. OIIKI.L Introduced his bill to provide for an aar'y canvass of tbe vetes takeu at the special election lor Senator in the Twenty-ninth District. On his motion it was referred to a Select Committee, composed ol the Ofttarto and Livingston tusvevcr, without some spirited LAMPORT, of Ontario, charging the Governor with designing to dis- franchise tbe District, a charge which was repelled by Mr. S. B. Coir, of Stenben, and Mr. BOYHTON, of MX. Yon will regret to natlce that there was a fierce HI nig- gle In the Assembly, growing out of sectional prejudices. In fact, a struggle for supremacy between the North and the South. Mr. LtiuH, of the Norll., mtrodncod a reso- lution ttat the South pullery be appropriated to the use or'laUK s. The South moved to unionJ iA thi: North gallery Ttiiu wan brought to a the North triumphed-, Ayes 45, Nays 67 The South then attempted a compromise, proposing to devote botli rles to the ladles, bat the North, knowing their strength, refueedto yield, and the amendment waa lost. The South then attempted a to postpone the question until they could rally their strength. Beat in this, tllc'y were forced to meet the issue on a direct vote, and of course suffered an overwhelming defeat. Disconcerted, not disheartened, I understand trip chival- ry will renew tlie contest, and failing there, will dissolve the Caion, and retiru in a body to the South gallery> v. hence they will issue an Inutgnant protest. T'lb NEW-YORK. POLICE UEPARTMENT. Mr STUVVKSANT ban matured and will present bill regulating the police department of the Ciiy of New- York. It repeals the first, scvrnth and eighth Demons of article 0 and the first section of article 3 of ttiuactof April 13, It-53, and provides that the chief of police In named thai! hTcaffr be appointed by ;i Board of Commissioners of Police, and shsll hold his oifl'v for four yf nrs from the date of his appointment. The second section of article 3 of the act ol' 1B53 U aiianded tliun Every otlkcr, policeman anJ doorman, ir.uttt be a citizen of the I'mted Mates, and previous to hm appointment muni produce a certiin-atc of a cliara IIT fur morality, honesty and .so'iriety, signed by twenty- five repmatile who have known hi.n personally 'or al least five ytars he mast a'io present the cortill- cale of the sargeun to the Commiesiom-rH, th.it Uu is .in able-bodied man and of robust constitution He mint also i HtaHlsh that be can read, write and undrrMtand English language, and the Mrst four rules of nntri- initld. shall hold ofllre during good tit-bat lor, and be removed only for <-auBe. The t ounnissioncrs arr to appoint a') police- mtn, clirlts and doormen connected witb. the nt. 1 hi) org-in as a Board   the onlre of Chiof or Polire Bhill be declurrd vacated, but all other appointments whicii have been Liadf under the act are to remain in full force The Tour ComrniflsionorB named in the act shall on the 3Ctt day of June, Ib55, decide by to serve for the term of two years, and two lor term of four 3-eari. 1 hey shall then an a Baard, by select- ing one of their number to be President, and appoint.ng who shall keep a record of their acts, recsivln? lhi_p lor sarli compensation as the Supervisors may din-el, not exceeding flfXcen hundred dollars per annum- All orders, notices, appointments or oipuleioas shall ha iSHueil in thi' nanie of Haul Freuident, attested by the Clerk. The Board nhal: also appoint tin- Clerk to Chief ot Pollrc 'Ihe Common Council phall provide u room for theune of the i oininiiKionerH, mid they nre to meet daily for the transaction of business, designating specific days for the pertorniance nf classes of duty. No appoint- ment oreipulflion shall take effect, except with the con- currence of three mi tiibrrsof the Board. The Commis- sioners are to such compcnsmon, not excoeJing per aunum, as thr Supervinora may said con'pent-atlon not 10 be ni'Toaged or diminished during their term of office Al General hrld In 1H37, and thereafter ii every second year, them shall be voted for a Commis- sioner of Police, and the two persona who shall receive ike highest number of votes shall be deelared chosen, and enter upon the duties of their office on 1st day of January meoeedtng tbe day election, and hold the same for the period of tour yoara. All vacancies are to be fifed IB the same manner ae in tto office of a. Just I M of the Snpremo Com. No CnwrolMlwiaj eriall bo to any otber off re.' The Mayor shall be a member of the BoarJ, by virtue of his office, and shall continue at the head of the Police department, but ah all receive no compensation thorefor I Ofooorse all acts and parts of nets inroniistcnt with the provisions of this bill are repealed by It. and It takes effect immediately. The names of the first Commission- ers it is proponed to Insert in the bill, but they have not yet been agreed upon. This la aimed directly at the present Chief of Poileeof, the City, and will bo pushed ahead with the pur- paaeof effecting bin removal. It m contended ihit no man in an official capacity done so much to bring odium upon the City, and to awaken the native senti- ment, aa the present Chief, and when they remember that he has on more than one occasion nnccei-ded In so shapinglegtsIatloB as to remain In office against tbe ex- pressed wishes of people, they wllh now feel prompted to extraordinary exertions to deprive him of a position of HO ranch influence, whlln they haut the power. Never an admirer of the individual, nor im- pressed with his honesty of purpose, 1 shall not nvirh regret to record a triunph ou the part nf thosn who fce.j Impelled to urge his overthrow. OVH STATE rHISONS. Allusion was made in the Governor's Message to the discrepancy which was manifest between the annual rtpotts of the Agents of the State 1'nsonu and tho ape. clal reports of the In specters in answer to the resolu- tion calling upon them to make a de'ailed sta'a-mj-u 01' their financial apndltlon. Prompted hy an-lety! I ria'.c been overlooking the documents referred to h'n Kxi-rl- lency, and have gathered the following facis bearing upon the caae. On the 10th of January, 1834, the In- spectors of enclosed to the Legislature the re- ports of the agents of the several prisons. These se- veral reports exhibit the following Hggregutts or re- ceipts, expenditures and indebtedness Auburn Prison. 34 67 13 Sing Sing Prison. 84 73 DO Clinton Prlsoa h7 00 Here Is an apparent excess of expenditures over re- ceipts, amounting to 35, to which HhouM lie ad- ded the Indebtedness which had been incurred, makine a total deficit of sum large enough in all conscience, but yet far short of the reality. On the IClh day of February, 1854, the Senate adopted a resolution, calling upon lha Inspectors to make a de- tailed statement of the indebtedness of each prison. In to that resolution, UAIUUS CLABK, Inspector. reported the Indebtedness of the Clinton Prlnon at 31. HENRY STORMS, Tnnpi'cior, r  tl.jt, the (loiiununt race in'ist regulate the u'coming 'I o dnpel from popul.ir use ajcry mn iijn lantM'age lo prim nil pnijlic documents in the Kng- lish tongue olonc lo ordain that al' s< hools aidtd by the btatu shjll u.se the .same 'anguagr to div- bnnd unlitaiy fcinipaliira founded on and den lopi.ig rxrlissivc MorciKii sympathies to :in purled political broken-dow n lead. IMS ol insular Agrananmin or Cont.nental Kod Rc- pvilihranisrn, whose trade here ia to put themselves al the head ot their deluded countrymen, to organ- ize p.ejndice, to Mtuhze ioicign leeling and morbid passion, rnd tken sell thomselveF to the inchest par- tisan bidder; to purify and ennoble elective fianehise to adopt a carefully-guarded check-list throimhout the nation; to cultivate a lur'i; aud enrneiic nationality to develop a and uta' to Americanize America, to rotaiu tli< Bible in our Common Schools to lu-ep i-nlirr the srpaiutton of the Cburch and StaU'; to nationalize before we naturalize, and educate lore either to guard againht ciiizensh.p becom- 11 n cheap. '1 hese constitute a work transci'iidni" ordinary platform of parly, and ranking with tue grtat moveiiH'ntB that originally iirilions. H': quotes the opinions of Ihe lathers of the Repub- lic in support of his opinions, and .says, th': uimer- record of history taachea that all Repub.ics that IIBTC risen and fallen, owe their deslracliou to foreign influence, unseen lit first, permitted till Uv) stroi.g for resistance, at last fulal. The Miisvachusetls distrust, foreign intlurnccs rursed 'n cviBtoniH and antagonistical to llepi-bhcau- iBm. Venal voters contro'led by aljon leaders of office and honor, ignorant milled by designing polilicians for place and pnwer Mcioiia voters bonpht by promised impunity an 1 license for their wrong doings. They hold, there- fore, that the foreigner shall eiijoy all the lees of this country, but that the natives niia.ll continue to the laws according to tlic.r own judgment, aad the example of their I'allieis. The piesent easy syatem of n.iturnliz.ition he cilia a blot upon judicial prorteedingd, tuid a depreciation the difBity eadrnrBA of citizenship. He ia in favor of reatrictrBf aliea franchiw. In regard to the agaWHtioa of industry, he our remedy ia not so much in legislative einwt. menu and tariff, in cultivating a feeling of patri- otic nationality, and a united determination to en- courage the skill and industry of the American labor by consuming the home products of the shop the factory and the field, tn preference to imported iabric and foreign production, which result must be the inevitable sequence of a truly American senti- ment pervading oar nation. He' reeomme'ndg an amendment the Constitution, that no of alien lurlh uliall fjiiHlifird to vote by rjatirraliza- tinn until he has been IUTP 21 years, nor then unless he can read und write the- English language. In regardto the military, he said One of the earliest official arts will be sanctioned an the laws require, hy the advice nnd consent of tbe Eiecntive Coun- cil, lo disband all militia companies composed of persons of foreign bnth He also recommends the forbidding by law the payment of the State bounty to any military com pany which haa members of foreign birth. He recommends the repeal ot the uneomrtitu lional sections of the licmor law, and will sanction any constitutional law passed to prevent intempe- ianre He alludes to the Slavery legislation of Con- gresB, denounces the Regressions of Slmery, and MilmtiU whether additional legislalion is not ne- to HiMMiri' these cardinal habean corpus and trial by jury In icgnrd to (he national policy of the American [mrly, he says We wish our Army and our Navy Nationalized. We wish the restric- tion as to birth, applicable to the office of President of the I'mted States, eitcnded to the members of the Cabinet and of Congress, to the Judges of tbe Supreme Court, and to all our diplomatic repre- sentatives abroad. We desire a vital amendment of the Naturalization laws, and a uniform require- ment of twenty-one years' residence in the United Stales before the elective franchise ia conferred upon aliens. We wish stringent national laws re- garding emigration, the imposition of a uniform and sufficient capitction tax, and universal deporta- tion of the ciiminals nnd shipped to our bhori s 'I In sc nud'oti.i'r reforms can only Ix con- summated through an American President an American Contress. The expenditures of the yar have been 205, and the deficit of incomes He Ihe repeal of the Usury Laws so far as regards negotiable paper of less than eight mouths, also a change in the laws for the imprisonment for debt and also more, security to the holders of bank notes, to the wages of labor, and for the laws of insolvency In conclusion, he argues the justice ofthe claims of Massachusetts in asking for the payment of the expenses incurred, and tor the serviwt performed, during the war of Ihl'J. Suicide. BOSTON, Tuesday, Jan 9 JACOB F a messenger in the New-Eng- land Bank, bung himself froiff window of his house m Rowdoin-streeV this morning. The rope broke aj.d he fell to the round, which lulled him instantly. Tae Legtalatnre. TBENTOH, (N Tuesjay, Jan. 9. The Legislature of this State met to-day, the Senate oiganized by electing Col. Wji C ALEX- ANDER, Democrat, President, ao4 A. K. THBOOK- HORTON, Democrat. Secretary, over JOBN ROUERI, I Whig, of Burlington. Mr THOMAS, of Cumher- land, Native American, was elected Sergeant-at. j Arms orrr FUHMAN, of Bnrligton, I hy a vote of 12 in fi. 'the usual resolutions, were passed, when the Senate adjonrned. Ohio Demeornilc huue CaaTesrdaa. CINCINNATI, Monday, Jan. 8. The. Ohio Slate Democratic Convention for the nomma'ion of State officers met at. Columbus to- day. 1 he attendance not large. A motion to defer the nominations until next Summer waa lost by a large majority, and Governor MEDILL ajid all the present State officers were then renominated for the offices nnw held by them respectively Resolutions were adopted denouncing Slavery, the Know-Nothings, End Senator ADAMS' bill nnicndintr Ihe law.s endorsing the H.illm.on- Fiji form of iH.'j-.i, frtvoniif the nftssugr of a law hi jirnenl Hanks from eolli .'liiif! debts and against taking Bank paper in payment oft ixrv. The pioceedings were calm and orderly Defeats. PITTIBUBO, Pa., Toeaday, Jan. 9. Mayor VOLZ, the Citizena1 candidate, wa.s re- elected in this city to day, by a majority of four hundi  lie I'harjred with smuggling N came pa-sHcnger in l) Cafiauba Ibe Post-OflHre Prlnilng al Saturday, Jan 9 Our Poslmas'erhas decided that the Delta is en- tilled lo publication of Ilie list of unclaimed letters in this city, the having hacked out from Ihu contest The circ ilation of llie Vitia ia Ceci'inber showF.l an aicrage excess of over Pu-ayunes tot the same month, I utt year. The at Erie. Jan. 9 In the Supreme Court, this morning, in conse- quence of tlie receipt of tbe dispatch from Erie an- nouncing tbe renewal of the railroad troubles thero, Messrs. CAMPBELL, Hoirr and MF.RCDITH ap- plied for a writ ef aatirtaaee, directed to the Shriiffof PhilaaUptoa, ooaananding him to proceed to the-aeaMT dhoratar wilt such force as may bs the several deoraea of tbe 8u- arfiqe Conn in reference to the affair. Tire Court, G. G. waa eoiapiitted charga of forging If JC. for over f 100. clothing, the baio( Bail was fixed at Attempt ta Raw The Blackatone Bank of Dx into either on Saturday mghtaor 8 Tbe rohbera forced the door of tbe two outer doors of the vault, the inner held by a combination lock, whicfe in such a-manner that it bad oat baqsi 6 o'clock yesterday afternoon. however, it waa found they away. At a meeting of oar ing resolution waa That Hayar of Beagor to pstltioa FlM M irroorry store, of THOMAS D. of Sleiihen and South-streets, lire at 2 o'clock thii morning The hi at Injured for Hirer. Cncimun, The Ohio River u fidluf h b deep at this point. t? -f i (nil New -Orleans papen of ceived, but we hava notking later from Charleston, where tke autl still unsettled. tuff Caiaay ta IBM Ta Ote KAitert of tke MATIOTIAL HOTEL, Certain pabUc their correspondents have, withia taa or two, made frnjuent to American ascribing to it true and unjust, and pnrpoers wholly____ Us true objects and having obaafTed_ia own paper also some objectiobi __." on the part of an official amilstiui Government, betraying _ deraigned, in the ahaence ot PreaiaVrat Company, bags leave to expBeMy-eJ mjuriooa impMatMMHand to make bMam American pvhlu: true par hopes) of the Compaay. The object of the company is to take of Boaaaary a quired, for tbe purpose of derelapii agricnltnral, mineral and oaouaerc doing so, it ii disj lo infringe nor to offend against any law. It wffl apect the nahla, territory aaal aad Ita aia t and, in taa judgment of taa iam aasV( raecettfal by peaceful proaacatiM Mi. Tbe company, viewing the ia tbt all ocraswaa to cultivate aaikabla i latiorjs with ail with whom, i duties, he may be into contact'; lands in the oooipanjrY gnat by th ly a .of colbaion, such intemperate aa4 which charactenie the TJew-York hich I have referred. If JIB wnurs, iaateai af adoptiaf I of taa tions awl makiag Utaia which aie at ridiculous aad ai information of the oftcera or amenta of uy, tkey would raeeirad would hare taaii aiantad instructed tMm fullv aa to ita In conchuion, I bare only to repeat jects of the Cowipany ara pcartjftl, i with nene of the their own Goverament, VH! law of their own country or any are such aa good men everywhere delightful climate, a soil tropical abundance, a location nMHaJHt iaV M L _ vantages, but all of which uaol aaw unused and uniaoDroved, an ioritvaf BMMfC enterprise to aad bring them nn4er AM minion of industry andcinlitttMa. take peaceable paaaeaaioa their uut prejudice to tlie of a' of any principle of the public the i thr Company, and it haa no other. Yours, vi ry nrnrx-ttrnlly, H L KIN NOT, General Agent C. A. Canpaay Mr. Marty's Keply Mr BFatatnftM The Minister from Nicaragua, LET A, has deemed it proper to give dispatches lately sent by him to in regard to the colonization management of Col. KlWMr To lie to understand correctly the Mr. MAFCY, we have been copy of hit- reply to Mr MAicourtA'a It will he seen that the Secretary of State same reply, in jmhstanee, to Mr MAljoati MOLIMA oa the other reply could reasonably hare from our Ijovernment. DiPiaTMniT or rlav. Ja, Thr uuderHifroed. Secretary at Slate at Matei, hit) the honor Ui ootr o  Jiainn upon which the inhabitants prtmtifutty no- ami, but tbe last ysar we utippiMni, paniculaily the poor, through the the greaJer part ofthe little poaaeaaiona, wiiajall- rienl to sustain life from the other of the group, bill during thr past seaw'B for rain, thr drought wai among the wlaada, fivored will scarcely produce enoogb for conBumplion and we Uaow noi where ta our ow n daily food Gloom aud death in evi iy countenance, and alie-dv pangs of hunger are felt by the and long, if not stalking abroad among any kind among ui with our stock of cattle and goata through Ibe kind heart- oMarltf eiprct or for abandancr scare peward and bleu Jjt a i i i iNEWSPAFERr NEWSPAPER!   

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